Date   

Re: Tarnoruda #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Thanks for the note, Israel.

It was my understanding that only three nice Galitzyaners are searching for
the roots in Tarnoruda, as this is stated in Suchostav Research Group.
Is there any particular reasons that nice Galitzyaners are avoiding JGFF?

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor
mailto: a.sharon@home.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "IsraelP" <zach4v6@actcom.co.il>
To: <galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: <b4kids@earthlink.net>; "Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@home.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 07, 2001 9:10 AM
Subject: Tarnoruda


Alexander Sharon writes as follows:
Currently Tarnoruda is included in Suchostav Regional Research Group
cluster
of shtetls (SRRG). According to the records, only three members of SRRG:
yourself, Renate Rosenblatt and Kathy Wallach are searching for
Tarnoruda
roots. I believe that your research abilities will be improved if you
will
introduce your ancestral names to the JGFF database. Currently
Tarnorud(k)a
is not even listed in JGFF system.
There are others among us with an interest in Tarnoruda, even if we have
not
registered that interest with JGFF. There are Pikholz families >from many
of
the Skalat-area towns. There is one >from Tarnoruda, married to a
Fainstein,
connected to the Pikholz family of Rita Margolies.

Alexander continues:
In Turowka
M.WALLACH, mill owner (Kathy Wallach search), N.PIKHOLZ, Foodstore
owner
(Israel Pikholtz search)
I have not seen that reference before, but Rita's relative >from Tarnoruda
was Nuta Pikholz, so I shall assume this is the person you mention.

Israel Pickholtz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Tarnoruda #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Thanks for the note, Israel.

It was my understanding that only three nice Galitzyaners are searching for
the roots in Tarnoruda, as this is stated in Suchostav Research Group.
Is there any particular reasons that nice Galitzyaners are avoiding JGFF?

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor
mailto: a.sharon@home.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "IsraelP" <zach4v6@actcom.co.il>
To: <galicia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: <b4kids@earthlink.net>; "Alexander Sharon" <a.sharon@home.com>
Sent: Sunday, January 07, 2001 9:10 AM
Subject: Tarnoruda


Alexander Sharon writes as follows:
Currently Tarnoruda is included in Suchostav Regional Research Group
cluster
of shtetls (SRRG). According to the records, only three members of SRRG:
yourself, Renate Rosenblatt and Kathy Wallach are searching for
Tarnoruda
roots. I believe that your research abilities will be improved if you
will
introduce your ancestral names to the JGFF database. Currently
Tarnorud(k)a
is not even listed in JGFF system.
There are others among us with an interest in Tarnoruda, even if we have
not
registered that interest with JGFF. There are Pikholz families >from many
of
the Skalat-area towns. There is one >from Tarnoruda, married to a
Fainstein,
connected to the Pikholz family of Rita Margolies.

Alexander continues:
In Turowka
M.WALLACH, mill owner (Kathy Wallach search), N.PIKHOLZ, Foodstore
owner
(Israel Pikholtz search)
I have not seen that reference before, but Rita's relative >from Tarnoruda
was Nuta Pikholz, so I shall assume this is the person you mention.

Israel Pickholtz


Tarnoruda #galicia

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Alexander Sharon writes as follows:
Currently Tarnoruda is included in Suchostav Regional Research Group
cluster
of shtetls (SRRG). According to the records, only three members of SRRG:
yourself, Renate Rosenblatt and Kathy Wallach are searching for Tarnoruda
roots. I believe that your research abilities will be improved if you will
introduce your ancestral names to the JGFF database. Currently
Tarnorud(k)a
is not even listed in JGFF system.
There are others among us with an interest in Tarnoruda, even if we have not
registered that interest with JGFF. There are Pikholz families >from many of
the Skalat-area towns. There is one >from Tarnoruda, married to a Fainstein,
connected to the Pikholz family of Rita Margolies.

Alexander continues:
In Turowka
M.WALLACH, mill owner (Kathy Wallach search), N.PIKHOLZ, Foodstore
owner
(Israel Pikholtz search)
I have not seen that reference before, but Rita's relative >from Tarnoruda
was Nuta Pikholz, so I shall assume this is the person you mention.

Israel Pickholtz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Tarnoruda #galicia

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

Alexander Sharon writes as follows:
Currently Tarnoruda is included in Suchostav Regional Research Group
cluster
of shtetls (SRRG). According to the records, only three members of SRRG:
yourself, Renate Rosenblatt and Kathy Wallach are searching for Tarnoruda
roots. I believe that your research abilities will be improved if you will
introduce your ancestral names to the JGFF database. Currently
Tarnorud(k)a
is not even listed in JGFF system.
There are others among us with an interest in Tarnoruda, even if we have not
registered that interest with JGFF. There are Pikholz families >from many of
the Skalat-area towns. There is one >from Tarnoruda, married to a Fainstein,
connected to the Pikholz family of Rita Margolies.

Alexander continues:
In Turowka
M.WALLACH, mill owner (Kathy Wallach search), N.PIKHOLZ, Foodstore
owner
(Israel Pikholtz search)
I have not seen that reference before, but Rita's relative >from Tarnoruda
was Nuta Pikholz, so I shall assume this is the person you mention.

Israel Pickholtz


Mail to Former Soviet Union #belarus

Maria Krane
 

Hello Genners,
Someone asked if it would be easier for mail to get to its destination
if it was addressed in Cyrillic rather than Latin characters. I have been
corresponding with a researcher in Lithuania for about six months now and
have always addressed the envelope using Latin characters. I had also
written to various people in the USSR (before the break-up) and always used
Latin characters. My mail has always reached its destination. I have never
worked in any type of post office, but I am sure that the postal system
world-wide has built in ways to deal with this.
Maria Krane
MariaKrane@aol.com
Pembroke Pines, Florida USA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Mail to Former Soviet Union #belarus

Maria Krane
 

Hello Genners,
Someone asked if it would be easier for mail to get to its destination
if it was addressed in Cyrillic rather than Latin characters. I have been
corresponding with a researcher in Lithuania for about six months now and
have always addressed the envelope using Latin characters. I had also
written to various people in the USSR (before the break-up) and always used
Latin characters. My mail has always reached its destination. I have never
worked in any type of post office, but I am sure that the postal system
world-wide has built in ways to deal with this.
Maria Krane
MariaKrane@aol.com
Pembroke Pines, Florida USA


Kolbuszowa Records - Mid To Late 1800'S #general

froggy <painpals@...>
 

New to researching and don't really know where to start!!!
Can any one tell me how to go about researching relatives
who were born in Kolbuszowa in the mid to late 1800's???
Where do I contact to get birth records, death records etc??

My gf's family GETTENBERG lived there until they came to
the USA in the early to mid 1900's.


Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks

-jessi-ann Rosenbaum

MODERATOR NOTE: All researchers are invited to explore
the resources available at http://www.jewishgen.org/
The FAQ is an especially good place to start, and specific
areas of interest are addressed in the InfoFiles.
You may also wish to enter your information into the
JewishGen Family Finder -- http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
-- a searchable database of surnames and towns currently
being researched by genealogists around the world.


Re: Changing names--how was it done? #general

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

Harriet,
My pggm and her 7 children arrived in New York >from Vashilishok
(Belarus) around 1910. They all remained in the Brooklyn area
except for the younger son, Samuel, who moved to Salem, MA (not
exactly a stronghold of Judaism), and went into business. He
began to use the name "Krinsk" instead of the family name "Krinsky",
specifically to play down his being of the "Hebrew race." In 1931,
he finally had his name legally changed to Krinsk.

I sometimes wonder why he didn't change it to a more "American-
sounding" name, but I'm glad he didn't -- it makes the research
much easier!

Lisa Dashman
ldashman@bestweb.net

I don't know how other families went about changing their names,
but I can tell you that my BRUCHANSKY family did it the legal
way in 1920 in Camden, New Jersey. I was lucky enough to get the
legal papers to show this a few years ago. Sure enough, just as
family lore had said, my grandfather and his brothers and sisters
all changed their name to BROWN at the same time.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kolbuszowa Records - Mid To Late 1800'S #general

froggy <painpals@...>
 

New to researching and don't really know where to start!!!
Can any one tell me how to go about researching relatives
who were born in Kolbuszowa in the mid to late 1800's???
Where do I contact to get birth records, death records etc??

My gf's family GETTENBERG lived there until they came to
the USA in the early to mid 1900's.


Any advice would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks

-jessi-ann Rosenbaum

MODERATOR NOTE: All researchers are invited to explore
the resources available at http://www.jewishgen.org/
The FAQ is an especially good place to start, and specific
areas of interest are addressed in the InfoFiles.
You may also wish to enter your information into the
JewishGen Family Finder -- http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
-- a searchable database of surnames and towns currently
being researched by genealogists around the world.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Changing names--how was it done? #general

Lisa Dashman <ldashman@...>
 

Harriet,
My pggm and her 7 children arrived in New York >from Vashilishok
(Belarus) around 1910. They all remained in the Brooklyn area
except for the younger son, Samuel, who moved to Salem, MA (not
exactly a stronghold of Judaism), and went into business. He
began to use the name "Krinsk" instead of the family name "Krinsky",
specifically to play down his being of the "Hebrew race." In 1931,
he finally had his name legally changed to Krinsk.

I sometimes wonder why he didn't change it to a more "American-
sounding" name, but I'm glad he didn't -- it makes the research
much easier!

Lisa Dashman
ldashman@bestweb.net

I don't know how other families went about changing their names,
but I can tell you that my BRUCHANSKY family did it the legal
way in 1920 in Camden, New Jersey. I was lucky enough to get the
legal papers to show this a few years ago. Sure enough, just as
family lore had said, my grandfather and his brothers and sisters
all changed their name to BROWN at the same time.


1900 Enumeration Dist. South Phila. #general

Carol Raspler
 

Over a year ago I began a quest for an E. D. for Oriana Street in Old South
Philadelphia. For those interested, the ED was #39. Since this was
evidently the heart of Russian immigration, particularly those >from Kiyev
Gubernia, you might be able to use this info for your research. Regards,
Carol Raspler,
Delray Beach, FL

Searching: HANAPOLSKY, ANAPOLSKY, GANAPOLSKY (Kiev Gub.: Belaya Tserkov,
Rakitina)


List of names from Pinkas Synagogue, Prague #general

Mimi Katz <geveret@...>
 

The former Pinkas Synagogue in Prague is now a Holocaust Memorial. On its
walls are the names of those >from each community in the Czech Republic who
perished. Next to each name is the person's date of birth and death. I
would like to find a list of *all* the names. Does anyone know if such a
list exists and where I might be able to get a copy?

--
Please do not reply to sender. Email address has been altered to avoid
spam. The correct email address is below.
Mimi Katz, Chicago
GeveretK@core.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1900 Enumeration Dist. South Phila. #general

Carol Raspler
 

Over a year ago I began a quest for an E. D. for Oriana Street in Old South
Philadelphia. For those interested, the ED was #39. Since this was
evidently the heart of Russian immigration, particularly those >from Kiyev
Gubernia, you might be able to use this info for your research. Regards,
Carol Raspler,
Delray Beach, FL

Searching: HANAPOLSKY, ANAPOLSKY, GANAPOLSKY (Kiev Gub.: Belaya Tserkov,
Rakitina)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen List of names from Pinkas Synagogue, Prague #general

Mimi Katz <geveret@...>
 

The former Pinkas Synagogue in Prague is now a Holocaust Memorial. On its
walls are the names of those >from each community in the Czech Republic who
perished. Next to each name is the person's date of birth and death. I
would like to find a list of *all* the names. Does anyone know if such a
list exists and where I might be able to get a copy?

--
Please do not reply to sender. Email address has been altered to avoid
spam. The correct email address is below.
Mimi Katz, Chicago
GeveretK@core.com


Re: changing names #belarus

Pamela Weisberger <thewks@...>
 

Dear Genners:

In response to the queries and examples of name changes, I too have
wondered how many were done consciously and legally, or others simply the
result of convenience or practicality?

My Hungarian grandmother arrived in this country in 1904 as "Szerena
Braun" but by 1921 (and probably much sooner) she was "Sadie Brown." The
story goes (like some others shared) that a teacher told her (or her
parents) that Szerena was too foreign-sounding and Sadie would be more
American, and "Braun" probably sounded too German. Her sister "Hani"
became "Helen."

A grandfather having arrrived in the early 1900s named "Greenhaut" became
"Greenhut" by 1919. also because the original name sounded too German. His
wife (my grandmother)was born Rachel, but, perhaps, biblical names weren't
"in fashion" so she called herself "Rose" >from a young age.

The Hungarian first names of relatives "Pepi" and "Beila"(or "Bayla") who
arrived in 1882 became "Pearl" and "Bertha" by the time the 1900
census-taker came around. In a way it makes sense that our ancestors
tried to "Americanize" their names, much in the same way we change
country/city names like "Danmark","Firenze" and "Wien" into
"Denmark","Florence" and "Vienna" (a practice I've always wondered about-
why couldn't they stay the same the world over?) but this strikes me as
different than actually changing your name to something entirely
different. Of course I won't know if any of this happened legally or not
until I do further research.

Question:

Have there been any books, studies, papers on this practice in Jewish
immigrants to this country? Also, one reader mentioned seeing a petition
of one of his relatives in a NY court for such a name change which was
then to be posted in the "NY Law Journal." Any suggestions on how one
would access these records, at least in New York City?

Thank you.

Pamela Weisberger
thewks2hotmail.com

Researching: GREENH(A)UT/BESSER/OBERMAN (Poland/Galicia)
WEISBERGER/WEISS/BRAUN/ELOVITZ (Chop/Tsap,Karasz/
Tiszasalka, Gyulahaza,Hungary)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: changing names #general

Pamela Weisberger <thewks@...>
 

Dear Genners:

In response to the queries and examples of name changes, I too have
wondered how many were done consciously and legally, or others simply the
result of convenience or practicality?

My Hungarian grandmother arrived in this country in 1904 as "Szerena
Braun" but by 1921 (and probably much sooner) she was "Sadie Brown." The
story goes (like some others shared) that a teacher told her (or her
parents) that Szerena was too foreign-sounding and Sadie would be more
American, and "Braun" probably sounded too German. Her sister "Hani"
became "Helen."

A grandfather having arrrived in the early 1900s named "Greenhaut" became
"Greenhut" by 1919. also because the original name sounded too German. His
wife (my grandmother)was born Rachel, but, perhaps, biblical names weren't
"in fashion" so she called herself "Rose" >from a young age.

The Hungarian first names of relatives "Pepi" and "Beila"(or "Bayla") who
arrived in 1882 became "Pearl" and "Bertha" by the time the 1900
census-taker came around. In a way it makes sense that our ancestors
tried to "Americanize" their names, much in the same way we change
country/city names like "Danmark","Firenze" and "Wien" into
"Denmark","Florence" and "Vienna" (a practice I've always wondered about-
why couldn't they stay the same the world over?) but this strikes me as
different than actually changing your name to something entirely
different. Of course I won't know if any of this happened legally or not
until I do further research.

Question:

Have there been any books, studies, papers on this practice in Jewish
immigrants to this country? Also, one reader mentioned seeing a petition
of one of his relatives in a NY court for such a name change which was
then to be posted in the "NY Law Journal." Any suggestions on how one
would access these records, at least in New York City?

Thank you.

Pamela Weisberger
thewks2hotmail.com

Researching: GREENH(A)UT/BESSER/OBERMAN (Poland/Galicia)
WEISBERGER/WEISS/BRAUN/ELOVITZ (Chop/Tsap,Karasz/
Tiszasalka, Gyulahaza,Hungary)


Russian document posted to view mate #general

Joel Levinson <joell@...>
 

I've just posted a russian language birth record on viewmate,
at VM251. It is a birth record >from Lithuania in 1876. Any
help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Joel Levinson

searching:

LEVINSON >from Mariampol, Suwalki Gubernya
BASKIND >from Ilya, Vilna Gubernya
ARIAN >from Ilya, Vilna Gubernya
KOTTLER >from Varapaeva (near Danilovichi) Vilna Gubernya.
HURWITZ and KISBER (same basic area as the KOTTLERS).

MODERATOR NOTE: To view, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/toview.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian document posted to view mate #general

Joel Levinson <joell@...>
 

I've just posted a russian language birth record on viewmate,
at VM251. It is a birth record >from Lithuania in 1876. Any
help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Joel Levinson

searching:

LEVINSON >from Mariampol, Suwalki Gubernya
BASKIND >from Ilya, Vilna Gubernya
ARIAN >from Ilya, Vilna Gubernya
KOTTLER >from Varapaeva (near Danilovichi) Vilna Gubernya.
HURWITZ and KISBER (same basic area as the KOTTLERS).

MODERATOR NOTE: To view, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/toview.html


ISO Yosef Karo Family Tree #lithuania

Steve Eller <steve-eller@...>
 

Does anyone know where I could find a list of the descendants of Yosef
Karo - author of the "Shulchan Aruch" - if such a tree even exists?

Steve Eller
Baltimore MD

Researching: KAMENETZKY of Voronovo, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and New Jersey.
Researching: LEVIN of Voronovo
Researching: ZARENDA/ZARENDE/ZARENDYTE
Researching: SENDZUL/SENZEL/SHENDZEL
Researching: SHMIT/SMITH/SCHMIDT of Klykoliai and Norway


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania ISO Yosef Karo Family Tree #lithuania

Steve Eller <steve-eller@...>
 

Does anyone know where I could find a list of the descendants of Yosef
Karo - author of the "Shulchan Aruch" - if such a tree even exists?

Steve Eller
Baltimore MD

Researching: KAMENETZKY of Voronovo, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and New Jersey.
Researching: LEVIN of Voronovo
Researching: ZARENDA/ZARENDE/ZARENDYTE
Researching: SENDZUL/SENZEL/SHENDZEL
Researching: SHMIT/SMITH/SCHMIDT of Klykoliai and Norway