Date   

Re: pre 1825 genealogy records for Ciechanow #ciechanow #poland

A Jendrzejewski <ajend@...>
 

In response to Amy's post:

In Mary Chorzempa's book, Polish Roots, she mentions
that Napoleon had instituted civil records in the
Russian Partition in 1807 and that it was the
Catholic parish priest of the region that kept the
records [to 1826] . Records that old are most likely
to be kept in the regional archives, in Ciechanow's
case, in Plock, the addresses of which I got from
Jonathan Shea's and William Hoffman's book, In Their
Words, Vol. I:

Archiwum Diecezjalne w Plocku
ul. Abpa. A. J. Nowpsielskiego 2
09-400 Plock,
Polska (Poland)

or in the State Archives in Warsaw, which is where
most non-Catholic records are by now kept:

Naczelna Dyrekcja Archiwow Panistwowych
ul. Dluga 6
skrytka pocztowa Nr 1005
00-950 Warsawa,
Polska (Poland)

Their web site address is:
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/alf/archiwa/

There is also a list of information on individual
archives in English at this page:
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/alf/archiwa/mapa/index.eng
.html

The Shea/Hoffman book says that early in the 19th
century many Jews still had no surname. Often the
records would show patronymic names that eventually
became surnames under pressure >from authorities for
purposes of taxation, military service, etc.

Regarding Jewish records specifically, the book
mentions at the following places to write:

The Jewish Historical Institute :

Zydowski Instytut Historyczny
ul. Tlomackie 3/5
00-090 Warsawa
Polska (Poland)


The following additional material was mentioned in
Chorzempka's book:

The Yidisher Visnshaftlekher Institut (Yiddish
Scientific Institute):

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research
1948 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10028
(This is one of the world's greatest archive of East
European Jewry.)

Leo Baeck Institute
129 East 73rd Street
New York, New York 10021
(Concentrates on German speaking Jews, including
parts of Poland occupied by Germany and Austria.)

And finally,
Jewish National University Library
Hebrew University
Givat Ram Campus
Jerusalem, Israel
(This source has some birth and death registers, and
some registers for a few dozen communities in the
old Polish areas of Lithuania; some Russian records
go back to at least the 18th century.)

Andy Jendrzejewski

----- Original Message -----
From: "Amy L Sheldon" <asheldon@tc.umn.edu>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group"
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: "Cheryl Lester" <chlester@falcon.cc.ukans.edu>
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 7:51 PM
Subject: pre 1825 genealogy records for Ciechanow


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Re Stan Z's last message about where to put our
resources for developing
our work on Ciechanow, has anyone researched pre
1826 records? It looks
tricky >from what Stan says about that:

"To research pre Mormon film records (pre 1826 for
Ciechanow) we would have to look into the Catholic
records. I
believe that in the period before 1826 Jewish
records were mixed
in with these. "

amy




---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion
group, send your message to:
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(ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org

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#Ciechanow #Poland Re: pre 1825 genealogy records for Ciechanow #ciechanow #poland

A Jendrzejewski <ajend@...>
 

In response to Amy's post:

In Mary Chorzempa's book, Polish Roots, she mentions
that Napoleon had instituted civil records in the
Russian Partition in 1807 and that it was the
Catholic parish priest of the region that kept the
records [to 1826] . Records that old are most likely
to be kept in the regional archives, in Ciechanow's
case, in Plock, the addresses of which I got from
Jonathan Shea's and William Hoffman's book, In Their
Words, Vol. I:

Archiwum Diecezjalne w Plocku
ul. Abpa. A. J. Nowpsielskiego 2
09-400 Plock,
Polska (Poland)

or in the State Archives in Warsaw, which is where
most non-Catholic records are by now kept:

Naczelna Dyrekcja Archiwow Panistwowych
ul. Dluga 6
skrytka pocztowa Nr 1005
00-950 Warsawa,
Polska (Poland)

Their web site address is:
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/alf/archiwa/

There is also a list of information on individual
archives in English at this page:
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/alf/archiwa/mapa/index.eng
.html

The Shea/Hoffman book says that early in the 19th
century many Jews still had no surname. Often the
records would show patronymic names that eventually
became surnames under pressure >from authorities for
purposes of taxation, military service, etc.

Regarding Jewish records specifically, the book
mentions at the following places to write:

The Jewish Historical Institute :

Zydowski Instytut Historyczny
ul. Tlomackie 3/5
00-090 Warsawa
Polska (Poland)


The following additional material was mentioned in
Chorzempka's book:

The Yidisher Visnshaftlekher Institut (Yiddish
Scientific Institute):

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research
1948 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10028
(This is one of the world's greatest archive of East
European Jewry.)

Leo Baeck Institute
129 East 73rd Street
New York, New York 10021
(Concentrates on German speaking Jews, including
parts of Poland occupied by Germany and Austria.)

And finally,
Jewish National University Library
Hebrew University
Givat Ram Campus
Jerusalem, Israel
(This source has some birth and death registers, and
some registers for a few dozen communities in the
old Polish areas of Lithuania; some Russian records
go back to at least the 18th century.)

Andy Jendrzejewski

----- Original Message -----
From: "Amy L Sheldon" <asheldon@tc.umn.edu>
To: "Ciechanow Research Group"
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Cc: "Cheryl Lester" <chlester@falcon.cc.ukans.edu>
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 7:51 PM
Subject: pre 1825 genealogy records for Ciechanow


This list is supported by JewishGen. Please show
your appreciation and support by visiting
http://www.jewishgen.org/Jewishgen-erosity/
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Re Stan Z's last message about where to put our
resources for developing
our work on Ciechanow, has anyone researched pre
1826 records? It looks
tricky >from what Stan says about that:

"To research pre Mormon film records (pre 1826 for
Ciechanow) we would have to look into the Catholic
records. I
believe that in the period before 1826 Jewish
records were mixed
in with these. "

amy




---
To post to the Ciechanow Research discussion
group, send your message to:
<ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org>

This research group
(ciechanow@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at
http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to ciechanow as:
[ajend@vincennes.net]
To unsubscribe send email to
$subst('Email.Unsub')


Re: Father's mid name/son's first? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

This particular naming pattern was almost universal among Dutch Ashkenazim.
A son's middle name was always his father's first name. And if a son was
named after his grandfather, then the son's first name was therefore the
same as his father's middle name.

Incidentally, the same applied to daughters. The daughter's middle name
was often her father's first name, even though that name was masculine.
>Harold Rabbie

Dear Harold,

Thank you for that useful information, which helped me a lot by
invcidentally explains why my gg gm Juliet (born in Holland around 1800)
was named as Juliet Hymans on the birth certificates of her three youngest
children (born in London after 1837 and listed in the English registers)
but as Juliet Collins in Australian marriage and death certificates
relating to several of her children who emigrated Down Under in the
mid-19th century.

Your comments were particularly helpful in clarifying that Hymans (i.e.
Chaim) would have been her patronymic (i.e. based on her father's given
name rather than her father's surname). This tells me that if I want to
track down her father, instead of looking for a Dutch Jew named Somebody
Hymans, I should be looking for a Dutch Jew named Chaim or Hyman
"Collins" -- though probably with some other spelling of Chaim and some
other spelling of Collins, but at least it's a start. Thank you again.

Judith Romney Wegner


Re: observation while walking in a Jewish cemetery #general

Jane Vogel-Kohai & Ofer Kohai <vogelko@...>
 

I was always under the impression that the significance of the rocks, is
that we should also remember the collective tragedy of the destruction of
the Temple, but I don't know if there is anything to this. My
brother-in-law the rabbi said the significance of rocks, is the concept of
">from dust you have come, to dust you shall return". I have heard of people
being buried with a handful of earth >from the Holy Land, in lieu of being
buried in Israel, which Jews throughout the ages have longed for - to be
buried in Israel.
Jane Vogel-Kohai
Jerusalem Israel

At 20:22 02/11/00 +0100, George Hall wrote:

My name is George Hall. My office is located directly across >from a rather
large Jewish cemetery in Trevose Pennsylvania. While walking through the
cemetery today I noticed that many of the gravestones had small piles of
rocks on top. Does anyone know if this has some cultural significance? At
first I thought it was coincidence but it soon became apparent that there
were many stones with small rocks.


Re: Female name: Gisha #general

Norman H. Carp-Gordon <zerakodesh@...>
 

The Yiddish form, Gesha, (Russian: Gesya) was found in my sub-clan, the
GORDONs of Dunilovichi, Vileika Uyezd, Vilna Guberniya (18th-19th
century).

On Fri, 03 Nov 2000 15:28:19 +0200 "Prof. G. L. Esterson"
<jerry@vms.huji.ac.il> writes:


The Yiddish name Gisha was indeed used for females in Lithuania.
Some of the other Yiddish names linked to this one are:

Gisa, Gise, Gisha, Gishe, Gisia, Giza, Gize

and some diminutives are:

Gisl, Gisala, Gisale

The main differences between the first group of these names is their
pronunciation.

The name was also used in Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Father's mid name/son's first? #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

This particular naming pattern was almost universal among Dutch Ashkenazim.
A son's middle name was always his father's first name. And if a son was
named after his grandfather, then the son's first name was therefore the
same as his father's middle name.

Incidentally, the same applied to daughters. The daughter's middle name
was often her father's first name, even though that name was masculine.
>Harold Rabbie

Dear Harold,

Thank you for that useful information, which helped me a lot by
invcidentally explains why my gg gm Juliet (born in Holland around 1800)
was named as Juliet Hymans on the birth certificates of her three youngest
children (born in London after 1837 and listed in the English registers)
but as Juliet Collins in Australian marriage and death certificates
relating to several of her children who emigrated Down Under in the
mid-19th century.

Your comments were particularly helpful in clarifying that Hymans (i.e.
Chaim) would have been her patronymic (i.e. based on her father's given
name rather than her father's surname). This tells me that if I want to
track down her father, instead of looking for a Dutch Jew named Somebody
Hymans, I should be looking for a Dutch Jew named Chaim or Hyman
"Collins" -- though probably with some other spelling of Chaim and some
other spelling of Collins, but at least it's a start. Thank you again.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: observation while walking in a Jewish cemetery #general

Jane Vogel-Kohai & Ofer Kohai <vogelko@...>
 

I was always under the impression that the significance of the rocks, is
that we should also remember the collective tragedy of the destruction of
the Temple, but I don't know if there is anything to this. My
brother-in-law the rabbi said the significance of rocks, is the concept of
">from dust you have come, to dust you shall return". I have heard of people
being buried with a handful of earth >from the Holy Land, in lieu of being
buried in Israel, which Jews throughout the ages have longed for - to be
buried in Israel.
Jane Vogel-Kohai
Jerusalem Israel

At 20:22 02/11/00 +0100, George Hall wrote:

My name is George Hall. My office is located directly across >from a rather
large Jewish cemetery in Trevose Pennsylvania. While walking through the
cemetery today I noticed that many of the gravestones had small piles of
rocks on top. Does anyone know if this has some cultural significance? At
first I thought it was coincidence but it soon became apparent that there
were many stones with small rocks.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Female name: Gisha #general

Norman H. Carp-Gordon <zerakodesh@...>
 

The Yiddish form, Gesha, (Russian: Gesya) was found in my sub-clan, the
GORDONs of Dunilovichi, Vileika Uyezd, Vilna Guberniya (18th-19th
century).

On Fri, 03 Nov 2000 15:28:19 +0200 "Prof. G. L. Esterson"
<jerry@vms.huji.ac.il> writes:


The Yiddish name Gisha was indeed used for females in Lithuania.
Some of the other Yiddish names linked to this one are:

Gisa, Gise, Gisha, Gishe, Gisia, Giza, Gize

and some diminutives are:

Gisl, Gisala, Gisale

The main differences between the first group of these names is their
pronunciation.

The name was also used in Ukraine.


Slovakian Towns - Help! #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Does anyone know what these two town in Zemplin County, 1828 & 1836,
could be?

Ma'd (apostrophe is the accent mark) -- possibly Ma'al

Karoly falva

Thank you,

Marian Brown
Cincinnati, Ohio


Hungary SIG #Hungary Slovakian Towns - Help! #hungary

Marian Brown
 

Does anyone know what these two town in Zemplin County, 1828 & 1836,
could be?

Ma'd (apostrophe is the accent mark) -- possibly Ma'al

Karoly falva

Thank you,

Marian Brown
Cincinnati, Ohio


Why #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Could enybody tell me why my e-mails to H-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org
do not make through?

Peter Winter



mod. - they are coming through now!LS


















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Hungary SIG #Hungary Why #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Could enybody tell me why my e-mails to H-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org
do not make through?

Peter Winter



mod. - they are coming through now!LS


















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Cece (Tzetze) #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Hear h-siggers,

I wish to notify you, that the first set of the Cece's Jewish cemetery is
uploaded now, and ready for examining.
The rest will appear as I will have the possibility to make a trip again.
(Perhaps in the second half of Nov.)


Some of the names:

Braun
Grunwadl
Fisher
Lipmann
Miller/Mu:ller
Reich
Segal
Stauber

Best wishes,
Shabat Shalom


Peter Winter




















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Dombrad #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear H-siggers!

I'm back now >from a longer photo-trip. I wish to ask all of you, interested
in Dombrad to contact me privately for sending you the translation of
certain matzevots.

Family names:
Berger
Burger
Danziger
Fettmann
Fo:ldes
Fried
Friedmann
Goldmann
Grosmann
Halévi
Herskovits
Kornfeld
Kron
Nebel
Reiz
Rosenbaum
Salamon
Schlanger
Schwartz
Simkovits
Szegal
Weiss
Zukermann

Thank you,
Winter Peter
























Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Cece #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear h-siggers,

I wish to notify you, that the first set of the Cece's Jewish cemetery is
uploaded now, and ready for examining.
The rest will appear as I will have the possibility to make a trip again.
(Perhaps in the second half of Nov.)


Some of the names:

Braun
Grunwadl
Fisher
Lipmann
Miller/Mu:ller
Reich
Segal
Stauber


http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4/cemeteries.html


Best wishes,
Shabat Shalom

Peter Winter




















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4























Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Hungary SIG #Hungary Cece (Tzetze) #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Hear h-siggers,

I wish to notify you, that the first set of the Cece's Jewish cemetery is
uploaded now, and ready for examining.
The rest will appear as I will have the possibility to make a trip again.
(Perhaps in the second half of Nov.)


Some of the names:

Braun
Grunwadl
Fisher
Lipmann
Miller/Mu:ller
Reich
Segal
Stauber

Best wishes,
Shabat Shalom


Peter Winter




















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Hungary SIG #Hungary Dombrad #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear H-siggers!

I'm back now >from a longer photo-trip. I wish to ask all of you, interested
in Dombrad to contact me privately for sending you the translation of
certain matzevots.

Family names:
Berger
Burger
Danziger
Fettmann
Fo:ldes
Fried
Friedmann
Goldmann
Grosmann
Halévi
Herskovits
Kornfeld
Kron
Nebel
Reiz
Rosenbaum
Salamon
Schlanger
Schwartz
Simkovits
Szegal
Weiss
Zukermann

Thank you,
Winter Peter
























Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Hungary SIG #Hungary Cece #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear h-siggers,

I wish to notify you, that the first set of the Cece's Jewish cemetery is
uploaded now, and ready for examining.
The rest will appear as I will have the possibility to make a trip again.
(Perhaps in the second half of Nov.)


Some of the names:

Braun
Grunwadl
Fisher
Lipmann
Miller/Mu:ller
Reich
Segal
Stauber


http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4/cemeteries.html


Best wishes,
Shabat Shalom

Peter Winter




















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4























Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Zakany #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

I kindly ask all of you, who are interested in Zakany's Jewish cemetery, or
those of you, who knows somebody with no Internet (e-mail) connection, but
had any relation to this South Hungarian willage, to contact me for the
cemetery restoration.
The restoration involves deeply the local government.
There are 27 matzevots. I didn't made photos yet, so I can't tell you names,
but I will try to do it in a month tenure.
Thank you.

Winter Peter






















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4


Hungary SIG #Hungary Zakany #hungary

Szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

I kindly ask all of you, who are interested in Zakany's Jewish cemetery, or
those of you, who knows somebody with no Internet (e-mail) connection, but
had any relation to this South Hungarian willage, to contact me for the
cemetery restoration.
The restoration involves deeply the local government.
There are 27 matzevots. I didn't made photos yet, so I can't tell you names,
but I will try to do it in a month tenure.
Thank you.

Winter Peter






















Check this out: Jewish cemeteries in Hungary

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4