Date   

KAJTER - and Central Jiddish #general

Tess Caiter <TessCaiter@...>
 

Hi Jewishgen-ners,
I know "kajt" in CJ means "chain" and I know Beider lists Kajtler and
Kajtel as occupational Polish surname variants. Would Kajter be a
similar variant of that name? (I came across one Rajzla Kajter e.g. at
the Hrubieszov listings at Jewishgen.)
I have been desperately looking for etymological clues to our original
surname (which was Romanised in the 1920ies and then in 1977 Germanised
to its current form), and would really be glad to have an expert look
into this...
Thanks!!

Tess
TessCaiter@t-online.de


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KAJTER - and Central Jiddish #general

Tess Caiter <TessCaiter@...>
 

Hi Jewishgen-ners,
I know "kajt" in CJ means "chain" and I know Beider lists Kajtler and
Kajtel as occupational Polish surname variants. Would Kajter be a
similar variant of that name? (I came across one Rajzla Kajter e.g. at
the Hrubieszov listings at Jewishgen.)
I have been desperately looking for etymological clues to our original
surname (which was Romanised in the 1920ies and then in 1977 Germanised
to its current form), and would really be glad to have an expert look
into this...
Thanks!!

Tess
TessCaiter@t-online.de


MORANTZ - Philadelphia #general

Norman Morantz <nmorantz@...>
 

Would some kind JewishGenner please look up the death notice for William
MORANTZ in the Philly papers and E-mail the obit. to me. The Soc. Sec.
Death Index lists his death as Sept. 20, 2000.

Please reply privately. I will be happy to reciprocate with lookup of
Montreal papers.

Norman Morantz
Montreal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MORANTZ - Philadelphia #general

Norman Morantz <nmorantz@...>
 

Would some kind JewishGenner please look up the death notice for William
MORANTZ in the Philly papers and E-mail the obit. to me. The Soc. Sec.
Death Index lists his death as Sept. 20, 2000.

Please reply privately. I will be happy to reciprocate with lookup of
Montreal papers.

Norman Morantz
Montreal


Re: SS-5 form #general

Jeanne Gold <jeannegold@...>
 

From: Eric Haas <erichaas@home.com>
If the person you are interested in does not appear in the SSDI, you will
have to provide proof of death. The Social Security Administration will
accept a copy of the death certificate, or a death notice or obituary
from the newspaper.
Unless the Social Security Administration (SSA) has changed it's
requirements, this is not true. I made 2 requests for an ancestor's SS-5
by modifying a standard letter produced by http://www.ancestry.com/ in
which I included the person's name at time of death, birth date, death
date, last residence, if known, parent's names, and check for $16.50 (the
cost when you don't know the Social Security Number (SSN); it's $7.00 when
you do know it). I did not include any proof of death. In one case the
record was found, and in the other it was not. In the case where the
record was not found I had thought she might not have had one since other
records asking for a SSN were blank. See "Guide to Freedom of Information
Act Requests" (below) -- there is no proof of death requirement.

I've also been following along the conversations about what is contained
in an SS-5 Application and what is contained in the "Master Files of
Social Security Number (SSN) Holders and SSN Applications, HHS/SSA/OSR".
SSA describes their files at:
http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/bluebook/09600058.htm

Information about the "Original Social Security Number Application Forms"
can be found at:
http://www.ssa.gov/history/ssnforms.html

Other pages of interest:
List of Historical Documents:
http://www.ssa.gov/history/brief.html
Part 2: Social Security Since 1935:
http://www.ssa.gov/history/history6.html

More specifically, those with questions about what/how to make requests
should refer to:

(1) Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ):
http://www.ssa.gov/history/hfaq.html
refer to Q9: What information is available >from Social Security
records to help in genealogical research?

(2) "Guide to Freedom of Information Act Requests"
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/foia_guide.htm
Summary:
(a) no form is required
(b) include your name and address on the request
(c) include a daytime telephone number
(d) do not include a return envelope
(e) write on your envelope and the letter "FREEDOM OF INFORMATION
REQUEST " or "INFORMATION REQUEST."
(f) if requesting copies of applications for social security
numbers (Form SS-5) for people who are deceased, address your request to:
Social Security Administration
OEO FOIA Workgroup
300 N. Greene Street
P.O. Box 33022
Baltimore, Maryland 21290-3022
(g) all other FOIA requests, send to:
Office of Disclosure Policy,
3-A-6 Operations Building,
6401 Security Boulevard,
Baltimore, Maryland, 21235
(h) You can also write or give your written request to any Social
Security field office
(i) FEES
- Social Security Number application search when you have the
number - $7.00
- Social Security Number application search when you don't have
the number. In these cases we need identifying information (name, place
and date of birth, father's full name, and mother's given and maiden
names) to find the record - $16.50
- Search for a claim file - $14
- Photocopying material(s) - 10 cents per page plus postage

Next: why are some records present and not others. Read the "Background"
and "Results of Review" sections and "Some Deaths Were Not Recorded in the
DMF" (page 5 of appendix B) contained in "Improving the Usefulness of the
Social Security Administration's Death Master File" located at:
http://www.ssa.gov/oig/adobepdf/98-61011.pdf

Jeanne Gold
California, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SS-5 form #general

Jeanne Gold <jeannegold@...>
 

From: Eric Haas <erichaas@home.com>
If the person you are interested in does not appear in the SSDI, you will
have to provide proof of death. The Social Security Administration will
accept a copy of the death certificate, or a death notice or obituary
from the newspaper.
Unless the Social Security Administration (SSA) has changed it's
requirements, this is not true. I made 2 requests for an ancestor's SS-5
by modifying a standard letter produced by http://www.ancestry.com/ in
which I included the person's name at time of death, birth date, death
date, last residence, if known, parent's names, and check for $16.50 (the
cost when you don't know the Social Security Number (SSN); it's $7.00 when
you do know it). I did not include any proof of death. In one case the
record was found, and in the other it was not. In the case where the
record was not found I had thought she might not have had one since other
records asking for a SSN were blank. See "Guide to Freedom of Information
Act Requests" (below) -- there is no proof of death requirement.

I've also been following along the conversations about what is contained
in an SS-5 Application and what is contained in the "Master Files of
Social Security Number (SSN) Holders and SSN Applications, HHS/SSA/OSR".
SSA describes their files at:
http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/bluebook/09600058.htm

Information about the "Original Social Security Number Application Forms"
can be found at:
http://www.ssa.gov/history/ssnforms.html

Other pages of interest:
List of Historical Documents:
http://www.ssa.gov/history/brief.html
Part 2: Social Security Since 1935:
http://www.ssa.gov/history/history6.html

More specifically, those with questions about what/how to make requests
should refer to:

(1) Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ):
http://www.ssa.gov/history/hfaq.html
refer to Q9: What information is available >from Social Security
records to help in genealogical research?

(2) "Guide to Freedom of Information Act Requests"
http://www.ssa.gov/foia/foia_guide.htm
Summary:
(a) no form is required
(b) include your name and address on the request
(c) include a daytime telephone number
(d) do not include a return envelope
(e) write on your envelope and the letter "FREEDOM OF INFORMATION
REQUEST " or "INFORMATION REQUEST."
(f) if requesting copies of applications for social security
numbers (Form SS-5) for people who are deceased, address your request to:
Social Security Administration
OEO FOIA Workgroup
300 N. Greene Street
P.O. Box 33022
Baltimore, Maryland 21290-3022
(g) all other FOIA requests, send to:
Office of Disclosure Policy,
3-A-6 Operations Building,
6401 Security Boulevard,
Baltimore, Maryland, 21235
(h) You can also write or give your written request to any Social
Security field office
(i) FEES
- Social Security Number application search when you have the
number - $7.00
- Social Security Number application search when you don't have
the number. In these cases we need identifying information (name, place
and date of birth, father's full name, and mother's given and maiden
names) to find the record - $16.50
- Search for a claim file - $14
- Photocopying material(s) - 10 cents per page plus postage

Next: why are some records present and not others. Read the "Background"
and "Results of Review" sections and "Some Deaths Were Not Recorded in the
DMF" (page 5 of appendix B) contained in "Improving the Usefulness of the
Social Security Administration's Death Master File" located at:
http://www.ssa.gov/oig/adobepdf/98-61011.pdf

Jeanne Gold
California, USA


Help with translation of document on Viewmate #general

Stranddr@...
 

I have posted the death certificate of L/ajb Jako'b Slowes on
Viewmate File VM 075. The language is Russian. He died in Warsaw
in 1893 and he might have been my great grandfather. Thanks in advance
for any help you can give me and I will make a donation to Jewishgen
in your honor.

Phyllis Goldberg
N. Bethesda, MD
My Email is stranddr@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with translation of document on Viewmate #general

Stranddr@...
 

I have posted the death certificate of L/ajb Jako'b Slowes on
Viewmate File VM 075. The language is Russian. He died in Warsaw
in 1893 and he might have been my great grandfather. Thanks in advance
for any help you can give me and I will make a donation to Jewishgen
in your honor.

Phyllis Goldberg
N. Bethesda, MD
My Email is stranddr@aol.com


Re: Talmud Torah question #latvia

David Crook <CROOKFAMILY@...>
 

we have come across a family member listed as being on the Board of the
Talmud Torah. Could someone please clarify what "Talmud Torah" would have
meant in the shtetl? >

Anne Johnston
Dear Anne,

I have seen no replies to your Talmud Torah question on the LitvakSIG and
related group noticeboards. I am a little uncertain whether this will be of
help, but here's my two cents' worth.

As someone who grew up in South Africa, a mainly Litvak community, I
remember well the constant discussion of my elders when I was a child
concerning the "Talmud Torah." I myself attended the Joseph Miller Talmud
Torah in Johannesburg's Southern Suburbs >from age four [!] until my
barmitzvah, moving on to the King David Jewish Day School in Linksfield. My
grandfather was on the Board of this Talmud Torah. Local references in
Jewish newspapers over the years to Talmud Torahs were of similar meaning:
The "Talmud Torah" was the Hebrew School attached to the synagogue,
generally attended each afternoon by the local community's children. We
referred to it as "Cheder," the Hebrew word for "room," and both "Cheder"
and "Talmud Torah" had their origins in the shtetl. Jewish children did not
go to state or other schools in "Der Heim" -- they went to
Jewish-administered educational establishments. Originally barred from
attending any other school, this was the only place of education for a
Jewish child, and the move to the newer, Western worlds with minor changes
to accommodate daily/compulsory, state-required morning school, was the
educational establishment that had worked for us for centuries -- the Hebrew
School, or "Cheder" which taught us how to read and write Hebrew, and in
earlier years, Yiddish as well, with the corresponding Judaic studies,
biblical and festival, literature and history. Since a Jewish child in the
shtetl had nowhere else to go, the Cheder became his [because it was
usually, but not always, confined to boys] place of overall learning,
literacy and guide to a way of life within the community. It has evolved
into today's Hebrew and Religious School, but this differs >from the original
like chalk >from cheese.

To study Torah, literally "Law", is to study a genealogical history of our
ancestors and the theocratic lifestyle commanded therein. But Judaism is to
the Torah as America to its Constitution -- one cannot exist without the
other, but can do little unless expanded upon and applied to daily life
situations, upgraded by the powers-that-be [Rabbis and Beth Dins, Supreme
Court and Senate and Congress], in order to be the "tree of life to those
who embrace it." The explanations, discussions, opinions and generally
accepted results of the "ongoing" talks on the subject were written down and
passed >from generation to generation and became Jewish Law -- the word "go"
in Hebrew = "Holaych", gives rise to the word "Halachah" -- the ongoing,
updated Jewish Law. And so, it is not the Torah that is Jewish Law, but
rather the interpretation based upon the Torah that scholars have determined
to protect the Torah throughout history, that has become Jewish Law; The
Hebrew word for "Learn" = "Lomed" changes with the distinctive "ooo" sound
of the passive voice to "Talmud," meaning "that which is learned or
studied". So, the Talmud Torah is nothing more nor less than the gathering
place where the Torah is studied, which, according to Jewish Law, is the
first place that needs to be erected by any Jewish community, since all
other Jewish activities can take place there, and the chief activity of Jews
is to study the Torah and Talmud. The Oral Law, or "Mishnah" is supplemented
by the discussions that become law, the completion or "Gemarah," which
together comprise the Talmud. The whole emphasis of Judaism is Study, to
understand that which the Divine wants us to accomplish and how to behave in
this life. Hence the importance of the "Talmud Torah," its import into the
New World, and the reverence for anyone who was entrusted with its execution
as being a Board Member -- implying knowledge, scholastic and leadership
qualities and one's standing within the community -- for the future of that
community's Jewish population and what it studied and the facilities
available to it, the emphasis of its core studies, the books chosen for the
studies, and the teachers chosen to supervise the young minds -- is awesome
in its scope and responsibility.

The Talmud Torah was the body that governed the Jewish learning process. It
raised the funds, chose the "melamdim" or teachers and ensured the passing
of Jewish knowledge "Midor ledor," >from generation to generation. Its
natural progression lead to the schools of higher learning -- the Yeshivot,
the Rabbinic schools and seminaries and even the establishment of the Beth
Din therefrom, since the credibility of the rabbis that form a Beth Din
cements its reputation within a community; there is a difference between a
Yale or Harvard and that of the local Community College, and its graduates
generally deserve the corresponding respect accorded them. >from humble
beginnings the great emerge. The Talmud Torah, a concept of teaching our
little ones, is the foundation for Judaic learning throughout the world.

DAVID CROOK
4800 SOUTH CHICAGO BEACH DRIVE
APARTMENT # 204 SOUTH
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 60615
TELEPHONE: [773] 924-6424
E-MAIL: CROOKFAMILY@prodigy.net


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Talmud Torah question #latvia

David Crook <CROOKFAMILY@...>
 

we have come across a family member listed as being on the Board of the
Talmud Torah. Could someone please clarify what "Talmud Torah" would have
meant in the shtetl? >

Anne Johnston
Dear Anne,

I have seen no replies to your Talmud Torah question on the LitvakSIG and
related group noticeboards. I am a little uncertain whether this will be of
help, but here's my two cents' worth.

As someone who grew up in South Africa, a mainly Litvak community, I
remember well the constant discussion of my elders when I was a child
concerning the "Talmud Torah." I myself attended the Joseph Miller Talmud
Torah in Johannesburg's Southern Suburbs >from age four [!] until my
barmitzvah, moving on to the King David Jewish Day School in Linksfield. My
grandfather was on the Board of this Talmud Torah. Local references in
Jewish newspapers over the years to Talmud Torahs were of similar meaning:
The "Talmud Torah" was the Hebrew School attached to the synagogue,
generally attended each afternoon by the local community's children. We
referred to it as "Cheder," the Hebrew word for "room," and both "Cheder"
and "Talmud Torah" had their origins in the shtetl. Jewish children did not
go to state or other schools in "Der Heim" -- they went to
Jewish-administered educational establishments. Originally barred from
attending any other school, this was the only place of education for a
Jewish child, and the move to the newer, Western worlds with minor changes
to accommodate daily/compulsory, state-required morning school, was the
educational establishment that had worked for us for centuries -- the Hebrew
School, or "Cheder" which taught us how to read and write Hebrew, and in
earlier years, Yiddish as well, with the corresponding Judaic studies,
biblical and festival, literature and history. Since a Jewish child in the
shtetl had nowhere else to go, the Cheder became his [because it was
usually, but not always, confined to boys] place of overall learning,
literacy and guide to a way of life within the community. It has evolved
into today's Hebrew and Religious School, but this differs >from the original
like chalk >from cheese.

To study Torah, literally "Law", is to study a genealogical history of our
ancestors and the theocratic lifestyle commanded therein. But Judaism is to
the Torah as America to its Constitution -- one cannot exist without the
other, but can do little unless expanded upon and applied to daily life
situations, upgraded by the powers-that-be [Rabbis and Beth Dins, Supreme
Court and Senate and Congress], in order to be the "tree of life to those
who embrace it." The explanations, discussions, opinions and generally
accepted results of the "ongoing" talks on the subject were written down and
passed >from generation to generation and became Jewish Law -- the word "go"
in Hebrew = "Holaych", gives rise to the word "Halachah" -- the ongoing,
updated Jewish Law. And so, it is not the Torah that is Jewish Law, but
rather the interpretation based upon the Torah that scholars have determined
to protect the Torah throughout history, that has become Jewish Law; The
Hebrew word for "Learn" = "Lomed" changes with the distinctive "ooo" sound
of the passive voice to "Talmud," meaning "that which is learned or
studied". So, the Talmud Torah is nothing more nor less than the gathering
place where the Torah is studied, which, according to Jewish Law, is the
first place that needs to be erected by any Jewish community, since all
other Jewish activities can take place there, and the chief activity of Jews
is to study the Torah and Talmud. The Oral Law, or "Mishnah" is supplemented
by the discussions that become law, the completion or "Gemarah," which
together comprise the Talmud. The whole emphasis of Judaism is Study, to
understand that which the Divine wants us to accomplish and how to behave in
this life. Hence the importance of the "Talmud Torah," its import into the
New World, and the reverence for anyone who was entrusted with its execution
as being a Board Member -- implying knowledge, scholastic and leadership
qualities and one's standing within the community -- for the future of that
community's Jewish population and what it studied and the facilities
available to it, the emphasis of its core studies, the books chosen for the
studies, and the teachers chosen to supervise the young minds -- is awesome
in its scope and responsibility.

The Talmud Torah was the body that governed the Jewish learning process. It
raised the funds, chose the "melamdim" or teachers and ensured the passing
of Jewish knowledge "Midor ledor," >from generation to generation. Its
natural progression lead to the schools of higher learning -- the Yeshivot,
the Rabbinic schools and seminaries and even the establishment of the Beth
Din therefrom, since the credibility of the rabbis that form a Beth Din
cements its reputation within a community; there is a difference between a
Yale or Harvard and that of the local Community College, and its graduates
generally deserve the corresponding respect accorded them. >from humble
beginnings the great emerge. The Talmud Torah, a concept of teaching our
little ones, is the foundation for Judaic learning throughout the world.

DAVID CROOK
4800 SOUTH CHICAGO BEACH DRIVE
APARTMENT # 204 SOUTH
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 60615
TELEPHONE: [773] 924-6424
E-MAIL: CROOKFAMILY@prodigy.net


Krakow Synagogue Marriage and Banns Project - Phase I Update #poland

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

To date we have received $2,415 towards the $3,000 needed to fund Phase I of
this great project. The indeces are very comprehensive including names of
bride and groom, parents of bride and groom, in many cases the maiden names
of the mothers, the towns >from which they came. This project, sponsored by
the JGS, INc. (NY) and with access given to us by the Jewish Historical
Institute in Warsaw, gives us a wonderful opportunity to move genealogical
research in this area forward to 1939 when all phases are funded.

Please send contributions in US$ to Jewish Records Indexing - Poland and
mark your check Krakow Marriage and Banns or JHI. Send funds to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland,
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer,
5607 Greenleaf Rd., Cheverly,
MD20785

or pay by Visa at:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm>

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Krakow Town Leader


JRI Poland #Poland Krakow Synagogue Marriage and Banns Project - Phase I Update #poland

Judy Wolkovitch <judywolk@...>
 

To date we have received $2,415 towards the $3,000 needed to fund Phase I of
this great project. The indeces are very comprehensive including names of
bride and groom, parents of bride and groom, in many cases the maiden names
of the mothers, the towns >from which they came. This project, sponsored by
the JGS, INc. (NY) and with access given to us by the Jewish Historical
Institute in Warsaw, gives us a wonderful opportunity to move genealogical
research in this area forward to 1939 when all phases are funded.

Please send contributions in US$ to Jewish Records Indexing - Poland and
mark your check Krakow Marriage and Banns or JHI. Send funds to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland,
c/o Sheila Salo, Treasurer,
5607 Greenleaf Rd., Cheverly,
MD20785

or pay by Visa at:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm>

Many thanks,

Judy Wolkovitch
Krakow Town Leader


Seredne Cemetary #hungary

ShifBe@...
 

I am wondering how I can get access to the names of those buried in the
Seredne Cemetary. I am hoping to find my great grandfather's father's name
via the records..his name was Menachim Weinberger and he died approx in 1925.
Any help or direction would be appreciated.
Thanks
Shifra Bemis
Researching Weinberger Seredne
Oestricher Seredne/Munkach/Csenger


Looking for Solomon Schlussel #hungary

lionsden@...
 

I am trying to locate a correct e-mail address for Solomon Schlussel.
The one that he used to post messages to the SIG is bouncing
mail back to me. Is anyone in touch with him? If so, please send
me his updated address or forward this note on to him. I have
information that he would be interested in.

Thank you,

Meyer Denn
Jerusalem


-----
Sent using MailStart.com ( http://MailStart.Com/welcome.html )
The FREE way to access your mailbox via any web browser, anywhere!


Hungary SIG #Hungary Seredne Cemetary #hungary

ShifBe@...
 

I am wondering how I can get access to the names of those buried in the
Seredne Cemetary. I am hoping to find my great grandfather's father's name
via the records..his name was Menachim Weinberger and he died approx in 1925.
Any help or direction would be appreciated.
Thanks
Shifra Bemis
Researching Weinberger Seredne
Oestricher Seredne/Munkach/Csenger


Hungary SIG #Hungary Looking for Solomon Schlussel #hungary

lionsden@...
 

I am trying to locate a correct e-mail address for Solomon Schlussel.
The one that he used to post messages to the SIG is bouncing
mail back to me. Is anyone in touch with him? If so, please send
me his updated address or forward this note on to him. I have
information that he would be interested in.

Thank you,

Meyer Denn
Jerusalem


-----
Sent using MailStart.com ( http://MailStart.Com/welcome.html )
The FREE way to access your mailbox via any web browser, anywhere!


Sam Jacobs: The Names of my great Uncle and Great Grandfatther #hungary

EScharff3@...
 

11/15/00

My Great Grandfather and Great Uncle were both named Sam Jacobs.
My Great Grandfather was born in Smilnick, Hungary in 1868. Sam Jacobs my
great Uncle was born in 1895 at Snina ,Czechoslovakia.They both Immigrated to
the USA. I would like to find out the following:
1. Where is Smilnick,Hungary?
2.When the Immigration occured.Ports of Departure and Arrival
3. What brought them to Mississippi?
4. Who were their Parents, Siblings etc.?
Thanks for any sugestions.
Earle U.Scharff III


Re: Magyarorszag helysegneptara #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

It does not contain any names, only a number identifying how many people were
living in the town.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Sam Jacobs: The Names of my great Uncle and Great Grandfatther #hungary

EScharff3@...
 

11/15/00

My Great Grandfather and Great Uncle were both named Sam Jacobs.
My Great Grandfather was born in Smilnick, Hungary in 1868. Sam Jacobs my
great Uncle was born in 1895 at Snina ,Czechoslovakia.They both Immigrated to
the USA. I would like to find out the following:
1. Where is Smilnick,Hungary?
2.When the Immigration occured.Ports of Departure and Arrival
3. What brought them to Mississippi?
4. Who were their Parents, Siblings etc.?
Thanks for any sugestions.
Earle U.Scharff III


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Magyarorszag helysegneptara #hungary

AttilaRona@...
 

It does not contain any names, only a number identifying how many people were
living in the town.