Date   

Re: Ethics - genealogy research #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

It seems to me that my experience reflects a significant historical
difference between the history of Anglo-Jews whose families lived in
England since around 1800 and the history of American Jews (and some
English Jews, too) whose families immigrated >from eastern Europe after
1880. Anglo-Jews of long standing simply do not have the same persecution
history or the same unpleasant memories passed down to them by their
grandparents.
Most English Jews have also been in England since about 1880. My mainly
German family (father's side) and mother's family (Poland) has been in
England since about 1860. My forebears on my father's side were quite
prosperous and we have been able to trace back to the 1600's.

The only problem has been with the ggf >from Russia/Belarus who left at 18
already married and is supposed to have left to avoid service in the Tsar's
army. I have found recently >from his naturalisation certificate that he
took 10 years to arrive in England with 2/3 sons.

Nick Landau
London


Re: searching for a good book of maps #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

Dear Saul and others,

I'm a bit surprised that Magosci's "Historical Atlas of East Central
Europe" is no longer available. I got a copy only a few months ago. The
soft cover edition was published in 1998 by the University of Washington
Press, Seattle, and perhaps you might get different information if you
wrote them directly. Although its main emphasis is Italy and Germany to
the west and the borders of the old Russian Empire on the east, because
of the fluidity of the eastern boundaries, it also includes a
substantial part of present-day Lithuania, Belorus and Ukraine.

The same author has produced A Historical Atlas of Ukraine, also very
useful, and published by the University of Toronto Press.

Needless to say, I have no commercial interest in either of these books.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England

Saul Goldstone wrote:


JewishGeners,

A while ago I was recommended to the following book of maps:

"Historical Atlas of East Central Europe by Paul Robert Magocsi"

Although it is listed by
[commercial reference deleted],they have just informed me that it is no
longer available.

Can someone recommend an alternate?


Nazi Era Stamps on Austrian Marriage Certificates #general

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

Yes indeed, there was a law at that time that Jews in Germany, including
Austria had to take on the addtional name of Israel or Sara. I remember,
having lived in Vienna at this time, that I had to go to the Government
district office to have my birth certificate stamped and this stamp is still
on it. My parents have a similar stamp also on their marriage certificate.
The translation of the stamp which you quote is as follows:
The acceptance of the additional name Israel - Sara is noted
B.H. (Bezirkshauptmannschaft) Government district office), Oct. 18, 1939
For genealogists this is an important clue, since it means that this person
was in Vienna on the date noted.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Some further thoughts #general

david fielker <david@...>
 

As a further contribution to the discussion on why we do genealogy, may I
humbly offer the following extract >from the preface to my recently published
"My Schneebaum Family"?


Why do we do it?

In my case, one reason is certainly the thrill of the chase. As a
mathematics teacher I have always enjoyed solving problems, and genealogy is
a huge and complex problem-solving situation. My Schneebaum research in
particular has thrown up so many situations in which I have had to piece
together information >from the flimsiest of clues, decide where to try to
obtain more information, weigh up the evidence, seek for proofs of
hypotheses, and so on. The section on Rebecca Schneebaum was the most
complex investigation, starting >from just a name and address on one
document, and involving a long chain of explorations in which about twelve
successive assumptions in turn were made, discounted and reformulated.

A second reason is the exciting discovery of a large family, mainly in the
US, that I never knew I had. I have met many of them and corresponded with
others. They have turned out to be pleasant, interesting and intelligent
people, with a sense of humour, and in most cases an interest in the
research I was doing. Sometimes I have also been able to put them back in
touch with each other after years of loss of contact, like Sam who phoned
his cousin Margot whom he had not seen for 60 years.

Third, one begins to develop a strong sense of one's background and roots.
When I began, the only true Schneebaum I knew was my grandfather, an
immigrant in England of whose origins I knew nothing at all.

Last, as with so many other family books, this is a memorial to the past and
to the history of the family. In particular it remembers those who were lost
in the Holocaust during World War II. I had the cosy feeling as a child that
all my family were safe in wartime England. Gradually I uncovered
information about various branches of the family who died in the camps.


David Fielker
London UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ethics - genealogy research #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

It seems to me that my experience reflects a significant historical
difference between the history of Anglo-Jews whose families lived in
England since around 1800 and the history of American Jews (and some
English Jews, too) whose families immigrated >from eastern Europe after
1880. Anglo-Jews of long standing simply do not have the same persecution
history or the same unpleasant memories passed down to them by their
grandparents.
Most English Jews have also been in England since about 1880. My mainly
German family (father's side) and mother's family (Poland) has been in
England since about 1860. My forebears on my father's side were quite
prosperous and we have been able to trace back to the 1600's.

The only problem has been with the ggf >from Russia/Belarus who left at 18
already married and is supposed to have left to avoid service in the Tsar's
army. I have found recently >from his naturalisation certificate that he
took 10 years to arrive in England with 2/3 sons.

Nick Landau
London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: searching for a good book of maps #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

Dear Saul and others,

I'm a bit surprised that Magosci's "Historical Atlas of East Central
Europe" is no longer available. I got a copy only a few months ago. The
soft cover edition was published in 1998 by the University of Washington
Press, Seattle, and perhaps you might get different information if you
wrote them directly. Although its main emphasis is Italy and Germany to
the west and the borders of the old Russian Empire on the east, because
of the fluidity of the eastern boundaries, it also includes a
substantial part of present-day Lithuania, Belorus and Ukraine.

The same author has produced A Historical Atlas of Ukraine, also very
useful, and published by the University of Toronto Press.

Needless to say, I have no commercial interest in either of these books.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England

Saul Goldstone wrote:


JewishGeners,

A while ago I was recommended to the following book of maps:

"Historical Atlas of East Central Europe by Paul Robert Magocsi"

Although it is listed by
[commercial reference deleted],they have just informed me that it is no
longer available.

Can someone recommend an alternate?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nazi Era Stamps on Austrian Marriage Certificates #general

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

Yes indeed, there was a law at that time that Jews in Germany, including
Austria had to take on the addtional name of Israel or Sara. I remember,
having lived in Vienna at this time, that I had to go to the Government
district office to have my birth certificate stamped and this stamp is still
on it. My parents have a similar stamp also on their marriage certificate.
The translation of the stamp which you quote is as follows:
The acceptance of the additional name Israel - Sara is noted
B.H. (Bezirkshauptmannschaft) Government district office), Oct. 18, 1939
For genealogists this is an important clue, since it means that this person
was in Vienna on the date noted.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Some further thoughts #general

david fielker <david@...>
 

As a further contribution to the discussion on why we do genealogy, may I
humbly offer the following extract >from the preface to my recently published
"My Schneebaum Family"?


Why do we do it?

In my case, one reason is certainly the thrill of the chase. As a
mathematics teacher I have always enjoyed solving problems, and genealogy is
a huge and complex problem-solving situation. My Schneebaum research in
particular has thrown up so many situations in which I have had to piece
together information >from the flimsiest of clues, decide where to try to
obtain more information, weigh up the evidence, seek for proofs of
hypotheses, and so on. The section on Rebecca Schneebaum was the most
complex investigation, starting >from just a name and address on one
document, and involving a long chain of explorations in which about twelve
successive assumptions in turn were made, discounted and reformulated.

A second reason is the exciting discovery of a large family, mainly in the
US, that I never knew I had. I have met many of them and corresponded with
others. They have turned out to be pleasant, interesting and intelligent
people, with a sense of humour, and in most cases an interest in the
research I was doing. Sometimes I have also been able to put them back in
touch with each other after years of loss of contact, like Sam who phoned
his cousin Margot whom he had not seen for 60 years.

Third, one begins to develop a strong sense of one's background and roots.
When I began, the only true Schneebaum I knew was my grandfather, an
immigrant in England of whose origins I knew nothing at all.

Last, as with so many other family books, this is a memorial to the past and
to the history of the family. In particular it remembers those who were lost
in the Holocaust during World War II. I had the cosy feeling as a child that
all my family were safe in wartime England. Gradually I uncovered
information about various branches of the family who died in the camps.


David Fielker
London UK


Foreign Characters in Windows - Summary #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

In a message dated 12/6/00 feraltek@zeta.org.au writes:
Is there a site with instructions and/or hot keys for typing European
characters in Windows programmes - particularly Czech, Hungarian,
Polish & German.
Thank you to all who replied.

Summary of a few methods.

(1) Windows95/98 has Multilanguage support that you have to install via
Add/Remove Programs on the Control Panel window. Read the Help file
carefully about the various ways to switch between languages. Characters
with diacritical marks are mainly tied to punctuation keys, in some
languages they're on the number keys. Some of the other letter and
punctuation keys will change position.

(2) In Word and some other programs, under the Insert menu, select Symbols
and hunt around the various character sets. Select the letter >from the chart.

(3) Alt key plus three number codes. In German - Alt.132= a/umlaut,
148=o/umlaut, 129=u/umlaut. Win.3x used a four digit code that still works
with Win.98 - eg. Alt.0163= English pound sign. Someone sent me a list of
French, German and Spanish special characters. (Thanks David S.) Please ask
if you want a copy.

(4) Somewhere in the Win.98 Help screens is a set of complex key codes
under the title "Type International Characters". Eg - CTL+SHIFT+COLON+ "a"
-> a/umlaut. Similar for o & u /umlaut. (Sorry, can't find the instructions
a second time.)

(5) The Hebrew word processing program called Dagesh has a collection of
characters >from all European countries.

Gary


Gary Luke
feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks for the summary, Gary. Messages sent to the
JewishGen Discussion Group should *not* use these special characters,
however. Differences in the handling of special characters among computer
systems makes their display impossible to predict, and moderators will have
to change them to the nearest standard ASCII equivalent, an unnecessary
burden.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Foreign Characters in Windows - Summary #general

Gary Luke <feraltek@...>
 

In a message dated 12/6/00 feraltek@zeta.org.au writes:
Is there a site with instructions and/or hot keys for typing European
characters in Windows programmes - particularly Czech, Hungarian,
Polish & German.
Thank you to all who replied.

Summary of a few methods.

(1) Windows95/98 has Multilanguage support that you have to install via
Add/Remove Programs on the Control Panel window. Read the Help file
carefully about the various ways to switch between languages. Characters
with diacritical marks are mainly tied to punctuation keys, in some
languages they're on the number keys. Some of the other letter and
punctuation keys will change position.

(2) In Word and some other programs, under the Insert menu, select Symbols
and hunt around the various character sets. Select the letter >from the chart.

(3) Alt key plus three number codes. In German - Alt.132= a/umlaut,
148=o/umlaut, 129=u/umlaut. Win.3x used a four digit code that still works
with Win.98 - eg. Alt.0163= English pound sign. Someone sent me a list of
French, German and Spanish special characters. (Thanks David S.) Please ask
if you want a copy.

(4) Somewhere in the Win.98 Help screens is a set of complex key codes
under the title "Type International Characters". Eg - CTL+SHIFT+COLON+ "a"
-> a/umlaut. Similar for o & u /umlaut. (Sorry, can't find the instructions
a second time.)

(5) The Hebrew word processing program called Dagesh has a collection of
characters >from all European countries.

Gary


Gary Luke
feraltek@zeta.org.au
Sydney, Australia

MODERATOR NOTE: Thanks for the summary, Gary. Messages sent to the
JewishGen Discussion Group should *not* use these special characters,
however. Differences in the handling of special characters among computer
systems makes their display impossible to predict, and moderators will have
to change them to the nearest standard ASCII equivalent, an unnecessary
burden.


Re: Sochaczew records? #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

In a message dated 12/8/00 1:18:30 PM EST, janmallen@worldnet.att.net writes:

The information
>from JRI-Poland's Stan Diamond recently about the "fumigation" problem
effects the access for some months on those records that the Warsaw
Archive referred to
Dear friends:

Here is a brief overview of the situation regarding the Index volume to
the Sochaczew Books for Residents that were in use at the end of
the 19th century. If the Index volume is similar to those >from other
towns, it will have the name of each resident, grouped with other
family members (by house and page number) and the year of birth.
Note: The actual registers with detailed information have not survived

For more information on Polish Books of Residents, see the current
edition of Avotaynu.

I discussed the entire issue of the holdings in the now closed Zyrardow
archives with the Exec. Director of the PSA during a meeting in late
October. The archive branch was closed several years ago and all the
books were moved to Kutno for storage including the above-mentioned
Sochaczew Books of Residents Index volume. But, it seems that in
the (movement to) new surroundings, the dormant bacteria came to life!

Thus, it was necessary to move all the books formerly held in
Zyrardow to a commercial fumigation service in Wroclaw. I.e. the
major fumigation and preservation program recently undertaken
by the PSA requires more capacity than they have in house.

The existence of an index (only) to the Sochaczew Books of
Residents is a great find and will be a goldmine when it becomes
available for research. It and the other volumes originally in
Zyrardow will be moved to the new Archives in Grodzisk
Mazowiecki when the fumigation has been done but because
of construction and cataloguing, etc., it is estimated that it
will be late spring before access will be possible.

This is one I personally am staying on top of and you can be
sure i will let everyone know as soon as I receive more
information.

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Sochaczew records? #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

In a message dated 12/8/00 1:18:30 PM EST, janmallen@worldnet.att.net writes:

The information
>from JRI-Poland's Stan Diamond recently about the "fumigation" problem
effects the access for some months on those records that the Warsaw
Archive referred to
Dear friends:

Here is a brief overview of the situation regarding the Index volume to
the Sochaczew Books for Residents that were in use at the end of
the 19th century. If the Index volume is similar to those >from other
towns, it will have the name of each resident, grouped with other
family members (by house and page number) and the year of birth.
Note: The actual registers with detailed information have not survived

For more information on Polish Books of Residents, see the current
edition of Avotaynu.

I discussed the entire issue of the holdings in the now closed Zyrardow
archives with the Exec. Director of the PSA during a meeting in late
October. The archive branch was closed several years ago and all the
books were moved to Kutno for storage including the above-mentioned
Sochaczew Books of Residents Index volume. But, it seems that in
the (movement to) new surroundings, the dormant bacteria came to life!

Thus, it was necessary to move all the books formerly held in
Zyrardow to a commercial fumigation service in Wroclaw. I.e. the
major fumigation and preservation program recently undertaken
by the PSA requires more capacity than they have in house.

The existence of an index (only) to the Sochaczew Books of
Residents is a great find and will be a goldmine when it becomes
available for research. It and the other volumes originally in
Zyrardow will be moved to the new Archives in Grodzisk
Mazowiecki when the fumigation has been done but because
of construction and cataloguing, etc., it is estimated that it
will be late spring before access will be possible.

This is one I personally am staying on top of and you can be
sure i will let everyone know as soon as I receive more
information.

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Lviv Web site update #galicia

ESES@...
 

I have just updated the Lviv Web site. Street photos and additional Book
titles have been added.
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/lviv/lviv.html
This change went smoothly thanks to the help of Jim Stein of JewishGen.

Errol Schneegurt
moderator Lviv Area Research Group


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Lviv Web site update #galicia

ESES@...
 

I have just updated the Lviv Web site. Street photos and additional Book
titles have been added.
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/lviv/lviv.html
This change went smoothly thanks to the help of Jim Stein of JewishGen.

Errol Schneegurt
moderator Lviv Area Research Group


Stammler family #galicia

Berthacam@...
 

I am looking for my grandfather's family who came >from the of Rzepnik. in
Galicia.
He came >from a religious family. He moved to NowySacz. I am also looking
for the Teitelbaum family >from Nowy Sacz?

The Weinberger Family came >from Dynov , Does any know if a Yiskor book was
written on the above towns?

Bertha Schwarz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Stammler family #galicia

Berthacam@...
 

I am looking for my grandfather's family who came >from the of Rzepnik. in
Galicia.
He came >from a religious family. He moved to NowySacz. I am also looking
for the Teitelbaum family >from Nowy Sacz?

The Weinberger Family came >from Dynov , Does any know if a Yiskor book was
written on the above towns?

Bertha Schwarz


Announcing ShtetlSchleppers 2001 Schedules #galicia

Paul W. Ginsburg <pginsburg@...>
 

Can you remember what you did when you first discovered the name of your
ancestral shtetl? Did you try to find it on a map, or did you know to go
right to JewishGen's Shtetlseeker where lo and behold, there it was with a
star marking the exact location. You may have looked at that spot over and
over and began to dream about going there yourself someday. If that has been
your dream, it can become reality. JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers can take you
there.

Let 2001 be the year when you will actually visit that shtetl of your
ancestry, walk in the footsteps of your parents, your grandparents, your
great grand parents . As the Talmudic saying goes..."if not now, when? Let
this be the year that "when" becomes "now".

Explore the itineraries which take you to a hub city, provide the best in
touring sites of Jewish interest, introduce you to local leaders and then,
with your own private guide/driver/translator, really **live** the dream.
visit the place where your family originated. To get a better idea of making
this work for you..
<http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/>. And what about London2001,
the International Summer Seminar?

Whether your plans include visiting before or after, but definitely 'in
conjunction with' London2001, the International Jewish Genealogy Summer
Seminar, be sure to sign up early . You will not only be sure of reserving
space, but most importantly you'll allow plenty of time for productive
pre-research.

The plans and schedules for London2001 are now online and linked >from the
JewishGen home page. It's a tremendous program with more than enough to meet
every interest. Have you looked, have you made your conference or hotel
reservation? Before you make your airline reservations, come and take a look
at
http://www.jewishgen.org/London2001/travel.htm

With advance planning and some smooth scheduling on the part of Joanna
Fletcher, JewishGen's ShtetlSchlepper Travel Manager it may be possible to
include London in the flight package for a pre- or post- conference
ShtetlSchlepper package enabling savings on airfares.

Finally, to accommodate those who have either already visited their
ancestral origins or have not yet reached that point in their research to
take that step, ShtetlSchleppers has created two or three-country cultural
tours
where you can visit Prague & Vienna, or Prague, Vienna & Budapest, all three
known for their breathtaking architecture and rich in Jewish history. It's
all online awaiting your visit.
-scheduled group departures,
-customized independent travel,
-two or three country cultural tours, and finally
- favorable air fares >from most cities to London2001

So whatever your dreams, whatever your travel interests may be in
conjunction with the London conference, Let JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers take
you there!

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/

Paul W. Ginsburg
ShtetlSchleppers Project Manager
pginsburg@jewishgen.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Announcing ShtetlSchleppers 2001 Schedules #galicia

Paul W. Ginsburg <pginsburg@...>
 

Can you remember what you did when you first discovered the name of your
ancestral shtetl? Did you try to find it on a map, or did you know to go
right to JewishGen's Shtetlseeker where lo and behold, there it was with a
star marking the exact location. You may have looked at that spot over and
over and began to dream about going there yourself someday. If that has been
your dream, it can become reality. JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers can take you
there.

Let 2001 be the year when you will actually visit that shtetl of your
ancestry, walk in the footsteps of your parents, your grandparents, your
great grand parents . As the Talmudic saying goes..."if not now, when? Let
this be the year that "when" becomes "now".

Explore the itineraries which take you to a hub city, provide the best in
touring sites of Jewish interest, introduce you to local leaders and then,
with your own private guide/driver/translator, really **live** the dream.
visit the place where your family originated. To get a better idea of making
this work for you..
<http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/>. And what about London2001,
the International Summer Seminar?

Whether your plans include visiting before or after, but definitely 'in
conjunction with' London2001, the International Jewish Genealogy Summer
Seminar, be sure to sign up early . You will not only be sure of reserving
space, but most importantly you'll allow plenty of time for productive
pre-research.

The plans and schedules for London2001 are now online and linked >from the
JewishGen home page. It's a tremendous program with more than enough to meet
every interest. Have you looked, have you made your conference or hotel
reservation? Before you make your airline reservations, come and take a look
at
http://www.jewishgen.org/London2001/travel.htm

With advance planning and some smooth scheduling on the part of Joanna
Fletcher, JewishGen's ShtetlSchlepper Travel Manager it may be possible to
include London in the flight package for a pre- or post- conference
ShtetlSchlepper package enabling savings on airfares.

Finally, to accommodate those who have either already visited their
ancestral origins or have not yet reached that point in their research to
take that step, ShtetlSchleppers has created two or three-country cultural
tours
where you can visit Prague & Vienna, or Prague, Vienna & Budapest, all three
known for their breathtaking architecture and rich in Jewish history. It's
all online awaiting your visit.
-scheduled group departures,
-customized independent travel,
-two or three country cultural tours, and finally
- favorable air fares >from most cities to London2001

So whatever your dreams, whatever your travel interests may be in
conjunction with the London conference, Let JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers take
you there!

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/

Paul W. Ginsburg
ShtetlSchleppers Project Manager
pginsburg@jewishgen.org


Duma List Project Status - Need Some More Help #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

As some of you know, the SIG purchased a mix of Minsk Gubernia 1906 and
1907 Duma (Voter) Lists in hard copy format over a year ago. These
include the ueyzds of Minsk, Borisov, Mozyr, Slutsk, Igumen, Novogrudok,
and Pinsk, as well as part of the Pinsk City list.

Gladys Paulin completed the Rechitsa ueyzd 1906 Duma list prior to the
SIG purchasing the lists for the other Minsk gubernia ueyzds and her
efforts can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/rechitsa.htm

Tbe 1906 Brobruisk ueyzd list was not purchased by the SIG because the
this list had already been obtained by the Bobruisk Interest Group. They
have started to transliterate it, but have not finished. The partially
complete list can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/bobruisk/duma/2dumfram.html

The transliteration of the Duma lists for Slutsk, Novogrudok, Pinsk, and
Mozyr ueyzds have been completed and should be available on the SIG
website shortly.

A partial list of Pinsk City was all that was available (through the
letter K) and this has been transliterated. Attempts are being made now
to try and locate the remainding pages >from other sources. The partial
Pinsk City duma list will also be available soon.

MINSK ueyzd
Two four of the volunteers working one these lists were unable to
complete their assigned pages. One group of pages has 4,200 entries and
the other group has 3,100. We need some volunteers to take over this
task and get it completed. The lists are in Cyrillic and are printed
(not script). If you want an opportunity to help the SIG and perhaps
learn Cyrillic, Edward Rosenbaum can provide you with instructions on
how to get started. Please contact Edward at <elr228@bellatlantic.net>.

IGUMEN ueyzd
One of the two volunteers for this ueyzd was only able to complete about
half of her assigned pages. There are approximate 900 entries left to
transliterate. If anyone can work on the remaining entries, please
contact Edward Rosenbaum <elr228@bellatlantic.net>.

BORISOV ueyzd
One of the two volunteers for this list was not able to work on their
portion of the list. Only half of this list has been complete. There
are still, about 1,600 entries that need to be transliterated. I have
already contacted Mike Levine, an active Borisov researcher to ask him
if he would be interested in doing the rest of the Borisov list, but if
you are interested in working on this list, please contact Edward
Rosenbaum.

GRODNO gubernia
The 1906 Grodno gubernia duma lists are now available for transliteration
and if anyone would like to work on these, please contact Judy Bennett
<benne034@tc.umn.edu> to volunteer your services.

Here is an opportunity to help get a lot more names into the All Belarus
Database (ABD). I urge some of you to please come forward and help us
get this project completed. Very shortly we will be announcing another
exciting project and I would like to get this one completed before we
start something new. Thanks in advance.

Dave
--
David M. Fox
fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus


Belarus SIG #Belarus Duma List Project Status - Need Some More Help #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

As some of you know, the SIG purchased a mix of Minsk Gubernia 1906 and
1907 Duma (Voter) Lists in hard copy format over a year ago. These
include the ueyzds of Minsk, Borisov, Mozyr, Slutsk, Igumen, Novogrudok,
and Pinsk, as well as part of the Pinsk City list.

Gladys Paulin completed the Rechitsa ueyzd 1906 Duma list prior to the
SIG purchasing the lists for the other Minsk gubernia ueyzds and her
efforts can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/rechitsa.htm

Tbe 1906 Brobruisk ueyzd list was not purchased by the SIG because the
this list had already been obtained by the Bobruisk Interest Group. They
have started to transliterate it, but have not finished. The partially
complete list can be found at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks/bobruisk/duma/2dumfram.html

The transliteration of the Duma lists for Slutsk, Novogrudok, Pinsk, and
Mozyr ueyzds have been completed and should be available on the SIG
website shortly.

A partial list of Pinsk City was all that was available (through the
letter K) and this has been transliterated. Attempts are being made now
to try and locate the remainding pages >from other sources. The partial
Pinsk City duma list will also be available soon.

MINSK ueyzd
Two four of the volunteers working one these lists were unable to
complete their assigned pages. One group of pages has 4,200 entries and
the other group has 3,100. We need some volunteers to take over this
task and get it completed. The lists are in Cyrillic and are printed
(not script). If you want an opportunity to help the SIG and perhaps
learn Cyrillic, Edward Rosenbaum can provide you with instructions on
how to get started. Please contact Edward at <elr228@bellatlantic.net>.

IGUMEN ueyzd
One of the two volunteers for this ueyzd was only able to complete about
half of her assigned pages. There are approximate 900 entries left to
transliterate. If anyone can work on the remaining entries, please
contact Edward Rosenbaum <elr228@bellatlantic.net>.

BORISOV ueyzd
One of the two volunteers for this list was not able to work on their
portion of the list. Only half of this list has been complete. There
are still, about 1,600 entries that need to be transliterated. I have
already contacted Mike Levine, an active Borisov researcher to ask him
if he would be interested in doing the rest of the Borisov list, but if
you are interested in working on this list, please contact Edward
Rosenbaum.

GRODNO gubernia
The 1906 Grodno gubernia duma lists are now available for transliteration
and if anyone would like to work on these, please contact Judy Bennett
<benne034@tc.umn.edu> to volunteer your services.

Here is an opportunity to help get a lot more names into the All Belarus
Database (ABD). I urge some of you to please come forward and help us
get this project completed. Very shortly we will be announcing another
exciting project and I would like to get this one completed before we
start something new. Thanks in advance.

Dave
--
David M. Fox
fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus