Date   

Chanukka Greetings #hungary

harry pick <hkpick@...>
 

To all my fellow-siggers!
Chanukka Same'ach!
Happy Festival of Lights!(if you are
"Hebrew-challenged")
Best wishes
HARRY K. PICK
West Hartford, CT, USA
Searching:
PICK in Vienna(Austria), Verbó(Nytra
Megye,Northwestern Hungary) now:Vrbove(Slovakia),
Lundenburg,Mähren/ Moravia); now:Breclav, Czech
Republic.
GEHR in Krone(Crone)an der Brahe also Polnisch Krone
(Posen,Germany)now:Koronowa(Poland).
GERSTL in Vienna(Austria), Deutschkreutz[in Yiddish:
Zelem] (Nemetkeresztur)Austro-Hungary, now:Burgenland,
Austria.
HIRSCHFELD in Königsberg(East Prussia,Germany) now:
Kaliningrad; Ortelsburg(East Prussia,Germany),now:
Szsytko(Poland).
SINGER in Vienna(Austria),Koros(Nytra Megye,North-
western Hungary; now:Krusovce,Slovakia)
WEISS/WEISZ in Vienna(Austria),Kis Báb(Northwestern
Hungary; now:Báb,Slovakia).
WELLWARD/VELLWART in Zay Ugrosz(Trencen Megye,North-
western Hungary;now:Uhrovic,Slovakia)Koros(Nytra Megye
Northwestern Hungary); now: Krusovce,Slovakia.


Synagogues in Hungary #hungary

Peter Spiro <avnesho@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Michele Sankar [mailto:sankosy@home.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2000 7:16 PM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: Synagogues


Hello H-siggers -

I am so used to the multitude of synagogues in the Toronto area that I
took for granted that this was the case everywhere. While I know that
the larger Hungarian cities had synagogues, I wonder about the smaller
communities that many of us are searching. Yes, we find Jewish
registers of births, marriages, and deaths, but would each of these
Hungarian towns and villages have had an official shul building or were
prayers held in other locations? I've never seen congregation names on
the records; were there any Beth Els, Shaarei Shomayims, etc., or did
the smaller places just use their town name to identify themselves?
Budapest had many synagogues, several of which are still in operation, and
they do indeed have individual names, although they tend to be the name of
the street it is located on, e.g., Dohany utca, Rumbach utca.
I think this is fairly customary throughout Europe. The custom of giving
synagogues names >from biblical phrases is mainly North American, whereas in
Europe to this day the names tend to be utilitarian, aimed at identifying
the location or nature of the synagogue (e.g., "Great Synagogue," "Spanish
and Portuguese Congregation"). In North America, Jews feel a greater sense
of confidence, so they give their buildings exotic-sounding names, while in
Europe Jews have always worried more about keeping a low profile, and they
give their synangogues names in the local language. If you go back to
earlier in the 20th century, however, you will find that many Toronto
synagogues were also known by their street addresses -- the predecessor of
Beth Tzedec used to be the "McCaul Street Shul."

In Hungary, religions had quasi-official status conferred by the government,
and so there would be one "official synagogue" in each town, responsible for
dealing with the government on behalf of all Jews. In some towns, the
official synagogue was Neolog, in others Orthodox. However, there would
also be unofficial congregations, especially in towns where there was a
strong Hasidic element. In Kisvarda, the official congregation was
mainstream Orthodox (the synagogue still stands, but is now a museum), but

there was also a large Hasidic congregation that met separately. For the
genealogist, the problem in this is that the separate rabbis kept their own
records of births, deaths and marriages. Therefore, for towns like Kisvarda
and Ujhely, in the Mormon microfilms one finds separate sets of books
covering the same period of time.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Chanukka Greetings #hungary

harry pick <hkpick@...>
 

To all my fellow-siggers!
Chanukka Same'ach!
Happy Festival of Lights!(if you are
"Hebrew-challenged")
Best wishes
HARRY K. PICK
West Hartford, CT, USA
Searching:
PICK in Vienna(Austria), Verbó(Nytra
Megye,Northwestern Hungary) now:Vrbove(Slovakia),
Lundenburg,Mähren/ Moravia); now:Breclav, Czech
Republic.
GEHR in Krone(Crone)an der Brahe also Polnisch Krone
(Posen,Germany)now:Koronowa(Poland).
GERSTL in Vienna(Austria), Deutschkreutz[in Yiddish:
Zelem] (Nemetkeresztur)Austro-Hungary, now:Burgenland,
Austria.
HIRSCHFELD in Königsberg(East Prussia,Germany) now:
Kaliningrad; Ortelsburg(East Prussia,Germany),now:
Szsytko(Poland).
SINGER in Vienna(Austria),Koros(Nytra Megye,North-
western Hungary; now:Krusovce,Slovakia)
WEISS/WEISZ in Vienna(Austria),Kis Báb(Northwestern
Hungary; now:Báb,Slovakia).
WELLWARD/VELLWART in Zay Ugrosz(Trencen Megye,North-
western Hungary;now:Uhrovic,Slovakia)Koros(Nytra Megye
Northwestern Hungary); now: Krusovce,Slovakia.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Synagogues in Hungary #hungary

Peter Spiro <avnesho@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Michele Sankar [mailto:sankosy@home.com]
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2000 7:16 PM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: Synagogues


Hello H-siggers -

I am so used to the multitude of synagogues in the Toronto area that I
took for granted that this was the case everywhere. While I know that
the larger Hungarian cities had synagogues, I wonder about the smaller
communities that many of us are searching. Yes, we find Jewish
registers of births, marriages, and deaths, but would each of these
Hungarian towns and villages have had an official shul building or were
prayers held in other locations? I've never seen congregation names on
the records; were there any Beth Els, Shaarei Shomayims, etc., or did
the smaller places just use their town name to identify themselves?
Budapest had many synagogues, several of which are still in operation, and
they do indeed have individual names, although they tend to be the name of
the street it is located on, e.g., Dohany utca, Rumbach utca.
I think this is fairly customary throughout Europe. The custom of giving
synagogues names >from biblical phrases is mainly North American, whereas in
Europe to this day the names tend to be utilitarian, aimed at identifying
the location or nature of the synagogue (e.g., "Great Synagogue," "Spanish
and Portuguese Congregation"). In North America, Jews feel a greater sense
of confidence, so they give their buildings exotic-sounding names, while in
Europe Jews have always worried more about keeping a low profile, and they
give their synangogues names in the local language. If you go back to
earlier in the 20th century, however, you will find that many Toronto
synagogues were also known by their street addresses -- the predecessor of
Beth Tzedec used to be the "McCaul Street Shul."

In Hungary, religions had quasi-official status conferred by the government,
and so there would be one "official synagogue" in each town, responsible for
dealing with the government on behalf of all Jews. In some towns, the
official synagogue was Neolog, in others Orthodox. However, there would
also be unofficial congregations, especially in towns where there was a
strong Hasidic element. In Kisvarda, the official congregation was
mainstream Orthodox (the synagogue still stands, but is now a museum), but

there was also a large Hasidic congregation that met separately. For the
genealogist, the problem in this is that the separate rabbis kept their own
records of births, deaths and marriages. Therefore, for towns like Kisvarda
and Ujhely, in the Mormon microfilms one finds separate sets of books
covering the same period of time.


Re: Bernard Smilovic #hungary

Fern Smiley <fernsmile@...>
 

--0-1548233367-977246713=:6392
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii


Anyone having ANY information regarding liberated Jews leaving Mathausen in May 1945 to Bratislava? This ir regarding Bernard Smilovic whose Red Cross records now show that he survived liberation >from M<athausen and was repatriated to Bratislawa.

Another interesting record offered by a fellow H-Sigger shows a list >from BARI (ITALY?). >from the Registry of Holococaust survivors, "List "C" mentions a Schmulevits, 19 yr. Fully 19 of the 0ther 35 names on this list give Munkacs as their hometown (this was Bernards hometown pre-war). Does anyone have an idea where this BARI group ended up? Thank you all for the info so far in our struggle to find the truth about our brother Bernard.

Please reply directly to samsmilovic@hotmail.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Bernard Smilovic #hungary

Fern Smiley <fernsmile@...>
 

--0-1548233367-977246713=:6392
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii


Anyone having ANY information regarding liberated Jews leaving Mathausen in May 1945 to Bratislava? This ir regarding Bernard Smilovic whose Red Cross records now show that he survived liberation >from M<athausen and was repatriated to Bratislawa.

Another interesting record offered by a fellow H-Sigger shows a list >from BARI (ITALY?). >from the Registry of Holococaust survivors, "List "C" mentions a Schmulevits, 19 yr. Fully 19 of the 0ther 35 names on this list give Munkacs as their hometown (this was Bernards hometown pre-war). Does anyone have an idea where this BARI group ended up? Thank you all for the info so far in our struggle to find the truth about our brother Bernard.

Please reply directly to samsmilovic@hotmail.com


Re: contributions to H-sig and tax #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

Hi all,
this is just a little note to point out that donations to h-sig are only tax
deductible in the US, but not in Canada. The only exception to this is that
Canadians who have income in the US are thereby enabled to make a deduction
under the US-Canada tax treaty agreement.

I am not sure if anything can be done about this; perhaps a "Canadian
friends of Jewish Gen or H-sig" - but that would need to be set up and
registered in Canada. Of course, if people make small donations, it may not
make much difference whether they can get some back >from the tax people...

Regards, to all, Judy Young

Subject: Contributions to H-SIG
From: Vivian Kahn <VKahn@kmort.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2000 15:57:07 -0800
X-Message-Number: 12

Shalom Chaverim/ Szia Baratok!

If you're doing your end-of-the year tax planning, remember that
contributions made to H-SIG through JewishGenerosity are
tax-deductible. To make a donation, go to the H-SIG website at
http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/ and click on "Contribute to H-SIG"
Moderator: Thanks for reminding us that our Canadian colleagues don't deal with the IRS. Is there anyone who can provide advice about contributions that would be deductible north of the border?? VK


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: contributions to H-sig and tax #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

Hi all,
this is just a little note to point out that donations to h-sig are only tax
deductible in the US, but not in Canada. The only exception to this is that
Canadians who have income in the US are thereby enabled to make a deduction
under the US-Canada tax treaty agreement.

I am not sure if anything can be done about this; perhaps a "Canadian
friends of Jewish Gen or H-sig" - but that would need to be set up and
registered in Canada. Of course, if people make small donations, it may not
make much difference whether they can get some back >from the tax people...

Regards, to all, Judy Young

Subject: Contributions to H-SIG
From: Vivian Kahn <VKahn@kmort.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Dec 2000 15:57:07 -0800
X-Message-Number: 12

Shalom Chaverim/ Szia Baratok!

If you're doing your end-of-the year tax planning, remember that
contributions made to H-SIG through JewishGenerosity are
tax-deductible. To make a donation, go to the H-SIG website at
http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/ and click on "Contribute to H-SIG"
Moderator: Thanks for reminding us that our Canadian colleagues don't deal with the IRS. Is there anyone who can provide advice about contributions that would be deductible north of the border?? VK


The correct pronunciation of Zsuzsa #hungary

Peter Spiro <avnesho@...>
 

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@uol.com.br> wrote:

Zsuzsa is a shorting of Zsuzsanna which equals Susan in English.
'zsu' is pronounced as 'ju' in 'june' and 'zsa' as 'ja' 'jargon'
Tom, I'm sure you know how it sounds in Hungarian, but being >from Brazil
your knowledge of English pronunciation is somewhat off. "Zs" in Hungarian
is pronounced like "j" in the French "jamais," not like "j" is pronounced in
English. The pronunciation of the letter "s" in "pleasure" is the closest
English equivalent. The "a" sound at the end of Zsuzsa is pronounced like
"a" in "ball."

To complete the Hungarian lesson: "sz" in Hungarian is like English "s" in
stop, and "s" is like the English "sh" in "shout." "z" is the same as
English "z."

Moderator: Although this string is ended, info about the intricacies of Magyar pronunciation and language should be helpful to researchers trying to decipher records. VK


synagogues and communties #hungary

Mehadrin@...
 

In a message dated 12/19/00 1:38:01 AM, h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

I am so used to the multitude of synagogues in the Toronto area that I
took for granted that this was the case everywhere. While I know that
the larger Hungarian cities had synagogues, I wonder about the smaller
communities. we find Jewish registers of births, marriages, and deaths, but
would >each of these Hungarian towns and villages have an official shul
building or were
prayers held in other locations? I've never seen congregation names on
the records; were there any Beth Els, Shaarei Shomayims, etc., or did
the smaller places just use their town name to identify themselves?
Would each community have had its own rabbi,
The Jewish records were kept by the Jewish community of the town, not by the
synagogues. Some towns had one synagogue, many had more than one. After 1867,
some towns and cities had separate Reform communities, Status Quo
communities, and Orthodox communities and occasionally even Sefardic (i.e.
those praying Nusach Sefard---Chassidim). If there were several synagogues in
a town they still had a single rabbinate of the community. Even other rabbis
in the town, who had their own private minyanim, had to ask the official
rabbi of the town to officiate at their children's weddings. The
European-trained rabbis who emigrated to the USA and Canada often had a hard
time adjusting to the lack of an official town rabbinate. This rabbinate kept
the birth, marriage and death records, which had to be filed at the end of
the year with the county government. On the other hand when there were
separate communities, they each had the right to keep separate books of
records. This is only relevant to a small period of time, since in 1895 the
keeping of these records was handed over to the civil authorities. Small
towns and villages often had their own synagogue, but were sometimes not
considered separate communities and had their records kept in a nearby larger
town.
Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
(Rabbi of Cong. Minchas Chinuch, but not of New York City)
mehadrin@aol.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary The correct pronunciation of Zsuzsa #hungary

Peter Spiro <avnesho@...>
 

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@uol.com.br> wrote:

Zsuzsa is a shorting of Zsuzsanna which equals Susan in English.
'zsu' is pronounced as 'ju' in 'june' and 'zsa' as 'ja' 'jargon'
Tom, I'm sure you know how it sounds in Hungarian, but being >from Brazil
your knowledge of English pronunciation is somewhat off. "Zs" in Hungarian
is pronounced like "j" in the French "jamais," not like "j" is pronounced in
English. The pronunciation of the letter "s" in "pleasure" is the closest
English equivalent. The "a" sound at the end of Zsuzsa is pronounced like
"a" in "ball."

To complete the Hungarian lesson: "sz" in Hungarian is like English "s" in
stop, and "s" is like the English "sh" in "shout." "z" is the same as
English "z."

Moderator: Although this string is ended, info about the intricacies of Magyar pronunciation and language should be helpful to researchers trying to decipher records. VK


Hungary SIG #Hungary synagogues and communties #hungary

Mehadrin@...
 

In a message dated 12/19/00 1:38:01 AM, h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

I am so used to the multitude of synagogues in the Toronto area that I
took for granted that this was the case everywhere. While I know that
the larger Hungarian cities had synagogues, I wonder about the smaller
communities. we find Jewish registers of births, marriages, and deaths, but
would >each of these Hungarian towns and villages have an official shul
building or were
prayers held in other locations? I've never seen congregation names on
the records; were there any Beth Els, Shaarei Shomayims, etc., or did
the smaller places just use their town name to identify themselves?
Would each community have had its own rabbi,
The Jewish records were kept by the Jewish community of the town, not by the
synagogues. Some towns had one synagogue, many had more than one. After 1867,
some towns and cities had separate Reform communities, Status Quo
communities, and Orthodox communities and occasionally even Sefardic (i.e.
those praying Nusach Sefard---Chassidim). If there were several synagogues in
a town they still had a single rabbinate of the community. Even other rabbis
in the town, who had their own private minyanim, had to ask the official
rabbi of the town to officiate at their children's weddings. The
European-trained rabbis who emigrated to the USA and Canada often had a hard
time adjusting to the lack of an official town rabbinate. This rabbinate kept
the birth, marriage and death records, which had to be filed at the end of
the year with the county government. On the other hand when there were
separate communities, they each had the right to keep separate books of
records. This is only relevant to a small period of time, since in 1895 the
keeping of these records was handed over to the civil authorities. Small
towns and villages often had their own synagogue, but were sometimes not
considered separate communities and had their records kept in a nearby larger
town.
Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein
(Rabbi of Cong. Minchas Chinuch, but not of New York City)
mehadrin@aol.com


Re: GOTTLIEB/Satoraljauhely(Nove Mesto) #hungary

Lee Goodman <goodman@...>
 

I have been to the archives in Satoraljaujhely, while they hold some records
of surrounding towns, there are other records of the area in Miskolc. The
addresses are:

Borsod-Abauj-Zemplen Counties
Tanacshaz ter 1
3525 Miskolc , Hungary

Zemplen Leveltara
Kossuth ter 5
3981 Satoraljaujhely, Hungary

Also there are records keep in the Mayor's office in most of the small
towns. For some futher info read of my trip to Hungary at:
http://home.twcny.rr.com/goodman/Schon/Diary.htm

Lee Goodman
Pennellville, NY 13132-3105
E-mail - goodman@twcny.rr.com
Home Page - http://home.twcny.rr.com/goodman


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: GOTTLIEB/Satoraljauhely(Nove Mesto) #hungary

Lee Goodman <goodman@...>
 

I have been to the archives in Satoraljaujhely, while they hold some records
of surrounding towns, there are other records of the area in Miskolc. The
addresses are:

Borsod-Abauj-Zemplen Counties
Tanacshaz ter 1
3525 Miskolc , Hungary

Zemplen Leveltara
Kossuth ter 5
3981 Satoraljaujhely, Hungary

Also there are records keep in the Mayor's office in most of the small
towns. For some futher info read of my trip to Hungary at:
http://home.twcny.rr.com/goodman/Schon/Diary.htm

Lee Goodman
Pennellville, NY 13132-3105
E-mail - goodman@twcny.rr.com
Home Page - http://home.twcny.rr.com/goodman


First Hit #hungary

SGerendasy@...
 

Hi All,
I scored my first hit on a family member >from a Hungarian source. On the
radixindex 1891 Record of Industry and Trade I found my grandfather, Jakab
Gerendasi, a grocer in Bene. Great stuff.
Can anyone recommend inexpensive, or better yet, free software for drawing
family trees? I really don't care for the Family Treemaker kind of thing
with dozens of CD's of data that don't apply and in any case are readily
available.
Happy Chanukah to all.
Stan Gerendasy

Moderator: Please reply privately if you have any software suggestions for Stan. VK


Hungary SIG #Hungary First Hit #hungary

SGerendasy@...
 

Hi All,
I scored my first hit on a family member >from a Hungarian source. On the
radixindex 1891 Record of Industry and Trade I found my grandfather, Jakab
Gerendasi, a grocer in Bene. Great stuff.
Can anyone recommend inexpensive, or better yet, free software for drawing
family trees? I really don't care for the Family Treemaker kind of thing
with dozens of CD's of data that don't apply and in any case are readily
available.
Happy Chanukah to all.
Stan Gerendasy

Moderator: Please reply privately if you have any software suggestions for Stan. VK


Re 100 Shtetls again #ukraine

Art Hoffman <arthh@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Art Hoffman <arthh@concentric.net>
To: <NFatouros@aol.com>; <ukraine@lyris.jewishhgen.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2000 11:48 AM

The following comes >from the Center for Jewish Art WebPages link
http://www.hum.huji.ac.il/CJA/Available.htm#Podolia1

One Hundred Shtetls of Ukraine: Historical Guide. Vol. 1: Jewish
Communities
of Podolia
edited by Benjamin Lukin and Boris Khaimovich
St. Petersburg - Jerusalem, 1997.
In Russian.

256 pages, 111 illustrations, 17 plans and maps.
This is the first volume of the historical guide to 100 Jewish shtetls in
the Ukraine. This unique guide combines comprehensive and precise
historical and cultural information with immense readability. This volume contains general articles on Podolian Jewry, articles on six centers of Jewish life in Northern Podolia including tourist information (Derazhnia, Zin'kov, Letichev, Medzhibozh, Proskurov and Satanov), and historical information on 11 small shtetls in the region.

Table of Contents:

B. Lukin
The Jews of Podolia in 14th - 17th centuries.
B. Khaimovich
The Podolian Shtetl.
V. Dymshitz
Historical Monuments in Jewish Folklore
B. Lukin
Derazhnia
A. Khaesh, B. Lukin
Zin'kov
B. Lukin
Medzhibozh
Yu. Khodorkovsky
Proskurov
B. Lukin, B. Khaimovich
Satanov
Shtetls of north-eastern Podolia (Horodok, Kuz'min, Kupin, Mikhalpol',
Nikolaev, Staraia Siniava, Tarnoruda, Fel'shtin, Chiornyi Ostrov,
Sharovka,
Yarmolintsy)

Re: Question asked by <NFatouros@aol.com>

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Please visit the Ukraine SIG web site
<http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I have been asked what shtetls the two volumes cover.

I don't know what the latest or second volume discusses, but,
according to a 2-21-99 posting by Ellen Shindelman (grapevyn#erols.com) >to the Volhynia Digest the contents of the first volume were listed by >Evie Mintzer (EMintser@compuserve.com) and if you can find Ms. >Shindelman's message you can see the names of the shtetls in that first >volume. I'd copy the list directly >from that old message but it is stored >on my old laptop which is not yet connected to my iMac and I haven't the >patience to copy them again by typing them here.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ,
SCHUTZ, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol.


Your Thoughts Please! #ukraine

haflo <haflo@...>
 

Dear U SIG Members,

To date, our membership has grown to over 955 members. Obviously, we are
hoping to make available the kind of information all of you need for your
research. I'm sure that many of you have specific thoughts on what you'd
like to see online that would help you to further your genealogical
efforts. For this, we require your assistance, your ideas, & your
contributions (both informational & financial).

I've received many letters privately >from a good number of people asking
for research assistance. *These should be posted to our mailing list
(rather than to me personally) as the answers "lie out there". Please don't
hesitate to use the means available, & remember, the only question that is
foolish is the one that isn't asked! Don't be shy about sending in letters
about your predicaments or concerns.

I need your ideas about the kinds of research & data in which you'd like to
see the U SIG become involved. If you know of sources & resources that can
be productively shared with others on our list, please let us know about
them by writing in. We all rely on each other to point us out in the right
direction. It's only with your input that we can turn our SIG into a
thriving site that will provide the information we need. We've had many
people offer to do typing & data input. Let's give them something to do!!

We're all waiting to hear your opinions. What you suggest, will make a
major difference in the direction our SIG will be heading in 2001. Do you
know of document sources that can be translated, informative books, or
other material useful for Ukraine research?

Another reminder - explore our website at www.jewishgen.org/ukraine!!!
What can we add to it that you would like to see?
** What can YOU contribute to it for our interest??

I want to wish all of you a Chag Sameach & a happy, healthy holiday with
your families.

May 2001 be kind to all of you in your genealogical searches! I look
forward to reading all of your suggestions & questions.

Warmest regards,
Florence Elman
(Ukraine SIG Coordinator)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re 100 Shtetls again #ukraine

Art Hoffman <arthh@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Art Hoffman <arthh@concentric.net>
To: <NFatouros@aol.com>; <ukraine@lyris.jewishhgen.org>
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2000 11:48 AM

The following comes >from the Center for Jewish Art WebPages link
http://www.hum.huji.ac.il/CJA/Available.htm#Podolia1

One Hundred Shtetls of Ukraine: Historical Guide. Vol. 1: Jewish
Communities
of Podolia
edited by Benjamin Lukin and Boris Khaimovich
St. Petersburg - Jerusalem, 1997.
In Russian.

256 pages, 111 illustrations, 17 plans and maps.
This is the first volume of the historical guide to 100 Jewish shtetls in
the Ukraine. This unique guide combines comprehensive and precise
historical and cultural information with immense readability. This volume contains general articles on Podolian Jewry, articles on six centers of Jewish life in Northern Podolia including tourist information (Derazhnia, Zin'kov, Letichev, Medzhibozh, Proskurov and Satanov), and historical information on 11 small shtetls in the region.

Table of Contents:

B. Lukin
The Jews of Podolia in 14th - 17th centuries.
B. Khaimovich
The Podolian Shtetl.
V. Dymshitz
Historical Monuments in Jewish Folklore
B. Lukin
Derazhnia
A. Khaesh, B. Lukin
Zin'kov
B. Lukin
Medzhibozh
Yu. Khodorkovsky
Proskurov
B. Lukin, B. Khaimovich
Satanov
Shtetls of north-eastern Podolia (Horodok, Kuz'min, Kupin, Mikhalpol',
Nikolaev, Staraia Siniava, Tarnoruda, Fel'shtin, Chiornyi Ostrov,
Sharovka,
Yarmolintsy)

Re: Question asked by <NFatouros@aol.com>

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Please visit the Ukraine SIG web site
<http://www.jewishgen.org/ukraine/>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I have been asked what shtetls the two volumes cover.

I don't know what the latest or second volume discusses, but,
according to a 2-21-99 posting by Ellen Shindelman (grapevyn#erols.com) >to the Volhynia Digest the contents of the first volume were listed by >Evie Mintzer (EMintser@compuserve.com) and if you can find Ms. >Shindelman's message you can see the names of the shtetls in that first >volume. I'd copy the list directly >from that old message but it is stored >on my old laptop which is not yet connected to my iMac and I haven't the >patience to copy them again by typing them here.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ,
SCHUTZ, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Your Thoughts Please! #ukraine

haflo <haflo@...>
 

Dear U SIG Members,

To date, our membership has grown to over 955 members. Obviously, we are
hoping to make available the kind of information all of you need for your
research. I'm sure that many of you have specific thoughts on what you'd
like to see online that would help you to further your genealogical
efforts. For this, we require your assistance, your ideas, & your
contributions (both informational & financial).

I've received many letters privately >from a good number of people asking
for research assistance. *These should be posted to our mailing list
(rather than to me personally) as the answers "lie out there". Please don't
hesitate to use the means available, & remember, the only question that is
foolish is the one that isn't asked! Don't be shy about sending in letters
about your predicaments or concerns.

I need your ideas about the kinds of research & data in which you'd like to
see the U SIG become involved. If you know of sources & resources that can
be productively shared with others on our list, please let us know about
them by writing in. We all rely on each other to point us out in the right
direction. It's only with your input that we can turn our SIG into a
thriving site that will provide the information we need. We've had many
people offer to do typing & data input. Let's give them something to do!!

We're all waiting to hear your opinions. What you suggest, will make a
major difference in the direction our SIG will be heading in 2001. Do you
know of document sources that can be translated, informative books, or
other material useful for Ukraine research?

Another reminder - explore our website at www.jewishgen.org/ukraine!!!
What can we add to it that you would like to see?
** What can YOU contribute to it for our interest??

I want to wish all of you a Chag Sameach & a happy, healthy holiday with
your families.

May 2001 be kind to all of you in your genealogical searches! I look
forward to reading all of your suggestions & questions.

Warmest regards,
Florence Elman
(Ukraine SIG Coordinator)