Date   

Re: Hebrew/Yiddish for "Lawrence" #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

My son is Rabbi Barnea Levi Ha-Kohen Selavan.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

From: Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@Brown.edu>

I now have this question: given that my great-grandfather's last name
was "Cohen", how likely is it that his first name would have been
"Levi"? It seems pretty contradictory to me. Is there any customary or
Halakhic reason why a Cohen would not have been called "Levi"?
There's no logical reason why Kohen should not have the given name Levi.
Apart >from anything else, the original Kohanim, according to the Torah,
were members of the tribe of Levi. Kohanim are (theoretically, at least)
the direct descendants of Aaron. But, according to the Torah text, Aaron
was the brother of Moses -- and both were >from the tribe of Levi. (See,
for instance,the genealogy given at Numbers 27:58-59 which spells this
out clearly.) So there's no inconsistency or contradiction involved here.


NYC Birth Certificates #general

McCarthy
 

Is anyone close to NYC archives able to help me get a copy of a birth
certificate for:
Pearl FERBER b. 13 December 1895 Certificate # 52093

Your help would be greatly appreciated. This info should help me through a
road block.

Thanks in advance,
Barbara Ferber-McCarthy
ga4mccarthys@mindspring.com

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen has two Infofiles that can help those
attempting to locate vital records in New York City.
1) "New York Vital Records" written by Sheila Kieval at <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ny-vital.html> and
2) "New York City Birth, Marriage and Death Records - LDS Microfilms"
written by Warren Blatt at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/nycv-lds.txt>.


Tay-Sachs and genealogy #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

<< I seem to remember that the Tay Sachs is not exclusively Ashkenazi. Is
it correct that it is also found in French Canadians? Is it found in
others? This subject has sudenly become of interest because a distant
cousin of my wife's (WASP convert to Judaism) has been informed of the
discovery of Tay Sachs in members of that family in England, who are
presumably entirely English. If there is no record of English Tay Sachs,
would it mean that a Jew (or, less likely, a French Canadian) had married
into the family? More generally, does discovery of the Tay Sachs gene
signify some Jewish ancestry in families nominally of other Ethnic groups?
Al Rosenfield >>

Al--It would depend. In October our JGS had the opportunity to hear Dr.
Harry Ostrer of NYU, who is working on the current project tracing Jewish
DNA. I actually asked him for a clarification of this point, having known
that both Askenazi Jews and the French Cajuns of Louisiana carry the gene
for Tay-Sachs. Since Tay-Sachs is caused by a mutation on a particular
chromosome, my question was whether or not these two groups are
genealogically related, since the disease is quite rare. His answer was
that in both groups, there is a mutation on a particular chromosome that
causes Tay-Sachs, *but* the mutation is different in both groups. In other
words, two completely different mutations on the same chromosome cause
Tay-Sachs to appear in the two groups, indicating that the abnormality
developed separately in both groups--ergo, they are *not* related to each
other.

What this means in your family's case I am not certain. I am not familiar
with the chances of a gene just mutating for Tay-Sachs in a family--for
this you would need to consult a geneticist. Could someone >from one of the
two above groups have married into your wife's family? Well, I guess you
have your genealogy work cut out for you!

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland CRomRider@aol.com


Jewish cemetery in Hull #general

JaneFish <Jane@...>
 

Evening :-)

Recently the Hull Daily Mail had a list of
persons to be re-located within
the Jewish Burial Ground at Delhi Street
Cemetery, Hull - Hedon road is to
be widened. Burials were between 1834 and 1937.
Anyone wishing more information should contact me.

Janefish@Henio.Muc.De

Cheers Jane


SCHWETSKY/GOLDBERG #general

Carol Hartzenberg <carol@...>
 

Reuben and Tina SCHWETSKY arrived in England, >from Russia, sometime
during the 1880s. They changed their name to GOLDBERG and settled in
Leeds. Any information greatly appreciated.
Carol HARTZENBERG
home : carol@erichome.demon.co.uk
Web : www.erichome.demon.co.uk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hebrew/Yiddish for "Lawrence" #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

My son is Rabbi Barnea Levi Ha-Kohen Selavan.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel

From: Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@Brown.edu>

I now have this question: given that my great-grandfather's last name
was "Cohen", how likely is it that his first name would have been
"Levi"? It seems pretty contradictory to me. Is there any customary or
Halakhic reason why a Cohen would not have been called "Levi"?
There's no logical reason why Kohen should not have the given name Levi.
Apart >from anything else, the original Kohanim, according to the Torah,
were members of the tribe of Levi. Kohanim are (theoretically, at least)
the direct descendants of Aaron. But, according to the Torah text, Aaron
was the brother of Moses -- and both were >from the tribe of Levi. (See,
for instance,the genealogy given at Numbers 27:58-59 which spells this
out clearly.) So there's no inconsistency or contradiction involved here.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Birth Certificates #general

McCarthy
 

Is anyone close to NYC archives able to help me get a copy of a birth
certificate for:
Pearl FERBER b. 13 December 1895 Certificate # 52093

Your help would be greatly appreciated. This info should help me through a
road block.

Thanks in advance,
Barbara Ferber-McCarthy
ga4mccarthys@mindspring.com

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen has two Infofiles that can help those
attempting to locate vital records in New York City.
1) "New York Vital Records" written by Sheila Kieval at <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ny-vital.html> and
2) "New York City Birth, Marriage and Death Records - LDS Microfilms"
written by Warren Blatt at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/nycv-lds.txt>.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Tay-Sachs and genealogy #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

<< I seem to remember that the Tay Sachs is not exclusively Ashkenazi. Is
it correct that it is also found in French Canadians? Is it found in
others? This subject has sudenly become of interest because a distant
cousin of my wife's (WASP convert to Judaism) has been informed of the
discovery of Tay Sachs in members of that family in England, who are
presumably entirely English. If there is no record of English Tay Sachs,
would it mean that a Jew (or, less likely, a French Canadian) had married
into the family? More generally, does discovery of the Tay Sachs gene
signify some Jewish ancestry in families nominally of other Ethnic groups?
Al Rosenfield >>

Al--It would depend. In October our JGS had the opportunity to hear Dr.
Harry Ostrer of NYU, who is working on the current project tracing Jewish
DNA. I actually asked him for a clarification of this point, having known
that both Askenazi Jews and the French Cajuns of Louisiana carry the gene
for Tay-Sachs. Since Tay-Sachs is caused by a mutation on a particular
chromosome, my question was whether or not these two groups are
genealogically related, since the disease is quite rare. His answer was
that in both groups, there is a mutation on a particular chromosome that
causes Tay-Sachs, *but* the mutation is different in both groups. In other
words, two completely different mutations on the same chromosome cause
Tay-Sachs to appear in the two groups, indicating that the abnormality
developed separately in both groups--ergo, they are *not* related to each
other.

What this means in your family's case I am not certain. I am not familiar
with the chances of a gene just mutating for Tay-Sachs in a family--for
this you would need to consult a geneticist. Could someone >from one of the
two above groups have married into your wife's family? Well, I guess you
have your genealogy work cut out for you!

Carol Rombro Rider Baltimore, Maryland CRomRider@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish cemetery in Hull #general

JaneFish <Jane@...>
 

Evening :-)

Recently the Hull Daily Mail had a list of
persons to be re-located within
the Jewish Burial Ground at Delhi Street
Cemetery, Hull - Hedon road is to
be widened. Burials were between 1834 and 1937.
Anyone wishing more information should contact me.

Janefish@Henio.Muc.De

Cheers Jane


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHWETSKY/GOLDBERG #general

Carol Hartzenberg <carol@...>
 

Reuben and Tina SCHWETSKY arrived in England, >from Russia, sometime
during the 1880s. They changed their name to GOLDBERG and settled in
Leeds. Any information greatly appreciated.
Carol HARTZENBERG
home : carol@erichome.demon.co.uk
Web : www.erichome.demon.co.uk


Re: Query about archives in Kosice, Slovakia #general

Jan Bousse <boussejan@...>
 

Dear Joan,

I did some research situated in Kosice, in particular the town of
Roznave. The address I have for the State archives in Kosice is :

Statny Oblastny Archiv v Kosiciach, 041 56 Kosice, Bacikova 1,
P.O.Box C-26.

For what I believe is the local authority I have this address :

Krajsky Urad v Kosiciach
Odbor Vseobecnej Vnutornej Spravy
Oddelenie statoobcianskych veci a matrik
Komenskeho 52, 041 26 Kosice.

Quite a mouthfull, isn't it! And of course there are heaps of little
signs of all possible shapes on some of the letters, which I could not
reproduce. My experience is that they are helpful, up to a point. The
State archives seem to be able to correspond in English, the town itself
answered in Slovak. >from the town I received a marriage certificate, the
State archives were able to search in other towns. Sometimes they asked
for money, but I don't think that was excessive.

I will be glad to tell you more if you need it and if I can.

Jan Bousse, Oostende, Belgium

Jfpol wrote:

I just obtained research documenting that my MOSKOWITZ ancestors
emigrated >from Kaschau, Hungary in 1880, presently Kosice, Slovakia.
I wonder if others doing family research in this region could direct me
to addresses I might write to in Slovakia for archival records >from
19th century Kaschau. Having had experience with another region in
Slovakia in the past, I'm aware that the records may be limited. If
someone is aware of the Family History Library microfilm numbers I
would also appreciate that information.


Re: Help Needed on Difficult Gravestone Inscriptions #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Dear Eric
If the first Hebrew letters, BAHVav N refer to a date, they may be " On the
first of the month of Nissan." This is just a guess.
The second word may be BeHorodna, another way of spelling Grodno.
The third word may be " In Nezhvish." I cannot figure out the Yod Vav Bet
or the other words.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel.

From: Eric Adler <eladler@yahoo.com>

I am unable to decipher inscriptions of the following
dates in the cemetery in Grodno:

bet-alef-khet-vav''nun
dalet-heh-vav-resh-dalet-nun-heh 5544

bet-nun-zayin-vav-tsadee-alef-yod yod-vav''bet
5647

vav-zayin''yod Adar 5554

yod-bet-vav Tishri 5637

alef-lamed-heh-yod-mem alef-samekh-peh-vav 5635

(Letters in the same word are separated by hyphens;
words are separated by spaces; '' indicates an
abbreviation. Some letters may be misread.)

Also, what might the abbreviation ayin''heh
immediately after the names of a woman and her
daughter-in-law signify (they died about six years
apart)?


Re: Help Needed on Difficult Gravestone Inscriptions #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

dates in the cemetery in Grodno:
[snip]>
alef-lamed-heh-yod-mem alef-samekh-peh-vav 5635

Also, what might the abbreviation ayin''heh
immediately after the names of a woman and her
daughter-in-law signify (they died about six years
apart)?

Eric Adler
This one had some fairly simple words and some morepuzzling groups of
letters. Here are the bits I have (I think!) managed to decipher --
hopefully someone else has figured out the rest:

(1)The last Hebrew line you give looks like : <Elohim asafo 5635> --
meaning "God gathered him up" (i..e., he died) in 1875."

(2) The letters <ayin"heh> after a woman's name signify <aleha hashalom>
("peace be upon her", i.e., "may she rest in peace" (in the case of a man,
it signifies <alav hashalom> ("may he rest in peace")

(3) I couldn't make sense of most of the letter groupings in the first few
lines -- if accurately transcribed, they don't seem to be Hebrew words as
such -- except that in the second line dalet-heh-vav-resh-dalet-nun-heh
can be read as "de-Horodnah" and my guess is that Horodnah is a Yiddish
spelling of Grodno -- in which case the whole phrase would mean "the
something-or-other of Grodno" (but I don't know what!)

(4) And the "5,000 series" of numbers are obviously years (you need to add
240 to each of them to arrive at the secular year in the 18th or 19th
centuries).

(5) I am wondering if some of what you read as "vav"s or "yod"s could be
misread slashes or squiggles -- for instance your "yod-bet-vav Tishri"
might be yod-bet/slash Tishri, meaning 12th of Tishri, and your "vav-zayin-
yod Adar" could perhaps be yod-zayin /slash Adar, meaning 17th Adar.

That's my best shot, and I look forward to someone else solving the other
mysteries.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Query about archives in Kosice, Slovakia #general

Jan Bousse <boussejan@...>
 

Dear Joan,

I did some research situated in Kosice, in particular the town of
Roznave. The address I have for the State archives in Kosice is :

Statny Oblastny Archiv v Kosiciach, 041 56 Kosice, Bacikova 1,
P.O.Box C-26.

For what I believe is the local authority I have this address :

Krajsky Urad v Kosiciach
Odbor Vseobecnej Vnutornej Spravy
Oddelenie statoobcianskych veci a matrik
Komenskeho 52, 041 26 Kosice.

Quite a mouthfull, isn't it! And of course there are heaps of little
signs of all possible shapes on some of the letters, which I could not
reproduce. My experience is that they are helpful, up to a point. The
State archives seem to be able to correspond in English, the town itself
answered in Slovak. >from the town I received a marriage certificate, the
State archives were able to search in other towns. Sometimes they asked
for money, but I don't think that was excessive.

I will be glad to tell you more if you need it and if I can.

Jan Bousse, Oostende, Belgium

Jfpol wrote:

I just obtained research documenting that my MOSKOWITZ ancestors
emigrated >from Kaschau, Hungary in 1880, presently Kosice, Slovakia.
I wonder if others doing family research in this region could direct me
to addresses I might write to in Slovakia for archival records >from
19th century Kaschau. Having had experience with another region in
Slovakia in the past, I'm aware that the records may be limited. If
someone is aware of the Family History Library microfilm numbers I
would also appreciate that information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help Needed on Difficult Gravestone Inscriptions #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

Dear Eric
If the first Hebrew letters, BAHVav N refer to a date, they may be " On the
first of the month of Nissan." This is just a guess.
The second word may be BeHorodna, another way of spelling Grodno.
The third word may be " In Nezhvish." I cannot figure out the Yod Vav Bet
or the other words.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, Israel.

From: Eric Adler <eladler@yahoo.com>

I am unable to decipher inscriptions of the following
dates in the cemetery in Grodno:

bet-alef-khet-vav''nun
dalet-heh-vav-resh-dalet-nun-heh 5544

bet-nun-zayin-vav-tsadee-alef-yod yod-vav''bet
5647

vav-zayin''yod Adar 5554

yod-bet-vav Tishri 5637

alef-lamed-heh-yod-mem alef-samekh-peh-vav 5635

(Letters in the same word are separated by hyphens;
words are separated by spaces; '' indicates an
abbreviation. Some letters may be misread.)

Also, what might the abbreviation ayin''heh
immediately after the names of a woman and her
daughter-in-law signify (they died about six years
apart)?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help Needed on Difficult Gravestone Inscriptions #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

dates in the cemetery in Grodno:
[snip]>
alef-lamed-heh-yod-mem alef-samekh-peh-vav 5635

Also, what might the abbreviation ayin''heh
immediately after the names of a woman and her
daughter-in-law signify (they died about six years
apart)?

Eric Adler
This one had some fairly simple words and some morepuzzling groups of
letters. Here are the bits I have (I think!) managed to decipher --
hopefully someone else has figured out the rest:

(1)The last Hebrew line you give looks like : <Elohim asafo 5635> --
meaning "God gathered him up" (i..e., he died) in 1875."

(2) The letters <ayin"heh> after a woman's name signify <aleha hashalom>
("peace be upon her", i.e., "may she rest in peace" (in the case of a man,
it signifies <alav hashalom> ("may he rest in peace")

(3) I couldn't make sense of most of the letter groupings in the first few
lines -- if accurately transcribed, they don't seem to be Hebrew words as
such -- except that in the second line dalet-heh-vav-resh-dalet-nun-heh
can be read as "de-Horodnah" and my guess is that Horodnah is a Yiddish
spelling of Grodno -- in which case the whole phrase would mean "the
something-or-other of Grodno" (but I don't know what!)

(4) And the "5,000 series" of numbers are obviously years (you need to add
240 to each of them to arrive at the secular year in the 18th or 19th
centuries).

(5) I am wondering if some of what you read as "vav"s or "yod"s could be
misread slashes or squiggles -- for instance your "yod-bet-vav Tishri"
might be yod-bet/slash Tishri, meaning 12th of Tishri, and your "vav-zayin-
yod Adar" could perhaps be yod-zayin /slash Adar, meaning 17th Adar.

That's my best shot, and I look forward to someone else solving the other
mysteries.

Judith Romney Wegner


Adoption of surnames in colonial U.S. #usa

Rachel Unkefer <runkefer@...>
 

I have been wondering about how the Jewish immigrants to the 18th
century colonies adopted surnames if they did not come >from other
parts of Britain.

If, in Germany, the practice was to use patronymics that shifted with
each generation, and the formal adoption of surnames did not occur
until after Napoleon, then when and where did these Jewish colonists
here adopt surnames? I know that many Sephardic families had surnames
from several centuries before, but what about the Ashkenazim?
Has anybody read anything about this?

Rachel
Rachel Unkefer
Charlottesville, VA
runkefer@cstone.net


Early American SIG #USA Adoption of surnames in colonial U.S. #usa

Rachel Unkefer <runkefer@...>
 

I have been wondering about how the Jewish immigrants to the 18th
century colonies adopted surnames if they did not come >from other
parts of Britain.

If, in Germany, the practice was to use patronymics that shifted with
each generation, and the formal adoption of surnames did not occur
until after Napoleon, then when and where did these Jewish colonists
here adopt surnames? I know that many Sephardic families had surnames
from several centuries before, but what about the Ashkenazim?
Has anybody read anything about this?

Rachel
Rachel Unkefer
Charlottesville, VA
runkefer@cstone.net


AARON Family #usa

Thomas Maher <tlm414@...>
 

I am a novice at genealogy, and was hoping SKS could help or lead me to
finding info about my early American ancestors. I would like to trace them
back to Germany if possible. The family data that I have was given to me
by a cousin , and until I find otherwise, is considered good data. In
reviewing her notes she states that family lore about THOMAS AARON, SR.
"says that he came >from Germany & may have been the son of a Baron." Also
that he was " Jewish " He married ELIZABETH REINSEL >from Lebanon county,
Pa. & reportedly converted to Catholicism. I am hoping , with your help,
to validate or disprove this.
Thanks ever so much for any help.
Tom Maher
Irwin, Pa.


Early American SIG #USA AARON Family #usa

Thomas Maher <tlm414@...>
 

I am a novice at genealogy, and was hoping SKS could help or lead me to
finding info about my early American ancestors. I would like to trace them
back to Germany if possible. The family data that I have was given to me
by a cousin , and until I find otherwise, is considered good data. In
reviewing her notes she states that family lore about THOMAS AARON, SR.
"says that he came >from Germany & may have been the son of a Baron." Also
that he was " Jewish " He married ELIZABETH REINSEL >from Lebanon county,
Pa. & reportedly converted to Catholicism. I am hoping , with your help,
to validate or disprove this.
Thanks ever so much for any help.
Tom Maher
Irwin, Pa.