Date   

Searching for Holocaust Survivor in Canada- Frymyt SHLOMKOWITZ #general

Jessee, James <jjessee@...>
 

Dear Friend,

I am seaching for Frymyt SHLOMKOWITZ (Frumet SZLAMKOWICZ), who survived the
Holocaust and migrated to Canada about 1950. She is the daughter of Schlomo
and Lajo Shlomkowitz of Czestochowa, Poland. No one in the family has ever
heard >from her since. I am picking up my grandmother's efforts to find her
or any of her descendants.

My name is Jim Jessee and I have been researching my family history for
over 35 years. You can see the fruits of my genealogy labors at www.jessee.org
from this website it should be clear that I have learned a great deal about
my father's JESSEE family, but precious little about my Jewish mother's
family, most of whom perished in the Holocaust. This is not because of
lack of effort, but because of the difficulty many of you can appreciate.
I need some help.

My mother was Frances Sylvia BROWNFIELD, and her parents, who immigrated
to San Franciso, CA USA about 1920, were Israel BROWNFIELD/BRAUNFELD and
Esther SHLOMKOWITZ/SZLAMKOWICZ >from Czestochowa, Poland. My grandmother
Esther wrote letters and helped support her large family left behind in
Poland through the 1920s and 30s. She lost contact with them in 1939, and
only in the 1950's through international tracing services was she able to
locate four of five known surviving nieces and nephews, all concentration
camp survivors. We believe the rest of the family perished when the
Czestochowa ghetto was overtaken in October 1943 or thereafter. We believe
most went to Auschwitz.

These five survivors were deemed fit enough for slave labor and their
odyssey over the next two years is nothing but horrific. At least two,
my cousins Sydney Shlomkowitz and Abram Herszlikowitz, were liberated from
Bergen-Belsen and lived in refugee camps after the war. My cousin Sidney
actually returned to Czestochowa, Poland to look for surviving family, but
was basically run out by the Poles who had taken over their homes and the
continuing anti-Semitism in Poland.

After she found them, my grandmother regularly wrote to and phoned her four
surviving nieces and nephews, and never stopped trying to find the fifth
survivor, her niece Frymyt. I have inherited my grandmother's love for her
family and continued regular communication and visited these four survivors
or their children for many years. Three of the five made it to Israel in
1948 and have families there today. These are the SHLOMKOWITZ (changed to
SHALEV) and HERSZLIKOWITZ families of Lod and Holon, Israel. My cousin
Sydney Shlomkowitz migrated to New York City about 1950 and I have stayed
with him for periods of time over the years and we talk every month. He is
79 and in relatively good health, but tormented by his memories. He is my
main source of all my mother's family information.

My purpose for posting this and telling you this long tale, is that I
want to find out what happened to the missing fifth cousin, FRYMYT
SHLOMKOWITZ (FRUMET SZLAMKOWICZ. I have tried to find her for several
years, without success, but I have not understood well how to use Canadian
resources or how to find Canadian Jewish immigration information. I am
asking for your help to perhaps publish my request as may be appropriate,
and to point me in the right direction. I feel very compelled to try and
find this lost cousin if she is still living (she would be about 80), and to
find out what happened to her if she is not. I wonder if she married and had
any family in Canada. It would be so wonderful to find these lost cousins.

Any help will be appreciated,

James W. "Jim" Jessee
Chico, CA USA
jim@jessee.org
www.jessee.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Holocaust Survivor in Canada- Frymyt SHLOMKOWITZ #general

Jessee, James <jjessee@...>
 

Dear Friend,

I am seaching for Frymyt SHLOMKOWITZ (Frumet SZLAMKOWICZ), who survived the
Holocaust and migrated to Canada about 1950. She is the daughter of Schlomo
and Lajo Shlomkowitz of Czestochowa, Poland. No one in the family has ever
heard >from her since. I am picking up my grandmother's efforts to find her
or any of her descendants.

My name is Jim Jessee and I have been researching my family history for
over 35 years. You can see the fruits of my genealogy labors at www.jessee.org
from this website it should be clear that I have learned a great deal about
my father's JESSEE family, but precious little about my Jewish mother's
family, most of whom perished in the Holocaust. This is not because of
lack of effort, but because of the difficulty many of you can appreciate.
I need some help.

My mother was Frances Sylvia BROWNFIELD, and her parents, who immigrated
to San Franciso, CA USA about 1920, were Israel BROWNFIELD/BRAUNFELD and
Esther SHLOMKOWITZ/SZLAMKOWICZ >from Czestochowa, Poland. My grandmother
Esther wrote letters and helped support her large family left behind in
Poland through the 1920s and 30s. She lost contact with them in 1939, and
only in the 1950's through international tracing services was she able to
locate four of five known surviving nieces and nephews, all concentration
camp survivors. We believe the rest of the family perished when the
Czestochowa ghetto was overtaken in October 1943 or thereafter. We believe
most went to Auschwitz.

These five survivors were deemed fit enough for slave labor and their
odyssey over the next two years is nothing but horrific. At least two,
my cousins Sydney Shlomkowitz and Abram Herszlikowitz, were liberated from
Bergen-Belsen and lived in refugee camps after the war. My cousin Sidney
actually returned to Czestochowa, Poland to look for surviving family, but
was basically run out by the Poles who had taken over their homes and the
continuing anti-Semitism in Poland.

After she found them, my grandmother regularly wrote to and phoned her four
surviving nieces and nephews, and never stopped trying to find the fifth
survivor, her niece Frymyt. I have inherited my grandmother's love for her
family and continued regular communication and visited these four survivors
or their children for many years. Three of the five made it to Israel in
1948 and have families there today. These are the SHLOMKOWITZ (changed to
SHALEV) and HERSZLIKOWITZ families of Lod and Holon, Israel. My cousin
Sydney Shlomkowitz migrated to New York City about 1950 and I have stayed
with him for periods of time over the years and we talk every month. He is
79 and in relatively good health, but tormented by his memories. He is my
main source of all my mother's family information.

My purpose for posting this and telling you this long tale, is that I
want to find out what happened to the missing fifth cousin, FRYMYT
SHLOMKOWITZ (FRUMET SZLAMKOWICZ. I have tried to find her for several
years, without success, but I have not understood well how to use Canadian
resources or how to find Canadian Jewish immigration information. I am
asking for your help to perhaps publish my request as may be appropriate,
and to point me in the right direction. I feel very compelled to try and
find this lost cousin if she is still living (she would be about 80), and to
find out what happened to her if she is not. I wonder if she married and had
any family in Canada. It would be so wonderful to find these lost cousins.

Any help will be appreciated,

James W. "Jim" Jessee
Chico, CA USA
jim@jessee.org
www.jessee.org


Lututow and Bielawy PSA data online! #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

More good news for Lodz area researchers...
The indices to Jewish vital records >from Lututow and Bielawy are now online
in the JRI-Poland searchable database:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm
This data was obtained as a result of the Lodz JRI-Poland / Polish State
Archives project to obtain indices to records not microfilmed by the Mormons.

Now online:
1) Lututow PSA: 1868, 1870-76, 1881-84 Births, Marriages and Deaths

Many thanks to Lututow town leader Morris Wirth and Lututow researchers for
making this data possible. Some of the indices did not state a year, so a
range of years may be given in the search results.

2) Bielawy PSA: 1878-85, 1887-92, 1894-99

Indices to 70 previously unavailable death records are now online. Many
thanks to Bielawy researchers for their support.

Best Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Lodz JRI-Poland / PSA Coordinator


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Lututow and Bielawy PSA data online! #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

More good news for Lodz area researchers...
The indices to Jewish vital records >from Lututow and Bielawy are now online
in the JRI-Poland searchable database:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/jriplweb.htm
This data was obtained as a result of the Lodz JRI-Poland / Polish State
Archives project to obtain indices to records not microfilmed by the Mormons.

Now online:
1) Lututow PSA: 1868, 1870-76, 1881-84 Births, Marriages and Deaths

Many thanks to Lututow town leader Morris Wirth and Lututow researchers for
making this data possible. Some of the indices did not state a year, so a
range of years may be given in the search results.

2) Bielawy PSA: 1878-85, 1887-92, 1894-99

Indices to 70 previously unavailable death records are now online. Many
thanks to Bielawy researchers for their support.

Best Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Lodz JRI-Poland / PSA Coordinator


Famous Jews #general

Herb Sollinger
 

For Famous Jews try www.jewhoo.com.

Herb Sollinger


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Famous Jews #general

Herb Sollinger
 

For Famous Jews try www.jewhoo.com.

Herb Sollinger


Thanks for NYC marriage info., and bonus Winnipeg Vital Statistics info #ukraine

Eve Greenfield <eve_rachel@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,
First of all, many thanks to all of you who helped me
brainstorm on how to find a record of my
great-grandparents' mariage, which ostensibly took
place in New York. I responded individually to the
first few respondents, and as soon as I emerge from
the special hell which is known as master's thesis
revisions, I will try to respond to the rest of you.

In general, though, I got almost as many inquiries
regarding how I had managed to get the birth
certificate >from Winnipeg. I suspect many other
people may have need for Canadian documents at some
point; I work at an immigration law firm, and my main
client has a large Canadian operation...and we have
discovered that approximately 25% of Canadians have at
least one family tie to the U.S. if you go back 2-3
generations.
I got the info >from the State Department's Foreign
Affairs Manual, which lists addresses to write for
biographic docs all over the world. (We use
it all the time at work, as these kinds of documents
are required for the green card process.)
For Manitoba, the appropriate agency is:
Vital Statistics Agency
254-258 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3C OB6

Ask them to send you a request form for the
geneaological birth certificate; Canada issues three
types of birth certificates, but the geneaological one
is actual microfilm copy of the form that was filled
out when the birth was recorded. The fee is $25
Canadian (or $18 U.S.), which you will need to send
them probably in the form of a postal money order.

One catch: you will need the written permission of the
individuals in question to have documents released to
you, if they are living, or permission of their next
of kin, if they are deceased. The form isn't terribly
clear about this, but I called them and found out for
sure.

The Vital Statistics Office is very helpful: I got
results in about 3 weeks door to door, and I didn't
even have my grandmother's first name right (which was
a big surprise for my dad and me!).
Good luck, Canadians!
Eve Greenfield, Chicago, Illinois


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Thanks for NYC marriage info., and bonus Winnipeg Vital Statistics info #ukraine

Eve Greenfield <eve_rachel@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,
First of all, many thanks to all of you who helped me
brainstorm on how to find a record of my
great-grandparents' mariage, which ostensibly took
place in New York. I responded individually to the
first few respondents, and as soon as I emerge from
the special hell which is known as master's thesis
revisions, I will try to respond to the rest of you.

In general, though, I got almost as many inquiries
regarding how I had managed to get the birth
certificate >from Winnipeg. I suspect many other
people may have need for Canadian documents at some
point; I work at an immigration law firm, and my main
client has a large Canadian operation...and we have
discovered that approximately 25% of Canadians have at
least one family tie to the U.S. if you go back 2-3
generations.
I got the info >from the State Department's Foreign
Affairs Manual, which lists addresses to write for
biographic docs all over the world. (We use
it all the time at work, as these kinds of documents
are required for the green card process.)
For Manitoba, the appropriate agency is:
Vital Statistics Agency
254-258 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3C OB6

Ask them to send you a request form for the
geneaological birth certificate; Canada issues three
types of birth certificates, but the geneaological one
is actual microfilm copy of the form that was filled
out when the birth was recorded. The fee is $25
Canadian (or $18 U.S.), which you will need to send
them probably in the form of a postal money order.

One catch: you will need the written permission of the
individuals in question to have documents released to
you, if they are living, or permission of their next
of kin, if they are deceased. The form isn't terribly
clear about this, but I called them and found out for
sure.

The Vital Statistics Office is very helpful: I got
results in about 3 weeks door to door, and I didn't
even have my grandmother's first name right (which was
a big surprise for my dad and me!).
Good luck, Canadians!
Eve Greenfield, Chicago, Illinois


Re: [Atlas of Jewish History] #ukraine

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dorothy Kohanski wrote:

"Although this is not the same atlas as the one requested, you can find
the one by Martin Gilbert: The Atlas of Jewish History at amazon.com. I
just got a copy. It includes ancient as well as modern history and maps."


I've owned this useful little book for years and always keep it handy.


Its maps are bordered by boxed texts with arrows leading to the specific
town or region that text relates to. They run the gamut >from "Early
Jewish Migrations about 2000 BC" -- a period to which not too many
of us can trace our ancestors! -- to "Forcible Conversions 460- 1858",
"The Chmielnicki Massacres 1648-1656", "The Jews of England
1066-1290", and "The Pale 1835-1917" as well as maps of Sephardi
Jewish history, the Middle East wars of the last decades and more.

As I somehow missed the first post about atlases, my apologies if this
message is out of context.

Michelle Frager NYC
Searching:
***BELARUS (Grodno, Bobruisk, Hlusk, Kaslovich): FRAKT, WOLFSON,
PADOVSCHIK, LIFSHITZ, SHAPIRO, DINABURSKY

***UKRAINE Podolia (Mogilov-Podolski, Snitkov, Zmerinka, Zamekov,
Liadova, Vinkivtsi): FRAGER/TRAGER, SEROTA, ZECKSER, SCHWEISBERG,
BASSUK, TRACHTENBERG


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: [Atlas of Jewish History] #ukraine

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Dorothy Kohanski wrote:

"Although this is not the same atlas as the one requested, you can find
the one by Martin Gilbert: The Atlas of Jewish History at amazon.com. I
just got a copy. It includes ancient as well as modern history and maps."


I've owned this useful little book for years and always keep it handy.


Its maps are bordered by boxed texts with arrows leading to the specific
town or region that text relates to. They run the gamut >from "Early
Jewish Migrations about 2000 BC" -- a period to which not too many
of us can trace our ancestors! -- to "Forcible Conversions 460- 1858",
"The Chmielnicki Massacres 1648-1656", "The Jews of England
1066-1290", and "The Pale 1835-1917" as well as maps of Sephardi
Jewish history, the Middle East wars of the last decades and more.

As I somehow missed the first post about atlases, my apologies if this
message is out of context.

Michelle Frager NYC
Searching:
***BELARUS (Grodno, Bobruisk, Hlusk, Kaslovich): FRAKT, WOLFSON,
PADOVSCHIK, LIFSHITZ, SHAPIRO, DINABURSKY

***UKRAINE Podolia (Mogilov-Podolski, Snitkov, Zmerinka, Zamekov,
Liadova, Vinkivtsi): FRAGER/TRAGER, SEROTA, ZECKSER, SCHWEISBERG,
BASSUK, TRACHTENBERG


Re: website:Simowitz/Gottesman and Munkacs/Munkachevo/Hungary/Slovakia #general

Hellfire <hellfire@...>
 

Sorry,

Our website address is http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mishpaka

Thanks
Allen and Sheila Greenfield
Atlanta, GA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:website:Simowitz/Gottesman and Munkacs/Munkachevo/Hungary/Slovakia #general

Hellfire <hellfire@...>
 

Sorry,

Our website address is http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mishpaka

Thanks
Allen and Sheila Greenfield
Atlanta, GA


JRI-Poland - Lodz Chevra Kadisha (Old Cemetery) Indexing Project #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

[MODERATOR NOTE: Message posted for Stanley Diamond
Refer to: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/lodzchev/lodzchevrakad.htm ]

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland announces a new initiative:

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project

At the 2000 Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Salt Lake City,
JRI-Poland announced plans for this new initiative, which includes
the burial records of the Old Cemetery in Lodz.

The Old Cemetery was established in 1811 and closed in 1892-3,
at which time the larger new cemetery was established. However,
burials continued to take place until 1922.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project should be of interest
to anyone with Jewish roots in the Lodz region. As a result of
the great influx of workers to Lodz in the 19th century, records
include not only individuals who were born and lived in Lodz
proper, but also those with roots in many surrounding and some
distant Polish villages and towns, some of which today are in
Lithuania and Belarus. Some of the records in the Hebrew and
Polish lists may coincide with data already in the JRI-Poland
database and will provide additional valuable information for
anyone researching their family in this region.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha records include the more than 5,400
entries listed in "Stary Cmentarz Zydowski w Lodzi" (The Old
Cemetery of Lodz), published by the Jewish Community of
Lodz in 1938. For a complete description of the contents of
this book, see "The Old Cemetery in Lodz" by Chaim Freedman,
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/oldcem.htm

JRI-Poland has taken on this indexing project with the enthusiastic
support of Mr. Symcha Keller, head of the Jewish Community of
Lodz. The much larger new Jewish cemetery survived nearly
intact and planning for the indexing of the burial records of the
New Lodz Cemetery is underway. More than 180,000 indices
to these burials will become part of the JRI-Poland searchable
database in the near future.

The Chevra Kadisha records are made up of two separate databases.
Phase I: Indexing of the Polish Subsidiary Death Register,
1826-1893, containing 2,034 entries, is complete and online in the
searchable JRI-Poland database. Data entry was done by
Shirley Flaum, who conceived this project. Proofreading was
done by Morris Wirth.

Phase II: Indexing of the Hebrew List of Burials, 1822-1922,
containing 3,411 graves in the Old Lodz Cemetery, is in progress.
This phase will require many Hebrew-speaking volunteers for data
entry. Pages will be mailed so you can work comfortably at home.
If you are interested in participating in this important project,
please contact Shirley Flaum at Seflaum@aol.com.

JRI-Poland web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
SMSDIAMOND@aol.com


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland JRI-Poland - Lodz Chevra Kadisha (Old Cemetery) Indexing Project #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

[MODERATOR NOTE: Message posted for Stanley Diamond
Refer to: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/lodzchev/lodzchevrakad.htm ]

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland announces a new initiative:

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project

At the 2000 Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Salt Lake City,
JRI-Poland announced plans for this new initiative, which includes
the burial records of the Old Cemetery in Lodz.

The Old Cemetery was established in 1811 and closed in 1892-3,
at which time the larger new cemetery was established. However,
burials continued to take place until 1922.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project should be of interest
to anyone with Jewish roots in the Lodz region. As a result of
the great influx of workers to Lodz in the 19th century, records
include not only individuals who were born and lived in Lodz
proper, but also those with roots in many surrounding and some
distant Polish villages and towns, some of which today are in
Lithuania and Belarus. Some of the records in the Hebrew and
Polish lists may coincide with data already in the JRI-Poland
database and will provide additional valuable information for
anyone researching their family in this region.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha records include the more than 5,400
entries listed in "Stary Cmentarz Zydowski w Lodzi" (The Old
Cemetery of Lodz), published by the Jewish Community of
Lodz in 1938. For a complete description of the contents of
this book, see "The Old Cemetery in Lodz" by Chaim Freedman,
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/oldcem.htm

JRI-Poland has taken on this indexing project with the enthusiastic
support of Mr. Symcha Keller, head of the Jewish Community of
Lodz. The much larger new Jewish cemetery survived nearly
intact and planning for the indexing of the burial records of the
New Lodz Cemetery is underway. More than 180,000 indices
to these burials will become part of the JRI-Poland searchable
database in the near future.

The Chevra Kadisha records are made up of two separate databases.
Phase I: Indexing of the Polish Subsidiary Death Register,
1826-1893, containing 2,034 entries, is complete and online in the
searchable JRI-Poland database. Data entry was done by
Shirley Flaum, who conceived this project. Proofreading was
done by Morris Wirth.

Phase II: Indexing of the Hebrew List of Burials, 1822-1922,
containing 3,411 graves in the Old Lodz Cemetery, is in progress.
This phase will require many Hebrew-speaking volunteers for data
entry. Pages will be mailed so you can work comfortably at home.
If you are interested in participating in this important project,
please contact Shirley Flaum at Seflaum@aol.com.

JRI-Poland web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
SMSDIAMOND@aol.com


Re: Rashstadt #general

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

Harvey, I recently located Rastatt, on the German-French border
(48N latitude, 8E longitude), my maternal ggf's hometown.
In German, this would be pronounced Rashstadt.

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
ldashman@bestweb.net

Can anyone identify Rashstadt? Possibly Ukraine c1911.
thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rashstadt #general

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

Harvey, I recently located Rastatt, on the German-French border
(48N latitude, 8E longitude), my maternal ggf's hometown.
In German, this would be pronounced Rashstadt.

Best wishes,
Lisa Dashman
ldashman@bestweb.net

Can anyone identify Rashstadt? Possibly Ukraine c1911.
thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


Researching family in Ukraine #ukraine

Mark Cohen <mlcohen@...>
 

Hello >from Hawaii (originally Philadelphia).

Last year I discovered a probable Canadian cousin on my mother's side by
using JGFF, but I've had no luck finding out about my father's family.

As best I can tell, my grandfather's name was originally Morris or Moshe
KOLCHEVNI, and I believe he was >from Buki. His name was changed to
Cohen when he came to the US, but I know we are not Kohanim. I
remember being told that Buki was a "suburb" of Kiev, but the
ShtetlFinder lists 3 towns named Buki, all 50-100 miles >from Kiev, so
that's not much help. My grandmother was Rose FINE, though she said her
family name was originally FINEZILBER or FEINZILBER. I believe she was
from Podolia Gubernia, but I don't know what village or town. (An old
family joke is that my dad told my maternal grandfather that his mother
was >from "Gubernia"!) They were married and lived in Philadelphia.
Morris died in 1945, and Rose died in the mid-70's, I can't recall the
year. They had three children, Herbert (who died in 1971, I think),
Myer, who still lives in Philadelphia, and Richard, my father, who died
in 1991.

I have a cousin who made a detailed family tree of the American branches
of the GALONOY family, which included my family; I believe Morris was
related to that family by marriage. I have a copy of that family tree,
if anyone is interested.

I am also interested in finding out more about my mother's family: her
father, Harry (Gershon) BONDER or BONDAR, was >from Kishinev in Moldova
(he was born in 1896 and remembered the 1901 Kishinever Pogrom), and his
wife, Mary NEWMAN, who I believe was also >from Kishinev but I think her
family originally came >from Romania. They were "cousins" by marriage,
and married in Philadelphia in 1919. Mary owned or worked in a
millinery shop on South Street and Harry was a dress cutter. Mary died
in 1975 and Harry in 1986 or thereabouts.

I would be very grateful for any information about these families.

Shalom and Aloha,

Mark Cohen
mlcohen@ilhawaii.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Researching family in Ukraine #ukraine

Mark Cohen <mlcohen@...>
 

Hello >from Hawaii (originally Philadelphia).

Last year I discovered a probable Canadian cousin on my mother's side by
using JGFF, but I've had no luck finding out about my father's family.

As best I can tell, my grandfather's name was originally Morris or Moshe
KOLCHEVNI, and I believe he was >from Buki. His name was changed to
Cohen when he came to the US, but I know we are not Kohanim. I
remember being told that Buki was a "suburb" of Kiev, but the
ShtetlFinder lists 3 towns named Buki, all 50-100 miles >from Kiev, so
that's not much help. My grandmother was Rose FINE, though she said her
family name was originally FINEZILBER or FEINZILBER. I believe she was
from Podolia Gubernia, but I don't know what village or town. (An old
family joke is that my dad told my maternal grandfather that his mother
was >from "Gubernia"!) They were married and lived in Philadelphia.
Morris died in 1945, and Rose died in the mid-70's, I can't recall the
year. They had three children, Herbert (who died in 1971, I think),
Myer, who still lives in Philadelphia, and Richard, my father, who died
in 1991.

I have a cousin who made a detailed family tree of the American branches
of the GALONOY family, which included my family; I believe Morris was
related to that family by marriage. I have a copy of that family tree,
if anyone is interested.

I am also interested in finding out more about my mother's family: her
father, Harry (Gershon) BONDER or BONDAR, was >from Kishinev in Moldova
(he was born in 1896 and remembered the 1901 Kishinever Pogrom), and his
wife, Mary NEWMAN, who I believe was also >from Kishinev but I think her
family originally came >from Romania. They were "cousins" by marriage,
and married in Philadelphia in 1919. Mary owned or worked in a
millinery shop on South Street and Harry was a dress cutter. Mary died
in 1975 and Harry in 1986 or thereabouts.

I would be very grateful for any information about these families.

Shalom and Aloha,

Mark Cohen
mlcohen@ilhawaii.net


Re: Missing NYC marriage cert #ukraine

SBens101@...
 

I wrote several letters to the 5 boroughs searching for the 1910 marriage
record of my grandparents. I was only able to find it after searching
through Mormon films of the marriage indexes and then ordering any records
that were remotely close in spelling. It turned out that BENNIS was listed
under BONOS. Hope this helps.

S Bens

Moderator Note: Please remember to sign all your postings


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Missing NYC marriage cert #ukraine

SBens101@...
 

I wrote several letters to the 5 boroughs searching for the 1910 marriage
record of my grandparents. I was only able to find it after searching
through Mormon films of the marriage indexes and then ordering any records
that were remotely close in spelling. It turned out that BENNIS was listed
under BONOS. Hope this helps.

S Bens

Moderator Note: Please remember to sign all your postings