Date   

Re: SS-5 Applications #general

Beachbk@...
 

I sent three requests, each mailed separately, in late Sept 2000,
received one two weeks ago, one on Dec 2 and still am waiting for third.
So far the two that I have received had different spellings for the
parents name than the ones found on their death certificates and the
mother's name on one is illegible. I'm hoping that the third will provide
information that will help in my genealogical search.

Rema Comras
Miami, Fl


Translation Help Please! Russian passport posted on ViewMate #general

Ed Posnak <ejp@...>
 

Fellow Genners:

My great-grandfather, Ezra Posnak (or Posniak, Poznyak) came to the US from
Dabrowa, Poland around 1900. I have posted his original passport, which is
in certificate form and written in Russian. I would greatly appreciate if
someone could translate it for me.

It may be viewed at http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate , file number
VM 140.

Thanks!

Ed Posnak
Orlando, FL
ejp@alumni.duke.edu


Research, research: Death Certificates. #general

vzelvin@...
 

Dear Jewish Genners, For those finding it difficult to locate a Death
Certificate, entertain the possibility that your relative did not die
where you expected he did. Here is my own experience, and why it is so
important to interview *all* the members of your family:

My great-grandmother's sister married a man who did very well
financially in Real Estate in New York City. The Personal Name Index
to The Times produced his Obituaries, printed in depth. However I had
no luck finding his death certificate, even with the exact death date.
His whole family lived in New York City.

A search my notes of family interviews done some years ago found one
cousin who had said "Oh, did I tell you that he was in the Spring Valley
Nursing Home before he died?" A quick phone call elicited the correct
archive, and yes they had his death certificate. Not near New York City at
all.

Sincerely, Vivian E. Shore Zelvin, Eastchester, NY

The family mentioned above is SOKOLSKI, GOODMAN/GUTMAN, PERLMAN/
PERLO/PERLA Also researching ROKEACH, BLOCH, BEHRMAN, BEHRMANN,
KOCHKOVSKI; SHUSHANSKY/SUSHANSKY, GREENSPAN;
HALPERN, DELMAN; ROSENTHAL; RAKOWSKI; PLIMACK;
KIVOVICH/KAVOVIT/KAVY/KAVEY/KIVET/KIVO/etc.
BESPROSVANNI, KLEBANSKY, ZELVIN


New Sundt #general

steve morgan <smorgan@...>
 

A document came to me that suggests my great-grandfather Max Sprei was born
in New Sundt, Austria in 1874.
My grandfather came >from Tarnow, now in Poland but in Austria when he was
born in 1896.

Could New Sundt be a German name for a different town in Galicia? I know
Nowy Sacz is in the general area, is this New Sundt?

Thanks to all.


Steven Morgan
Burgaw, NC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SS-5 Applications #general

Beachbk@...
 

I sent three requests, each mailed separately, in late Sept 2000,
received one two weeks ago, one on Dec 2 and still am waiting for third.
So far the two that I have received had different spellings for the
parents name than the ones found on their death certificates and the
mother's name on one is illegible. I'm hoping that the third will provide
information that will help in my genealogical search.

Rema Comras
Miami, Fl


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation Help Please! Russian passport posted on ViewMate #general

Ed Posnak <ejp@...>
 

Fellow Genners:

My great-grandfather, Ezra Posnak (or Posniak, Poznyak) came to the US from
Dabrowa, Poland around 1900. I have posted his original passport, which is
in certificate form and written in Russian. I would greatly appreciate if
someone could translate it for me.

It may be viewed at http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate , file number
VM 140.

Thanks!

Ed Posnak
Orlando, FL
ejp@alumni.duke.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research, research: Death Certificates. #general

vzelvin@...
 

Dear Jewish Genners, For those finding it difficult to locate a Death
Certificate, entertain the possibility that your relative did not die
where you expected he did. Here is my own experience, and why it is so
important to interview *all* the members of your family:

My great-grandmother's sister married a man who did very well
financially in Real Estate in New York City. The Personal Name Index
to The Times produced his Obituaries, printed in depth. However I had
no luck finding his death certificate, even with the exact death date.
His whole family lived in New York City.

A search my notes of family interviews done some years ago found one
cousin who had said "Oh, did I tell you that he was in the Spring Valley
Nursing Home before he died?" A quick phone call elicited the correct
archive, and yes they had his death certificate. Not near New York City at
all.

Sincerely, Vivian E. Shore Zelvin, Eastchester, NY

The family mentioned above is SOKOLSKI, GOODMAN/GUTMAN, PERLMAN/
PERLO/PERLA Also researching ROKEACH, BLOCH, BEHRMAN, BEHRMANN,
KOCHKOVSKI; SHUSHANSKY/SUSHANSKY, GREENSPAN;
HALPERN, DELMAN; ROSENTHAL; RAKOWSKI; PLIMACK;
KIVOVICH/KAVOVIT/KAVY/KAVEY/KIVET/KIVO/etc.
BESPROSVANNI, KLEBANSKY, ZELVIN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Sundt #general

steve morgan <smorgan@...>
 

A document came to me that suggests my great-grandfather Max Sprei was born
in New Sundt, Austria in 1874.
My grandfather came >from Tarnow, now in Poland but in Austria when he was
born in 1896.

Could New Sundt be a German name for a different town in Galicia? I know
Nowy Sacz is in the general area, is this New Sundt?

Thanks to all.


Steven Morgan
Burgaw, NC


GAM, ZATURENSKY, KAPLAN #belarus

tina gam <gam1227@...>
 

It was very exciting to see these surnames, (GAM,
ZATURENSKY, KAPLAN) in print but my research has hit a
brick wall. I have been unable to locate or match up
to any families researching these surnames. Although
I believe I am related to many names printed, I want
to connect to others researching these families.

If anyone has any suggestions, I would apprectiate
your contacting me.

Thank you,
Tina GAM
New York


Belarus SIG #Belarus GAM, ZATURENSKY, KAPLAN #belarus

tina gam <gam1227@...>
 

It was very exciting to see these surnames, (GAM,
ZATURENSKY, KAPLAN) in print but my research has hit a
brick wall. I have been unable to locate or match up
to any families researching these surnames. Although
I believe I am related to many names printed, I want
to connect to others researching these families.

If anyone has any suggestions, I would apprectiate
your contacting me.

Thank you,
Tina GAM
New York


Book review- A Beginner's Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Great Britain #general

koosh@...
 

Published in Oxford Menorah, Issue no. 158, Winter 2000
Forwarded by and reprinted with permission of:
Harold Pollins, book review author
Oxford England
<snillop@tesco.net>


Rosemary Wenzerul (ed.), Jewish Ancestors? A Beginner's Guide to Jewish
Genealogy in Great Britain, 2000, The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great
Britain, PO Box 13288, London, N3 3WD, £4.50, pp.80. ISBN 0-0537559-0-X

The Centre for Oxfordshire Studies at the Westgate Library is a magnificent
resource for all manner of research material and, despite its name, not
confined to that which relates solely to the county. Its tables are usually
fully occupied by people peering at microfiches supplying them with details
of births, marriages and deaths. They are seeking to fill out their family
trees. Around the shelves are copies of numerous genealogical publications.
There are microfilms of the Censuses of England & Wales covering many
counties.

Why genealogy should have become, in recent years, so popular is
interesting but not something to be pursued here; rather we can just note
the fact. Jewish genealogy has similarly flourished; the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Great Britain is a product of the 1990s but is
growing apace and now has over 700 members. For them and for anyone else
this is a handbook on how to do genealogy, where to look for information
about one's forbears as well as one's contemporaries. It is more than
that. Some people might be satisfied with collecting basic information
about their family, such as births, marriages and deaths. But for those
who want more there is advice on how to undertake interviews including the
type of questions to ask. Perhaps there could have been a cautionary
warning about the possible unreliability of people's memories, and the
need to check where possible with other material, a standard caveat in
Oral History.

How far ought one to go? In 'Making the Most of Your Family History', the
editor starts by asserting that a tree with merely many names and dates is
rather boring and she argues in favour of bringing the data to life. As
well as any relevant interviews this means including photographs (and
there is advice on how to preserve old photographs and get them copied),
but also such artefacts as a child's first lock of hair, reminiscences of
grandparents on observing their grandchildren and their development; menus
at weddings; and so on. Four pages of suggestions. Each one to their taste;
some might find this somewhat obsessive even though one can see the
usefulness to future generations of such material. My son was excited to
point out how similar he was to his great-grandfather and I experienced a
thrill when I first saw a photograph of this paternal grandfather who died
just before I was born - after whom I was named - and there is regret in
not having a likeness of his wife nor of my maternal grandfather (although
a description of him in a Russian army document does add something.) Many
Jews are heard to observe that their parents and grandparents never told
them anything about their early life including even where they came from
originally let alone the details of their everyday life.

This booklet is essentially a practical document. Its aim is to assist
people, especially newcomers to research and to genealogy but also those
with some experience in these matters. It thus contains many lists, of
libraries, of local and national record offices (in some cases with street
maps), and of the numerous Mormon Family History Centres (the Church of the
Latter Day Saints, for its own purposes, collects details of births,
marriages and deaths throughout the world, and makes them available to
everyone.) There are pages of relevant publications, lists of overseas
archives and libraries, a guide to reading headstones in cemeteries
(including a Hebrew alphabet as well as the meaning of abbreviations and
pictorial symbols found on headstones but there seems to be a yud missing
from Avraham avinu [p.43].) There is a helpful Glossary of Yiddish terms
but zeydah, grandfather, is spelled with a tsadik instead of a zayin and
yerushe, inheritance, begins with a vav instead of a yud (p.72.)

A guide such as this is a functional document; it is meant to be of
assistance to those using it. Undoubtedly, for those interested in taking
up this subject or in adding to their knowledge of it this is a very useful
publication. Of course its usefulness depends on the breadth of its
inclusion and perhaps reduced by anything omitted. And the information
needs to be accurate and up to date; as details change, of telephone
numbers, addresses or other facts, new editions need to be thought of.
There are, as indicated above, a number of errors, including printing
mistakes; these and others I shall communicate, along with other comments,
separately to the editor. The purpose of drawing attention to them is
positive, to hope that any new editions will be even better.

---end forward---
--
bkouchel@jewishgen.org
Bernard I. Kouchel


Sidney LUTIN #general

Carol Fairman
 

I received the death certificate for my grandfather Nathan FAIRMAN. He died
in Baltimore Maryland Sept 18, 1989. I do not know very much about my
grandfather. On the death certificate is listed as the informant a Sidney
LUTIN >from Queens NY (I have the exact address on the death certificate). I
did find a person with this surname at the address I have on the web, and
have sent a letter. I don't know if Sidney was a lawyer, a guardian or a
relative.

If anyone has ever come across a Sidney Lutin and can perhaps help me in
who he was, please respond to me privately at cfairman@bellsouth.net

Thank you


Re: Chesterfield couch manufacturers #general

George Farkas <george@...>
 

A chesterfield is another word used for couch in Montreal.
It is not "generally" a brand name, although it may have been one once.

I live in Montreal and might be able to help you if you provided more
information.

George Farkas

researching the names FARKAS, FRIED, LINKS, KNOPFELMACHER,
WEISZ, VIDOR, LIFSHITZ, KORNETZKY, YELLIN, SHAPIRA

Hello
Does any one know anything about a couch known as a Chesterfield? My
friend said her family manufactured such an item. This was in Toronto or
Montreal.
She was related to a family possibly the GELFONDs or FELDMANs.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fwd: Book review- A Beginner's Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Great Britain #general

koosh@...
 

Published in Oxford Menorah, Issue no. 158, Winter 2000
Forwarded by and reprinted with permission of:
Harold Pollins, book review author
Oxford England
<snillop@tesco.net>


Rosemary Wenzerul (ed.), Jewish Ancestors? A Beginner's Guide to Jewish
Genealogy in Great Britain, 2000, The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great
Britain, PO Box 13288, London, N3 3WD, £4.50, pp.80. ISBN 0-0537559-0-X

The Centre for Oxfordshire Studies at the Westgate Library is a magnificent
resource for all manner of research material and, despite its name, not
confined to that which relates solely to the county. Its tables are usually
fully occupied by people peering at microfiches supplying them with details
of births, marriages and deaths. They are seeking to fill out their family
trees. Around the shelves are copies of numerous genealogical publications.
There are microfilms of the Censuses of England & Wales covering many
counties.

Why genealogy should have become, in recent years, so popular is
interesting but not something to be pursued here; rather we can just note
the fact. Jewish genealogy has similarly flourished; the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Great Britain is a product of the 1990s but is
growing apace and now has over 700 members. For them and for anyone else
this is a handbook on how to do genealogy, where to look for information
about one's forbears as well as one's contemporaries. It is more than
that. Some people might be satisfied with collecting basic information
about their family, such as births, marriages and deaths. But for those
who want more there is advice on how to undertake interviews including the
type of questions to ask. Perhaps there could have been a cautionary
warning about the possible unreliability of people's memories, and the
need to check where possible with other material, a standard caveat in
Oral History.

How far ought one to go? In 'Making the Most of Your Family History', the
editor starts by asserting that a tree with merely many names and dates is
rather boring and she argues in favour of bringing the data to life. As
well as any relevant interviews this means including photographs (and
there is advice on how to preserve old photographs and get them copied),
but also such artefacts as a child's first lock of hair, reminiscences of
grandparents on observing their grandchildren and their development; menus
at weddings; and so on. Four pages of suggestions. Each one to their taste;
some might find this somewhat obsessive even though one can see the
usefulness to future generations of such material. My son was excited to
point out how similar he was to his great-grandfather and I experienced a
thrill when I first saw a photograph of this paternal grandfather who died
just before I was born - after whom I was named - and there is regret in
not having a likeness of his wife nor of my maternal grandfather (although
a description of him in a Russian army document does add something.) Many
Jews are heard to observe that their parents and grandparents never told
them anything about their early life including even where they came from
originally let alone the details of their everyday life.

This booklet is essentially a practical document. Its aim is to assist
people, especially newcomers to research and to genealogy but also those
with some experience in these matters. It thus contains many lists, of
libraries, of local and national record offices (in some cases with street
maps), and of the numerous Mormon Family History Centres (the Church of the
Latter Day Saints, for its own purposes, collects details of births,
marriages and deaths throughout the world, and makes them available to
everyone.) There are pages of relevant publications, lists of overseas
archives and libraries, a guide to reading headstones in cemeteries
(including a Hebrew alphabet as well as the meaning of abbreviations and
pictorial symbols found on headstones but there seems to be a yud missing
from Avraham avinu [p.43].) There is a helpful Glossary of Yiddish terms
but zeydah, grandfather, is spelled with a tsadik instead of a zayin and
yerushe, inheritance, begins with a vav instead of a yud (p.72.)

A guide such as this is a functional document; it is meant to be of
assistance to those using it. Undoubtedly, for those interested in taking
up this subject or in adding to their knowledge of it this is a very useful
publication. Of course its usefulness depends on the breadth of its
inclusion and perhaps reduced by anything omitted. And the information
needs to be accurate and up to date; as details change, of telephone
numbers, addresses or other facts, new editions need to be thought of.
There are, as indicated above, a number of errors, including printing
mistakes; these and others I shall communicate, along with other comments,
separately to the editor. The purpose of drawing attention to them is
positive, to hope that any new editions will be even better.

---end forward---
--
bkouchel@jewishgen.org
Bernard I. Kouchel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sidney LUTIN #general

Carol Fairman
 

I received the death certificate for my grandfather Nathan FAIRMAN. He died
in Baltimore Maryland Sept 18, 1989. I do not know very much about my
grandfather. On the death certificate is listed as the informant a Sidney
LUTIN >from Queens NY (I have the exact address on the death certificate). I
did find a person with this surname at the address I have on the web, and
have sent a letter. I don't know if Sidney was a lawyer, a guardian or a
relative.

If anyone has ever come across a Sidney Lutin and can perhaps help me in
who he was, please respond to me privately at cfairman@bellsouth.net

Thank you


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chesterfield couch manufacturers #general

George Farkas <george@...>
 

A chesterfield is another word used for couch in Montreal.
It is not "generally" a brand name, although it may have been one once.

I live in Montreal and might be able to help you if you provided more
information.

George Farkas

researching the names FARKAS, FRIED, LINKS, KNOPFELMACHER,
WEISZ, VIDOR, LIFSHITZ, KORNETZKY, YELLIN, SHAPIRA

Hello
Does any one know anything about a couch known as a Chesterfield? My
friend said her family manufactured such an item. This was in Toronto or
Montreal.
She was related to a family possibly the GELFONDs or FELDMANs.


Re Warszawa in the years 1850 #general

Nicole Berline <nberline@...>
 

Florence
These numbers are Hipoteka plot numbers
( numeros de parcelles du Cadastre: prewar Poland was organized so
much like France !)

Members of the Warszawa Resaerch group warszawa@lyris.jewishgen.org
have computerized the 1869 Warszawa Business and Homeowners Directory,
making it possible to find the address of a given plot ( street, number,
district ) and the name of the owner.
I looked up your numbers and here is the result:
plots number 2929 and 2930a were at 31 Solec street , district
( in polish : cyrkuli) IX
plot number 2930b was at 80 Czerniakowska street , also district IX .
The three plots had the same owner: BERNSTEJN/ BORNSZTEJN Wiktor , who
ran a beer brewery.

Concerning books about 19th century Warszawa,
apart >from the fantastic litterature in Yiddish ( partly translated in
English) there is a lot of information in Encyclopaedia Judaica ,
paper and electronic versions ( the latter is extremely convenient).
These books can be consulted freely, for instance, at the Bibliotheque
de l'Alliance Israelite Universelle in Paris.

Amicalement
Nicole BERLINE, Paris

Dear Genners,
I would like to find books relating the life in Warszawa in the years
1850..(the addresses of my Mendelssohn ancestors are given only by >numbers:
2929,2930 in a part of the city named "new world", 10th ardt of
Warszawa.What does it mean?)


Experiences with Center for Jewish History #general

Bkhait@...
 

If you've used the resources of the Center for Jewish History, I'd like to
hear about your experiences for possible use in a Heritage Quest article
about the Center. Please respond privately to bkhait@aol.com.

Barbara Khait
bkhait@aol.com
Somerset, NJ


Re: Warszawa in the years 1850 #general

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

Florence Mendelssohn writes:

I would like to find books relating the life in Warszawa in the years
1850..(the addresses of my Mendelssohn ancestors are given only by
numbers:
2929,2930 in a part of the city named "new world", 10th ardt of
Warszawa.What does it mean?)
Thanks in advance!
Florence Mendelssohn (Paris),France
The 1852 Warszawa Home Owners List shows that plot number 2929 was
actually divided into 3 plots, 2929a, b and c. Plot 2929a was owned by
Frydrych KALL, 2929b was owned by Hersz KERNER and 2929c was owned by Jan
BILE. Plot number 2930 was also owned by Jan Bile. They are all on
Solec street.

The 1870 Warszawa Business Directory shows many MENDELSOHN's including the
following given names:

Ber, Berek, Dawid, Eljasz, Emanuel, Gerszon, Hersz, Jakier, Jankiel,
Lejzer, Majer, Mendel, Moszek, Wolf and Perla.


Hadassah Lipsius
Warszawa Research Group


New address & thanks #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello All
This is to inform you that I have a new e-address.
It is
Susserl@home.com

Thank you all for your response to my translation
Lili Susser
Colorado