Date   

Re: Meaning of "Rav" on headstone #general

Gene and Ellen Sucov <genellen@...>
 

Rav usually signifies that the person was not only a rabbi but also a
teacher or other honored person. It is to be distinguished >from "Reb" ,
abbreviated in Hebrew as Resh(R) followed by an apostrophe, which is more
like "Mister".

Gene Sucov, Pittsburgh JGS, searching for
SUCHOWCZYCKI, Horodetz-Bialystok-US
SHLAFMITZ, Zaremby-Koscielne-US


Warren Kohn <Wakohn@aol.com> wrote:

My g'grandmother's headstone indicates that her husband was "Rav" Chaim
and he was a Rabbi. It also indicates that her father was "Rav" Eli.
Can I take it that the use of "Rav" indicates that the person is/was a
Rabbi or is it used sometimes as a term of "honor?"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Meaning of "Rav" on headstone #general

Gene and Ellen Sucov <genellen@...>
 

Rav usually signifies that the person was not only a rabbi but also a
teacher or other honored person. It is to be distinguished >from "Reb" ,
abbreviated in Hebrew as Resh(R) followed by an apostrophe, which is more
like "Mister".

Gene Sucov, Pittsburgh JGS, searching for
SUCHOWCZYCKI, Horodetz-Bialystok-US
SHLAFMITZ, Zaremby-Koscielne-US


Warren Kohn <Wakohn@aol.com> wrote:

My g'grandmother's headstone indicates that her husband was "Rav" Chaim
and he was a Rabbi. It also indicates that her father was "Rav" Eli.
Can I take it that the use of "Rav" indicates that the person is/was a
Rabbi or is it used sometimes as a term of "honor?"


Trotzky's-A catering hall #general

HAL5858@...
 

Does anyone out there know the borough of this catering hall. It would
help me in obtaining a copy of parents marriage records. It existed in
the '30s. Most likely Bklyn, Bx, or Manhattan.
Please reply privately to
Hal Smith
hAL5858@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Trotzky's-A catering hall #general

HAL5858@...
 

Does anyone out there know the borough of this catering hall. It would
help me in obtaining a copy of parents marriage records. It existed in
the '30s. Most likely Bklyn, Bx, or Manhattan.
Please reply privately to
Hal Smith
hAL5858@aol.com


Name Leie #general

Len Pincus <lennyp@...>
 

Lisa,

My GM came into NYC in 1905 with a baby Leie who was known to all as Lena.

Len Pincus


Searching; SCHALLER, SPARRER, SPIEGEL, ROTH - - - >from Brody 1880s


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name Leie #general

Len Pincus <lennyp@...>
 

Lisa,

My GM came into NYC in 1905 with a baby Leie who was known to all as Lena.

Len Pincus


Searching; SCHALLER, SPARRER, SPIEGEL, ROTH - - - >from Brody 1880s


Lithuanian State Historical Archives #general

Howard Margol
 

You will find the necessary information you seek by reading the FAQ's on the
Litvak SIG site on Jewishgen. Send your personal check in the amount of $70.
Send with it the names, dates, and place or places in Lithuania you want them
to research. If additional cost is involved, the archive will notify you. Do
not expect to receive a response >from the archive for eight or nine months.

Howard Margol

Rhoda Miller < MillerR@dowling.edu > wrote:

<< I am about to place a request to the Lithuanian State Historical
Archives. I understand that the fee is $70 per surname per town.

Does anyone know if they will accept a check or if I need to get an
International Money Order >from the post office or some other system?

Also, can anyone give some indication of recent turnaround time?
Thanks for your help. >>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuanian State Historical Archives #general

Howard Margol
 

You will find the necessary information you seek by reading the FAQ's on the
Litvak SIG site on Jewishgen. Send your personal check in the amount of $70.
Send with it the names, dates, and place or places in Lithuania you want them
to research. If additional cost is involved, the archive will notify you. Do
not expect to receive a response >from the archive for eight or nine months.

Howard Margol

Rhoda Miller < MillerR@dowling.edu > wrote:

<< I am about to place a request to the Lithuanian State Historical
Archives. I understand that the fee is $70 per surname per town.

Does anyone know if they will accept a check or if I need to get an
International Money Order >from the post office or some other system?

Also, can anyone give some indication of recent turnaround time?
Thanks for your help. >>


JRI-Poland - Lodz Chevra Kadisha (Old Cemetery) Indexing Project #general

Stanley Diamond
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland announces a new initiative:

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project

At the 2000 Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Salt Lake City,
JRI-Poland announced plans for this new initiative, which includes
the burial records of the Old Cemetery in Lodz.

The Old Cemetery was established in 1811 and closed in 1892-3,
at which time the larger new cemetery was established. However,
burials continued to take place until 1922.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project should be of interest
to anyone with Jewish roots in the Lodz region. As a result of
the great influx of workers to Lodz in the 19th century, records
include not only individuals who were born and lived in Lodz
proper, but also those with roots in many surrounding and some
distant Polish villages and towns, some of which today are in
Lithuania and Belarus. Some of the records in the Hebrew and
Polish lists may coincide with data already in the JRI-Poland
database and will provide additional valuable information for
anyone researching their family in this region.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha records include the more than 5,400
entries listed in "Stary Cmentarz Zydowski w Lodzi" (The Old
Cemetery of Lodz), published by the Jewish Community of
Lodz in 1938. For a complete description of the contents of
this book, see "The Old Cemetery in Lodz" by Chaim Freedman,
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/oldcem.htm

JRI-Poland has taken on this indexing project with the enthusiastic
support of Mr. Symcha Keller, head of the Jewish Community of
Lodz. The much larger new Jewish cemetery survived nearly
intact and planning for the indexing of the burial records of the
New Lodz Cemetery is underway. More than 180,000 indices
to these burials will become part of the JRI-Poland searchable
database in the near future.

The Chevra Kadisha records are made up of two separate databases.
Phase I: Indexing of the Polish Subsidiary Death Register,
1826-1893, containing 2,034 entries, is complete and online in the
searchable JRI-Poland database. Data entry was done by
Shirley Flaum, who conceived this project. Proofreading was
done by Morris Wirth.

Phase II: Indexing of the Hebrew List of Burials, 1822-1922,
containing 3,411 graves in the Old Lodz Cemetery, is in progress.
This phase will require many Hebrew-speaking volunteers for data
entry. Pages will be mailed so you can work comfortably at home.
If you are interested in participating in this important project,
please contact Shirley Flaum at Seflaum@aol.com.

JRI-Poland web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JRI-Poland - Lodz Chevra Kadisha (Old Cemetery) Indexing Project #general

Stanley Diamond
 

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland announces a new initiative:

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project

At the 2000 Conference on Jewish Genealogy in Salt Lake City,
JRI-Poland announced plans for this new initiative, which includes
the burial records of the Old Cemetery in Lodz.

The Old Cemetery was established in 1811 and closed in 1892-3,
at which time the larger new cemetery was established. However,
burials continued to take place until 1922.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha Indexing Project should be of interest
to anyone with Jewish roots in the Lodz region. As a result of
the great influx of workers to Lodz in the 19th century, records
include not only individuals who were born and lived in Lodz
proper, but also those with roots in many surrounding and some
distant Polish villages and towns, some of which today are in
Lithuania and Belarus. Some of the records in the Hebrew and
Polish lists may coincide with data already in the JRI-Poland
database and will provide additional valuable information for
anyone researching their family in this region.

The Lodz Chevra Kadisha records include the more than 5,400
entries listed in "Stary Cmentarz Zydowski w Lodzi" (The Old
Cemetery of Lodz), published by the Jewish Community of
Lodz in 1938. For a complete description of the contents of
this book, see "The Old Cemetery in Lodz" by Chaim Freedman,
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/oldcem.htm

JRI-Poland has taken on this indexing project with the enthusiastic
support of Mr. Symcha Keller, head of the Jewish Community of
Lodz. The much larger new Jewish cemetery survived nearly
intact and planning for the indexing of the burial records of the
New Lodz Cemetery is underway. More than 180,000 indices
to these burials will become part of the JRI-Poland searchable
database in the near future.

The Chevra Kadisha records are made up of two separate databases.
Phase I: Indexing of the Polish Subsidiary Death Register,
1826-1893, containing 2,034 entries, is complete and online in the
searchable JRI-Poland database. Data entry was done by
Shirley Flaum, who conceived this project. Proofreading was
done by Morris Wirth.

Phase II: Indexing of the Hebrew List of Burials, 1822-1922,
containing 3,411 graves in the Old Lodz Cemetery, is in progress.
This phase will require many Hebrew-speaking volunteers for data
entry. Pages will be mailed so you can work comfortably at home.
If you are interested in participating in this important project,
please contact Shirley Flaum at Seflaum@aol.com.

JRI-Poland web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Novo-Alexandrovsk... #lithuania

Stan Baron <sbaron1@...>
 

Does anyone have information as to where the vital records for the
Jewish Community of Novo-Alexandrovsk (modern Zarasai), Lithuania might
be found.

I have traced my family >from the USA to England (1880's) to Latvia. The
Latvian archives provided a good report that take me back to the 1840's
and in some cases to the 1750's, and showed that one branch of the
family were originally members of the Jewish Community of
Novo-Alexandrovsk (the Latvians spelled the modern name as Zarasay),
Lithuania.

Stan Baron
sbaron1@maine.rr.com

Researching:
BARON or BARRON - Latvia, Lithuania
MANSFELD or MANSFIELD - Latvia
BENDET - Latvia, Lithuania
KATCHER or KATZER - Latvia, Lithuania
YACHTER or JAKTER - Belz, Galicia
STRAHLBERG, - Belz, Vienna?

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The All-Lithuania Database contains lists >from several towns in the Zarsai District, including an additional revision list >from 1873/4 >from Dusetos, 1895 census data >from Skalas, and various 1919 lists >from kapiskis. You can search the All-Lithuania Database at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/all.htm


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Novo-Alexandrovsk... #lithuania

Stan Baron <sbaron1@...>
 

Does anyone have information as to where the vital records for the
Jewish Community of Novo-Alexandrovsk (modern Zarasai), Lithuania might
be found.

I have traced my family >from the USA to England (1880's) to Latvia. The
Latvian archives provided a good report that take me back to the 1840's
and in some cases to the 1750's, and showed that one branch of the
family were originally members of the Jewish Community of
Novo-Alexandrovsk (the Latvians spelled the modern name as Zarasay),
Lithuania.

Stan Baron
sbaron1@maine.rr.com

Researching:
BARON or BARRON - Latvia, Lithuania
MANSFELD or MANSFIELD - Latvia
BENDET - Latvia, Lithuania
KATCHER or KATZER - Latvia, Lithuania
YACHTER or JAKTER - Belz, Galicia
STRAHLBERG, - Belz, Vienna?

MODERATOR'S NOTE: The All-Lithuania Database contains lists >from several towns in the Zarsai District, including an additional revision list >from 1873/4 >from Dusetos, 1895 census data >from Skalas, and various 1919 lists >from kapiskis. You can search the All-Lithuania Database at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/all.htm


New Piotrkow Tryb ShtetLinks site now online! #poland

Seflaum@...
 

I am pleased to announce the launch of a ShtetLinks site commemorating the Jewish community of Piotrkow Trybunalski, Poland.

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/piotrkowtryb/

Piotrkow Trybunalski is located 42 kilometers or 26 miles south-southeast of Lodz. It was an important Jewish cultural, religious and Hebrew publishing center in pre-war Poland. This site is a work in progress. We hope to add much more interesting and useful information to the site in
the near future.

Your contributions of information, documents or photos are always welcome.

Special thanks go to Marla Waltman Daschko, Ben Giladi, Paul W. Ginsburg,
Alice and Maurice Klinger, Leonard Markowitz and Petje Schroeder for their invaluable contributions to the site.

I also want to thank John Berman, Chuck Weinstein and the entire ShtetLinks team for their assistance in making ShtetLinks sites like this possible. They are a pleasure to work with.

Best Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas


JRI Poland #Poland New Piotrkow Tryb ShtetLinks site now online! #poland

Seflaum@...
 

I am pleased to announce the launch of a ShtetLinks site commemorating the Jewish community of Piotrkow Trybunalski, Poland.

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/piotrkowtryb/

Piotrkow Trybunalski is located 42 kilometers or 26 miles south-southeast of Lodz. It was an important Jewish cultural, religious and Hebrew publishing center in pre-war Poland. This site is a work in progress. We hope to add much more interesting and useful information to the site in
the near future.

Your contributions of information, documents or photos are always welcome.

Special thanks go to Marla Waltman Daschko, Ben Giladi, Paul W. Ginsburg,
Alice and Maurice Klinger, Leonard Markowitz and Petje Schroeder for their invaluable contributions to the site.

I also want to thank John Berman, Chuck Weinstein and the entire ShtetLinks team for their assistance in making ShtetLinks sites like this possible. They are a pleasure to work with.

Best Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas


Re: Statistics on Jews in Eastern Galicia - continued #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Hi,

It is unfortunate that my original posting concerning Jewish statistical
data in prewar Eastern Galicia and search for the actual figures of the
Jewish population has been sidetracked to the nationalistic squabble of the
Eastern European neighbors post WWI.

I have been awaiting >from Peter promised detailed data on 1921 and 1931
Poland census results and the clear definition of the "Jewish nationality"
term. I understand that person can be of Mosaic faith and Polish citizenship
(nationality). What in this case the Jewish nationality suppose to mean?
What is this definition is based on?

On a final note I strongly disagree with Peter that Versailles Treaty did
not deal with the borders issue. Peace Conference by dismembering four
Empires (incl. Ottoman) has de facto establish the birth of the national
states in the Eastern Europe, Balkans and in the Middle East, and has
designed their respective national borders.

I would also like to clarify that my Dad communicated in Hebrew to his
_first_ wife in prewar Poland, not to my Mom who spoke Yiddish.

I would like also to confirm that Peter and I have a good and friendly
relations, which does not mean that I share his view on the subject.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Statistics on Jews in Eastern Galicia - continued #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Hi,

It is unfortunate that my original posting concerning Jewish statistical
data in prewar Eastern Galicia and search for the actual figures of the
Jewish population has been sidetracked to the nationalistic squabble of the
Eastern European neighbors post WWI.

I have been awaiting >from Peter promised detailed data on 1921 and 1931
Poland census results and the clear definition of the "Jewish nationality"
term. I understand that person can be of Mosaic faith and Polish citizenship
(nationality). What in this case the Jewish nationality suppose to mean?
What is this definition is based on?

On a final note I strongly disagree with Peter that Versailles Treaty did
not deal with the borders issue. Peace Conference by dismembering four
Empires (incl. Ottoman) has de facto establish the birth of the national
states in the Eastern Europe, Balkans and in the Middle East, and has
designed their respective national borders.

I would also like to clarify that my Dad communicated in Hebrew to his
_first_ wife in prewar Poland, not to my Mom who spoke Yiddish.

I would like also to confirm that Peter and I have a good and friendly
relations, which does not mean that I share his view on the subject.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta


Re: Seeking Shmuel Katz near Lvov #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Shmuel.

I can not assist you with the search for Katz family.
But I can help with the location identification. Shtetl Gologo(u)ry
(Gologury) [goloh gooryh] which means the "naked hills" is currently located
in Zloczow district (oblast') of Tarnopol (Ternopil) Province.Town name did
not change.

You are probably aware that JRI-P is conducting currently indexing for the
19th century AGAD Warsaw records, and their work has started with Tarnopol
Province. You might be able soon to search for Zloczow and Gologory records
on line.


Alexander Sharon
mailto: a.sharon@home.com

I am seeking information on Shmuel Katz in Gora Gura (Gologury?),
Galician Poland (now BelaRussia?) about 20 km East of Lvov

The town was known as Lemberg during A-H Empire.

I believe that he was either a Rabbi or >from a rabbinical family.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Seeking Shmuel Katz near Lvov #galicia

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Shmuel.

I can not assist you with the search for Katz family.
But I can help with the location identification. Shtetl Gologo(u)ry
(Gologury) [goloh gooryh] which means the "naked hills" is currently located
in Zloczow district (oblast') of Tarnopol (Ternopil) Province.Town name did
not change.

You are probably aware that JRI-P is conducting currently indexing for the
19th century AGAD Warsaw records, and their work has started with Tarnopol
Province. You might be able soon to search for Zloczow and Gologory records
on line.


Alexander Sharon
mailto: a.sharon@home.com

I am seeking information on Shmuel Katz in Gora Gura (Gologury?),
Galician Poland (now BelaRussia?) about 20 km East of Lvov

The town was known as Lemberg during A-H Empire.

I believe that he was either a Rabbi or >from a rabbinical family.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT


Statistics on Jews in Eastern Galicia - final remarks #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

Dear Alex,

You wrote:
"I have been awaiting >from Peter promised detailed data on 1921 and 1931
Poland census results and the clear definition of the "Jewish nationality"
term."

Unfortunately my limited mobility due to my recent injury prevented me from
getting to the appropriate resources. A friend has promised however to look
for and deliver such materials to my home, and if it happens I will
certainly analize them and share my findings with you. I did some reading on
the subject and found a comment that in 1921 census there was some ambiguity
regarding Belorussians. The assimilated, Polish-speaking, Roman-Catholics
of Belorussian ancestry were counted as Poles. This, by reference, leads us
to better understanding of possible source of difference in numbers of
Galician Jews by nationality and faith in the 1921 census.
You wrote:
On a final note I strongly disagree with Peter that Versailles Treaty did
not deal with the borders issue."

I guess, this was a misunderstanding rather than a difference of opinion. I
meant that the Peace Treaty of Nov. 11, 1918 did not deal with borders. The
June 28, 1919 Versailles Treaty dealt with borders and it dealt very
extensively with the borders of Germany including the Polish-German border.
The overall detailed boundaries of Europe, including the non-German
boundaries of Poland had not been determined there yet. Section VIII
(Poland), Article 87 says "The boundaries of Poland not laid down in the
present Treaty will be subsequently determined by the Principal Allied and
Associated Powers." The Treaty of St. Germain (September 1919) has also
left the final disposition of Eastern Galicia unresolved thus unleashing
Pilsudskis dreams of multi-ethnic Poland including all of Galicia and
Ukrainian dreams of sovereignty.

You wrote:
"I would also like to clarify that my Dad communicated in Hebrew to his
first wife in prewar Poland, not to my Mom who spoke Yiddish."

I find this subject fascinating and hope to hear more >from others on the use
of Hebrew in Poland.

Thank you Alex. My pleasure having this conversation. Thank you all who
are still willing to read.

Peter Jassem,
Toronto, Ontario
jassep@tdbank.ca


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Statistics on Jews in Eastern Galicia - final remarks #galicia

Peter Jassem <jassep@...>
 

Dear Alex,

You wrote:
"I have been awaiting >from Peter promised detailed data on 1921 and 1931
Poland census results and the clear definition of the "Jewish nationality"
term."

Unfortunately my limited mobility due to my recent injury prevented me from
getting to the appropriate resources. A friend has promised however to look
for and deliver such materials to my home, and if it happens I will
certainly analize them and share my findings with you. I did some reading on
the subject and found a comment that in 1921 census there was some ambiguity
regarding Belorussians. The assimilated, Polish-speaking, Roman-Catholics
of Belorussian ancestry were counted as Poles. This, by reference, leads us
to better understanding of possible source of difference in numbers of
Galician Jews by nationality and faith in the 1921 census.
You wrote:
On a final note I strongly disagree with Peter that Versailles Treaty did
not deal with the borders issue."

I guess, this was a misunderstanding rather than a difference of opinion. I
meant that the Peace Treaty of Nov. 11, 1918 did not deal with borders. The
June 28, 1919 Versailles Treaty dealt with borders and it dealt very
extensively with the borders of Germany including the Polish-German border.
The overall detailed boundaries of Europe, including the non-German
boundaries of Poland had not been determined there yet. Section VIII
(Poland), Article 87 says "The boundaries of Poland not laid down in the
present Treaty will be subsequently determined by the Principal Allied and
Associated Powers." The Treaty of St. Germain (September 1919) has also
left the final disposition of Eastern Galicia unresolved thus unleashing
Pilsudskis dreams of multi-ethnic Poland including all of Galicia and
Ukrainian dreams of sovereignty.

You wrote:
"I would also like to clarify that my Dad communicated in Hebrew to his
first wife in prewar Poland, not to my Mom who spoke Yiddish."

I find this subject fascinating and hope to hear more >from others on the use
of Hebrew in Poland.

Thank you Alex. My pleasure having this conversation. Thank you all who
are still willing to read.

Peter Jassem,
Toronto, Ontario
jassep@tdbank.ca