Date   

Re: "Molka CHALPHIN" #general

NFatouros@...
 

Although I myself have no interest in the surname CHALFIN, I am writing
to tell those several Jewishgenners who are researching this name, that I
have come across the name "Molka Chalphin[sic]" in a printout of a
microfilmed 331-page report I have obtained, courtesy of the Law Library at
Indiana Unversity. The report,made to US Congress in 1892, was compiled by
the Comissioner of Immigration. A large part of it consists of a very long
sub-report by Commissioners Weber and Kempster of their investigation into
the conditions of Jews in several countries, especially in Russia. The
report mentions the names in part or in full of several would-be immigrants,
but in many cases, to protect identities, the names are disguised, even as
to their initials, especially the names of important Jews and certain other
people some of whom were in "high places."

Since this government report was and is public information and never
covered by copyright, I feel free in quoting the passage which illustrates
the effects of the so-called "May Laws," directly upon a "Molka Chalphin."

Among the people tolerated by the police...(in certain towns or cities)
"was a young girl named Molka Chalphin, 18 years of age, a seamstress who
worked in Moscow two or three years and who was in the habit of sending >from
her earnings about 10 rubles per months to her mother, who lived in the
Pale. Sinc the active movement against the Jews, she had lived in Moscow
secretly, but the measures increasing in severity her country people feared
to take the risk of harboring her until she was finally confronted with the
alternative of aplying [sic} for a "yellow ticket" (the protective ticket of
a prostitute,who,besides Russians and certain specified classes, are the
only ones permitted to live anywhere in Russia) or to return to the
prescribed Pale, where she could not find work to support herself and assist
her mother. She wandered about the streets a few nights, and finally, in
despair, threw herself into the river Moscow, >from which, after resistance
on her part, she was rescued. At the station house, she firmly insisted
that she had no motive to destroy herself except that under Russian law she
saw no way of avoiding a life of shame, and stated that her"only crime was
that she was a Jewess." Some kindly disposed ladies hearing of the case
became interested and, after tenderly nursing her back to a proper
condition, sent her home. One of these ladies received a letter written by
the mother of Molka, expressing gratitude for the kindness exhibited to her
daughter, the original of which is in our possession. We have had it
translated and extract as follows:

H____, May 18th, 1891

Honored and Esteemed Lady:

When this letter reachers your hands you will surely be astonished that I
permitted myself to take the liberty to write to you, and if I did not know
your noble heart I would not have dared to do it. But my daughter Molka has
told me so much about you-how you saved her >from death-that I feel impelled
to express my hearfelt gratitude, though, unfortunately, only by letter to
you,as an angel guardian sent by God. God will make you happy wherever you
go, and your glory shall be known to all the world. Our Jews ought to be
proud of the fac tthat such a woman is living among them in Russia. Highly
esteemed lady, I am unable to express to you in words how great is my
gratitude and how much you deserve it. *** God will not forgive the
murderers who brought my child to despair.***I cannot describe what sort of
child she is. Every mother holds her child dear, expecially when it behaves
well. I think it is better not to be born at all than not to be able to do
good to one's chhilden. Oh, how I felt when my duaghter had to apply to
strang people for help, who did not know her at all, and to whom she felt so
grateful. Of course, you did not act >from a desire to receive her thanks,but
from mere humanity's sake and pity, because you are a human being who lives
for others. May God preserve you and make you happy.*** Pray, finish the
good work you commenced. With my prayer for you and your husband, I
remain,'"

As I plow throught the report, I am taking notes and, of course. will let
everyone know about other names that are mentioned, as well certain details
about immigration and other matters which may be of interest.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol.


Re: Mollova #general

Simon Barak
 

bandeklein@juno.com wrote:

I have been following the Mogilev discussion......My husband's grandfather
listed Mollova, Ukraine as his
birthplace....My husband's aunt died recently and in her papers .....It
list Mollova, Podalia, Russia as his place of birth. I still haven't fpund
the town on a map but I now know that Mollova is not Mogilev in Belarus.
Of course not! It's probably Moguilev Podolskyi in Podolia Ukraine

Shimon Barak
ISRAEL


Vienna / Zentralfriedhof #general

mleonards@...
 

My great-grandparents were born and married in Bohemia, but died in
Vienna and are buried in the Zentralfriedhof. I believe I've exhausted
all the sources available at the FHL (the Matriken and Civil
Registrations), and am at the point where I must either contact the
Czech archives or hire a researcher.

I thought it would be helpful if I knew the names of my gg
grandfathers. The Matriken do not list the names of the decedant's
parents, but the gravestones might.

Does anyone know whether Mr. Walter Pagler, who runs a gravesite-
finding service at the Zentralfriedhof, is willing to photograph
gravestones? Would the cemetery records contain information that's not
in the Matriken?

Thank you for your help.
Monica Leonards


Occupation: tischler #general

alan benjamin <wizard@...>
 

On a ship manifest, a great-uncle's occupation is listed as "tischler."
Would someone please translate this for me? Thank you.
Alan Benjamin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "Molka CHALPHIN" #general

NFatouros@...
 

Although I myself have no interest in the surname CHALFIN, I am writing
to tell those several Jewishgenners who are researching this name, that I
have come across the name "Molka Chalphin[sic]" in a printout of a
microfilmed 331-page report I have obtained, courtesy of the Law Library at
Indiana Unversity. The report,made to US Congress in 1892, was compiled by
the Comissioner of Immigration. A large part of it consists of a very long
sub-report by Commissioners Weber and Kempster of their investigation into
the conditions of Jews in several countries, especially in Russia. The
report mentions the names in part or in full of several would-be immigrants,
but in many cases, to protect identities, the names are disguised, even as
to their initials, especially the names of important Jews and certain other
people some of whom were in "high places."

Since this government report was and is public information and never
covered by copyright, I feel free in quoting the passage which illustrates
the effects of the so-called "May Laws," directly upon a "Molka Chalphin."

Among the people tolerated by the police...(in certain towns or cities)
"was a young girl named Molka Chalphin, 18 years of age, a seamstress who
worked in Moscow two or three years and who was in the habit of sending >from
her earnings about 10 rubles per months to her mother, who lived in the
Pale. Sinc the active movement against the Jews, she had lived in Moscow
secretly, but the measures increasing in severity her country people feared
to take the risk of harboring her until she was finally confronted with the
alternative of aplying [sic} for a "yellow ticket" (the protective ticket of
a prostitute,who,besides Russians and certain specified classes, are the
only ones permitted to live anywhere in Russia) or to return to the
prescribed Pale, where she could not find work to support herself and assist
her mother. She wandered about the streets a few nights, and finally, in
despair, threw herself into the river Moscow, >from which, after resistance
on her part, she was rescued. At the station house, she firmly insisted
that she had no motive to destroy herself except that under Russian law she
saw no way of avoiding a life of shame, and stated that her"only crime was
that she was a Jewess." Some kindly disposed ladies hearing of the case
became interested and, after tenderly nursing her back to a proper
condition, sent her home. One of these ladies received a letter written by
the mother of Molka, expressing gratitude for the kindness exhibited to her
daughter, the original of which is in our possession. We have had it
translated and extract as follows:

H____, May 18th, 1891

Honored and Esteemed Lady:

When this letter reachers your hands you will surely be astonished that I
permitted myself to take the liberty to write to you, and if I did not know
your noble heart I would not have dared to do it. But my daughter Molka has
told me so much about you-how you saved her >from death-that I feel impelled
to express my hearfelt gratitude, though, unfortunately, only by letter to
you,as an angel guardian sent by God. God will make you happy wherever you
go, and your glory shall be known to all the world. Our Jews ought to be
proud of the fac tthat such a woman is living among them in Russia. Highly
esteemed lady, I am unable to express to you in words how great is my
gratitude and how much you deserve it. *** God will not forgive the
murderers who brought my child to despair.***I cannot describe what sort of
child she is. Every mother holds her child dear, expecially when it behaves
well. I think it is better not to be born at all than not to be able to do
good to one's chhilden. Oh, how I felt when my duaghter had to apply to
strang people for help, who did not know her at all, and to whom she felt so
grateful. Of course, you did not act >from a desire to receive her thanks,but
from mere humanity's sake and pity, because you are a human being who lives
for others. May God preserve you and make you happy.*** Pray, finish the
good work you commenced. With my prayer for you and your husband, I
remain,'"

As I plow throught the report, I am taking notes and, of course. will let
everyone know about other names that are mentioned, as well certain details
about immigration and other matters which may be of interest.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mollova #general

Simon Barak
 

bandeklein@juno.com wrote:

I have been following the Mogilev discussion......My husband's grandfather
listed Mollova, Ukraine as his
birthplace....My husband's aunt died recently and in her papers .....It
list Mollova, Podalia, Russia as his place of birth. I still haven't fpund
the town on a map but I now know that Mollova is not Mogilev in Belarus.
Of course not! It's probably Moguilev Podolskyi in Podolia Ukraine

Shimon Barak
ISRAEL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Vienna / Zentralfriedhof #general

mleonards@...
 

My great-grandparents were born and married in Bohemia, but died in
Vienna and are buried in the Zentralfriedhof. I believe I've exhausted
all the sources available at the FHL (the Matriken and Civil
Registrations), and am at the point where I must either contact the
Czech archives or hire a researcher.

I thought it would be helpful if I knew the names of my gg
grandfathers. The Matriken do not list the names of the decedant's
parents, but the gravestones might.

Does anyone know whether Mr. Walter Pagler, who runs a gravesite-
finding service at the Zentralfriedhof, is willing to photograph
gravestones? Would the cemetery records contain information that's not
in the Matriken?

Thank you for your help.
Monica Leonards


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Occupation: tischler #general

alan benjamin <wizard@...>
 

On a ship manifest, a great-uncle's occupation is listed as "tischler."
Would someone please translate this for me? Thank you.
Alan Benjamin


Announcing ShtetlSchleppers 2001 Schedules #latinamerica

Paul W. Ginsburg <pginsburg@...>
 

Can you remember what you did when you first discovered the name of your
ancestral shtetl? Did you try to find it on a map, or did you know to go
right to JewishGen's Shtetlseeker where lo and behold, there it was with a
star marking the exact location. You may have looked at that spot over and
over and began to dream about going there yourself someday. If that has
been your dream, it can become reality. JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers can
take you there.

Let 2001 be the year when you will actually visit that shtetl of your
ancestry, walk in the footsteps of your parents, your grandparents, your
great grand parents . As the Talmudic saying goes..."if not now, when? Let
this be the year that "when" becomes "now".

Explore the itineraries which take you to a hub city, provide the best in
touring sites of Jewish interest, introduce you to local leaders and then,
with your own private guide/driver/translator, really **live** the dream.
visit the place where your family originated. To get a better idea of
making this work for you..
<http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/>.

And what about London2001, the International Summer Seminar?

Whether your plans include visiting before or after, but definitely 'in
conjunction with' London2001, the International Jewish Genealogy Summer
Seminar, be sure to sign up early . You will not only be sure of reserving
space, but most importantly you'll allow plenty of time for productive
pre-research.

The plans and schedules for London2001 are now online and linked >from the
JewishGen home page. It's a tremendous program with more than enough to
meet every interest. Have you looked, have you made your conference or
hotel reservation? Before you make your airline reservations, come and
take a look at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/London2001/travel.htm>

With advance planning and some smooth scheduling on the part of Joanna
Fletcher, JewishGen's ShtetlSchlepper Travel Manager it may be possible to
include London in the flight package for a pre- or post-conference
ShtetlSchlepper package enabling savings on airfares.

Finally, to accommodate those who have either already visited their
ancestral origins or have not yet reached that point in their research to
take that step, ShtetlSchleppers has created two or three-country cultural
tours where you can visit Prague & Vienna, or Prague, Vienna & Budapest,
all three known for their breathtaking architecture and richness of Jewish
history. It's all online awaiting your visit.
-scheduled group departures,
-customized independent travel,
-two or three country cultural tours, and finally
-favorable air fares >from most cities to London2001

So whatever your dreams, whatever your travel interests may be in
conjunction with the London conference, Let JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers
take you there!

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/

Paul W. Ginsburg
ShtetlSchleppers Project Manager
pginsburg@jewishgen.org


Latin America #LatinAmerica Announcing ShtetlSchleppers 2001 Schedules #latinamerica

Paul W. Ginsburg <pginsburg@...>
 

Can you remember what you did when you first discovered the name of your
ancestral shtetl? Did you try to find it on a map, or did you know to go
right to JewishGen's Shtetlseeker where lo and behold, there it was with a
star marking the exact location. You may have looked at that spot over and
over and began to dream about going there yourself someday. If that has
been your dream, it can become reality. JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers can
take you there.

Let 2001 be the year when you will actually visit that shtetl of your
ancestry, walk in the footsteps of your parents, your grandparents, your
great grand parents . As the Talmudic saying goes..."if not now, when? Let
this be the year that "when" becomes "now".

Explore the itineraries which take you to a hub city, provide the best in
touring sites of Jewish interest, introduce you to local leaders and then,
with your own private guide/driver/translator, really **live** the dream.
visit the place where your family originated. To get a better idea of
making this work for you..
<http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/>.

And what about London2001, the International Summer Seminar?

Whether your plans include visiting before or after, but definitely 'in
conjunction with' London2001, the International Jewish Genealogy Summer
Seminar, be sure to sign up early . You will not only be sure of reserving
space, but most importantly you'll allow plenty of time for productive
pre-research.

The plans and schedules for London2001 are now online and linked >from the
JewishGen home page. It's a tremendous program with more than enough to
meet every interest. Have you looked, have you made your conference or
hotel reservation? Before you make your airline reservations, come and
take a look at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/London2001/travel.htm>

With advance planning and some smooth scheduling on the part of Joanna
Fletcher, JewishGen's ShtetlSchlepper Travel Manager it may be possible to
include London in the flight package for a pre- or post-conference
ShtetlSchlepper package enabling savings on airfares.

Finally, to accommodate those who have either already visited their
ancestral origins or have not yet reached that point in their research to
take that step, ShtetlSchleppers has created two or three-country cultural
tours where you can visit Prague & Vienna, or Prague, Vienna & Budapest,
all three known for their breathtaking architecture and richness of Jewish
history. It's all online awaiting your visit.
-scheduled group departures,
-customized independent travel,
-two or three country cultural tours, and finally
-favorable air fares >from most cities to London2001

So whatever your dreams, whatever your travel interests may be in
conjunction with the London conference, Let JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers
take you there!

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/

Paul W. Ginsburg
ShtetlSchleppers Project Manager
pginsburg@jewishgen.org


Re: Ethics - genealogy research #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

It seems to me that my experience reflects a significant historical
difference between the history of Anglo-Jews whose families lived in
England since around 1800 and the history of American Jews (and some
English Jews, too) whose families immigrated >from eastern Europe after
1880. Anglo-Jews of long standing simply do not have the same persecution
history or the same unpleasant memories passed down to them by their
grandparents.
Most English Jews have also been in England since about 1880. My mainly
German family (father's side) and mother's family (Poland) has been in
England since about 1860. My forebears on my father's side were quite
prosperous and we have been able to trace back to the 1600's.

The only problem has been with the ggf >from Russia/Belarus who left at 18
already married and is supposed to have left to avoid service in the Tsar's
army. I have found recently >from his naturalisation certificate that he
took 10 years to arrive in England with 2/3 sons.

Nick Landau
London


Re: searching for a good book of maps #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

Dear Saul and others,

I'm a bit surprised that Magosci's "Historical Atlas of East Central
Europe" is no longer available. I got a copy only a few months ago. The
soft cover edition was published in 1998 by the University of Washington
Press, Seattle, and perhaps you might get different information if you
wrote them directly. Although its main emphasis is Italy and Germany to
the west and the borders of the old Russian Empire on the east, because
of the fluidity of the eastern boundaries, it also includes a
substantial part of present-day Lithuania, Belorus and Ukraine.

The same author has produced A Historical Atlas of Ukraine, also very
useful, and published by the University of Toronto Press.

Needless to say, I have no commercial interest in either of these books.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England

Saul Goldstone wrote:


JewishGeners,

A while ago I was recommended to the following book of maps:

"Historical Atlas of East Central Europe by Paul Robert Magocsi"

Although it is listed by
[commercial reference deleted],they have just informed me that it is no
longer available.

Can someone recommend an alternate?


Nazi Era Stamps on Austrian Marriage Certificates #general

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

Yes indeed, there was a law at that time that Jews in Germany, including
Austria had to take on the addtional name of Israel or Sara. I remember,
having lived in Vienna at this time, that I had to go to the Government
district office to have my birth certificate stamped and this stamp is still
on it. My parents have a similar stamp also on their marriage certificate.
The translation of the stamp which you quote is as follows:
The acceptance of the additional name Israel - Sara is noted
B.H. (Bezirkshauptmannschaft) Government district office), Oct. 18, 1939
For genealogists this is an important clue, since it means that this person
was in Vienna on the date noted.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Some further thoughts #general

david fielker <david@...>
 

As a further contribution to the discussion on why we do genealogy, may I
humbly offer the following extract >from the preface to my recently published
"My Schneebaum Family"?


Why do we do it?

In my case, one reason is certainly the thrill of the chase. As a
mathematics teacher I have always enjoyed solving problems, and genealogy is
a huge and complex problem-solving situation. My Schneebaum research in
particular has thrown up so many situations in which I have had to piece
together information >from the flimsiest of clues, decide where to try to
obtain more information, weigh up the evidence, seek for proofs of
hypotheses, and so on. The section on Rebecca Schneebaum was the most
complex investigation, starting >from just a name and address on one
document, and involving a long chain of explorations in which about twelve
successive assumptions in turn were made, discounted and reformulated.

A second reason is the exciting discovery of a large family, mainly in the
US, that I never knew I had. I have met many of them and corresponded with
others. They have turned out to be pleasant, interesting and intelligent
people, with a sense of humour, and in most cases an interest in the
research I was doing. Sometimes I have also been able to put them back in
touch with each other after years of loss of contact, like Sam who phoned
his cousin Margot whom he had not seen for 60 years.

Third, one begins to develop a strong sense of one's background and roots.
When I began, the only true Schneebaum I knew was my grandfather, an
immigrant in England of whose origins I knew nothing at all.

Last, as with so many other family books, this is a memorial to the past and
to the history of the family. In particular it remembers those who were lost
in the Holocaust during World War II. I had the cosy feeling as a child that
all my family were safe in wartime England. Gradually I uncovered
information about various branches of the family who died in the camps.


David Fielker
London UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ethics - genealogy research #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

It seems to me that my experience reflects a significant historical
difference between the history of Anglo-Jews whose families lived in
England since around 1800 and the history of American Jews (and some
English Jews, too) whose families immigrated >from eastern Europe after
1880. Anglo-Jews of long standing simply do not have the same persecution
history or the same unpleasant memories passed down to them by their
grandparents.
Most English Jews have also been in England since about 1880. My mainly
German family (father's side) and mother's family (Poland) has been in
England since about 1860. My forebears on my father's side were quite
prosperous and we have been able to trace back to the 1600's.

The only problem has been with the ggf >from Russia/Belarus who left at 18
already married and is supposed to have left to avoid service in the Tsar's
army. I have found recently >from his naturalisation certificate that he
took 10 years to arrive in England with 2/3 sons.

Nick Landau
London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: searching for a good book of maps #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

Dear Saul and others,

I'm a bit surprised that Magosci's "Historical Atlas of East Central
Europe" is no longer available. I got a copy only a few months ago. The
soft cover edition was published in 1998 by the University of Washington
Press, Seattle, and perhaps you might get different information if you
wrote them directly. Although its main emphasis is Italy and Germany to
the west and the borders of the old Russian Empire on the east, because
of the fluidity of the eastern boundaries, it also includes a
substantial part of present-day Lithuania, Belorus and Ukraine.

The same author has produced A Historical Atlas of Ukraine, also very
useful, and published by the University of Toronto Press.

Needless to say, I have no commercial interest in either of these books.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England

Saul Goldstone wrote:


JewishGeners,

A while ago I was recommended to the following book of maps:

"Historical Atlas of East Central Europe by Paul Robert Magocsi"

Although it is listed by
[commercial reference deleted],they have just informed me that it is no
longer available.

Can someone recommend an alternate?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nazi Era Stamps on Austrian Marriage Certificates #general

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

Yes indeed, there was a law at that time that Jews in Germany, including
Austria had to take on the addtional name of Israel or Sara. I remember,
having lived in Vienna at this time, that I had to go to the Government
district office to have my birth certificate stamped and this stamp is still
on it. My parents have a similar stamp also on their marriage certificate.
The translation of the stamp which you quote is as follows:
The acceptance of the additional name Israel - Sara is noted
B.H. (Bezirkshauptmannschaft) Government district office), Oct. 18, 1939
For genealogists this is an important clue, since it means that this person
was in Vienna on the date noted.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Some further thoughts #general

david fielker <david@...>
 

As a further contribution to the discussion on why we do genealogy, may I
humbly offer the following extract >from the preface to my recently published
"My Schneebaum Family"?


Why do we do it?

In my case, one reason is certainly the thrill of the chase. As a
mathematics teacher I have always enjoyed solving problems, and genealogy is
a huge and complex problem-solving situation. My Schneebaum research in
particular has thrown up so many situations in which I have had to piece
together information >from the flimsiest of clues, decide where to try to
obtain more information, weigh up the evidence, seek for proofs of
hypotheses, and so on. The section on Rebecca Schneebaum was the most
complex investigation, starting >from just a name and address on one
document, and involving a long chain of explorations in which about twelve
successive assumptions in turn were made, discounted and reformulated.

A second reason is the exciting discovery of a large family, mainly in the
US, that I never knew I had. I have met many of them and corresponded with
others. They have turned out to be pleasant, interesting and intelligent
people, with a sense of humour, and in most cases an interest in the
research I was doing. Sometimes I have also been able to put them back in
touch with each other after years of loss of contact, like Sam who phoned
his cousin Margot whom he had not seen for 60 years.

Third, one begins to develop a strong sense of one's background and roots.
When I began, the only true Schneebaum I knew was my grandfather, an
immigrant in England of whose origins I knew nothing at all.

Last, as with so many other family books, this is a memorial to the past and
to the history of the family. In particular it remembers those who were lost
in the Holocaust during World War II. I had the cosy feeling as a child that
all my family were safe in wartime England. Gradually I uncovered
information about various branches of the family who died in the camps.


David Fielker
London UK


Foreign Characters in Windows - Summary #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

In a message dated 12/6/00 feraltek@zeta.org.au writes:
Is there a site with instructions and/or hot keys for typing European
characters in Windows programmes - particularly Czech, Hungarian,
Polish & German.
Thank you to all who replied.

Summary of a few methods.

(1) Windows95/98 has Multilanguage support that you have to install via
Add/Remove Programs on the Control Panel window. Read the Help file
carefully about the various ways to switch between languages. Characters
with diacritical marks are mainly tied to punctuation keys, in some
languages they're on the number keys. Some of the other letter and
punctuation keys will change position.

(2) In Word and some other programs, under the Insert menu, select Symbols
and hunt around the various character sets. Select the letter >from the chart.

(3) Alt key plus three number codes. In German - Alt.132= a/umlaut,
148=o/umlaut, 129=u/umlaut. Win.3x used a four digit code that still works
with Win.98 - eg. Alt.0163= English pound sign. Someone sent me a list of
French, German and Spanish special characters. (Thanks David S.) Please ask
if you want a copy.

(4) Somewhere in the Win.98 Help screens is a set of complex key codes
under the title "Type International Characters". Eg - CTL+SHIFT+COLON+ "a"
-> a/umlaut. Similar for o & u /umlaut. (Sorry, can't find the instructions
a second time.)

(5) The Hebrew word processing program called Dagesh has a collection of
characters >from all European countries.

Gary


Gary Luke
feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks for the summary, Gary. Messages sent to the
JewishGen Discussion Group should *not* use these special characters,
however. Differences in the handling of special characters among computer
systems makes their display impossible to predict, and moderators will have
to change them to the nearest standard ASCII equivalent, an unnecessary
burden.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Foreign Characters in Windows - Summary #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

In a message dated 12/6/00 feraltek@zeta.org.au writes:
Is there a site with instructions and/or hot keys for typing European
characters in Windows programmes - particularly Czech, Hungarian,
Polish & German.
Thank you to all who replied.

Summary of a few methods.

(1) Windows95/98 has Multilanguage support that you have to install via
Add/Remove Programs on the Control Panel window. Read the Help file
carefully about the various ways to switch between languages. Characters
with diacritical marks are mainly tied to punctuation keys, in some
languages they're on the number keys. Some of the other letter and
punctuation keys will change position.

(2) In Word and some other programs, under the Insert menu, select Symbols
and hunt around the various character sets. Select the letter >from the chart.

(3) Alt key plus three number codes. In German - Alt.132= a/umlaut,
148=o/umlaut, 129=u/umlaut. Win.3x used a four digit code that still works
with Win.98 - eg. Alt.0163= English pound sign. Someone sent me a list of
French, German and Spanish special characters. (Thanks David S.) Please ask
if you want a copy.

(4) Somewhere in the Win.98 Help screens is a set of complex key codes
under the title "Type International Characters". Eg - CTL+SHIFT+COLON+ "a"
-> a/umlaut. Similar for o & u /umlaut. (Sorry, can't find the instructions
a second time.)

(5) The Hebrew word processing program called Dagesh has a collection of
characters >from all European countries.

Gary


Gary Luke
feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks for the summary, Gary. Messages sent to the
JewishGen Discussion Group should *not* use these special characters,
however. Differences in the handling of special characters among computer
systems makes their display impossible to predict, and moderators will have
to change them to the nearest standard ASCII equivalent, an unnecessary
burden.