Date   

Re: belarus digest: January 08, 2001 #belarus

Leonid Smilovitsky <smilov@...>
 

Dear friends!

I was born in Rechitsa Gomel region (oblast) in Belarus (1955), lived,
studied history and worked as a researcher and tutor in Minsk. Now I am a
researcher (Ph.D.) at the Diaspora Research Institute of Tel Aviv
University. I want to collect all possible materials and documents dealing
with the life of Jews in two Belarus towns: Rechitsa and Turov. Also I am
very interested in all people who has family name SMILOVITSKY and CHECHIK. I
have already prepared a paper "Jews in Rechitsa, 14-20 centures". Short
variant of it was published in Hebrew in "Yalkut Moreshet" (Tel Aviv), No
60, 1995, pp. 125-133. Full variant is in Russian. I will be very gratiful
if any could help to translate it in English and enter to the Internet.
Thank you all in advance.
My address is:

Leonid Smilovitsky,
Alexander Rubovich Str., 322/20
93811, Jerusalem, Israel
tel. + 972-2-672-3682
e-mail: smilov@netvision.net.il

----- Original Message -----
From: Belarus SIG digest <belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: belarus digest recipients <belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 09, 2001 8:00 AM
Subject: belarus digest: January 08, 2001


Support the work of the Belarus SIG and JewishGen by
clicking on http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/belarus.html
BELARUS Digest for Monday, January 08, 2001.

1. 1884 placename "Diarbicha near Neval"
2. Oral History Project
3. Cemetery keepers
4. The Tale of the Rabbi's Wife
5. PLEASE NOTE! Change in email addresses
6. News Release: Slonim Synagogue Saved

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 1884 placename "Diarbicha near Neval"
From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Lindsay=20Jackson?= <l_c_jackson@yahoo.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 13:16:29 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 1

My great uncle "Samuel ZARCHIN known as
Samuel JACKSON" was naturalised in the UK in 1951.
His 1951 certificate states that he was born in
1884 in "Diarbicha near Neval". My father believes
this to be really Nevel', which was in the Vitebsk
gubernia, Belarus, in 1884 and is now in the Russian
Republic.

Does anyone recognise the placename "Diarbicha"?

It does not seem to be on the 1899 "Vsia Rossiia" map
on the Belarus SIG section of the Jewishgen website,
but I have difficulty reading small fuzzy italicised
Cyrillic! Any clue might help me to locate the place
on an 1867 map at the Royal Geographical Society,
Kensington, London, which I hope to visit fairly soon.


Thank you for your attention. Lindsay Jackson
Guildford, UK
l_c_jackson@yahoo.co.uk

--------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
Just a reminder for anyone searching for a specific shtetl:
(Lindsay might have done so already)
Try to find it on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/Shtetls/Belarus.htm
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/
or in "Where Once We Walked - A guide to the Jewish Communities
Destroyed in the Holocaust", Avotaynu, 1991.
--- other suggestions will be welcomed!
--------------


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Oral History Project
From: "Franklin J. Swartz" <eejhp@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 03:56:14 +0200
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Friends,

I think this may be of interest to those of you considering taking
advantage of Jewishgen’s Shtetlschleppers’ programme.

Often when visiting shtetls in Belarus you will come across survivors
of the pre-Holocaust era. These people are our last living link with
the past.

Over and over again I have seen visitors learn about life before the
war and, incredibly, even meet people who knew their relatives.

I have been compiling oral histories for over ten years. I have placed
an example of one of the interviews in our oral history section which
begins at
http://eejhp.tripod.ca/ohp.htm
It’s fairly long, even though it’s only an extract, but I think you
will find it worthwhile. It gives you a hint of the kind of rich
experience you will have when you visit Belarus and meet some of your
people.

I really urge you to visit. I know you will find it rewarding and it
means so much to members of the pre-Holocaust generation. They will
not be with us for long. Terrible living conditions and the hardships
they have had to endure are bringing their lives to a close. They want
to share their past with you. This will not be an opportunity you will
have for long.

Best regards,
Frank

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)
13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca <http://eejhp.tripod.ca/>
SAVE LIVES AND TRADITIONS: http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm
<http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cemetery keepers
From: "Roman Vilner" <roman.vilner@att.net>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 01:44:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear friends,
some may consider this message to be slightly off the list's interest,
but then it is something that we all really care about. Anyway, I
will proceed without much ado: does anyone know (dealt with) of a
respectable company/person who could attend to a grave in St. Petersburg
(naturally for a fee)?

I know that list does not promote particular companies, so feel free to
respond privately.

Thank you
Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Tale of the Rabbi's Wife
From: David Frey <dfrey@bigpond.net.au>
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 01:39:15 +1100
X-Message-Number: 4

In the tale of the "Trip to Beshincovichi" in the Belarus Online
Newsletter, Issue No. 3 - May 1999:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/frey.htm

written by yours truly, I humbly suggested that the purpose of my
trip was to find some evidence that the family tale of Rabbi Avram
Isroel Gildenson was in some sense true. Upon finding the "lost"
cemetery of the town it became apparent that at least certain facts
were true. There was such a town. Some of the gravestones suggested
that members of my current family were named after their parents or
grandparents.

However since the gravestones contained only references such as Rifka,
daughter of Rev. Mendel and some dates, actual verification would be
difficult.

One of the central components of the story of the Rabbi was that he
was married twice and his second wife was married three times. All we
knew of this prolific woman was that her first husband had the last
name of Steinhart by whom she bore a daughter named Elka Leah, the
second husband's name has been lost to history and the third was
named Gildenson, The Rabbi of the town, and possibly a student of
Menachem Mendal of Vitebsk.

But even though I found the cemetery, I found not one shred of direct
evidence that the family tale was true. The story passed on by my
Grandmother, Beila, and told to me by my mother was that the woman at
the centre of this saga was named Frumma Chana, and that she owned
and ran a grocery store.

Tonight, this very night I looked through:

"The Vsia Rossiia translation team for the 1911 Vitebsk data:
Roberta Solit supplied the paper copies of Vsia Rossiia used
in the translation. The data was translated by Tom Gartman,
Vitaly Charney edited the data and supplied the list of
abbreviations."

And to my amazement I did a search on Gildensohn and came up with:

Surname: GILDENSON
Given: Khava Mord.
Patronymic:
Occupation: Grocery
Year: 1911
Column #: 407
Town: Beshenkovichi
Uyezd: Lepel
Gubernia: Vitebsk

So here it was, the first actual proof that someone name Khava
Gildenson, grocery store owner, actually existed. >from Frumme Chana
to Khava, daughter of Mordichi, is not such a big leap. Perhaps the
Mordichi that my uncle Morris the Doctor was named after, and
probably the Mother of Elka Leah, named after the first wife of the
Rabbi.

And just make the story complete, my lately departed Mother's name
was Elka Leah. I was with her for five years as she slowly died of
Alzheimer's.

And so while the details of the story are not complete, as they never
are, the G-d of my people, the G-d who I prayed to, while standing in
front of that overgrown cemetery, G-d granted me a pearl to wear in
my heart, as long as it lasts, and to pass on to my sons when it
finally gives out.

Baruch Ha Shem

David Frey
dfrey@bigpond.net.au


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: PLEASE NOTE! Change in email addresses
From: "Martin Kronman" <mkronman@dreamscape.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 14:51:17 -0000
X-Message-Number: 5

Its a long bitter story why this is the second time within the week that I
have notify you of a change in email address. It is now
mkronman@dreamscape.com. Please forgive me for this!

Martin Kronman
Syracuse, NY

---------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
---------------
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----------------------------------------------------------------
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support@jewishgen.org



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: News Release: Slonim Synagogue Saved
From: "David M. Fox" <fox@erols.com>
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 19:35:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear SIG Members,

While I am sure that members with ties to Slonim will be interested in
this news release, you should all be aware of efforts to preserve Jewish
buildings and cemeteries in Belarus.

--
David M. Fox
mailto:fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus>
************************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8 January 2001

Slonim Synagogue Saved

World Monument Fund and EEJHP Team up to Save Historic Landmark of East
European Jewry.

Minsk, 8 Janaury 2001. The East European Jewish Heritage Project
announced today that the first steps to assuring the preservation of the
historic Slonim Synagogue will be taken next week.

The historic building, listed by the World Monument Fund as the most
important Jewish structure in East Europe requiring restoration has long
been in a state of disrepair and jeopardy. Franklin J. Swartz, Executive
Director of the EEJHP, has lobbied for years for support to renew the
building. Finally with the support of Samuel Gruber, Director of the
International Survey of Jewish Monuments in the United States, the World
Monument Fund, also in the U.S., the U.K. based Conference of European
Rabbis, the Belarusian Government's Commission for the Preservation of the
Nation's Heritage and the Slonim Local Government conservation will
move ahead.

A WMF conservator and his team have already visited to begin work. 'I
am very heartened by this development,' said Mr. Swartz. Sam Gruber's
organisation and the WMF have an excellent track record. I hope that what
they were able to do in Krakow will be duplicated in Slonim.'

Located in the city centre the 16th century Synagogue was spared
destruction by both the Luftwaffe and the Soviet Air Force because of its
utility as a landmark for aerial navigation. After the war it was used as
a warehouse and for the past two decades has been empty. 'I was concerned
that unless work was begun rapidly we would have nothing to preserve',
said
Mr. Swartz 'It is a great relief to me that work is finally beginning.'

The entire Jewish population of Slonim, 39,000 people, plus 2,000 Jews
from surrounding areas were murdered during the war. 'In many ways this
restoration will be a monument to a way of life which largely vanished
because of genocide, it is a monument that functions at many levels,' said
Mr. Swartz.

The Slonim Local Authority passed the title to the building over to the
Union of Religious Jewish Congregations of the Republic of Belarus in
November 2000. 'I am especially satisfied with this development',
said Mr. Swartz. 'We can be assured that the project will be in safe
hands. There has been an unfortunate history in Belarus of old line
Soviet
apologists in the community misusing funds for memorials for their own
benefits. By passing the title to the building over to an organisation
run by a new generation in the Jewish community we can assure Western
donors of the integrity of the project.'Mr. Swartz pointed out that former
Communist Party Members who had actively supported repressive measures
during the Soviet period had attempted to prevent the restoration of the
synagogue as recently as last year. 'This was a disturbing development
but the failure of these attempts proves that the era of the 'Party Jew'
is
coming to an end. This is another example of why the Slonim Synagogue is
not only a symbol of the past but a beacon of light for a renewed Jewish
future in East Europe.'

For more information about the Slonim Synagogue and other restoration
projects please contact:

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)

13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca <http://eejhp.tripod.ca/>



---

END OF DIGEST

---

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reply to: belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org

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<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm>

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Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: belarus digest: January 08, 2001 #belarus

Leonid Smilovitsky <smilov@...>
 

Dear friends!

I was born in Rechitsa Gomel region (oblast) in Belarus (1955), lived,
studied history and worked as a researcher and tutor in Minsk. Now I am a
researcher (Ph.D.) at the Diaspora Research Institute of Tel Aviv
University. I want to collect all possible materials and documents dealing
with the life of Jews in two Belarus towns: Rechitsa and Turov. Also I am
very interested in all people who has family name SMILOVITSKY and CHECHIK. I
have already prepared a paper "Jews in Rechitsa, 14-20 centures". Short
variant of it was published in Hebrew in "Yalkut Moreshet" (Tel Aviv), No
60, 1995, pp. 125-133. Full variant is in Russian. I will be very gratiful
if any could help to translate it in English and enter to the Internet.
Thank you all in advance.
My address is:

Leonid Smilovitsky,
Alexander Rubovich Str., 322/20
93811, Jerusalem, Israel
tel. + 972-2-672-3682
e-mail: smilov@netvision.net.il

----- Original Message -----
From: Belarus SIG digest <belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: belarus digest recipients <belarus@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 09, 2001 8:00 AM
Subject: belarus digest: January 08, 2001


Support the work of the Belarus SIG and JewishGen by
clicking on http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/belarus.html
BELARUS Digest for Monday, January 08, 2001.

1. 1884 placename "Diarbicha near Neval"
2. Oral History Project
3. Cemetery keepers
4. The Tale of the Rabbi's Wife
5. PLEASE NOTE! Change in email addresses
6. News Release: Slonim Synagogue Saved

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 1884 placename "Diarbicha near Neval"
From: =?iso-8859-1?q?Lindsay=20Jackson?= <l_c_jackson@yahoo.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 13:16:29 +0000 (GMT)
X-Message-Number: 1

My great uncle "Samuel ZARCHIN known as
Samuel JACKSON" was naturalised in the UK in 1951.
His 1951 certificate states that he was born in
1884 in "Diarbicha near Neval". My father believes
this to be really Nevel', which was in the Vitebsk
gubernia, Belarus, in 1884 and is now in the Russian
Republic.

Does anyone recognise the placename "Diarbicha"?

It does not seem to be on the 1899 "Vsia Rossiia" map
on the Belarus SIG section of the Jewishgen website,
but I have difficulty reading small fuzzy italicised
Cyrillic! Any clue might help me to locate the place
on an 1867 map at the Royal Geographical Society,
Kensington, London, which I hope to visit fairly soon.


Thank you for your attention. Lindsay Jackson
Guildford, UK
l_c_jackson@yahoo.co.uk

--------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
Just a reminder for anyone searching for a specific shtetl:
(Lindsay might have done so already)
Try to find it on:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/Shtetls/Belarus.htm
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker/
or in "Where Once We Walked - A guide to the Jewish Communities
Destroyed in the Holocaust", Avotaynu, 1991.
--- other suggestions will be welcomed!
--------------


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Oral History Project
From: "Franklin J. Swartz" <eejhp@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 03:56:14 +0200
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Friends,

I think this may be of interest to those of you considering taking
advantage of Jewishgen’s Shtetlschleppers’ programme.

Often when visiting shtetls in Belarus you will come across survivors
of the pre-Holocaust era. These people are our last living link with
the past.

Over and over again I have seen visitors learn about life before the
war and, incredibly, even meet people who knew their relatives.

I have been compiling oral histories for over ten years. I have placed
an example of one of the interviews in our oral history section which
begins at
http://eejhp.tripod.ca/ohp.htm
It’s fairly long, even though it’s only an extract, but I think you
will find it worthwhile. It gives you a hint of the kind of rich
experience you will have when you visit Belarus and meet some of your
people.

I really urge you to visit. I know you will find it rewarding and it
means so much to members of the pre-Holocaust generation. They will
not be with us for long. Terrible living conditions and the hardships
they have had to endure are bringing their lives to a close. They want
to share their past with you. This will not be an opportunity you will
have for long.

Best regards,
Frank

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)
13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca <http://eejhp.tripod.ca/>
SAVE LIVES AND TRADITIONS: http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm
<http://eejhp.tripod.ca/donation1.htm>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cemetery keepers
From: "Roman Vilner" <roman.vilner@att.net>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 01:44:04 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear friends,
some may consider this message to be slightly off the list's interest,
but then it is something that we all really care about. Anyway, I
will proceed without much ado: does anyone know (dealt with) of a
respectable company/person who could attend to a grave in St. Petersburg
(naturally for a fee)?

I know that list does not promote particular companies, so feel free to
respond privately.

Thank you
Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Tale of the Rabbi's Wife
From: David Frey <dfrey@bigpond.net.au>
Date: Tue, 9 Jan 2001 01:39:15 +1100
X-Message-Number: 4

In the tale of the "Trip to Beshincovichi" in the Belarus Online
Newsletter, Issue No. 3 - May 1999:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/frey.htm

written by yours truly, I humbly suggested that the purpose of my
trip was to find some evidence that the family tale of Rabbi Avram
Isroel Gildenson was in some sense true. Upon finding the "lost"
cemetery of the town it became apparent that at least certain facts
were true. There was such a town. Some of the gravestones suggested
that members of my current family were named after their parents or
grandparents.

However since the gravestones contained only references such as Rifka,
daughter of Rev. Mendel and some dates, actual verification would be
difficult.

One of the central components of the story of the Rabbi was that he
was married twice and his second wife was married three times. All we
knew of this prolific woman was that her first husband had the last
name of Steinhart by whom she bore a daughter named Elka Leah, the
second husband's name has been lost to history and the third was
named Gildenson, The Rabbi of the town, and possibly a student of
Menachem Mendal of Vitebsk.

But even though I found the cemetery, I found not one shred of direct
evidence that the family tale was true. The story passed on by my
Grandmother, Beila, and told to me by my mother was that the woman at
the centre of this saga was named Frumma Chana, and that she owned
and ran a grocery store.

Tonight, this very night I looked through:

"The Vsia Rossiia translation team for the 1911 Vitebsk data:
Roberta Solit supplied the paper copies of Vsia Rossiia used
in the translation. The data was translated by Tom Gartman,
Vitaly Charney edited the data and supplied the list of
abbreviations."

And to my amazement I did a search on Gildensohn and came up with:

Surname: GILDENSON
Given: Khava Mord.
Patronymic:
Occupation: Grocery
Year: 1911
Column #: 407
Town: Beshenkovichi
Uyezd: Lepel
Gubernia: Vitebsk

So here it was, the first actual proof that someone name Khava
Gildenson, grocery store owner, actually existed. >from Frumme Chana
to Khava, daughter of Mordichi, is not such a big leap. Perhaps the
Mordichi that my uncle Morris the Doctor was named after, and
probably the Mother of Elka Leah, named after the first wife of the
Rabbi.

And just make the story complete, my lately departed Mother's name
was Elka Leah. I was with her for five years as she slowly died of
Alzheimer's.

And so while the details of the story are not complete, as they never
are, the G-d of my people, the G-d who I prayed to, while standing in
front of that overgrown cemetery, G-d granted me a pearl to wear in
my heart, as long as it lasts, and to pass on to my sons when it
finally gives out.

Baruch Ha Shem

David Frey
dfrey@bigpond.net.au


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: PLEASE NOTE! Change in email addresses
From: "Martin Kronman" <mkronman@dreamscape.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Jan 2001 14:51:17 -0000
X-Message-Number: 5

Its a long bitter story why this is the second time within the week that I
have notify you of a change in email address. It is now
mkronman@dreamscape.com. Please forgive me for this!

Martin Kronman
Syracuse, NY

---------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
---------------
Re: change of e-mail addresses - Please save this for future use
----------------------------------------------------------------
We're sorry, there is no secretarial staff at any of the
JewishGen programs to make changes to any subscription
on your behalf. You are expected to do this yourself.

***********************************************************
HERE IS HOW A DESCRIPTION HOT TO DO THAT
PLEASE KEEP THIS FOR FUTURE USE!
***********************************************************
&
***********************************************************
REMEMBER TO CHANGE YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS IN JGFF ETC. AS WELL
***********************************************************

To change your e-mail address:
------------------------------
If you still have access to your former e-mail address AND
from THAT ADDRESS ONLY send an e-mail to:
listserv@lyris.jewishgen.org

and say:

set (listname) email=and type your new e-mail address

In place of the word "listname" insert the list to which
you belong, if you belong to more than one list, type the
same message again.
NOTE: There is no space on either side of the=sign

------------------------------

If you no longer have access to your old address, the
simplest way is to go to the online system and enter an
Unsubscribe order >from the old address and then enter a
Subscribe order >from the new address.

For any of the SIG or Research Group mailing lists, the
URL is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv/sigs.htm


***********************************************************
REMEMBER TO CHANGE YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS IN JGFF ETC. AS WELL
***********************************************************

To change your e-mail address in the JGFF the URL is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/

Select the MODIFY icon.

You will need both your password and researcher code to
make any changes in the JGFF

To get your JGFF researcher CODE:

from the JewishGen homepage
http://www.jewishgen.org
click on JGFF and once there
select SEARCH

Search any surname that you listed in that program and your
researcher CODE will be shown in parenthesis.
Please WRITE IT DOWN!

To get your password:
Send an e-mail containing your researcher CODE, your full name
and address to
password@jewishgen.org
and your PASSWORD will be returned to you.

Please consider modifying your PASSWORD to one that you will
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Go back to the beginning of the JGFF and click on MODIFY, select
changing password, then follow the instructions to change your
password to one you will not forget.

Finally, if you are requesting a change in your e-mail address
in conjunction with a gift through the JewishGen-erosity program
please notify

owner-jewishgen-erosity@jewishgen.org

Thanks for your cooperation,
JewishGen Support Team
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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: News Release: Slonim Synagogue Saved
From: "David M. Fox" <fox@erols.com>
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 19:35:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear SIG Members,

While I am sure that members with ties to Slonim will be interested in
this news release, you should all be aware of efforts to preserve Jewish
buildings and cemeteries in Belarus.

--
David M. Fox
mailto:fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus>
************************************************

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8 January 2001

Slonim Synagogue Saved

World Monument Fund and EEJHP Team up to Save Historic Landmark of East
European Jewry.

Minsk, 8 Janaury 2001. The East European Jewish Heritage Project
announced today that the first steps to assuring the preservation of the
historic Slonim Synagogue will be taken next week.

The historic building, listed by the World Monument Fund as the most
important Jewish structure in East Europe requiring restoration has long
been in a state of disrepair and jeopardy. Franklin J. Swartz, Executive
Director of the EEJHP, has lobbied for years for support to renew the
building. Finally with the support of Samuel Gruber, Director of the
International Survey of Jewish Monuments in the United States, the World
Monument Fund, also in the U.S., the U.K. based Conference of European
Rabbis, the Belarusian Government's Commission for the Preservation of the
Nation's Heritage and the Slonim Local Government conservation will
move ahead.

A WMF conservator and his team have already visited to begin work. 'I
am very heartened by this development,' said Mr. Swartz. Sam Gruber's
organisation and the WMF have an excellent track record. I hope that what
they were able to do in Krakow will be duplicated in Slonim.'

Located in the city centre the 16th century Synagogue was spared
destruction by both the Luftwaffe and the Soviet Air Force because of its
utility as a landmark for aerial navigation. After the war it was used as
a warehouse and for the past two decades has been empty. 'I was concerned
that unless work was begun rapidly we would have nothing to preserve',
said
Mr. Swartz 'It is a great relief to me that work is finally beginning.'

The entire Jewish population of Slonim, 39,000 people, plus 2,000 Jews
from surrounding areas were murdered during the war. 'In many ways this
restoration will be a monument to a way of life which largely vanished
because of genocide, it is a monument that functions at many levels,' said
Mr. Swartz.

The Slonim Local Authority passed the title to the building over to the
Union of Religious Jewish Congregations of the Republic of Belarus in
November 2000. 'I am especially satisfied with this development',
said Mr. Swartz. 'We can be assured that the project will be in safe
hands. There has been an unfortunate history in Belarus of old line
Soviet
apologists in the community misusing funds for memorials for their own
benefits. By passing the title to the building over to an organisation
run by a new generation in the Jewish community we can assure Western
donors of the integrity of the project.'Mr. Swartz pointed out that former
Communist Party Members who had actively supported repressive measures
during the Soviet period had attempted to prevent the restoration of the
synagogue as recently as last year. 'This was a disturbing development
but the failure of these attempts proves that the era of the 'Party Jew'
is
coming to an end. This is another example of why the Slonim Synagogue is
not only a symbol of the past but a beacon of light for a renewed Jewish
future in East Europe.'

For more information about the Slonim Synagogue and other restoration
projects please contact:

Franklin J. Swartz
Executive Director
East European Jewish Heritage Project Ltd (USA)
East European Jewish Heritage Project (UK)
Jewish Revival Charitable Mission (Republic of Belarus)

13b Dauman Street
Minsk 220002
Belarus
Tel/Fax: +375 17 234 3360
eejhp@yahoo.com
http://eejhp.tripod.ca <http://eejhp.tripod.ca/>



---

END OF DIGEST

---

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From Rose Linden #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

"Does anyone know of a resource for postal zone numbers for towns/cities in
Hungary? At this time, i want to send a letter to Tiszalucz which, I
believe, is in Zemplen. Thank you.

RoseLinden@aol.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary From Rose Linden #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

"Does anyone know of a resource for postal zone numbers for towns/cities in
Hungary? At this time, i want to send a letter to Tiszalucz which, I
believe, is in Zemplen. Thank you.

RoseLinden@aol.com


Magyarositas.. 1877 Hungarian Gazetteer #hungary

Jordan Auslander <jordan@...>
 

I'm almost finished with the data entry (about 18,000 different places
in 64 megye/counties), and hope to have the entire Gazetteer translated,
alphabetized by town, with all the alternate names, in time for the
London conference.

Jordan Auslander


Hungary SIG #Hungary Magyarositas.. 1877 Hungarian Gazetteer #hungary

Jordan Auslander <jordan@...>
 

I'm almost finished with the data entry (about 18,000 different places
in 64 megye/counties), and hope to have the entire Gazetteer translated,
alphabetized by town, with all the alternate names, in time for the
London conference.

Jordan Auslander


Stern and Danzig Families #southafrica

Thndrblt0@...
 

According to sparse family records and oral heritage, my great-grandfather
Noah Stern was a shochet >from Poland, born c. 1861, who married
Sarah-Shoshana Danzig in her native Lithuania in the late 1880s, fathered two
daughters, and left for South Africa. He became a trader in Francistown (now
Botswana). When his wife and children came to join him around 1890-91, she
died on the train journey somewhere in South Africa, apparently after having
stopped to visit her brother, who was a lawyer living between Cape Town and
Johannesburg. Noah was eventually reunited with the children, who lived in
southern Africa until they were about 17 years old, at which age they chose
to stay in England when he brought them there on provisioning trips. (The
daughters' descendants live mainly in the UK or US. Some appear in Chaim
Freedman's book on the Vilna Gaon.) Noah himself remarried, fathered other
children, and died in Port Elizabeth in 1947.


I would appreciate any additional information that anyone may be able to give
me on Noah and his Stern descendants, or on South African Danzigs who may be
related to Sarah-Shoshana through her brother. I would also appreciate any
guidance on the most effective ways to locate official documentation for Noah
and Sarah-Shoshana. I have looked at the SASIG resource guides on-line, so I
could probably figure it all out, but I would appreciate it very much if
someone could be kind enough to steer me in the right direction.

Gregory Lubkin
thndrblt0@aol.com
or
glubkin@shearman.com


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Stern and Danzig Families #southafrica

Thndrblt0@...
 

According to sparse family records and oral heritage, my great-grandfather
Noah Stern was a shochet >from Poland, born c. 1861, who married
Sarah-Shoshana Danzig in her native Lithuania in the late 1880s, fathered two
daughters, and left for South Africa. He became a trader in Francistown (now
Botswana). When his wife and children came to join him around 1890-91, she
died on the train journey somewhere in South Africa, apparently after having
stopped to visit her brother, who was a lawyer living between Cape Town and
Johannesburg. Noah was eventually reunited with the children, who lived in
southern Africa until they were about 17 years old, at which age they chose
to stay in England when he brought them there on provisioning trips. (The
daughters' descendants live mainly in the UK or US. Some appear in Chaim
Freedman's book on the Vilna Gaon.) Noah himself remarried, fathered other
children, and died in Port Elizabeth in 1947.


I would appreciate any additional information that anyone may be able to give
me on Noah and his Stern descendants, or on South African Danzigs who may be
related to Sarah-Shoshana through her brother. I would also appreciate any
guidance on the most effective ways to locate official documentation for Noah
and Sarah-Shoshana. I have looked at the SASIG resource guides on-line, so I
could probably figure it all out, but I would appreciate it very much if
someone could be kind enough to steer me in the right direction.

Gregory Lubkin
thndrblt0@aol.com
or
glubkin@shearman.com


Jews in Eastern Galicia before the outbreak of WWII - review of stastistical data #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Dear Fellow Galitzyaners,

Allow me please to engage you into discussion concerning number of Jews in
Galicia before the outbreak of WWII.

1. Published available data

It is generally acceptable that in the absolute numbers there were 3,114,000
Jews residing in Poland in 1931, which has constituted ~10% of the total
Poland population of 31,916,000 people in accordance with Landau and
Tomaszewski work [Ref.1]

This information is based on the Poland's 1931 general census (previous
general census was conducted in 1921). It is also commonly acceptable that
about 20% of total Poland's Jewish population resided in Eastern Galicia

Now lets compare statistics for years 1921 and 1931 for three Eastern
Galicia Provinces: Tarnopol, Stanislawow and Lwow.

Note1
Data for 1921 census has been extracted >from 1929 Poland Business Directory.
It claims that in 1921 Jewish population based on the religion was
distributed as follows:

Tarnopol Province: 9% of the total 1,428,520 inhabitants (= 128,567)
Stanislawow Province: 10.7% of the total 1,339,191 inhabitants (= 143,293)
Lwow Province: 11.5% of the total 2,718,014 inhabitants (= 312,571)

Note 2.

During Poland's interwar period Lwow Province, one of the country largest,
covered also large part of the territory of Western Galicia (western part
of Dobromil and Rzeszow, Przemysl, Lancut, Kolbuszowa Lezajsk districts).
This should be discounted when only Eastern Galicia Jewish population is
considered.

General Population of three Eastern Galicia Provinces during 1921-1931

1921 1931
Growth (%)
Tarnopol 1,428,520 1,600,406 11.2
Stanislawow 1,339,191 1,480,285 11.5
Lwow 2,718,014 3,127,409 11.5

Total 5,485,725 6,208,100
11.3

It appears that general population of all three provinces have grown 11.3%
during ten years period

Jewish Population of three Eastern Galicia Provinces during 1921-1931

1921 1931
Growth (%)
Tarnopol 128,567 134,117
10.4
Stanislawow 143,293 139,746 9.75
Lwow 312,571 342,405
10.9

Total 584,431 616,268
10.5

It appears that Jewish population growth average 10.5% was smaller than
the average growth of the total Poland's general population of Eastern Galicia.

2. Discussion on the statistical data 1921/1931

Lower growth of Jewish population as compared to the general population
figures can be contributed to several factors:

a). Immigration

Exact data for immigration figures for the interwar period is not ready
available, HIAS or Sochnut (Jewish Agency) should be contacted for those
numbers.Although to the States was restricted due to the Depression era and
political motivations, the numbers of Jews making Aliya to Palestine from
Galicia should not be discounted. Many young Jews moved to study to the
foreign countries due to anti-Semitic restriction (numerous nulus and
numerus clausus) at Polish universities.

b). Town dwellers

Jews in Galicia have moved into larger towns and cities, and urban/educated
families are tend to be usually smaller.

32% residents of total Lwow city population (312,231) were Jewish, and in
total for all 561,173 towns dwellers in Eastern Galicia general population,
188,477 were Jews.

c). Assimilation process

1931 statistics display that in Galicia amount of Jews that declared their
mother tongue as Yiddish or Hebrew was smaller than in other Provinces.

Percentage of people that declared Yiddish/Hebrew as the mother tongue:

City of Lwow - 75.6%
Lwow Province- 68%
Stanislawow Province - 78.8%
Tarnopol Province - 58.8%

By comparison:
Krakow City 81%
Krakow Province - 73.7%
Wolhyn Province - 98.9%
City of Vilna - 99.2%
Polesie Region - 99.1%
Polish Lithuania (Vilna Province) - 97.8%
City of Warsaw - 94.4%
Poznan Region - 44.6%
Polish Upper Silesia - 34.1%

d). Data correction

I would be surprised if data published by Polish statisticians for years
1921 and 1931 was not politically manipulated by the authorities.
Poland has acquired Eastern Galicia (and part of Vilna, Lithuania territory)
as the result of the military aggression against weaker neighbors.
Poles substituted for minorities in some of those territories.
Official statistics 1921 show in:
Lwow Province - 56.6% Poles, 36% Ukrainians, 7% Jewish by NATIONALITY (?)
46% Roman Catholics, 41.4% Greek Catholics, 11.5%
Hebrew
Tarnopol Province - 22.2% Poles, 69.8% Ukrainians, 6.8% Jews by Nationality
(?)
14.5% RC, 73.9% Greek Cath, 10.7% Hebrew
(Mosaic)

Stanislawow Province: -45% Poles, 50% Ukrainians, 4.8% Jews by Nationality
(?)
31.3 RC, 59.4% Greek Cath., 9% Hebrew

It is obvious that Jews that did not declare their mother tongue as
Hebrew/Yiddish were categorized as Poles by nationality.
Population of Jews in Eastern Galicia and subsequently in all prewar Poland
was in my opinion, should be larger that quoted by sources as 10% of the
total population of Poland. This also increase the number of Holocaust
victims.

3. Eastern Galicia Jews in Holocaust.

Amazingly that I have finally discovered nearly exact number of the Eastern
Galicia Jews in occupied by Germans territory in recently purchased
publication [2].
On page 461 of this book table exhibits that in June 1941 Germans (date of
Germans invasion to Russia) captured 530,000 Jews in the territory of
Eastern Galicia (East of San River and town Przemysl).

In July 1944 estimated number of 5,000 survivors were alive, less than 1%.

This probably answers question about the number of Jews in Eastern Galicia
during WWII.


References:

[1] Landau, Z and Tomaszewski, J. "Spoleczenstwo Drugiej
Rzeczypospolitej(Uwagi Polemiczne), "Przeglad Historyczny, 2 (1970), pp.
317-322

[2] "Endlèosung" in Galizien : der Judenmord in Ostpolen und die
Rettungsinitiativen von Berthold Beitz, 1941-1944 by Thomas Sandkèuhler,
Verlag J.H.W. Dietz Nachfolger, In der Raste 2 -53129 Bonn, 1996, pp.461


Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
January 2001


ViewMate: German text #galicia

P NG <png42@...>
 

Please help me translate the following German text:

VM248, VM249

These files can be found in ViewMate at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

These 2 paragraphs come >from a work detail >from Boryslaw, during the
Holocaust. They look very similar so they must have come >from the same
place. I need a translation of each of them.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Barbara U. Yeager
png42@hotmail.com
_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Jews in Eastern Galicia before the outbreak of WWII - review of stastistical data #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Dear Fellow Galitzyaners,

Allow me please to engage you into discussion concerning number of Jews in
Galicia before the outbreak of WWII.

1. Published available data

It is generally acceptable that in the absolute numbers there were 3,114,000
Jews residing in Poland in 1931, which has constituted ~10% of the total
Poland population of 31,916,000 people in accordance with Landau and
Tomaszewski work [Ref.1]

This information is based on the Poland's 1931 general census (previous
general census was conducted in 1921). It is also commonly acceptable that
about 20% of total Poland's Jewish population resided in Eastern Galicia

Now lets compare statistics for years 1921 and 1931 for three Eastern
Galicia Provinces: Tarnopol, Stanislawow and Lwow.

Note1
Data for 1921 census has been extracted >from 1929 Poland Business Directory.
It claims that in 1921 Jewish population based on the religion was
distributed as follows:

Tarnopol Province: 9% of the total 1,428,520 inhabitants (= 128,567)
Stanislawow Province: 10.7% of the total 1,339,191 inhabitants (= 143,293)
Lwow Province: 11.5% of the total 2,718,014 inhabitants (= 312,571)

Note 2.

During Poland's interwar period Lwow Province, one of the country largest,
covered also large part of the territory of Western Galicia (western part
of Dobromil and Rzeszow, Przemysl, Lancut, Kolbuszowa Lezajsk districts).
This should be discounted when only Eastern Galicia Jewish population is
considered.

General Population of three Eastern Galicia Provinces during 1921-1931

1921 1931
Growth (%)
Tarnopol 1,428,520 1,600,406 11.2
Stanislawow 1,339,191 1,480,285 11.5
Lwow 2,718,014 3,127,409 11.5

Total 5,485,725 6,208,100
11.3

It appears that general population of all three provinces have grown 11.3%
during ten years period

Jewish Population of three Eastern Galicia Provinces during 1921-1931

1921 1931
Growth (%)
Tarnopol 128,567 134,117
10.4
Stanislawow 143,293 139,746 9.75
Lwow 312,571 342,405
10.9

Total 584,431 616,268
10.5

It appears that Jewish population growth average 10.5% was smaller than
the average growth of the total Poland's general population of Eastern Galicia.

2. Discussion on the statistical data 1921/1931

Lower growth of Jewish population as compared to the general population
figures can be contributed to several factors:

a). Immigration

Exact data for immigration figures for the interwar period is not ready
available, HIAS or Sochnut (Jewish Agency) should be contacted for those
numbers.Although to the States was restricted due to the Depression era and
political motivations, the numbers of Jews making Aliya to Palestine from
Galicia should not be discounted. Many young Jews moved to study to the
foreign countries due to anti-Semitic restriction (numerous nulus and
numerus clausus) at Polish universities.

b). Town dwellers

Jews in Galicia have moved into larger towns and cities, and urban/educated
families are tend to be usually smaller.

32% residents of total Lwow city population (312,231) were Jewish, and in
total for all 561,173 towns dwellers in Eastern Galicia general population,
188,477 were Jews.

c). Assimilation process

1931 statistics display that in Galicia amount of Jews that declared their
mother tongue as Yiddish or Hebrew was smaller than in other Provinces.

Percentage of people that declared Yiddish/Hebrew as the mother tongue:

City of Lwow - 75.6%
Lwow Province- 68%
Stanislawow Province - 78.8%
Tarnopol Province - 58.8%

By comparison:
Krakow City 81%
Krakow Province - 73.7%
Wolhyn Province - 98.9%
City of Vilna - 99.2%
Polesie Region - 99.1%
Polish Lithuania (Vilna Province) - 97.8%
City of Warsaw - 94.4%
Poznan Region - 44.6%
Polish Upper Silesia - 34.1%

d). Data correction

I would be surprised if data published by Polish statisticians for years
1921 and 1931 was not politically manipulated by the authorities.
Poland has acquired Eastern Galicia (and part of Vilna, Lithuania territory)
as the result of the military aggression against weaker neighbors.
Poles substituted for minorities in some of those territories.
Official statistics 1921 show in:
Lwow Province - 56.6% Poles, 36% Ukrainians, 7% Jewish by NATIONALITY (?)
46% Roman Catholics, 41.4% Greek Catholics, 11.5%
Hebrew
Tarnopol Province - 22.2% Poles, 69.8% Ukrainians, 6.8% Jews by Nationality
(?)
14.5% RC, 73.9% Greek Cath, 10.7% Hebrew
(Mosaic)

Stanislawow Province: -45% Poles, 50% Ukrainians, 4.8% Jews by Nationality
(?)
31.3 RC, 59.4% Greek Cath., 9% Hebrew

It is obvious that Jews that did not declare their mother tongue as
Hebrew/Yiddish were categorized as Poles by nationality.
Population of Jews in Eastern Galicia and subsequently in all prewar Poland
was in my opinion, should be larger that quoted by sources as 10% of the
total population of Poland. This also increase the number of Holocaust
victims.

3. Eastern Galicia Jews in Holocaust.

Amazingly that I have finally discovered nearly exact number of the Eastern
Galicia Jews in occupied by Germans territory in recently purchased
publication [2].
On page 461 of this book table exhibits that in June 1941 Germans (date of
Germans invasion to Russia) captured 530,000 Jews in the territory of
Eastern Galicia (East of San River and town Przemysl).

In July 1944 estimated number of 5,000 survivors were alive, less than 1%.

This probably answers question about the number of Jews in Eastern Galicia
during WWII.


References:

[1] Landau, Z and Tomaszewski, J. "Spoleczenstwo Drugiej
Rzeczypospolitej(Uwagi Polemiczne), "Przeglad Historyczny, 2 (1970), pp.
317-322

[2] "Endlèosung" in Galizien : der Judenmord in Ostpolen und die
Rettungsinitiativen von Berthold Beitz, 1941-1944 by Thomas Sandkèuhler,
Verlag J.H.W. Dietz Nachfolger, In der Raste 2 -53129 Bonn, 1996, pp.461


Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
January 2001


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia ViewMate: German text #galicia

P NG <png42@...>
 

Please help me translate the following German text:

VM248, VM249

These files can be found in ViewMate at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

These 2 paragraphs come >from a work detail >from Boryslaw, during the
Holocaust. They look very similar so they must have come >from the same
place. I need a translation of each of them.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Barbara U. Yeager
png42@hotmail.com
_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com


Viewmate VM 247 #poland

Jackye Sullins <jackye@...>
 

Just wanted to share with the group that I received an 1896 marriage
certificate >from the Lodz archives ordered through JRI. It took a while but
it
did arrive. A friend helped translate what she could and I just posted a
copy of it on Viewmate in case someone can translate it in full. It's VM
247 and it's in Cyrillic. The groom was >from Warta and the bride from
Zdunska Wola. Would appreciate any help I can get.

Jackye Sullins


Finding emigrants to Israel #poland

Caughlan - Kevin M. <caughlan@...>
 

Hi LIst, i just found a note >from my mother that my grandfather had a
brother who went >from chechenowice area to new york and then to
israel. he had 5 children too. how would i go about looking for cousins
in israel? is there an online telephone directory where i could look for
the last name, sall or sole? thanks for this tangential subject
response. jenny in md


JRI Poland #Poland Viewmate VM 247 #poland

Jackye Sullins <jackye@...>
 

Just wanted to share with the group that I received an 1896 marriage
certificate >from the Lodz archives ordered through JRI. It took a while but
it
did arrive. A friend helped translate what she could and I just posted a
copy of it on Viewmate in case someone can translate it in full. It's VM
247 and it's in Cyrillic. The groom was >from Warta and the bride from
Zdunska Wola. Would appreciate any help I can get.

Jackye Sullins


JRI Poland #Poland Finding emigrants to Israel #poland

Caughlan - Kevin M. <caughlan@...>
 

Hi LIst, i just found a note >from my mother that my grandfather had a
brother who went >from chechenowice area to new york and then to
israel. he had 5 children too. how would i go about looking for cousins
in israel? is there an online telephone directory where i could look for
the last name, sall or sole? thanks for this tangential subject
response. jenny in md


Cemetery keepers #ukraine

Roman Vilner <roman.vilner@...>
 

Dear friends,
some may consider this message to be slightly off the list's interest, but
then it is something that we all really care about. Anyway, I will proceed
without much ado: does anyone know (dealt with) of a respectable
company/person who could attend to a grave in St. Petersburg (naturally for
a fee)?
I know that list does not promote particular companies, so feel free to
respond privately.

Thank you
Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Cemetery keepers #ukraine

Roman Vilner <roman.vilner@...>
 

Dear friends,
some may consider this message to be slightly off the list's interest, but
then it is something that we all really care about. Anyway, I will proceed
without much ado: does anyone know (dealt with) of a respectable
company/person who could attend to a grave in St. Petersburg (naturally for
a fee)?
I know that list does not promote particular companies, so feel free to
respond privately.

Thank you
Roman Vilner
Brooklyn, NY


Re: "shtetl boosk webpage" #ukraine

Mark Heckman
 

The site is simply a list of links to Amazon.com. (The creator of
the site most likely gets some benefit >from Amazon >from sending folks
in Amazon's direction.)

--Mark Heckman
Davis, California


--- Ukraine SIG digest <ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

Subject: shtetl books webpage
From: "Anita Shtup" <anita_shtup@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 01:13:05 -0000
X-Message-Number: 1

I want to let you know about a webpage I just found
that has books on Jewish genealogy
and Ukrainian Jewish history. It is
called Shtetl Bookstore and can be
found at:

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~pauldana/shtetlbookstore.htm

I have no connection to this store but
just wanted to post this for the benefit
of the list.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: "shtetl boosk webpage" #ukraine

Mark Heckman
 

The site is simply a list of links to Amazon.com. (The creator of
the site most likely gets some benefit >from Amazon >from sending folks
in Amazon's direction.)

--Mark Heckman
Davis, California


--- Ukraine SIG digest <ukraine@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:

Subject: shtetl books webpage
From: "Anita Shtup" <anita_shtup@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 08 Jan 2001 01:13:05 -0000
X-Message-Number: 1

I want to let you know about a webpage I just found
that has books on Jewish genealogy
and Ukrainian Jewish history. It is
called Shtetl Bookstore and can be
found at:

http://members.bellatlantic.net/~pauldana/shtetlbookstore.htm

I have no connection to this store but
just wanted to post this for the benefit
of the list.