Date   

ViewMate: Help with translation of Russian Death Certificate #general

Stranddr@...
 

I have put a scanned copy of a Death Certificate "VM083" on Viewmate.
It is for a nameless Beinfater who died in Warsaw in 1870. Thanks in
advance for your help. I will make a contribution to Jewishgen in honor
of all those who offer their help as I did for those of you who translated
"VM075".

I hope that everyone follows my practice of contributing something for
each document that they put on Viewmate. It is a great service and should
be so recognized.

Phyllis Goldberg
North Bethesda, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: Help with translation of Russian Death Certificate #general

Stranddr@...
 

I have put a scanned copy of a Death Certificate "VM083" on Viewmate.
It is for a nameless Beinfater who died in Warsaw in 1870. Thanks in
advance for your help. I will make a contribution to Jewishgen in honor
of all those who offer their help as I did for those of you who translated
"VM075".

I hope that everyone follows my practice of contributing something for
each document that they put on Viewmate. It is a great service and should
be so recognized.

Phyllis Goldberg
North Bethesda, MD


Re: Submission standards #yizkorbooks

P NG <png42@...>
 

Carol Edan wrote on 15 Nov 2000 :

As a volunteer HTMLer I would like to add some of my observations.
Recently I received 4 chapters to be added to a book that were in HTML
format. Contrary to thought that this format may help us in our work,
it is the exactly the opposite. Many programs for changing word documents
to HTML use many tags/commands that are superfluous and not in standards
of pages on the site. The time making/deleting/changing all these commands
is quite time consuming. I found that I had to copy /paste the material
on a new document and transfer it to a new html blank page.
Why not send the files back to the person who submitted them, explaining
what the problem was and what the standards are so that they could make the
pages compatible. Could you share with us more details about how the pages
were not compatible?

I don't think it should be difficult for those of us who have HTML skills to
submit HTML pages that are compatible with the JewishGen standards for HTML
if we knew what these standards were.

Barbara Yeager


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks RE: Submission standards #yizkorbooks

P NG <png42@...>
 

Carol Edan wrote on 15 Nov 2000 :

As a volunteer HTMLer I would like to add some of my observations.
Recently I received 4 chapters to be added to a book that were in HTML
format. Contrary to thought that this format may help us in our work,
it is the exactly the opposite. Many programs for changing word documents
to HTML use many tags/commands that are superfluous and not in standards
of pages on the site. The time making/deleting/changing all these commands
is quite time consuming. I found that I had to copy /paste the material
on a new document and transfer it to a new html blank page.
Why not send the files back to the person who submitted them, explaining
what the problem was and what the standards are so that they could make the
pages compatible. Could you share with us more details about how the pages
were not compatible?

I don't think it should be difficult for those of us who have HTML skills to
submit HTML pages that are compatible with the JewishGen standards for HTML
if we knew what these standards were.

Barbara Yeager


A Proofreading Tool #yizkorbooks

P NG <png42@...>
 

I would like to share with everyone information about a tool which I have
developed to help me with proofreading. I usually use it in conjunction with
getting feedback >from people who have direct knowledge of the material.

Since I started the Przemysl YB translation project, I have been using a
surname database which I have developed over time. I add names there as they
become available, together with information as to where they appeared. That
also allows me to assess which spelling variation is likely to be correct
based on the source where it appeared. I check every single name in our
translation against that database to ensure that the names have been
transliterated correctly.

Recently, I've also developed a second name database, which contains solely
the names as they have been transliterated in our translation. To do that, I
used WORD's indexing feature. For this to work, I needed to index each
chapter separately and then put the names together in one EXCEL file, with a
reference to the chapter where any given name appeared.

It really is pretty easy to do. Here is how. You mark each name in the text,
then compile the index. The index will include page numbers, which are not
necessarily helpful for our purposes. What we need to know is in which file
a given name appeared and then it can be found easily through the FIND
feature.

So after you compile the Index, you copy it (you may need to paste it into a
NOTEPAD first, or any other simple word processing program to get rid of any
special formatting), copy it >from NOTEPAD, paste it into a new WORD file.
Then you convert the comma delimited text (it's comma delimited since it has
page numbers, which are separated >from the names by commas) into a table. To
do this, you click Select All to highlight the whole text, then go to
Table>Convert then Text to Table. In the dialog box, select Separate Text at
Commas and click OK. This will automatically make a table with as many
columns as there are entries separated with a comma in a row and as many
rows as there are names. Save the file for future reference.

What you need to do now is put your cursor on top of the table, in the names
column and click. This will highlight the whole name column. Copy it and
paste it into an EXCEL file. Once all the names >from your table are pasted,
type in the name of the Chapter or file where they appreared in cell to the
right of the first name. It can be something like Part II, chapter 1, or
anything else that will make it easy for you to recognize the file where the
names appeared. You will want this reference to appear by each name from
that chapter. So you need to put your cursor at the bottom right corner of
the cell which includes the reference information, wait for the cursor to
become a tiny little cross, and then drag that cross handle down to the end
of your list SIMULTANEOUSLY holding the CONTROL button. You need to hold
the CONTROL button till you are done, otherwise the chapter number will
increment by one with each consecutive row you go through. This will copy
the information >from the first cell into all the cells directly below it.

Repeat this procedure with each chapter. Once all the names are in the Excel
file, save it for future reference (you will be adding names >from subsequent
chapters to it). Then sort it and save it under a different name to indicate
that these are the sorted names >from this and this chapter.

Print the file and you will be surprised how helpful this file can be. Why?
For one, it allows you to see how you've handled name spellings throughout
your translation. You will easily see any inconsistencies and will be able
to fix them in the future. Also, you may want to send this file to your
translator so that they could use it as a reference. That will help with
consistent name spelling throghout the translation. If, despite your
diligent efforts to make the transliteration accurate, any of the names turn
out misspelled in the future, you will be able to fix that easily also since
they will be spelled consistently throughout your material.

Any thoughts about this idea?

Barbara U. Yeager
Przemysl YB Coordinator


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks A Proofreading Tool #yizkorbooks

P NG <png42@...>
 

I would like to share with everyone information about a tool which I have
developed to help me with proofreading. I usually use it in conjunction with
getting feedback >from people who have direct knowledge of the material.

Since I started the Przemysl YB translation project, I have been using a
surname database which I have developed over time. I add names there as they
become available, together with information as to where they appeared. That
also allows me to assess which spelling variation is likely to be correct
based on the source where it appeared. I check every single name in our
translation against that database to ensure that the names have been
transliterated correctly.

Recently, I've also developed a second name database, which contains solely
the names as they have been transliterated in our translation. To do that, I
used WORD's indexing feature. For this to work, I needed to index each
chapter separately and then put the names together in one EXCEL file, with a
reference to the chapter where any given name appeared.

It really is pretty easy to do. Here is how. You mark each name in the text,
then compile the index. The index will include page numbers, which are not
necessarily helpful for our purposes. What we need to know is in which file
a given name appeared and then it can be found easily through the FIND
feature.

So after you compile the Index, you copy it (you may need to paste it into a
NOTEPAD first, or any other simple word processing program to get rid of any
special formatting), copy it >from NOTEPAD, paste it into a new WORD file.
Then you convert the comma delimited text (it's comma delimited since it has
page numbers, which are separated >from the names by commas) into a table. To
do this, you click Select All to highlight the whole text, then go to
Table>Convert then Text to Table. In the dialog box, select Separate Text at
Commas and click OK. This will automatically make a table with as many
columns as there are entries separated with a comma in a row and as many
rows as there are names. Save the file for future reference.

What you need to do now is put your cursor on top of the table, in the names
column and click. This will highlight the whole name column. Copy it and
paste it into an EXCEL file. Once all the names >from your table are pasted,
type in the name of the Chapter or file where they appreared in cell to the
right of the first name. It can be something like Part II, chapter 1, or
anything else that will make it easy for you to recognize the file where the
names appeared. You will want this reference to appear by each name from
that chapter. So you need to put your cursor at the bottom right corner of
the cell which includes the reference information, wait for the cursor to
become a tiny little cross, and then drag that cross handle down to the end
of your list SIMULTANEOUSLY holding the CONTROL button. You need to hold
the CONTROL button till you are done, otherwise the chapter number will
increment by one with each consecutive row you go through. This will copy
the information >from the first cell into all the cells directly below it.

Repeat this procedure with each chapter. Once all the names are in the Excel
file, save it for future reference (you will be adding names >from subsequent
chapters to it). Then sort it and save it under a different name to indicate
that these are the sorted names >from this and this chapter.

Print the file and you will be surprised how helpful this file can be. Why?
For one, it allows you to see how you've handled name spellings throughout
your translation. You will easily see any inconsistencies and will be able
to fix them in the future. Also, you may want to send this file to your
translator so that they could use it as a reference. That will help with
consistent name spelling throghout the translation. If, despite your
diligent efforts to make the transliteration accurate, any of the names turn
out misspelled in the future, you will be able to fix that easily also since
they will be spelled consistently throughout your material.

Any thoughts about this idea?

Barbara U. Yeager
Przemysl YB Coordinator


Zeev and Elster #general

SY PEARLMAN <pearlman@...>
 

My grandfather said his father's name was Zeev. Is there any nickname,
synonym,variation of that name. Also, a JRI record says my great aunt's
first name was El/ster. What could be the variations of that name? Could
Rose or Rivka be derived >from that name? Could Gnesze become Feige? thanks,
Regards, Sy of New York(pearlman@cybernex.net)

Researching: PEARLMAN (Bialystok), ETKUS, ROSACHOTSKY, SANDEROVICH,
SEGALOVICH & SKOVRONEK (Lomza,Ciechanowiec,Wysokie Mazowieckie);
KUNOFSKY, LEVINE & KANTROWITZ (Uzda,Nesvizh in Belarus); BERNBACH
& HACKEL (Ulanow,Poland); MUNTZER (Glebowice,Poland); TREITELMAN
& KAMINER (Odessa & Kishinev); KRULL (Warsaw & Otvotsk)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Zeev and Elster #general

SY PEARLMAN <pearlman@...>
 

My grandfather said his father's name was Zeev. Is there any nickname,
synonym,variation of that name. Also, a JRI record says my great aunt's
first name was El/ster. What could be the variations of that name? Could
Rose or Rivka be derived >from that name? Could Gnesze become Feige? thanks,
Regards, Sy of New York(pearlman@cybernex.net)

Researching: PEARLMAN (Bialystok), ETKUS, ROSACHOTSKY, SANDEROVICH,
SEGALOVICH & SKOVRONEK (Lomza,Ciechanowiec,Wysokie Mazowieckie);
KUNOFSKY, LEVINE & KANTROWITZ (Uzda,Nesvizh in Belarus); BERNBACH
& HACKEL (Ulanow,Poland); MUNTZER (Glebowice,Poland); TREITELMAN
& KAMINER (Odessa & Kishinev); KRULL (Warsaw & Otvotsk)


Hello- #usa

rebecca baldwin <calicomist@...>
 

Hi everyone-
I'm very happy this list exists-
I live in southwestern West Virginia, and have been researching my
family's genealogy for 20 years. Lately, I've discovered many "clues" that
my famil/y/(ies) had Jewish roots.
My family (Baldwin) and others they married settled not too far >from
Cincinnati, where many Jews settled after coming to America, I've learned.
I've also learned that many Jews settled in the Ohio Valley.
I've also been attending Jewish adult classes at the local temple, and
attending services. Almost everything I've leaned about Judaism, it's seems
I knew it before. Religious practices may change, but traditions carried on
in the household do not.
My grandfather Baldwin was a methodist minister, for example, but I was
never raised on Scriptures, which would be the norm if my family was
completely Christian. I've read some things >from teh Talmud, and those are
the philospohies and commentaries I was "raised on." Anyone else find that
to be true?
At the Jewish Gen page, I've done D-M Soundex searches for many family
names, and have have numerous hits for each one.
I'm directly descended >from six known American Revolutionary War
Soldiers, and in every family relatives fought for the North during the
Civil War. And plus the arranged marriages...Too much synchronization (sp?)
to be ignored-
I have many things to discuss, and ideas-can't wait to share with others-

Thanks,

Becky Baldwin

(Rebecca)


Early American SIG #USA Hello- #usa

rebecca baldwin <calicomist@...>
 

Hi everyone-
I'm very happy this list exists-
I live in southwestern West Virginia, and have been researching my
family's genealogy for 20 years. Lately, I've discovered many "clues" that
my famil/y/(ies) had Jewish roots.
My family (Baldwin) and others they married settled not too far >from
Cincinnati, where many Jews settled after coming to America, I've learned.
I've also learned that many Jews settled in the Ohio Valley.
I've also been attending Jewish adult classes at the local temple, and
attending services. Almost everything I've leaned about Judaism, it's seems
I knew it before. Religious practices may change, but traditions carried on
in the household do not.
My grandfather Baldwin was a methodist minister, for example, but I was
never raised on Scriptures, which would be the norm if my family was
completely Christian. I've read some things >from teh Talmud, and those are
the philospohies and commentaries I was "raised on." Anyone else find that
to be true?
At the Jewish Gen page, I've done D-M Soundex searches for many family
names, and have have numerous hits for each one.
I'm directly descended >from six known American Revolutionary War
Soldiers, and in every family relatives fought for the North during the
Civil War. And plus the arranged marriages...Too much synchronization (sp?)
to be ignored-
I have many things to discuss, and ideas-can't wait to share with others-

Thanks,

Becky Baldwin

(Rebecca)


Marriage certificate from Argentina #general

Enter your name here <feinber2@...>
 

A friend, who is not "on-line", asked for help. . . She would like to
obtain the marriage certificate for her husband's maternal grandparents.
She has given me the following information. . . The groom, Harry ZEID, was
born in the Ukraine, fled to England to avoid conscription, and then left
England as an "indentured servant", and arrived in Argentina. He is said
to have worked "on a rubber plantation". He met his wife- to- be, Hannah
KRONFELD in Argentina. Her family came >from Austria, and her father was a
cattle dealer. She was placed in an orphanage in Argentina as a small
child after the death of her mother. The marriage is said to have taken
place in about 1909. . . perhaps in Buenos Aires. The couple had a child,
Sandra Olivia ZEID who was born in 1911. And, in 1913, the family
immigrated to the USA. . . arriving in Philadelphia and settling in Los
Angeles. There were also "cousins" in LA by the names of "Al and Minnie
SINGER". Does any of this sound familiar ? And, does anyone have any
leads about where to go for information and who could be contacted? Any
and all help is greatly appreciated!! Thanks!!

Marilyn Feinberg
Kalamazoo, MI USA
feinber2@ix.netcom.com

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen has some InfoFiles on Argentina at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ (click on "Argentina" in the
countries section). They should be worthwhile, either for this question,
or for future research.


Re: Occupation on a Passengers list #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

I think the occupation is clerk.


Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado


Ilya Zeldes wrote in message
<001901c05324$a8915a00$8b731ecf@pavilion>...

I'm posting on the ViewMate an image >from the passengers list.
The URL is http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ in the "To View"
section - as file - VM085


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marriage certificate from Argentina #general

Enter your name here <feinber2@...>
 

A friend, who is not "on-line", asked for help. . . She would like to
obtain the marriage certificate for her husband's maternal grandparents.
She has given me the following information. . . The groom, Harry ZEID, was
born in the Ukraine, fled to England to avoid conscription, and then left
England as an "indentured servant", and arrived in Argentina. He is said
to have worked "on a rubber plantation". He met his wife- to- be, Hannah
KRONFELD in Argentina. Her family came >from Austria, and her father was a
cattle dealer. She was placed in an orphanage in Argentina as a small
child after the death of her mother. The marriage is said to have taken
place in about 1909. . . perhaps in Buenos Aires. The couple had a child,
Sandra Olivia ZEID who was born in 1911. And, in 1913, the family
immigrated to the USA. . . arriving in Philadelphia and settling in Los
Angeles. There were also "cousins" in LA by the names of "Al and Minnie
SINGER". Does any of this sound familiar ? And, does anyone have any
leads about where to go for information and who could be contacted? Any
and all help is greatly appreciated!! Thanks!!

Marilyn Feinberg
Kalamazoo, MI USA
feinber2@ix.netcom.com

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen has some InfoFiles on Argentina at
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/ (click on "Argentina" in the
countries section). They should be worthwhile, either for this question,
or for future research.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Occupation on a Passengers list #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

I think the occupation is clerk.


Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado


Ilya Zeldes wrote in message
<001901c05324$a8915a00$8b731ecf@pavilion>...

I'm posting on the ViewMate an image >from the passengers list.
The URL is http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ in the "To View"
section - as file - VM085


Translation from Yiddish Requested #hungary

David Mandel <dcmandel@...>
 

I have posted three Yiddish inscriptions to the ViewMate website. They were
copied >from a Hebrew prayer book that belonged to my great-grandfather, Natan
Ehrenreich, who lived in Goroginye (Ohradzany), Slovakia in the 1890s. One of
the inscriptions may be a notation on the birth date of my grandmother, Lena
Ehrenreich Mandel. Any help in translating these inscriptions would be greatly
appreciated!!!

ViewMate identifier: VM084
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate


Thank you.

David Mandel
Cedar Grove, New Mexico


Isaszeg again #hungary

szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Sorry for forgetting the URL address for Isaszeg Jewish cemetery-photos.

The address is:

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4/cemeteries.html

Sorry again,
Winter Peter


Hungary SIG #Hungary Translation from Yiddish Requested #hungary

David Mandel <dcmandel@...>
 

I have posted three Yiddish inscriptions to the ViewMate website. They were
copied >from a Hebrew prayer book that belonged to my great-grandfather, Natan
Ehrenreich, who lived in Goroginye (Ohradzany), Slovakia in the 1890s. One of
the inscriptions may be a notation on the birth date of my grandmother, Lena
Ehrenreich Mandel. Any help in translating these inscriptions would be greatly
appreciated!!!

ViewMate identifier: VM084
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate


Thank you.

David Mandel
Cedar Grove, New Mexico


Hungary SIG #Hungary Isaszeg again #hungary

szombat <szombat@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Sorry for forgetting the URL address for Isaszeg Jewish cemetery-photos.

The address is:

http://www.geocities.com/winter_peter_4/cemeteries.html

Sorry again,
Winter Peter


Re: Etsched, near Munkacz #hungary

Reveald@...
 

Hi Moishe;

You write about a town near Munkacz called Etsched. My Grandfather came >from
a place called Isznyete which, altho' it's a different spelling,
pronnunciations are quite close.

Nathan Gross

<The following response came in a separate message >from Attila Rona>

It sounds like Ecse'd, bur it is located northeast of Budapest.

Attila Rona


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Etsched, near Munkacz #hungary

Reveald@...
 

Hi Moishe;

You write about a town near Munkacz called Etsched. My Grandfather came >from
a place called Isznyete which, altho' it's a different spelling,
pronnunciations are quite close.

Nathan Gross

<The following response came in a separate message >from Attila Rona>

It sounds like Ecse'd, bur it is located northeast of Budapest.

Attila Rona