Date   

Re: INS notations on Ships Passenger List #general

buffmufin
 

The notations entered on the ships passenger pages under the occupation
column are related to obtaining naturalization papers. What do the
numbers mean ?
for example 2-769948-8-7-40
and 2-915214
from my own experience in researching these kinds of numbers in my own
family, this is what I learned:

The 2 refers to the fact that the papers were submitted in New York.
Other locations have other prefixes (e.g. 8 is Detroit). The second set
of numbers (long series) is the document number. It may be a declaration,
petition, etc. The 3rd number was the date of the document.

Considering the date, and >from personal experience in my own family, most
likely your relative filed a declaration of intent prior to having to
register under the Alien Registration Act. That is what some of my
relatives did, at about the same time, and thereafter became citizens.

Hope this helps.

Carol Kunkis Cohn
Newport Beach, CA

Searching:
KOSSOI/KOSSOY/KOSOFF - Vetka, Gomel, Chechersk, Zagor'ye, Mogilev, Belarus;
KUNKIS - Glubokoye, Belarus
SCHRIER - Yarmolinits, Kaminets-Podolsk, Ukraine


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: INS notations on Ships Passenger List #general

buffmufin
 

The notations entered on the ships passenger pages under the occupation
column are related to obtaining naturalization papers. What do the
numbers mean ?
for example 2-769948-8-7-40
and 2-915214
from my own experience in researching these kinds of numbers in my own
family, this is what I learned:

The 2 refers to the fact that the papers were submitted in New York.
Other locations have other prefixes (e.g. 8 is Detroit). The second set
of numbers (long series) is the document number. It may be a declaration,
petition, etc. The 3rd number was the date of the document.

Considering the date, and >from personal experience in my own family, most
likely your relative filed a declaration of intent prior to having to
register under the Alien Registration Act. That is what some of my
relatives did, at about the same time, and thereafter became citizens.

Hope this helps.

Carol Kunkis Cohn
Newport Beach, CA

Searching:
KOSSOI/KOSSOY/KOSOFF - Vetka, Gomel, Chechersk, Zagor'ye, Mogilev, Belarus;
KUNKIS - Glubokoye, Belarus
SCHRIER - Yarmolinits, Kaminets-Podolsk, Ukraine


Re: Bielcza (jri-pl digest: November 05, 2000) #poland

NFatouros@...
 

In her message of November 5,00 concerning the town of Bielcza Ellen
Sattler-Harpin asked whether is is unusual for only two or three families to
live "in a village like this."

It may have been the case that there weren't many non-Jewish families in that
village either; Bielcza was just a small village. (I couldn't find an entry
for it in any of my Gazetteers.) Or, perhaps, those few Jewish families
supplied the needs of the rest of the population,such as for tailoring and
tinsmithing, and in particular, the need for liquor. A tavern was also a
place of respite for the area's farmers and for intinerant traders and
peddlars.

If those few Jewish families of a little village were observant, they would
go to a larger village or nearby town to fulfill their religious oblgations
for circumcision, marriages, cheder attendance, etc., and the great holy days
and, maybe, more regularly and frequently, for Sabbath services.

That at the time of the Shoah there were only two or three Jewish families in
Bielcza may indicate merely that other Jewish families who may have lived
there had died out by then, or had emigrated.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse.


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Bielcza (jri-pl digest: November 05, 2000) #poland

NFatouros@...
 

In her message of November 5,00 concerning the town of Bielcza Ellen
Sattler-Harpin asked whether is is unusual for only two or three families to
live "in a village like this."

It may have been the case that there weren't many non-Jewish families in that
village either; Bielcza was just a small village. (I couldn't find an entry
for it in any of my Gazetteers.) Or, perhaps, those few Jewish families
supplied the needs of the rest of the population,such as for tailoring and
tinsmithing, and in particular, the need for liquor. A tavern was also a
place of respite for the area's farmers and for intinerant traders and
peddlars.

If those few Jewish families of a little village were observant, they would
go to a larger village or nearby town to fulfill their religious oblgations
for circumcision, marriages, cheder attendance, etc., and the great holy days
and, maybe, more regularly and frequently, for Sabbath services.

That at the time of the Shoah there were only two or three Jewish families in
Bielcza may indicate merely that other Jewish families who may have lived
there had died out by then, or had emigrated.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse.


My immigrant ancestors #ukraine

Kacy <Crye@...>
 

My grandfather immigrated to the US >from Odessa in the company of his
parents and grandparents (most likely paternal grandparents). He was
probably a toddler at the time. His siblings were born in the US. I
have a photocopy of the front of a paper relating to my
great-grandfather's naturalization. My grandfather's parents (not sure
about 'his' grandparents) took the surname SMITH. My mother thinks that
her father told her this was because it was the simplest name in the
'S's and that a more exact American translation would have been
STEPHENS. The paper I have gives my great-grandfather's name, that the
naturalization date was in September (it does give the exact date),
bundle and copy of record number, his address, occupation, age, port
(NY), and arrival in July 1888. (They stayed in the NYC area and are
buried in Montefiore Cemetery.)

I have learned >from lurking on the list that even if I get a full copy
of the naturalization papers I probably will not know the original name
as they were using SMITH at the time of naturalization. I am hoping
that it will lead me to the ship, though my mother has looked over the
records of ships for the time period and found no one listed with a name
that might translate into STEPHENS.

Supposedly, there was a brother of my great-grandfather's who also
immigrated ( I suspect at a different time) and lived in the Cincinnati,
Ohio area who took STEPHENS as his surname. My grandfather did not know
his uncle growing up.

Kacy


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine My immigrant ancestors #ukraine

Kacy <Crye@...>
 

My grandfather immigrated to the US >from Odessa in the company of his
parents and grandparents (most likely paternal grandparents). He was
probably a toddler at the time. His siblings were born in the US. I
have a photocopy of the front of a paper relating to my
great-grandfather's naturalization. My grandfather's parents (not sure
about 'his' grandparents) took the surname SMITH. My mother thinks that
her father told her this was because it was the simplest name in the
'S's and that a more exact American translation would have been
STEPHENS. The paper I have gives my great-grandfather's name, that the
naturalization date was in September (it does give the exact date),
bundle and copy of record number, his address, occupation, age, port
(NY), and arrival in July 1888. (They stayed in the NYC area and are
buried in Montefiore Cemetery.)

I have learned >from lurking on the list that even if I get a full copy
of the naturalization papers I probably will not know the original name
as they were using SMITH at the time of naturalization. I am hoping
that it will lead me to the ship, though my mother has looked over the
records of ships for the time period and found no one listed with a name
that might translate into STEPHENS.

Supposedly, there was a brother of my great-grandfather's who also
immigrated ( I suspect at a different time) and lived in the Cincinnati,
Ohio area who took STEPHENS as his surname. My grandfather did not know
his uncle growing up.

Kacy


Re: Brick Wall #romania

Milton Kline <miltonk@...>
 

Re: Polonnoye

Dave Sandler, in a message to Stu Bernstein, suggested reviewing the 1858
tax census records for Polonnoye, in order to check on his family. My
family, KLEINER's, also came >from Polonnoye. Where could I find the 1858 tax records for that shtetl?

Milton Kline


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Brick Wall #ukraine

Milton Kline <miltonk@...>
 

Re: Polonnoye

Dave Sandler, in a message to Stu Bernstein, suggested reviewing the 1858
tax census records for Polonnoye, in order to check on his family. My
family, KLEINER's, also came >from Polonnoye. Where could I find the 1858 tax records for that shtetl?

Milton Kline


Dirduk tombstone picture #ukraine

Raanan S Isseroff <raanan1@...>
 

BS"D

Joel and Steve Shalom,
The correct spelling of Zaydie in Yiddish is zayin-yud-yud-dalet-ayin or
yud.
I do not think this word is "Zaydie", I think it is a name or title.
The word zidi appears after the name on the husbands stone as well.
(Zayin-yud-dalet-yud) "Wife of" would make sense, but then on the
husbands stone we see it says his first name and last name and the extra
word "Zidi" is hanging out in left field.

Lets figure out what this word Zidi is, whether a name or title.
Raanan S. Isseroff
Brooklyn, USA

On Sun, 05 Nov 2000 20:43:19 -0500 Joel Bressler <nefesh2@erols.com>
writes:

Steve:
I believe the stone reads:
Here lies the remains of Pesa, daughter of Eliezer, wife of Zady,
DIRDEK,
who passed away on the 18th of Shevat, 5684 (equivalent to January
24,
1924). May her soul be bound up in the bond of eternal life.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Dirduk tombstone picture #ukraine

Raanan S Isseroff <raanan1@...>
 

BS"D

Joel and Steve Shalom,
The correct spelling of Zaydie in Yiddish is zayin-yud-yud-dalet-ayin or
yud.
I do not think this word is "Zaydie", I think it is a name or title.
The word zidi appears after the name on the husbands stone as well.
(Zayin-yud-dalet-yud) "Wife of" would make sense, but then on the
husbands stone we see it says his first name and last name and the extra
word "Zidi" is hanging out in left field.

Lets figure out what this word Zidi is, whether a name or title.
Raanan S. Isseroff
Brooklyn, USA

On Sun, 05 Nov 2000 20:43:19 -0500 Joel Bressler <nefesh2@erols.com>
writes:

Steve:
I believe the stone reads:
Here lies the remains of Pesa, daughter of Eliezer, wife of Zady,
DIRDEK,
who passed away on the 18th of Shevat, 5684 (equivalent to January
24,
1924). May her soul be bound up in the bond of eternal life.


Re: BARANSHTEYN Search #ukraine

SBernst579@...
 

In a message dated 11/5/00 10:11:47 PM Pacific Standard Time,
Dennis Brown

<< Please let me know if any of this sounds familar to you >>

Thanx(name?)

The names don't look familiar, but who know what BARANSHTEYN might have been
transklated into. As I originally said in my E-Mail, I only know of one
brother to my grandfather, there must have been additional children born.
Good luck in your searc.

Stewart


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: BARANSHTEYN Search #ukraine

SBernst579@...
 

In a message dated 11/5/00 10:11:47 PM Pacific Standard Time,
Dennis Brown

<< Please let me know if any of this sounds familar to you >>

Thanx(name?)

The names don't look familiar, but who know what BARANSHTEYN might have been
transklated into. As I originally said in my E-Mail, I only know of one
brother to my grandfather, there must have been additional children born.
Good luck in your searc.

Stewart


England help -- PREIL #general

NEIL185@...
 

Looking for the family PREIL or PRAIL >from Liverpool.
The father was Rabbi Haim Isaac PREIL who had daughters -
1. Gertie SPIRA of Golders Green
2. Lily Ackerman (husband was Dr. J.) of Birmingham
3. Emily King of Childwall, Liverpool

Rabbi Haim had a sister Anna SORSKI or SORSKY.

Any help very much appreciated.

Thanks, Dr. Neil Rosenstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen England help -- PREIL #general

NEIL185@...
 

Looking for the family PREIL or PRAIL >from Liverpool.
The father was Rabbi Haim Isaac PREIL who had daughters -
1. Gertie SPIRA of Golders Green
2. Lily Ackerman (husband was Dr. J.) of Birmingham
3. Emily King of Childwall, Liverpool

Rabbi Haim had a sister Anna SORSKI or SORSKY.

Any help very much appreciated.

Thanks, Dr. Neil Rosenstein


Belmar, NJ #general

delete_this_to_reply_stacy_harris@...
 

Thanks to all for the information on Belmar, N.J. with the possible
exception of the person who told me to look on a map.

Stacy Harris


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Belmar, NJ #general

delete_this_to_reply_stacy_harris@...
 

Thanks to all for the information on Belmar, N.J. with the possible
exception of the person who told me to look on a map.

Stacy Harris


Re: The name Bashe or Basha #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

In my experience I have found Bashe to be a women's name, although
I have come across a Bushy or Bushinkel as a nickname for a youngest
child who was a boy.

Abraham J. Heschel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The name Bashe or Basha #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

In my experience I have found Bashe to be a women's name, although
I have come across a Bushy or Bushinkel as a nickname for a youngest
child who was a boy.

Abraham J. Heschel


Zhitomer testimonies at Yad V'Shem #ukraine

Gilda and Bob Kurtzman <gildak@...>
 

I got the names >from the Beit Volin library in Givatayim which is a branch of Yad
V'Shem. They told me that in order to access the names we would have to go to the
Yad V'Shem ARCHIVES (and not the library). Since we live in Israel the librarian at
Beit Volin did not tell me how to access them by internet. First, I suggest you try
to find the website for Yad V'Shem and see if the testimonies in the archives can be
ordered by internet. Second, if not, please let me know. Although we do not plan to
go to the Archives in the near future because we have already spent some time at the
library and we don't live in Petach Tikva, there is a possibility that at some future
date we will be able to get there. I am not looking for myself but was looking for
Mickey Freedman who has done me a few favors in the US and I found the material he
needed at Beit Volin. But, my husband is looking for background material on his town
and was told to look at the testimonies so I think he will go up there sometime over
the winter (and to visit the grandchildren).

The testimonies *might* be in Hebrew or Yiddish. Do you read either? Right now the
information on Zhitomer we got for Mickey is in Hebrew and we are going to have to
sit down and translate it all for him.

Before I came on aliyah in 1972, I lived in Far Rockaway. Almost neighbors!

Gilda Kurtzman
gildak@zahav.net.il
Petach Tikva, Israel

-->The above list has some interest to me since it includes a Rotenberg -

which is how my grandfather spelled his name on some documents and he came
from a town a few miles >from Zhitomir . How do I access Rachel Rotenberg
and where can I access her statement?


Re: TROTSKY AS BRONSTEIN #ukraine

Bronstein Family <sygaa@...>
 

8 Heshvan 5761
Monday, November 06, 2000

Dear All & especially to all the BRONSTEIN's:
In 1971, The Jewish Publication Society published the book "Trotsky
and the Jews" by Joseph Nedava. It contains numerous quotes >from
Trotsky's book My Life. I am sure that the book is long out of print & I
don't know how easy it will be to find in libraries. Of special interest
to genealogists may be the following: page 28 - "My father, David
Leonteivich BRONSTEIN, was a farmer [Trotsky wrote in his autobiography].
As a little boy, he had left with his parents the Jewish town in the
province of Poltava, where he had been born, when they went to seek their
fortune on the free steppes of the South. There were at that time about
forty Jewish agricultural colonies in the provinces of Kherson and
Ekaterinoslav, with a total population of about 25,000 souls." Nedava
adds, "When the Jews were expelled >from the villages (for under the 1804
statute, one regulation expelled Jews >from the villages while another
invited them to till the soil), many families answered the call. Within
fifty years three successive waves of would-be settlers moved to the
south. The BRONSTEIN family must have participated in the second
migration, sometime in the 1830's. Some of the villages were given
Hebrew names: Seidemenuka (Field of Rest), Nahartav (Good River),
Yefenahar (Fair River.)" There is not much more about his early years.
One other memorable quote in the book which I heard many years before the
book came out is found on page 167: "When in 1921 the chief
rabbi of Moscow, Rabbi Jacob Maze, appeared before TROTSKY to plead for the
Russian Jews. TROTSKY was reputed to have answered him, as he had done on
various previous occasions, that he was a Bolshevik revolutionary and did
not consider himself a Jew. To this Rabbi Maze replied: "The TROTSKYs
make the revolutions, and the BRONSTEINs pay the bills."" A few years
back Commentary magazine carried an article about some
of TROTSKY's descendants. One of his great-grandsons is a frum Jew living
in Kiryat Arba a suburb of Hebron.

Shalom BRONSTEIN, Jerusalem
Researching - SHULMAN/SHILLMAN - Panevezys; BLOCH - Krekanava (Lithania);
the DIMMERMAN, BECK & GELMAN families >from Ostrog & vicinity (Volhyn);
BRONSTEIN, BROWNSTEIN, RUNSTEIN, ROCHMANN - Kishinev (Moldava); GOLDSTEIN -
Iasi (Romania) - those who came to America all settled in Philadelphia;
GOLDZWEIG & LETZTER - Cholojow/Uzlovoye (Eastern Galicia/Ukraine)

Original Messages
From: Max Stool [mailto:makstool@delrio.com]
Subject: [ukraine] Re: TROTSKY AS BRONSTEIN

Dennis, I read with interest your posting. My mother, who came from
Starokonstantinov, Ukraine, told me that her mother's family name was
BRONSTEIN and that was TROTSKY's name before he changed it.
Max Stool
Del Rio, TX

From: <Pharmer329@aol.com>
Subject: [ukraine] TROTSKY AS BRONSTEIN

"Dear Udi,
I am at work now& don't have access to references, but Leon TROTSKY's
real name was BRONSTEIN. He came >from a rich family near Elizabethgrad
now Kirovohrad......"
Dennis BROWN (BRONSTEIN)
Cheltenham,Pa