Date   

Adopted Children #general

David Frey <dfrey@...>
 

from the volume of written reaction I have received I must assume
that I did not make myself clear in my last letter.

I meant to make clear that truth demands that all children be
included. That includes adopted children , illegitimate children and
birth parents, where they are known.

I did not mean to exclude the birth parents if they are known. The
truth about an adoptive child (like me)is that he has two sets of
parents. And a good program like Reunion can cater for that.

When I found my own birth parents at the age of 40, I included them,
and my half brothers, nieces, grandparents, etc.

I'm sorry if you misunderstood my intent. But a truthful family tree
gives all the facts that are known including adoption, illegitimacy
and many more different situations. If other considerations are
allowed to enter in, then the value of the tree as a piece of
research is diminished.

David Frey
dfrey@bigpond.net.au

Researching: Beshincovichi, (GILDINSOHN,, STEINHART)
K'lemnick,(Rabbi Avram Israel GILDINSOHN, GILDEN)
Dryhobitch (FREY), and
Ireland & Canada & USA (WILLIAM WALSH) (Yes I know!)
Warsaw (KAUFMAN, BRAF)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Adopted Children #general

David Frey <dfrey@...>
 

from the volume of written reaction I have received I must assume
that I did not make myself clear in my last letter.

I meant to make clear that truth demands that all children be
included. That includes adopted children , illegitimate children and
birth parents, where they are known.

I did not mean to exclude the birth parents if they are known. The
truth about an adoptive child (like me)is that he has two sets of
parents. And a good program like Reunion can cater for that.

When I found my own birth parents at the age of 40, I included them,
and my half brothers, nieces, grandparents, etc.

I'm sorry if you misunderstood my intent. But a truthful family tree
gives all the facts that are known including adoption, illegitimacy
and many more different situations. If other considerations are
allowed to enter in, then the value of the tree as a piece of
research is diminished.

David Frey
dfrey@bigpond.net.au

Researching: Beshincovichi, (GILDINSOHN,, STEINHART)
K'lemnick,(Rabbi Avram Israel GILDINSOHN, GILDEN)
Dryhobitch (FREY), and
Ireland & Canada & USA (WILLIAM WALSH) (Yes I know!)
Warsaw (KAUFMAN, BRAF)


Re: Adoption #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

While I totally agree with Mr. Frey's moving words and strongly support
including adopted children in birth trees, for the sake of the parents and
the children and I have noticed that this seems to be the accepted practice
among the Professional Genealogists that I am acquainted with , I think that
it would be important to add a "*" or some sort of annotation to signify
that this is an adopted a child for the following reasons:
Firstly, a later generation or descendant of that family may wish to
research who their natural parents were - in addition to the adopted
parents, and secondly and perhaps more importantly is the fact that
according to the Torah a Kohen (a direct descendant >from Aaron the High
Priest) cannot marry a divorce. There have been situations of people wishing
to live an Orthodox lifestyle yet wishing to marry a divorcee, by
discovering that although the person that they thought was their paternal
grandfather was a Kohen - their father was adopted, and hence they are not a
Kohen and were able to marry the women they wished. In addition to Kohanim
there are various other Halachic ramifications regarding adoption - nearly
all are beneficial to know that they are adopted, as this falls outside the
parameters of this list I would be glad to personally correspond with anyone
on this matter.
Abraham J. Heschel

Brooklyn NY

MODERATOR NOTE: Any comments concerning the religious aspect
of this topic should discussed privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Adoption #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

While I totally agree with Mr. Frey's moving words and strongly support
including adopted children in birth trees, for the sake of the parents and
the children and I have noticed that this seems to be the accepted practice
among the Professional Genealogists that I am acquainted with , I think that
it would be important to add a "*" or some sort of annotation to signify
that this is an adopted a child for the following reasons:
Firstly, a later generation or descendant of that family may wish to
research who their natural parents were - in addition to the adopted
parents, and secondly and perhaps more importantly is the fact that
according to the Torah a Kohen (a direct descendant >from Aaron the High
Priest) cannot marry a divorce. There have been situations of people wishing
to live an Orthodox lifestyle yet wishing to marry a divorcee, by
discovering that although the person that they thought was their paternal
grandfather was a Kohen - their father was adopted, and hence they are not a
Kohen and were able to marry the women they wished. In addition to Kohanim
there are various other Halachic ramifications regarding adoption - nearly
all are beneficial to know that they are adopted, as this falls outside the
parameters of this list I would be glad to personally correspond with anyone
on this matter.
Abraham J. Heschel

Brooklyn NY

MODERATOR NOTE: Any comments concerning the religious aspect
of this topic should discussed privately.


searching relative of late Oscar JANOWSKY #general

jsher@...
 

My father, Israel, is searching for the son or daughter of late Oscar and
Pauline JANOWSKY. The son's name is Abba or Ebba , (not sure of English
name) and one daughter is named Evelyn. Oscar Janowsky was my father's
step-uncle. He lost contact with him for many, many years.

Judi Chesler


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen searching relative of late Oscar JANOWSKY #general

jsher@...
 

My father, Israel, is searching for the son or daughter of late Oscar and
Pauline JANOWSKY. The son's name is Abba or Ebba , (not sure of English
name) and one daughter is named Evelyn. Oscar Janowsky was my father's
step-uncle. He lost contact with him for many, many years.

Judi Chesler


Re: ben and bit #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Hebrew names consist of a name and a patronymic. Traditionally, a Jew
is called to the Torah by his Hebrew name, followed by "son of" and his
father's name. There were never ongoing surnames in most Jewish
families until they were required to take on surnames in the 18th or
19th centuries. My Hebrew name is Rachmael; my father's is Yehuda
Leib. When I am called to the Torah, I am known as Rachmael ben Yehuda
Leib. His father was Shmuel ben Moshe, so my father is Yehuda Leib ben
Shmuel. A woman would be called to the Torah (in a modern Conservative
or Reform congregation) in the same fashion. Ben is Hebrew for "son"
and bat is Hebrew for "daughter". If I had a sister, she would be Sarah
bat Yehuda Leib. In your example, the name Elizabeth often comes from
the Hebrew name Elisheva, so we would have Rut (Hebrew name generally
rendered in English as Ruth) bat Elisheva, Elisheva bat Miriam (again, a
common Hebrew name for Marian) and Yitzhaaq (Hebrew, often rendered
Isaac in English) ben Yisroel (generally rendered Israel in English),
Yisroel ben Yosef, etc. Hope this helps.

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ben and bit #general

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Hebrew names consist of a name and a patronymic. Traditionally, a Jew
is called to the Torah by his Hebrew name, followed by "son of" and his
father's name. There were never ongoing surnames in most Jewish
families until they were required to take on surnames in the 18th or
19th centuries. My Hebrew name is Rachmael; my father's is Yehuda
Leib. When I am called to the Torah, I am known as Rachmael ben Yehuda
Leib. His father was Shmuel ben Moshe, so my father is Yehuda Leib ben
Shmuel. A woman would be called to the Torah (in a modern Conservative
or Reform congregation) in the same fashion. Ben is Hebrew for "son"
and bat is Hebrew for "daughter". If I had a sister, she would be Sarah
bat Yehuda Leib. In your example, the name Elizabeth often comes from
the Hebrew name Elisheva, so we would have Rut (Hebrew name generally
rendered in English as Ruth) bat Elisheva, Elisheva bat Miriam (again, a
common Hebrew name for Marian) and Yitzhaaq (Hebrew, often rendered
Isaac in English) ben Yisroel (generally rendered Israel in English),
Yisroel ben Yosef, etc. Hope this helps.

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


Getting the family interested #general

Hafcjf@...
 

Like Rochelle, there are many of us who've had trouble getting other family
members interested in our project. Here's what worked for me.

About 10 years ago, I'd asked my father and mother in law (now dead) for
info on the family tree and made notes. Over the years I'd asked a few
other folks. A couple of them shared information, but it was usually a
rousing ho-hum. About 8 months ago I discovered Jewishgen and managed to
make amazing progress taking several of the branches of the family back to
the early 1800s and one to the late 1700s. I was so pleased with myself and
eager to share the information. To my amazement, I had more trouble learning
about the present members of the family tree (who were the children of
cousin so and so...stuff like that), then I'd had tracing the family back.

No one seemed particularly excited about the project. Since FLAMHOLTZ was
such as unusual name, I'd been searching out ALL occurances of Flamholtz
(and its variants)...not just the ones in our immediate family. What I
finally did was to combine all the information into what turned out to be
a 115 page spiral bound book called * The FLAMHOLTZ Family Tree Project.
This was sent out to all the family members that we knew as well as
everyone, world wide, with this last name that we were able to locate
(thanks to the internet phone books and the help of Jewishgenners).

Part One of the book gave information on the possible meanings of the name,
when it was adopted and something of the decrees which led to Jews adopting
surnames; information about the towns in Poland where Flamholtzes had
lived, with a map; Why our family could have chosen to come to the US; what
the journey to this country was like aboard ship with photos of some of the
ships; what happened to the family in the Holocaust (the places they
disappeared and the names of those that had been in the Lodz ghetto). There
was also a section called: Do You Know These People? which included the
names of Flamholtzes that we'd found in the passenger records, census
records and naturalizations but weren't in our immediate family and were
therefore unknown to us. This was followed by Getting Acquainted... a
section that told the stories of Flamholtzes that I'd located in Sweden,
England and Israel that were not >from our immediate family. And finally
What's Next? which told of things we could do (establish a website; gather
old photos; hire a researcher to search the Polish archives contributions
welcome; should we search lines who'd married into the Flamholtz family, etc.)

Part two of the book consisted of the Family Trees for all Flamholtzes that
we'd found. These were not expressed in the usual genealogical form that most
software programs used, but in a chart form that was easy for novices to
understand at a glance.

We asked for feedback of all kinds...corrections to the information we had,
additional information, contributions, ideas, etc.

It worked. People were very excited once they'd actually seen things in
print. While I didn't have a great deal of response >from those closest to us
in the family, responses >from distant cousins and other lines of Flamholtzes
has been great and I've gotten a great deal more information. We've actually
gotten contributions as well as some great suggestions for future issues.
It's been very gratifying.

While just talking and corresponding did little (honestly, it was like
pulling teeth to get information), giving the people something that would
impress them and show in a visual way just how much we'd learned seems to
have sparked everyone's imagination.

Don't know if this will work for any of you, but it's been very successful
for us.

Good luck,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Brent, AL
hafcjf@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Getting the family interested #general

Hafcjf@...
 

Like Rochelle, there are many of us who've had trouble getting other family
members interested in our project. Here's what worked for me.

About 10 years ago, I'd asked my father and mother in law (now dead) for
info on the family tree and made notes. Over the years I'd asked a few
other folks. A couple of them shared information, but it was usually a
rousing ho-hum. About 8 months ago I discovered Jewishgen and managed to
make amazing progress taking several of the branches of the family back to
the early 1800s and one to the late 1700s. I was so pleased with myself and
eager to share the information. To my amazement, I had more trouble learning
about the present members of the family tree (who were the children of
cousin so and so...stuff like that), then I'd had tracing the family back.

No one seemed particularly excited about the project. Since FLAMHOLTZ was
such as unusual name, I'd been searching out ALL occurances of Flamholtz
(and its variants)...not just the ones in our immediate family. What I
finally did was to combine all the information into what turned out to be
a 115 page spiral bound book called * The FLAMHOLTZ Family Tree Project.
This was sent out to all the family members that we knew as well as
everyone, world wide, with this last name that we were able to locate
(thanks to the internet phone books and the help of Jewishgenners).

Part One of the book gave information on the possible meanings of the name,
when it was adopted and something of the decrees which led to Jews adopting
surnames; information about the towns in Poland where Flamholtzes had
lived, with a map; Why our family could have chosen to come to the US; what
the journey to this country was like aboard ship with photos of some of the
ships; what happened to the family in the Holocaust (the places they
disappeared and the names of those that had been in the Lodz ghetto). There
was also a section called: Do You Know These People? which included the
names of Flamholtzes that we'd found in the passenger records, census
records and naturalizations but weren't in our immediate family and were
therefore unknown to us. This was followed by Getting Acquainted... a
section that told the stories of Flamholtzes that I'd located in Sweden,
England and Israel that were not >from our immediate family. And finally
What's Next? which told of things we could do (establish a website; gather
old photos; hire a researcher to search the Polish archives contributions
welcome; should we search lines who'd married into the Flamholtz family, etc.)

Part two of the book consisted of the Family Trees for all Flamholtzes that
we'd found. These were not expressed in the usual genealogical form that most
software programs used, but in a chart form that was easy for novices to
understand at a glance.

We asked for feedback of all kinds...corrections to the information we had,
additional information, contributions, ideas, etc.

It worked. People were very excited once they'd actually seen things in
print. While I didn't have a great deal of response >from those closest to us
in the family, responses >from distant cousins and other lines of Flamholtzes
has been great and I've gotten a great deal more information. We've actually
gotten contributions as well as some great suggestions for future issues.
It's been very gratifying.

While just talking and corresponding did little (honestly, it was like
pulling teeth to get information), giving the people something that would
impress them and show in a visual way just how much we'd learned seems to
have sparked everyone's imagination.

Don't know if this will work for any of you, but it's been very successful
for us.

Good luck,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Brent, AL
hafcjf@aol.com


LERNER in Chilpansingo, Mexico #general

Jackye Sullins <jackye@...>
 

Is anyone researching the above city? I have a picture of a little boy in
cowboy clothes whose family emigrated to Chilpansingo many years ago.

Jackye Sullins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LERNER in Chilpansingo, Mexico #general

Jackye Sullins <jackye@...>
 

Is anyone researching the above city? I have a picture of a little boy in
cowboy clothes whose family emigrated to Chilpansingo many years ago.

Jackye Sullins


Ukraine - Kiev; Unsolicited "Researchers" #ukraine

haflo <haflo@...>
 

Dan,
I had a very similar experience after I wrote for info to the Kiev
Archives. Can you tell me the name of the person who targetted you? It
seems [an] Archivist & his wife have a "business" on the side. He writes to
say nothing was found; she writes, (without revealing their relationship) &
asks for money (as an "interested historian" who has found exactly the
information I'd originally requested). I wonder if they've extended their
solicitations!??

(Please reply privately as specifics about researchers aren't publishable on the List.)

Florence Elman
<haflo@cadvision.com>

ELMAN researching: KOROSTYSHEVSKY - Zhitomir & Kiev, Ukraine; PRESSMAN -
Dolginov, Vilenskaya (Vileyka); SURIS/SURES - Odessa, Ukraine; WEISSBEIN/VAJSBEJN - Odessa, Ukraine; NERENBERG - Sokoletz & Verbovetz,
Podolsk, Ukraine; ZILBERBERG/SILBERBERG - Podolia, Ukraine;
GOTLIBOVICH/GOTLIBOWITZ/GOTLIEB - Cherkassy, Korsun, Zolotonosha, Kharkov,
& H/Gorodishche, Ukraine; STIRBERG & POGRAN/ICH - Nova Ushitsa & USA

Daniel Kazez wrote:

After posting a message to JewishGen, I have been solicited by
a person in Ukraine who stated that perhaps some of the people
on my family tree (>from Ukraine) had money and gold confiscated
during WWII. In particular, he wrote:
All information about victims that have been received as
result of use of author method is a private property. We can
send you information concerning each person indicated above,
if you pay for the information.
Thereafter, he faxed me pages stating his intention to search.
Finally, he sent me e-mail stating that--surprise, surprise--he
had found records for most of the surnames of interest to me
(as I have them simply listed below). He asked me to send
money to "complete the search." (By the way, none of my family
ever lived in Kiev!)
Last year, when I wrote directly to the Kiev Archives, this
same person sent me a fax stating, essentially, "I have found
records for you. Please send money."
Is this a scam? ... Last year, after he sent a fax regarding
my Kiev Archives search, I posted a message on JewishGen asking
if anyone knew him or could vouch for him. Not one person
responded in the affirmative.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ukraine - Kiev; Unsolicited "Researchers" #ukraine

haflo <haflo@...>
 

Dan,
I had a very similar experience after I wrote for info to the Kiev
Archives. Can you tell me the name of the person who targetted you? It
seems [an] Archivist & his wife have a "business" on the side. He writes to
say nothing was found; she writes, (without revealing their relationship) &
asks for money (as an "interested historian" who has found exactly the
information I'd originally requested). I wonder if they've extended their
solicitations!??

(Please reply privately as specifics about researchers aren't publishable on the List.)

Florence Elman
<haflo@cadvision.com>

ELMAN researching: KOROSTYSHEVSKY - Zhitomir & Kiev, Ukraine; PRESSMAN -
Dolginov, Vilenskaya (Vileyka); SURIS/SURES - Odessa, Ukraine; WEISSBEIN/VAJSBEJN - Odessa, Ukraine; NERENBERG - Sokoletz & Verbovetz,
Podolsk, Ukraine; ZILBERBERG/SILBERBERG - Podolia, Ukraine;
GOTLIBOVICH/GOTLIBOWITZ/GOTLIEB - Cherkassy, Korsun, Zolotonosha, Kharkov,
& H/Gorodishche, Ukraine; STIRBERG & POGRAN/ICH - Nova Ushitsa & USA

Daniel Kazez wrote:

After posting a message to JewishGen, I have been solicited by
a person in Ukraine who stated that perhaps some of the people
on my family tree (>from Ukraine) had money and gold confiscated
during WWII. In particular, he wrote:
All information about victims that have been received as
result of use of author method is a private property. We can
send you information concerning each person indicated above,
if you pay for the information.
Thereafter, he faxed me pages stating his intention to search.
Finally, he sent me e-mail stating that--surprise, surprise--he
had found records for most of the surnames of interest to me
(as I have them simply listed below). He asked me to send
money to "complete the search." (By the way, none of my family
ever lived in Kiev!)
Last year, when I wrote directly to the Kiev Archives, this
same person sent me a fax stating, essentially, "I have found
records for you. Please send money."
Is this a scam? ... Last year, after he sent a fax regarding
my Kiev Archives search, I posted a message on JewishGen asking
if anyone knew him or could vouch for him. Not one person
responded in the affirmative.


Berdichev yizkor books #ukraine

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

Needless to say, the Yizkor Book Project would be interested in
having the translations of both Berdichev books online. Note that
professional translators can be hired by creating a yizkor book
fundraising project to raise tax-deductible funds to pay for
translation. The procedures are explained at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation/.

Joyce
--
JOYCE FIELD
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project Manager

W. Lafayette, IN
jfield@jewishgen.org
[Address & phone number removed; to contact personally, write to the given email address]

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Berdichev yizkor books #ukraine

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

Needless to say, the Yizkor Book Project would be interested in
having the translations of both Berdichev books online. Note that
professional translators can be hired by creating a yizkor book
fundraising project to raise tax-deductible funds to pay for
translation. The procedures are explained at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation/.

Joyce
--
JOYCE FIELD
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project Manager

W. Lafayette, IN
jfield@jewishgen.org
[Address & phone number removed; to contact personally, write to the given email address]

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/translations.html


Krasnoysky Kray #general

ESES@...
 

I am trying to locate a place called Krasnoysky Kray in Russia. Just found
out some family information that this city and its Labor camps back in 1941
may have played a part in my Grandfathers life.
Is there some place I can find out about the Labor camps there back in 1941?
Seems that my Grandfather was sentenced to 5 years there but no record of him
arriving there.
Errol Schneegurt LI NY eses@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Krasnoysky Kray #general

ESES@...
 

I am trying to locate a place called Krasnoysky Kray in Russia. Just found
out some family information that this city and its Labor camps back in 1941
may have played a part in my Grandfathers life.
Is there some place I can find out about the Labor camps there back in 1941?
Seems that my Grandfather was sentenced to 5 years there but no record of him
arriving there.
Errol Schneegurt LI NY eses@aol.com


JGS of SW FL Meeting Dec. 3 #general

Kim Sheintal
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

If you are going to be in the Sarasota-Manatee area on Sunday, December 3,
2000, please join us at 1:00 PM at the JCC, 582 S. McIntosh Road, Sarasota
for our JGS of SW Florida meeting.

"Sharing Our Bubbie's Recipes" is the program. Bring a recipe or two and,
if you can, a sampling for eight people. We will eat, enjoy and reminisce
about our Bubbies!

Kim Sheintal, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Southwest Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of SW FL Meeting Dec. 3 #general

Kim Sheintal
 

Dear Jewishgenners,

If you are going to be in the Sarasota-Manatee area on Sunday, December 3,
2000, please join us at 1:00 PM at the JCC, 582 S. McIntosh Road, Sarasota
for our JGS of SW Florida meeting.

"Sharing Our Bubbie's Recipes" is the program. Bring a recipe or two and,
if you can, a sampling for eight people. We will eat, enjoy and reminisce
about our Bubbies!

Kim Sheintal, President
Jewish Genealogical Society of Southwest Florida