Date   

Cemetery--Worksman's Circle (Arbeiter Ring 318) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

With more great help >from Toronto, I have learned that a member
of my family (Israel ENGLANDER) was buried in Toronto, Ontario,
at Roselawn Cemetery. Most interesting, I have learned that he
was a member of:

Workman's Circle--Arbeiter Ring, #318

Perhaps this is the detail that I need that will allow me to
find this missing branch of my ENGLANDER family?

Does anyone have any knowledge of Arbeiter Ring, #318? Perhaps
old directories >from Toronto or elsewhere? I'd love to have
any help at all with this!

Daniel Kazez

P.S. Israel ENGLANDER's father was Solomon; his mother was
Mary/Miriam; and his two brothers were Samuel and Joseph.
They lived in Chicago until about 1905, and then went to Ontario.

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LISS, SOBLE-SOBEL, STEIN, AXMAN
Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, FRESKO-FRESCO, ALHADEF-ELHADEF
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/ent/fam.html


given name Hodes(h) #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello list,

What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?
Thanks
Tom
--

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Re: Russian congregation #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Like many congregations of people >from one 'old country' or part of a
country, a Russian Congregation would be made up of families >from Russia
and their descendents. Russia in the 19th century included Ukraine and
lots more.

I can't speak for the specific congregation in Brockton, MA, but that
was very common with Landsmenshaften and whold neighborhoods of people
from a certain town or area. People came to relatives and neighbors.
They flocked together so that they could speak their native language or
dialect of Yiddish. They could help each other adapt.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


Camp survivors #general

J. Lang <jen.lang@...>
 

After some research, it has been suggested that my grandfather, Otto May
from Wien, who although not Jewish himself but married to a Jewish woman
(my grandmother), was interred at Buchenwald at some point. Both later
ended up living in the UK.

I have evidence that goods were confiscated >from him during Austria's
occupation, but I would like to find out for sure whether he was in the
camp. Can anyone recommend any databases or other leads that may help?

Thanks

J.


Immigration to USA through Canada #general

Gary & Ruth Ross <evieross@...>
 

My grandfather, Harry Weinar (originally Weinarab?), came to the USA
through Canada >from Russia (possible Sevestopol). Is there any way one can
find lists of immigrants who entered >from Canada? I don't think he was in
Canada for very long. Any ideas?

Thanks.

Ruth Ross
evieross@home.com


The Yiddish work "roys" #general

Mike Fischer <miketran@...>
 

Does anyone know what "roys" in Yiddish might be. I just found out that
my family name ROSE was originally something like it. The family was in
some way involved in leather working, maybe as leather merchants. We think
the term may have been the name for calf, leather, skin or something
similar.

Wilma Fischer
Passaic, N.J.


Re: Tombstones-changes #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

There are many reasons a stone might have the wrong names on it. A
couple big ones are:

1. The name was changed at some point. You definitely want to keep this
in mind for the future. If Grandpa died lateR than the babies, the
name change could have come in between.
2. The engraver made a mistake and wanted to charge the family for
correcting it (I have heard of this happening).


It may be that the name was changed about the time of the twins
birth/death. It was not uncommon, of course, for babies to be buried
without tombstones if the parents were not well to do, so the stone may
have been erected later. Lots of babies died very young-you could go
broke buying tombstones.

That leaves the question of what to do. You could call an engraver in
NYC to see what can be done. I have heard of 'fixing' stones, and you
could certainly buy a new stone with the agreement of whoever has
custody of the plot. However, I would leave it as is. Unless you know
for sure why the name was different, and it was definitely a mistake, I
would leave it. The office knows the name that you know, they are
buried with Grandfather of the right name; no one is going to be fooled
into thinking they are another family.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


Re: Age changes #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

I should have read farther before replying.

In Jewish law, marriage between first cousins is very legal. It is even
legal for an uncle to marry a neice. First cousin marriages were
extremely common, and not because the families didn't know they were
related. The parents of first cousins are brothers and sisters! It had
nothing to do with losing touch and moving around. If you look at a
stable population, first cousin marriages are very common. Check out my
family tree for many examples!

In small towns, with arranged marriages, it was very common to marry 'my
2 sons with your 2 daughters' when the parents are brothers and sisters.
There was no reason not to.

Amazingly enough, with all the intermarriage, the incidence of genetic
diseases is not very high. Yes, there are some well known examples, but
there are examples in most any population group. In the US we think of
Deliverance-with the idiot savant who's parents are related-but problems
just don't occur very often.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


ENGLISHER, BRUS (PRUSAK) & DENIS Families from Warsaw #general

Elless <elless@...>
 

I am seeking information about the Englisher family of Warsaw. At least
two members of the family married men named Denis and either Brus or
Prusak. The last information I have is a letter >from Victor Brus in 1944
from Paris in which he refers to his brother Camille who was a POW in
Austria and asking the addressee (my gm) if she had any news of the Denis
family >from Warsaw. The tone of the letter was such that he did not
appear to realize at the time of its writing that the Jewish population of
Warsaw was no more.
Lewis Stein
Boynton Beach, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery--Worksman's Circle (Arbeiter Ring 318) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

With more great help >from Toronto, I have learned that a member
of my family (Israel ENGLANDER) was buried in Toronto, Ontario,
at Roselawn Cemetery. Most interesting, I have learned that he
was a member of:

Workman's Circle--Arbeiter Ring, #318

Perhaps this is the detail that I need that will allow me to
find this missing branch of my ENGLANDER family?

Does anyone have any knowledge of Arbeiter Ring, #318? Perhaps
old directories >from Toronto or elsewhere? I'd love to have
any help at all with this!

Daniel Kazez

P.S. Israel ENGLANDER's father was Solomon; his mother was
Mary/Miriam; and his two brothers were Samuel and Joseph.
They lived in Chicago until about 1905, and then went to Ontario.

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, CZAPNIK
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LISS, SOBLE-SOBEL, STEIN, AXMAN
Turkey: KAZEZ-KAZES, FRESKO-FRESCO, ALHADEF-ELHADEF
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/ent/fam.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen given name Hodes(h) #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello list,

What's the origin of the *given name* Hodes (or Hodesh)? Is it Hebrew?
Thanks
Tom
--

Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian congregation #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Like many congregations of people >from one 'old country' or part of a
country, a Russian Congregation would be made up of families >from Russia
and their descendents. Russia in the 19th century included Ukraine and
lots more.

I can't speak for the specific congregation in Brockton, MA, but that
was very common with Landsmenshaften and whold neighborhoods of people
from a certain town or area. People came to relatives and neighbors.
They flocked together so that they could speak their native language or
dialect of Yiddish. They could help each other adapt.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Camp survivors #general

J. Lang <jen.lang@...>
 

After some research, it has been suggested that my grandfather, Otto May
from Wien, who although not Jewish himself but married to a Jewish woman
(my grandmother), was interred at Buchenwald at some point. Both later
ended up living in the UK.

I have evidence that goods were confiscated >from him during Austria's
occupation, but I would like to find out for sure whether he was in the
camp. Can anyone recommend any databases or other leads that may help?

Thanks

J.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Immigration to USA through Canada #general

Gary & Ruth Ross <evieross@...>
 

My grandfather, Harry Weinar (originally Weinarab?), came to the USA
through Canada >from Russia (possible Sevestopol). Is there any way one can
find lists of immigrants who entered >from Canada? I don't think he was in
Canada for very long. Any ideas?

Thanks.

Ruth Ross
evieross@home.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Yiddish work "roys" #general

Mike Fischer <miketran@...>
 

Does anyone know what "roys" in Yiddish might be. I just found out that
my family name ROSE was originally something like it. The family was in
some way involved in leather working, maybe as leather merchants. We think
the term may have been the name for calf, leather, skin or something
similar.

Wilma Fischer
Passaic, N.J.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tombstones-changes #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

There are many reasons a stone might have the wrong names on it. A
couple big ones are:

1. The name was changed at some point. You definitely want to keep this
in mind for the future. If Grandpa died lateR than the babies, the
name change could have come in between.
2. The engraver made a mistake and wanted to charge the family for
correcting it (I have heard of this happening).


It may be that the name was changed about the time of the twins
birth/death. It was not uncommon, of course, for babies to be buried
without tombstones if the parents were not well to do, so the stone may
have been erected later. Lots of babies died very young-you could go
broke buying tombstones.

That leaves the question of what to do. You could call an engraver in
NYC to see what can be done. I have heard of 'fixing' stones, and you
could certainly buy a new stone with the agreement of whoever has
custody of the plot. However, I would leave it as is. Unless you know
for sure why the name was different, and it was definitely a mistake, I
would leave it. The office knows the name that you know, they are
buried with Grandfather of the right name; no one is going to be fooled
into thinking they are another family.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Age changes #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

I should have read farther before replying.

In Jewish law, marriage between first cousins is very legal. It is even
legal for an uncle to marry a neice. First cousin marriages were
extremely common, and not because the families didn't know they were
related. The parents of first cousins are brothers and sisters! It had
nothing to do with losing touch and moving around. If you look at a
stable population, first cousin marriages are very common. Check out my
family tree for many examples!

In small towns, with arranged marriages, it was very common to marry 'my
2 sons with your 2 daughters' when the parents are brothers and sisters.
There was no reason not to.

Amazingly enough, with all the intermarriage, the incidence of genetic
diseases is not very high. Yes, there are some well known examples, but
there are examples in most any population group. In the US we think of
Deliverance-with the idiot savant who's parents are related-but problems
just don't occur very often.

Sally Bruckheimer
Buffalo, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ENGLISHER, BRUS (PRUSAK) & DENIS Families from Warsaw #general

Elless <elless@...>
 

I am seeking information about the Englisher family of Warsaw. At least
two members of the family married men named Denis and either Brus or
Prusak. The last information I have is a letter >from Victor Brus in 1944
from Paris in which he refers to his brother Camille who was a POW in
Austria and asking the addressee (my gm) if she had any news of the Denis
family >from Warsaw. The tone of the letter was such that he did not
appear to realize at the time of its writing that the Jewish population of
Warsaw was no more.
Lewis Stein
Boynton Beach, FL


Re: Poland travel #poland

Elsebeth Paikin
 

At 09:50 03-01-01 -0800, Martin Brandon wrote:
Looking for genners who would like to go to Kracow and
Warsaw Poland to do Genealogy. Need to set up
interpreter and accommondations and entries to offices
of records. I am looking to view records in Kracow,
Miechow, Ksiaz-Wielki, etc. and then to the main
office in Warsaw. Any takers for a 2-3 week trip in
the spring?
-----------------

Just wondering:

You are aware of JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers?
They arrange several trips to Poland, and >from what I have
heard, they really are the right choice for genealogist,
because they have contacts with the archives and guides
specialized in Jewish history and genealogy.

So they have paved the way -- No need to reinvent the wheel <VBG>

They have Poland-Krakow both in May and July and Poland-Warsaw
in July and September.
And they also have special arrangements for shtetl visits of your
own choice, etc. etc.

Better check it out yourselves.

You can find them at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/

Best wishes for 2001!


-------
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@paikin.dk

Researching:
One name study: PAIKIN (worldwide - all spellings)
Latvia & Lithuania:
STOLBOW/STOLBOFF - HAMEROW/GAMEROw - SOFFER/SOFER
-------


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Poland travel #poland

Elsebeth Paikin
 

At 09:50 03-01-01 -0800, Martin Brandon wrote:
Looking for genners who would like to go to Kracow and
Warsaw Poland to do Genealogy. Need to set up
interpreter and accommondations and entries to offices
of records. I am looking to view records in Kracow,
Miechow, Ksiaz-Wielki, etc. and then to the main
office in Warsaw. Any takers for a 2-3 week trip in
the spring?
-----------------

Just wondering:

You are aware of JewishGen's ShtetlSchleppers?
They arrange several trips to Poland, and >from what I have
heard, they really are the right choice for genealogist,
because they have contacts with the archives and guides
specialized in Jewish history and genealogy.

So they have paved the way -- No need to reinvent the wheel <VBG>

They have Poland-Krakow both in May and July and Poland-Warsaw
in July and September.
And they also have special arrangements for shtetl visits of your
own choice, etc. etc.

Better check it out yourselves.

You can find them at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/

Best wishes for 2001!


-------
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@paikin.dk

Researching:
One name study: PAIKIN (worldwide - all spellings)
Latvia & Lithuania:
STOLBOW/STOLBOFF - HAMEROW/GAMEROw - SOFFER/SOFER
-------