Date   

Spice up your life! #general

Clankarol@...
 

Have you seen this week's fabulous offer in the JewishGen Auction House?

It's a unique, handcrafted chinese silver condiment set- guaranteed to
take pride of place on your mantlepiece. This unusual collection comes
with it's own family history- the donor's father brought it back >from the
far east after the war. This is one of the most amazing donations to the
AuctionHouse to date- and it could be yours!

So, go on. Take a look. You know you want to!-
http://www.jewishgen.org/auction/

Karol Schlosser
AuctionHouse Volunteer


Re: Conflict of Information lack thereof #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

I think most of us who have been digging into the past find many
mysteries and discrepancies. In my own family the surname and given
names have many variations used by relatives, and often not what was
used in their country of origin. This complicates searches of Census
records, Social Security records, city directories, ships manifests,
death certificates, etc. Also ages vary >from document to document.
Immigrants often made mistakes or did not tell the truth for various
reasons. It is a time consuming process but eventually you may be able
to discover why there are these discrepancies. In my own experience I
found a lot of useful leads on the passenger arrival records and
talking to much older relatives who still have a good memory. Each
document you obtain will yield a bit more information about your family,
even though there may be discrepancies. You also may need to learn
something about the geography and history of the area of your ancestors.
My mother was born in Hungary, but by the time she emigrated it was
Czechoslovakia and it is now Ukraine. The name of the hometown has
changed each time a new country "took over". This is very typical,
especially in Eastern Europe. All of the difficulties you describe are
very common to most of us, but we do make progress over time. Be
prepared for a long involvement in genealogy.

--


Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado


Re: Conflict of Information lack thereof #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I've been pushed into my genial trip into the past by my children who want
to know about their ancestors on my side,
If my family is not unique in this, perhaps some more experienced, genial
researchers might give me some tips
Barbara Harris
Dear Genial Genners:

While I personally find most JGenners very "con-genial" and even
"gener-ous," I am kicking myself for never having had the "in-genuity"
to call our researches "genial" trips! Kudos to Barbara for being
so "in-genious" -- and no, I am not being "dis-ingenuous"!

Yours genially,

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@...


Re: David Clyd RUTH (RUTHERFORD?) #general

NFatouros@...
 

I didn't pay much attention to Brenda Ray's post of 9-9-00, in which
she said she had been told by her grandmother that her paternal
great-grandfather's surname RUTH might have been changed >from RUTHERFORD,
and that she thought he might have been Jewish.

A little while ago I was leafing through a book catalogue I'd just
received in the mail >from a Canadian dealer, and my eye was caught by a
listing of a costly and purportedly rare book called "Comfort for the
Jews," published by the International Bible Students Association,
Brooklyn, in 1923. The author of this book was J.F. Rutherford. The entry
said that Judge Rutherford was a friend of the Jewish People and very pro-
Zionist. He was also said to be the founder or a founder of the Jehovah's
Witnesses.

Could it be that Judge Rutherford of this book was related to Ms. Ray's
grandfather? And could the notion that her grandfather was Jewish have
arisen >from the friendliness toward Jews evinced by the Judge?

Just wondering...

Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@...
9-11-00


Beider data base #general

SHEILA TOFFELL <toffell@...>
 

Thanks to all those who commiserated with me and the one person who came up
with a solution - to type in the town of origin. This is the only way this
data base apparently works.
As long as you know the town of origin ( which is what you wanted to find
out, and might have done anyway, >from the hard copy of the book) you can
find the origin and variations of the name - the latter being what you had
probably been typing in trying to confirm or find the town of origin....!
This is like something out of Alice in Wonderland. What a shame to make a
mess of such a well researched and valuable tool. Makes you wonder, doesn't
it?

Sheila Toffell


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Spice up your life! #general

Clankarol@...
 

Have you seen this week's fabulous offer in the JewishGen Auction House?

It's a unique, handcrafted chinese silver condiment set- guaranteed to
take pride of place on your mantlepiece. This unusual collection comes
with it's own family history- the donor's father brought it back >from the
far east after the war. This is one of the most amazing donations to the
AuctionHouse to date- and it could be yours!

So, go on. Take a look. You know you want to!-
http://www.jewishgen.org/auction/

Karol Schlosser
AuctionHouse Volunteer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Conflict of Information lack thereof #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

I think most of us who have been digging into the past find many
mysteries and discrepancies. In my own family the surname and given
names have many variations used by relatives, and often not what was
used in their country of origin. This complicates searches of Census
records, Social Security records, city directories, ships manifests,
death certificates, etc. Also ages vary >from document to document.
Immigrants often made mistakes or did not tell the truth for various
reasons. It is a time consuming process but eventually you may be able
to discover why there are these discrepancies. In my own experience I
found a lot of useful leads on the passenger arrival records and
talking to much older relatives who still have a good memory. Each
document you obtain will yield a bit more information about your family,
even though there may be discrepancies. You also may need to learn
something about the geography and history of the area of your ancestors.
My mother was born in Hungary, but by the time she emigrated it was
Czechoslovakia and it is now Ukraine. The name of the hometown has
changed each time a new country "took over". This is very typical,
especially in Eastern Europe. All of the difficulties you describe are
very common to most of us, but we do make progress over time. Be
prepared for a long involvement in genealogy.

--


Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Conflict of Information lack thereof #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I've been pushed into my genial trip into the past by my children who want
to know about their ancestors on my side,
If my family is not unique in this, perhaps some more experienced, genial
researchers might give me some tips
Barbara Harris
Dear Genial Genners:

While I personally find most JGenners very "con-genial" and even
"gener-ous," I am kicking myself for never having had the "in-genuity"
to call our researches "genial" trips! Kudos to Barbara for being
so "in-genious" -- and no, I am not being "dis-ingenuous"!

Yours genially,

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: David Clyd RUTH (RUTHERFORD?) #general

NFatouros@...
 

I didn't pay much attention to Brenda Ray's post of 9-9-00, in which
she said she had been told by her grandmother that her paternal
great-grandfather's surname RUTH might have been changed >from RUTHERFORD,
and that she thought he might have been Jewish.

A little while ago I was leafing through a book catalogue I'd just
received in the mail >from a Canadian dealer, and my eye was caught by a
listing of a costly and purportedly rare book called "Comfort for the
Jews," published by the International Bible Students Association,
Brooklyn, in 1923. The author of this book was J.F. Rutherford. The entry
said that Judge Rutherford was a friend of the Jewish People and very pro-
Zionist. He was also said to be the founder or a founder of the Jehovah's
Witnesses.

Could it be that Judge Rutherford of this book was related to Ms. Ray's
grandfather? And could the notion that her grandfather was Jewish have
arisen >from the friendliness toward Jews evinced by the Judge?

Just wondering...

Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@...
9-11-00


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Beider data base #general

SHEILA TOFFELL <toffell@...>
 

Thanks to all those who commiserated with me and the one person who came up
with a solution - to type in the town of origin. This is the only way this
data base apparently works.
As long as you know the town of origin ( which is what you wanted to find
out, and might have done anyway, >from the hard copy of the book) you can
find the origin and variations of the name - the latter being what you had
probably been typing in trying to confirm or find the town of origin....!
This is like something out of Alice in Wonderland. What a shame to make a
mess of such a well researched and valuable tool. Makes you wonder, doesn't
it?

Sheila Toffell


GORDON Family of Passaic, New Jersey in 1924 #general

Jules Feldman
 

The passenger manifest for Boris GORDON who landed in New York on June
16, 1924 states that he was coming to join a cousin by the name of Asher
GORDON at 114 Morfut St, Passaic, New Jersey.
The Passaic City Directory >from 1929 has an Osher GORDON listed as a
physician, married to Henrietta and living and practicing medicine at
99 Prospect St. in Passaic. At the same address is another physician,
Abel GORDON, who seems to have shared an office with Osher and had a
room in his house, and a student, Sarah GORDON.
Any further information on this family would be appreciated.

Many thanks to Nurit Kraus-Friedberg who in an act of genealogical
kindness searched the NY archives and found the manifest and the
directory entry .

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GORDON Family of Passaic, New Jersey in 1924 #general

Jules Feldman
 

The passenger manifest for Boris GORDON who landed in New York on June
16, 1924 states that he was coming to join a cousin by the name of Asher
GORDON at 114 Morfut St, Passaic, New Jersey.
The Passaic City Directory >from 1929 has an Osher GORDON listed as a
physician, married to Henrietta and living and practicing medicine at
99 Prospect St. in Passaic. At the same address is another physician,
Abel GORDON, who seems to have shared an office with Osher and had a
room in his house, and a student, Sarah GORDON.
Any further information on this family would be appreciated.

Many thanks to Nurit Kraus-Friedberg who in an act of genealogical
kindness searched the NY archives and found the manifest and the
directory entry .

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel.


Results of testing Beider's on-line dictionary #general

Art Mayoff AA6AM
 

Genners,

Having read the many complaints about Beider's on-line dictionary, I
figured it was time for a scientific test. I just completed a random
census of the on-line database using my actual copy of "A Dictionary of
Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire" as the benchmark.

I elected to randomly choose one name for each letter of the alphabet.
The random names I chose are listed below and my results are summarized
as follows:

With only one exception as explained, I was one hundred percent
successful finding *every* entry attempted. The exception is for surnames
beginning with the letter "E." Probably ninty-five percent of the names
in the actual book beginning with "E" having an accent over the "E." I
was unable to get the database to recognize all my attempts with or
without the appropriate accents over the "E." Surnames in the book
beginning with "E" that do not use the accent were recognized without
problem. Additionally, I experimented with apostrophized surnames and
discovered that the apostrophy *must* be included or else there will be
negative results.

You can draw your own conclusions, but this random test indicated to me
that the on-line data base is accurate. Do not fault the search engine
or its contents. Recheck your spelling, apostrophes and accents. If
someone can advise this group how to search for surnames beginning with
the accented letter "E" please let us know.

The search engine is at:
http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/3173.htm

Here are my random name findings - including the number of "hits" which
correlates exactly with Beider's dictionary.

APPEL'BAUM -2
APPELBAUM - 0 (without ' does not exist in the book or on-line)
BESHENKEVICH - 9
CHARNA - 38
DUBOV - 4
ENBINDER - 2
ELIAZOR - 0 (Accent over the "E" is needed but when used, it's still not
recognized)
ELEZEROVICH - 0 (Accent over the "E" is needed but when used, it's still
not recognized)
FAVUS - 85
FRIDMAN - 10
GLAUBERMAN - 17
GUROVITS - 2
IDELIOVICH - 2
IL'EVSKIJ - 3
KAGAN - 10
LOTKER - 2
MAJOFIS - 6
NEKHAMIN - 40
ORSHER - 9
POSTERNAK - 18
RAPPOPORT - 18
SHIMEN - 52
TOPERMAN - 2
UNGER - 2
VIL'CHEK - 2
VILCHEK - 0 (without ' does not exist in the book or on-line)
YUKEL'SON - 3
YUKELSON (without ' does not exist in the book or on-line)
ZUSKIND - 64

Not one single case of "it's in the book, but not on-line" - except for
the accented letter E problem.

Art Mayoff <mailto:@AA6AM> Benicia, California

Access The Mayoff Family Web Sites at :
http://www.mayoff.com
The Family Descendant Newsletter at:
http://www.mayoff.com/newsletter.html


PIATETSKY #general

Njturtle55@...
 

Looking for any info. on Piatetsky. I have a marriage date of June 27,
1948, somewhere in the USA. They may be related to either an Ostroff or
Winitsky (Vinitsky).

Any info greatly appreciated.

Steve Pickholtz
njturtle55@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Results of testing Beider's on-line dictionary #general

Art Mayoff AA6AM
 

Genners,

Having read the many complaints about Beider's on-line dictionary, I
figured it was time for a scientific test. I just completed a random
census of the on-line database using my actual copy of "A Dictionary of
Jewish Surnames >from the Russian Empire" as the benchmark.

I elected to randomly choose one name for each letter of the alphabet.
The random names I chose are listed below and my results are summarized
as follows:

With only one exception as explained, I was one hundred percent
successful finding *every* entry attempted. The exception is for surnames
beginning with the letter "E." Probably ninty-five percent of the names
in the actual book beginning with "E" having an accent over the "E." I
was unable to get the database to recognize all my attempts with or
without the appropriate accents over the "E." Surnames in the book
beginning with "E" that do not use the accent were recognized without
problem. Additionally, I experimented with apostrophized surnames and
discovered that the apostrophy *must* be included or else there will be
negative results.

You can draw your own conclusions, but this random test indicated to me
that the on-line data base is accurate. Do not fault the search engine
or its contents. Recheck your spelling, apostrophes and accents. If
someone can advise this group how to search for surnames beginning with
the accented letter "E" please let us know.

The search engine is at:
http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/inddbs/3173.htm

Here are my random name findings - including the number of "hits" which
correlates exactly with Beider's dictionary.

APPEL'BAUM -2
APPELBAUM - 0 (without ' does not exist in the book or on-line)
BESHENKEVICH - 9
CHARNA - 38
DUBOV - 4
ENBINDER - 2
ELIAZOR - 0 (Accent over the "E" is needed but when used, it's still not
recognized)
ELEZEROVICH - 0 (Accent over the "E" is needed but when used, it's still
not recognized)
FAVUS - 85
FRIDMAN - 10
GLAUBERMAN - 17
GUROVITS - 2
IDELIOVICH - 2
IL'EVSKIJ - 3
KAGAN - 10
LOTKER - 2
MAJOFIS - 6
NEKHAMIN - 40
ORSHER - 9
POSTERNAK - 18
RAPPOPORT - 18
SHIMEN - 52
TOPERMAN - 2
UNGER - 2
VIL'CHEK - 2
VILCHEK - 0 (without ' does not exist in the book or on-line)
YUKEL'SON - 3
YUKELSON (without ' does not exist in the book or on-line)
ZUSKIND - 64

Not one single case of "it's in the book, but not on-line" - except for
the accented letter E problem.

Art Mayoff <mailto:@AA6AM> Benicia, California

Access The Mayoff Family Web Sites at :
http://www.mayoff.com
The Family Descendant Newsletter at:
http://www.mayoff.com/newsletter.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PIATETSKY #general

Njturtle55@...
 

Looking for any info. on Piatetsky. I have a marriage date of June 27,
1948, somewhere in the USA. They may be related to either an Ostroff or
Winitsky (Vinitsky).

Any info greatly appreciated.

Steve Pickholtz
njturtle55@...


TERSUHOW #general

Njturtle55@...
 

Additional info. on Nathan TERSUHOW.

He was a decendent of the rabbi know as Turei Zahav,
which is where his name originated. Therefore he is a Levi.

Steve Pickholtz
njturtle55@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen TERSUHOW #general

Njturtle55@...
 

Additional info. on Nathan TERSUHOW.

He was a decendent of the rabbi know as Turei Zahav,
which is where his name originated. Therefore he is a Levi.

Steve Pickholtz
njturtle55@...


Conflict of Information lack thereof #general

<maybug@...>
 

I've been pushed into my genial trip into the past by my children who want
to know about their ancestors on my side, their non-Jewish side being able
trace theirs almost to the Garden itself. Not content with my buying them
their own copies of the Bible, they want more recent history.

As a beginning genner >from a family of loose or contentious ties, I have
little available family lore on one side. Most of the last 50 years I have
neglected to keep up my family connection (to our mutual satisfaction).
This represented neglect rather than animus so I am free to personally
contact those still alive.

On calling the oldest living family member to find out the names of her
siblings' spouses, children, etc, I discovered that while she was willing
to tell mostly malicious, amusing stories about them, she was totally
unwilling to let their names pass her lips and angry at herself when she
accidentally let one slip. Others are merely uninterested or unknowing.

I'm quite willing to do an archive/document crawl, but I am then confronted
with another family characteristic: Whether >from their lack of
information, >from error, or >from intention, the results are ususally
conflicting and sometimes impossible. I find, for example, that my
grandfather used different versions of his first name (understandable
difference), or that my grandmother had two very different maiden names
(Reuben/Strauss), or that she managed to give birth to two daughters in the
same year (one in April, the other in September - both living to give that
information on their marriage applications). And needless to say, I have
so far three documented countries of origin for the original immigrants and
*no* town of origin - but then as I say, I've just begun.

I use the rule of: document, then go with the preponderance of the
evidence. But after I go to the Nat'l Archives this week to get their
census data - and hopefully - their naturalization info, how do I know even
that that is correct? It's clear that in their minds official documents
did not require accurate information.

If my family is not unique in this, perhaps some more experienced, genial
researchers might give me some tips in this not so much technical as human
predicament. My thanks for any and all.

Barbara Harris


KRISLOFF and GOTCOVITCH families living in London early #general

Peter_Hills <Peter_Hills@...>
 

Myer Krisloff was born in London. Parents were Joseph Krisloff and Yetta
Gotcovitch. Variations on the names might include Kresloff or Krugilov,
and Goodkovitch. The family came to America on S.S. Philadelphia which
sailed >from Southampton in 1908.


Please let me know of any interest in either of these names - or close
variants - particularly if there any links with England. I have researched
both names at the UK Public Record Office and happy to share results.



Peter Hills
London UK

Also researching following families:

VELONSKY Jurbarkas , Raseiniai and London
RAYMOND/RAYMAN Vilna and London
BLUMENTHAL Ozerkov, Kalisz and London
PHILLIPS LA and SF