Date   

great map site #general

davidbaron@...
 

I just found a really great map site on the internet at
http://www.multimap.com. If you click on the world map picture, and
continue to click away, you can find almost any little village. I found
dozens of small shtetls I have never been able to find on any other
internet mapping system.

David Baron
Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State
http://www.jgsws.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen great map site #general

davidbaron@...
 

I just found a really great map site on the internet at
http://www.multimap.com. If you click on the world map picture, and
continue to click away, you can find almost any little village. I found
dozens of small shtetls I have never been able to find on any other
internet mapping system.

David Baron
Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State
http://www.jgsws.org


Re: Given names: Girsh/Hirsh, Gershon #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/01 1:48:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
ogus@impact.xerox.com writes:

<< I know that the Yiddish given name Hirsh/Girsh is a kinui for the
Hebrew name Tzvi. Does anyone know whether the given name "Gershon" is
derived >from the same name Girsh/Hirsh, or has some other root?

I have seen one reference that indicates that the meaning of Gershon is
"a stranger there", which would mean that it has a completely different
root than Girsh/Hirsh. >>

==Hirsch is the kinnuy for Naftali. Tzvi is a backfromation >from Hirsch. In
Russia, where there is no letter for H, Hirsh became Girsh (but not very
common). Naftali was a son of the patriarch Jacob.

==GershoM was a son of Moses, born "in exile"--whence the name "a stranger,
there." GershoN was one of the sons of Levi, head of a Levitic clan. Moses,
too was a descendant of Levi and Gershom and Geshon were therefore very
closely related (cousin once removed, i think)

It is not unlikely that either of these names were used as a kinnuy for
Naftali in Russia, an extension"/improvement" of the Russian for Hirsch.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given names: Girsh/Hirsh, Gershon #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/01 1:48:09 PM Eastern Standard Time,
ogus@impact.xerox.com writes:

<< I know that the Yiddish given name Hirsh/Girsh is a kinui for the
Hebrew name Tzvi. Does anyone know whether the given name "Gershon" is
derived >from the same name Girsh/Hirsh, or has some other root?

I have seen one reference that indicates that the meaning of Gershon is
"a stranger there", which would mean that it has a completely different
root than Girsh/Hirsh. >>

==Hirsch is the kinnuy for Naftali. Tzvi is a backfromation >from Hirsch. In
Russia, where there is no letter for H, Hirsh became Girsh (but not very
common). Naftali was a son of the patriarch Jacob.

==GershoM was a son of Moses, born "in exile"--whence the name "a stranger,
there." GershoN was one of the sons of Levi, head of a Levitic clan. Moses,
too was a descendant of Levi and Gershom and Geshon were therefore very
closely related (cousin once removed, i think)

It is not unlikely that either of these names were used as a kinnuy for
Naftali in Russia, an extension"/improvement" of the Russian for Hirsch.

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: The meaning of a tree as a gravestone symbol #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/01 11:45:17 AM Eastern Standard Time,
DavBirnbaum@netscape.net writes:

<< Many of my family graves in Unterbalbach in Germany have a carving
of a tree at the top of the gravestone. In 1997, Earl Vilardofsky asked
what this symbol meant. I have been unable to locate any answers in
the archives, or to contact him.
I know that a tree stump implies an early death. However the trees on
these graves are fully grown, and the graves are of old people. One
thought I had was that the tree might represent the Tora - referring to
the verse in the regular Sabbath prayers "it is a living tree to those
that hold it" - i.e. implying that this is the grave of a learned person.
Another thought was the tree represents the head of a family - just as we
refer to family trees.
Any other ideas?
David Birnbaum >>

How about it's a pear tree, in German a Birnbaum?

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The meaning of a tree as a gravestone symbol #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/24/01 11:45:17 AM Eastern Standard Time,
DavBirnbaum@netscape.net writes:

<< Many of my family graves in Unterbalbach in Germany have a carving
of a tree at the top of the gravestone. In 1997, Earl Vilardofsky asked
what this symbol meant. I have been unable to locate any answers in
the archives, or to contact him.
I know that a tree stump implies an early death. However the trees on
these graves are fully grown, and the graves are of old people. One
thought I had was that the tree might represent the Tora - referring to
the verse in the regular Sabbath prayers "it is a living tree to those
that hold it" - i.e. implying that this is the grave of a learned person.
Another thought was the tree represents the head of a family - just as we
refer to family trees.
Any other ideas?
David Birnbaum >>

How about it's a pear tree, in German a Birnbaum?

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Given names: Girsh/Hirsh, Gershon #general

Ben Fox <bfgp@...>
 

I actually recently found out that the name Hirsch is the German form, and
that Hirsch is the Yiddish form. The name means 'stag'.

I got my information >from a book by Benzion C. Kaganoff, called "A
dictionary of Jewish names and their history" which I found at my local
Geneological Society. I think that this book is similar to one of the
Dicionary of names which has been mentioned on this list before, but I
forgot the name of it. Perhaps someone else on the list can assist in this
matter.

I hope this helps,

Gail.

I know that the Yiddish given name Hirsh/Girsh is a kinui for the
Hebrew name Tzvi. Does anyone know whether the given name "Gershon" is
derived >from the same name Girsh/Hirsh, or has some other root?

I have seen one reference that indicates that the meaning of Gershon is
"a stranger there", which would mean that it has a completely different
root than Girsh/Hirsh.

I didn't see an answer to this question in the JewishGen Discussion
Archives database.

Thanks for any information.

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA
ogus@impact.xerox.com


Suggestions for New Researchers #ukraine

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

So many new researchers...... I thought I might post a JewishGen
introduction.....hello New Researcher..... you've come to the
right place...........genealogy is very interesting, and often
exciting, but it requires a good deal of time.......so if you're
willing, follow the instructions below......that will start you
off in the right direction... it just needs some patience and a
sincere interest.

First, talk to any living relatives you already know. Find out
anything you can.....names, dates, towns.....then perhaps get a
simple computer program to keep track of all your information....
Figure out where you want to go.....and please use JewishGen
webpages and ALL our databases to help you get there.......

JewishGen is an electronic facilitator connecting researchers
worldwide to each other through our mailing list. We do not have
any staff to do research for anyone, but we open up a number of
incredible resources. There are many ways that JewishGen can
help you to see if there's info out there pertaining to your
ancestors. Many of these sources can be linked to >from our home
page (http://www.jewishgen.org):

(1) First, if you haven't already done so, I would suggest that
you CHECK THE JEWISHGEN FAMILY FINDER (JGFF) to see if anyone
else is interested in your towns and surnames.

Go to <http://www.jewishgen.org> to see if anybody else is
researching the same town or surname. Click on the "JewishGen
Family Finder (JGFF)" and that will take you to the search engine.
Enter each of the surnames and towns you are searching, separately.
(If you don't get a hit on your town, perhaps the spelling is
wrong..... you might try our "ShtetlSeeker", also available from
our home page). If you think the spelling might have changed,
please use the Soundex option (Soundex will search for names
which sound alike, in addition to names which are spelled alike).

If you get a match, click on the researcher number and that will
give you a name and address (email if it was provided) of where
to write. And PLEASE enter your own data for others to find.
To do this, go back to the beginning of the JGFF program, click
on the ENTER icon and you will be taken through the process which
will assign a researcher number and ask that you select your own
password (so that only YOU can modify the data you have entered).

(2) Next I would suggest you READ the JewishGen Infofile called
the FAQ ("Frequently Asked Questions"); this is THE BEST SOURCE
FOR JEWISH GENEALOGICAL INFORMATION YOU WILL EVER FIND!
To get it to to http: file://www.jewishgen.org and click on FAQ.

If you're just beginning with Jewish genealogy, the FAQ is the
place to start......here's what's in the FAQ:

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
1) GETTING STARTED
2) PUBLICATIONS
3) JEWISHGEN FAMILY FINDER (JGFF)
4) BOOKS
5) VENDORS
6) JEWISH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETIES (JGSs)
7) SEMINARS ON JEWISH GENEALOGY
8) NATIONAL ARCHIVES
9) U.S. VITAL RECORDS (BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS)
10) PASSENGER LISTS
11) FINDING YOUR ANCESTRAL TOWN
12) NATURALIZATION RECORDS
13) LDS (MORMON) FAMILY HISTORY CENTERS
14) OTHER ARCHIVES
15) HOLOCAUST RESEARCH
16) FAMILY TREE OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE (FTJP)
17) JEWISH NAMES
18) JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP
19) COMPUTERS AND GENEALOGY
20) GLOSSARY, ABBREVIATIONS
The JewishGen FAQ is updated monthly.

Also, look at our other JewishGen InfoFiles..there are over 200
of them....they will tell you how to go about searching using
publicly available information......like vital records,
sephardim, getting records >from eastern europe, reading
passenger ship entries etc.... Again, go to our home page
http://www.jewishgen.org, and click on "InfoFiles".

And lastly, why not SUBSCRIBE to our mailings list and ask any
specific question(s) there...oh, don't forget the wonderful
JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP ARCHIVES....you can find out if
anyone ever posted on any topic or surname you're interested in...
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/archive.htm

and, please read thru the JewishGen web page....click on the
databases and see if there are any of interest to you.....click
on the shtetlinks and see if anyone has written a web page about
your shtetl....

Then sit back and enjoy the wonders of Jewish genealogy!

Regards,
Phyllis phylliskramer1@att.net Wilton Ct & Savannah Ga,
searching...
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from JASIENICA ROSIELNA (galicia)
STECHER, STECKLER, TRACHMAN, GOETZ, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,
DUKLA, RYMANOW (galicia)
SCHEINER, SCHIMMEL, KANDEL >from DUBIECKO, STRZYZOW (galicia)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN >from ROHATYN (galicia & romania)
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER, PANTELEON >from Germany


Moderator's Note: A few quick tips for posting messages
- Provide a meaningful Subject: line
- Use ALL UPPER CASE LETTERS for SURNAMES only.
- Sign your message (full name, city, Reply to: your email
address, please)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given names: Girsh/Hirsh, Gershon #general

Ben Fox <bfgp@...>
 

I actually recently found out that the name Hirsch is the German form, and
that Hirsch is the Yiddish form. The name means 'stag'.

I got my information >from a book by Benzion C. Kaganoff, called "A
dictionary of Jewish names and their history" which I found at my local
Geneological Society. I think that this book is similar to one of the
Dicionary of names which has been mentioned on this list before, but I
forgot the name of it. Perhaps someone else on the list can assist in this
matter.

I hope this helps,

Gail.

I know that the Yiddish given name Hirsh/Girsh is a kinui for the
Hebrew name Tzvi. Does anyone know whether the given name "Gershon" is
derived >from the same name Girsh/Hirsh, or has some other root?

I have seen one reference that indicates that the meaning of Gershon is
"a stranger there", which would mean that it has a completely different
root than Girsh/Hirsh.

I didn't see an answer to this question in the JewishGen Discussion
Archives database.

Thanks for any information.

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA
ogus@impact.xerox.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Suggestions for New Researchers #ukraine

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

So many new researchers...... I thought I might post a JewishGen
introduction.....hello New Researcher..... you've come to the
right place...........genealogy is very interesting, and often
exciting, but it requires a good deal of time.......so if you're
willing, follow the instructions below......that will start you
off in the right direction... it just needs some patience and a
sincere interest.

First, talk to any living relatives you already know. Find out
anything you can.....names, dates, towns.....then perhaps get a
simple computer program to keep track of all your information....
Figure out where you want to go.....and please use JewishGen
webpages and ALL our databases to help you get there.......

JewishGen is an electronic facilitator connecting researchers
worldwide to each other through our mailing list. We do not have
any staff to do research for anyone, but we open up a number of
incredible resources. There are many ways that JewishGen can
help you to see if there's info out there pertaining to your
ancestors. Many of these sources can be linked to >from our home
page (http://www.jewishgen.org):

(1) First, if you haven't already done so, I would suggest that
you CHECK THE JEWISHGEN FAMILY FINDER (JGFF) to see if anyone
else is interested in your towns and surnames.

Go to <http://www.jewishgen.org> to see if anybody else is
researching the same town or surname. Click on the "JewishGen
Family Finder (JGFF)" and that will take you to the search engine.
Enter each of the surnames and towns you are searching, separately.
(If you don't get a hit on your town, perhaps the spelling is
wrong..... you might try our "ShtetlSeeker", also available from
our home page). If you think the spelling might have changed,
please use the Soundex option (Soundex will search for names
which sound alike, in addition to names which are spelled alike).

If you get a match, click on the researcher number and that will
give you a name and address (email if it was provided) of where
to write. And PLEASE enter your own data for others to find.
To do this, go back to the beginning of the JGFF program, click
on the ENTER icon and you will be taken through the process which
will assign a researcher number and ask that you select your own
password (so that only YOU can modify the data you have entered).

(2) Next I would suggest you READ the JewishGen Infofile called
the FAQ ("Frequently Asked Questions"); this is THE BEST SOURCE
FOR JEWISH GENEALOGICAL INFORMATION YOU WILL EVER FIND!
To get it to to http: file://www.jewishgen.org and click on FAQ.

If you're just beginning with Jewish genealogy, the FAQ is the
place to start......here's what's in the FAQ:

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
1) GETTING STARTED
2) PUBLICATIONS
3) JEWISHGEN FAMILY FINDER (JGFF)
4) BOOKS
5) VENDORS
6) JEWISH GENEALOGICAL SOCIETIES (JGSs)
7) SEMINARS ON JEWISH GENEALOGY
8) NATIONAL ARCHIVES
9) U.S. VITAL RECORDS (BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS)
10) PASSENGER LISTS
11) FINDING YOUR ANCESTRAL TOWN
12) NATURALIZATION RECORDS
13) LDS (MORMON) FAMILY HISTORY CENTERS
14) OTHER ARCHIVES
15) HOLOCAUST RESEARCH
16) FAMILY TREE OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE (FTJP)
17) JEWISH NAMES
18) JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP
19) COMPUTERS AND GENEALOGY
20) GLOSSARY, ABBREVIATIONS
The JewishGen FAQ is updated monthly.

Also, look at our other JewishGen InfoFiles..there are over 200
of them....they will tell you how to go about searching using
publicly available information......like vital records,
sephardim, getting records >from eastern europe, reading
passenger ship entries etc.... Again, go to our home page
http://www.jewishgen.org, and click on "InfoFiles".

And lastly, why not SUBSCRIBE to our mailings list and ask any
specific question(s) there...oh, don't forget the wonderful
JEWISHGEN DISCUSSION GROUP ARCHIVES....you can find out if
anyone ever posted on any topic or surname you're interested in...
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/archive.htm

and, please read thru the JewishGen web page....click on the
databases and see if there are any of interest to you.....click
on the shtetlinks and see if anyone has written a web page about
your shtetl....

Then sit back and enjoy the wonders of Jewish genealogy!

Regards,
Phyllis phylliskramer1@att.net Wilton Ct & Savannah Ga,
searching...
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from JASIENICA ROSIELNA (galicia)
STECHER, STECKLER, TRACHMAN, GOETZ, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,
DUKLA, RYMANOW (galicia)
SCHEINER, SCHIMMEL, KANDEL >from DUBIECKO, STRZYZOW (galicia)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN >from ROHATYN (galicia & romania)
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER, PANTELEON >from Germany


Moderator's Note: A few quick tips for posting messages
- Provide a meaningful Subject: line
- Use ALL UPPER CASE LETTERS for SURNAMES only.
- Sign your message (full name, city, Reply to: your email
address, please)


Given names: Girsh/Hirsh, Gershon #general

Udi Cain
 

I know that the Yiddish given name Hirsh/Girsh is a kinui for the
Hebrew name Tzvi. Does anyone know whether the given name "Gershon" is
derived >from the same name Girsh/Hirsh, or has some other root?

I have seen one reference that indicates that the meaning of Gershon is
"a stranger there", which would mean that it has a completely different
root than Girsh/Hirsh.

I didn't see an answer to this question in the JewishGen Discussion
Archives database.

Thanks for any information.

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA
Dear Roy et al.

The Hebrew word GER, means proselyted, joined to the religion, and since
such step, makes him a stranger within his new community, than Ger means
also stranger.
The first time that the name Gershon appears in the bible, in Genesis
chapter 46 : 11. "And the sons of Levi; Gershon, Kohath, and Merari."

RISHON in Hebrew, means first. It seems like Gershon is the combination of
the two words. So does it mean that the son of Levi, got the name to
commemorate the entrance to the new religion?

With regards. Udi Cain. Jerusalem.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Given names: Girsh/Hirsh, Gershon #general

Udi Cain
 

I know that the Yiddish given name Hirsh/Girsh is a kinui for the
Hebrew name Tzvi. Does anyone know whether the given name "Gershon" is
derived >from the same name Girsh/Hirsh, or has some other root?

I have seen one reference that indicates that the meaning of Gershon is
"a stranger there", which would mean that it has a completely different
root than Girsh/Hirsh.

I didn't see an answer to this question in the JewishGen Discussion
Archives database.

Thanks for any information.

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA
Dear Roy et al.

The Hebrew word GER, means proselyted, joined to the religion, and since
such step, makes him a stranger within his new community, than Ger means
also stranger.
The first time that the name Gershon appears in the bible, in Genesis
chapter 46 : 11. "And the sons of Levi; Gershon, Kohath, and Merari."

RISHON in Hebrew, means first. It seems like Gershon is the combination of
the two words. So does it mean that the son of Levi, got the name to
commemorate the entrance to the new religion?

With regards. Udi Cain. Jerusalem.


Irving KRINSKY-Wolkowysk- Belarus #general

SuanSmithe <Suee20@...>
 

Hi --I am looking for anyone who may have known Irving Krinsky or
anything about his life. He was born in Wolkowysk in 1902. He came
to the US in 1917 with his mother Mollie, his brothers William and
Rubin. He may have also been called Israel Krinsky. His brother George
came in 1913 and his father, Isaac Krinsky came in 1900. Isaac Krinsky
came on the ship called the Vaderland.

They all came through Ellis Island and lived on the lower East Side.
For awhile Isaac lived at 101 Delancey Street.

At some point he lived in the Williamsburgh section of Brooklyn with
his new family. He worked in textiles in Manhattan.

For summers he used to go the Catskill Mountains. He like to go
swimming there and hiking. One town in the Catskills he went to was
Mountaindale.

Thank you for reading this. I would be grateful for any information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Irving KRINSKY-Wolkowysk- Belarus #general

SuanSmithe <Suee20@...>
 

Hi --I am looking for anyone who may have known Irving Krinsky or
anything about his life. He was born in Wolkowysk in 1902. He came
to the US in 1917 with his mother Mollie, his brothers William and
Rubin. He may have also been called Israel Krinsky. His brother George
came in 1913 and his father, Isaac Krinsky came in 1900. Isaac Krinsky
came on the ship called the Vaderland.

They all came through Ellis Island and lived on the lower East Side.
For awhile Isaac lived at 101 Delancey Street.

At some point he lived in the Williamsburgh section of Brooklyn with
his new family. He worked in textiles in Manhattan.

For summers he used to go the Catskill Mountains. He like to go
swimming there and hiking. One town in the Catskills he went to was
Mountaindale.

Thank you for reading this. I would be grateful for any information.


Interesting book #general

Dr Michel BODKIER <bodkier@...>
 

I recently read a book, "the secrets of Exod", which seems to me very
pertinent and interesting ,although this could represent our very old roots,
but dives an other perspective of what we collectively imagine.
Of course, I have no commercial interst in it!

Michel BODKIER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Interesting book #general

Dr Michel BODKIER <bodkier@...>
 

I recently read a book, "the secrets of Exod", which seems to me very
pertinent and interesting ,although this could represent our very old roots,
but dives an other perspective of what we collectively imagine.
Of course, I have no commercial interst in it!

Michel BODKIER


SITE CITE: Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America #general

Naomi Teveth <ntevet@...>
 

Dear Friends,

This a site I stumbled on while rechecking the links of the Famous Jews -
Yahoodi site.

As far as I understand it the material is taken >from a book "Jewish Heroes
and Heroines of America" written by Seymour "Sy" Brody of Delray Beach,
Florida and includes true stories of American heroism in the form of short
biographies.
It has four sections:

Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America >from Colonial Times to 1900
http://www.fau.edu/library/brodytoc.htm

Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America 1900 to WWII
http://www.fau.edu/library/bro2toc.htm

Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America WWII to Present
http://www.fau.edu/library/bro3toc.htm

Jewish Recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor
http://www.fau.edu/library/cmohtoc.htm


At the bottom of the page you will find a link : FAU Libraries Judaica
Collections Home Page, click on it and then click on :Other Judaica
Resources.This will bring you to a page with all kinds of links related to
Jewish subjects (you surely already know many of them). JewishGen of course
is also prominent.

In the history section choose : "Tulane University Manuscripts Department :
Jewish Heritage Archives of the Southern United States" and then "Internet
Resources and Links".
This should lead you to a page "Archival Internet Resources". Click on
"Master list of Archives", then "Unesco Archival Portal"
and then "primary sources online".
Now use the search function by inputting the keyword "Jewish". This will
produce a list of archives around the world holding Jewish collections,
also related to genealogy.
I haven't tested all the links and possibilities around this site (I have
been online for about 3 hours now composing this mail and following the
links, but it's getting too late to go on), and it looks as if there is a
lot of information to be found there.

Please let me have your feedbacks and new discoveries.

Good night to all
from
Naomi Teveth in Tel Aviv
ntevet@netvision.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SITE CITE: Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America #general

Naomi Teveth <ntevet@...>
 

Dear Friends,

This a site I stumbled on while rechecking the links of the Famous Jews -
Yahoodi site.

As far as I understand it the material is taken >from a book "Jewish Heroes
and Heroines of America" written by Seymour "Sy" Brody of Delray Beach,
Florida and includes true stories of American heroism in the form of short
biographies.
It has four sections:

Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America >from Colonial Times to 1900
http://www.fau.edu/library/brodytoc.htm

Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America 1900 to WWII
http://www.fau.edu/library/bro2toc.htm

Jewish Heroes and Heroines in America WWII to Present
http://www.fau.edu/library/bro3toc.htm

Jewish Recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor
http://www.fau.edu/library/cmohtoc.htm


At the bottom of the page you will find a link : FAU Libraries Judaica
Collections Home Page, click on it and then click on :Other Judaica
Resources.This will bring you to a page with all kinds of links related to
Jewish subjects (you surely already know many of them). JewishGen of course
is also prominent.

In the history section choose : "Tulane University Manuscripts Department :
Jewish Heritage Archives of the Southern United States" and then "Internet
Resources and Links".
This should lead you to a page "Archival Internet Resources". Click on
"Master list of Archives", then "Unesco Archival Portal"
and then "primary sources online".
Now use the search function by inputting the keyword "Jewish". This will
produce a list of archives around the world holding Jewish collections,
also related to genealogy.
I haven't tested all the links and possibilities around this site (I have
been online for about 3 hours now composing this mail and following the
links, but it's getting too late to go on), and it looks as if there is a
lot of information to be found there.

Please let me have your feedbacks and new discoveries.

Good night to all
from
Naomi Teveth in Tel Aviv
ntevet@netvision.net.il


Re: SITE CITE: Famous Jews - Yahoodi - Comments #general

Naomi Teveth <ntevet@...>
 

Dear Friends,

It was brought to my attention that fellow researchers who tried to access
the Famous Jews - Yahoodi site did not succeed or found only very few links
working.

I therefore rechecked many of the categories and in each category two-
three names. I got answers for:

Albert BERNSTEIN,Judith RESNIK, Tanya ROBERTS, Felix MENDELSSOHN, Leonard
BERNSTEIN, Juda Philip BENJAMIN, Johann JACOBY, Gabriel RIESSER, Benjamin
DISREALI, Levi STRAUSS, Ralph LAUREN, Herschel GRYNSZPAN, Miklos RODNOTI,
Benny GOODMAN, Lee KONITZ, Yehudi MENUCHIN, Flavius JOSEPHUS,Adolph OCHS,
Henry Anatole GRUNWALD,Yves MONTANT,Richard DREYFUSS,Sara BERNHARDT,Marc
CHAGALL,Isaak LEVITAN, MODIGLIANI,Albert KAHN, David OLERE,SherwinWINE,
Walter ANNENBERG,Jerome ROTHENBERG,Alexander HARKAVY,Sigmund FREUD,Harry
HOUDINI, Jack RUBY, Maximilian HELLER,Rabbi Samson Raphael HIRSCH, Rashi,
Vilna Gaon, George GERSHWIN, Kurt WEILL, Jacques FROMENTAL HALEVY, Aron
COPLAND, Felix FRANKFURTER, Dina SHARE, Baruch SPINOZA, Franz ROSENZWEIG,
Isaiah BERLIN.
Not all of these are biographies, some of them are articles on these
persons.
There are definitely a number of links that do not work ( I cannot say how
many as I have not checked all of them). If you still are willing and have
the time for "trial and error" without getting too frustrated, go ahead and
try some of the links.You might have the benefit of stumbling on other
interesting websites as I did. I will post these in a separate message.

Please be assured that in general I will cite a site after I myself tried
it out, tested many of the links and read a lot of the material (not always
all of it), so as to avoid frustrations and to make sure (as far as I can)
that it is serious material and interesting >from the genealogical
viewpoint.

If you have any observations, comments, suggestions, please do not hesitate
to contact me.

I wish you all well and hope you will find interesting information for your
family research.

Best regards from

Naomi Teveth in Tel Aviv
ntevet@netvision.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SITE CITE: Famous Jews - Yahoodi - Comments #general

Naomi Teveth <ntevet@...>
 

Dear Friends,

It was brought to my attention that fellow researchers who tried to access
the Famous Jews - Yahoodi site did not succeed or found only very few links
working.

I therefore rechecked many of the categories and in each category two-
three names. I got answers for:

Albert BERNSTEIN,Judith RESNIK, Tanya ROBERTS, Felix MENDELSSOHN, Leonard
BERNSTEIN, Juda Philip BENJAMIN, Johann JACOBY, Gabriel RIESSER, Benjamin
DISREALI, Levi STRAUSS, Ralph LAUREN, Herschel GRYNSZPAN, Miklos RODNOTI,
Benny GOODMAN, Lee KONITZ, Yehudi MENUCHIN, Flavius JOSEPHUS,Adolph OCHS,
Henry Anatole GRUNWALD,Yves MONTANT,Richard DREYFUSS,Sara BERNHARDT,Marc
CHAGALL,Isaak LEVITAN, MODIGLIANI,Albert KAHN, David OLERE,SherwinWINE,
Walter ANNENBERG,Jerome ROTHENBERG,Alexander HARKAVY,Sigmund FREUD,Harry
HOUDINI, Jack RUBY, Maximilian HELLER,Rabbi Samson Raphael HIRSCH, Rashi,
Vilna Gaon, George GERSHWIN, Kurt WEILL, Jacques FROMENTAL HALEVY, Aron
COPLAND, Felix FRANKFURTER, Dina SHARE, Baruch SPINOZA, Franz ROSENZWEIG,
Isaiah BERLIN.
Not all of these are biographies, some of them are articles on these
persons.
There are definitely a number of links that do not work ( I cannot say how
many as I have not checked all of them). If you still are willing and have
the time for "trial and error" without getting too frustrated, go ahead and
try some of the links.You might have the benefit of stumbling on other
interesting websites as I did. I will post these in a separate message.

Please be assured that in general I will cite a site after I myself tried
it out, tested many of the links and read a lot of the material (not always
all of it), so as to avoid frustrations and to make sure (as far as I can)
that it is serious material and interesting >from the genealogical
viewpoint.

If you have any observations, comments, suggestions, please do not hesitate
to contact me.

I wish you all well and hope you will find interesting information for your
family research.

Best regards from

Naomi Teveth in Tel Aviv
ntevet@netvision.net.il