Date   

Re: Surname TARANTOUR #general

David Ziants <dziants@...>
 

from Alan Rackow <rackow@...> :
I know of a family named TARANTOUR, and have always wondered about the
origin. What would a Taran be?
Two possibilities, that I can think of:

1) The Hebrew word "toren" means: A flag-pole or a mast on a ship.

2) The Hebrew word "toran" is a noun formed >from the word "tor"
(= queue), that was just discussed. It means: a person on rota
duty. In Germanic Hebrew pronunciation, this would be said
"touron". "tor" is said "tour", with "ou" like in the English
word ouch.

Both "toren" and "toran" are spelt with the same letters
(tav vav resh nun) .

It is just a speculation whether "taran" actually comes
from any of these, but the second possibility does seem to give a
doubling up.

David Ziants
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel


Re: Surname TARANTOUR #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I know of a family named TARANTOUR, and have always wondered about the
origin. What would a Taran be?

Alan Rackow
But why would you want to split this name into TARAN and TOUR in the first
place? There is no special reason to suppose that that last syllable is
a completely separate word! In fact, at first glance, it seems possible
that TARANTOUR could signify a "man >from Taranto." There was in fact a
Jewish community in Taranto (Italy) in medieval times. Maybe a remote
ancestor settled elsewhere and became known as the "man >from Taranto"?

In medieval times, people who moved >from their birthplace to settle
elsewhere were often identified by the name of their hometown. Thus
someone might be known as Moses >from Taranto, and a much later descendant
might well take a surname like TARANTOR. (Of course, if they were still
living in Italy one would expect a form like TARANTINO -- but that suffix
could easily become altered to the type of suffix that would be more normal
in a completely different language spoken in whatever country they settled
down in.

I've personally never heard the name TARANTOUR, so all of this reasoning is
purely theoretical , but it is the way things do happen with place-names.
And even if it turned out not to be a place name at all, there's no reason
to start out by splitting the name up before first investigating whether
the whole word may have a meaning of its own.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname TARANTOUR #general

David Ziants <dziants@...>
 

from Alan Rackow <rackow@...> :
I know of a family named TARANTOUR, and have always wondered about the
origin. What would a Taran be?
Two possibilities, that I can think of:

1) The Hebrew word "toren" means: A flag-pole or a mast on a ship.

2) The Hebrew word "toran" is a noun formed >from the word "tor"
(= queue), that was just discussed. It means: a person on rota
duty. In Germanic Hebrew pronunciation, this would be said
"touron". "tor" is said "tour", with "ou" like in the English
word ouch.

Both "toren" and "toran" are spelt with the same letters
(tav vav resh nun) .

It is just a speculation whether "taran" actually comes
from any of these, but the second possibility does seem to give a
doubling up.

David Ziants
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname TARANTOUR #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I know of a family named TARANTOUR, and have always wondered about the
origin. What would a Taran be?

Alan Rackow
But why would you want to split this name into TARAN and TOUR in the first
place? There is no special reason to suppose that that last syllable is
a completely separate word! In fact, at first glance, it seems possible
that TARANTOUR could signify a "man >from Taranto." There was in fact a
Jewish community in Taranto (Italy) in medieval times. Maybe a remote
ancestor settled elsewhere and became known as the "man >from Taranto"?

In medieval times, people who moved >from their birthplace to settle
elsewhere were often identified by the name of their hometown. Thus
someone might be known as Moses >from Taranto, and a much later descendant
might well take a surname like TARANTOR. (Of course, if they were still
living in Italy one would expect a form like TARANTINO -- but that suffix
could easily become altered to the type of suffix that would be more normal
in a completely different language spoken in whatever country they settled
down in.

I've personally never heard the name TARANTOUR, so all of this reasoning is
purely theoretical , but it is the way things do happen with place-names.
And even if it turned out not to be a place name at all, there's no reason
to start out by splitting the name up before first investigating whether
the whole word may have a meaning of its own.

Judith Romney Wegner


Given Name: Harvey #general

PKWin2029@...
 

Does anyone have any ideas regarding the derivation of the given name
"Harvey" for a Jewish male child born in the early 1880's?

TIA

Paul K. Winston
Palm Desert, CA

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen has a number of Infofiles that pertain
to Given names. You can access these documents at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/#Names>.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Given Name: Harvey #general

PKWin2029@...
 

Does anyone have any ideas regarding the derivation of the given name
"Harvey" for a Jewish male child born in the early 1880's?

TIA

Paul K. Winston
Palm Desert, CA

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen has a number of Infofiles that pertain
to Given names. You can access these documents at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/#Names>.


Information for the new Ukraine SIG #ukraine

Bud484BG@...
 

Thanks to David Goldman and his English translations of 100 pages of
handwritten Yiddish letters, sent mostly >from Kiev and the Crimea, I have
discovered that nearly all of my mother's brothers and sisters were still
alive and living in Kiev, Kherson, Yvepatoria/Crimea, and Vladivostok in
1936, the date of the last of the letters, one >from Kiev and one >from
Yvepatoria, Crimea. The only member of the Minkovsky family whom I have any
information on since 1936 is Yiddish writer Motte Talalaevsky, who I was able
to trace through his prolific literary works in the USSR (thanks to the NY
Public Library Jewish Division and YIVO), having served in the Red Army in
WWII, survived being imprisoned in the Stalin repression of writers in the
1950s, he died in Kiev in 1978. He was born in Mokhnachka, Popelyansky
District, Zhitomir area.


So far, I have reached a blank wall with the rest of the family members in
the Ukraine. There are at least 30+ family members unaccounted for. Does
this mean they all perished in the Nazi occupation of Kiev, Kherson and the
Crimea? And has anyone out there been able to access this information?

Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California

Researching In the Ukraine

Minkovsky: Rozhevere/Kiev/Kherson
Talalaevsky: Mokhnachka,Zhitomir/Kiev
Dorfman/Sharfman: Kiev/Kherson


Re: Gesher Galicia #ukraine

haflo <haflo@...>
 

Because of constantly changing borders, "countries" fell under different
rule. Gesher Galicia is doing an excellent job focusing on those places
which were Galician, & were once under Austrian domination. If Ukraine SIG
comes across records >from an area reflecting a time period when that area
was part of Galicia, it is our intention to share them.

MODERATOR Ukraine SIG

At 10:21 AM 09/15/2000 EDT, Harriet wrote:
Thank you for your email! My interest lies in Boguslav, Kiev, gerbernia &
Bolechow, Galicia. When you get to that part of the Ukraine, I will be most
interested in your success! I am a member of Gesher Galicia, so I am up to
date with their successes. Harriet Ader


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Information for the new Ukraine SIG #ukraine

Bud484BG@...
 

Thanks to David Goldman and his English translations of 100 pages of
handwritten Yiddish letters, sent mostly >from Kiev and the Crimea, I have
discovered that nearly all of my mother's brothers and sisters were still
alive and living in Kiev, Kherson, Yvepatoria/Crimea, and Vladivostok in
1936, the date of the last of the letters, one >from Kiev and one >from
Yvepatoria, Crimea. The only member of the Minkovsky family whom I have any
information on since 1936 is Yiddish writer Motte Talalaevsky, who I was able
to trace through his prolific literary works in the USSR (thanks to the NY
Public Library Jewish Division and YIVO), having served in the Red Army in
WWII, survived being imprisoned in the Stalin repression of writers in the
1950s, he died in Kiev in 1978. He was born in Mokhnachka, Popelyansky
District, Zhitomir area.


So far, I have reached a blank wall with the rest of the family members in
the Ukraine. There are at least 30+ family members unaccounted for. Does
this mean they all perished in the Nazi occupation of Kiev, Kherson and the
Crimea? And has anyone out there been able to access this information?

Beatrice Markel
Redondo Beach, California

Researching In the Ukraine

Minkovsky: Rozhevere/Kiev/Kherson
Talalaevsky: Mokhnachka,Zhitomir/Kiev
Dorfman/Sharfman: Kiev/Kherson


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Gesher Galicia #ukraine

haflo <haflo@...>
 

Because of constantly changing borders, "countries" fell under different
rule. Gesher Galicia is doing an excellent job focusing on those places
which were Galician, & were once under Austrian domination. If Ukraine SIG
comes across records >from an area reflecting a time period when that area
was part of Galicia, it is our intention to share them.

MODERATOR Ukraine SIG

At 10:21 AM 09/15/2000 EDT, Harriet wrote:
Thank you for your email! My interest lies in Boguslav, Kiev, gerbernia &
Bolechow, Galicia. When you get to that part of the Ukraine, I will be most
interested in your success! I am a member of Gesher Galicia, so I am up to
date with their successes. Harriet Ader


Re: Welcoming Ukraine SIG #ukraine

CoolGram13@...
 

In reply to David Goldman...there are Binders in our family as
well...probably >from Zhitomir and the surrounding area. My great aunt, Dora
Stepansky, married Morris Binder. They had six children...who resided in St.
Louis, MO....The 2nd husband of my great grandmother, Matil (Myrtle)
Nemovitch Stepansky (who was Dora's mother) was Avrum Binder. They also
emigrated to St. Louis. Most of my family came >from Zhitomir. Hopefully
there is a connection with your Binder family.

Searching: Bezboki, Stepansky, Binder

Thank you for any information you may have that may be a connection with my
family.
Nadine Kaufman


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Welcoming Ukraine SIG #ukraine

CoolGram13@...
 

In reply to David Goldman...there are Binders in our family as
well...probably >from Zhitomir and the surrounding area. My great aunt, Dora
Stepansky, married Morris Binder. They had six children...who resided in St.
Louis, MO....The 2nd husband of my great grandmother, Matil (Myrtle)
Nemovitch Stepansky (who was Dora's mother) was Avrum Binder. They also
emigrated to St. Louis. Most of my family came >from Zhitomir. Hopefully
there is a connection with your Binder family.

Searching: Bezboki, Stepansky, Binder

Thank you for any information you may have that may be a connection with my
family.
Nadine Kaufman


Re: Welcome #germany

The Mouallems <mouallem@...>
 

I am happy to be a part of the Ukraine SIG. I have been hoping that
there would be a separate group like this one. My Lukashevsky ancestors
were >from Kiyev. As a member of the Belarus SIG, I have learned a
tremendous amount >from other researchers and I am sure that this list
will be just as rewarding.

Carole Mouallem
Bayside, NY

Also researching:
Domashevsky - ODESSA>NY
Tzivin - Kiyev>US


Re: Welcoming Ukraine SIG #ukraine

GLebo111@...
 

Hi David,

Hope you have a great time on your trip. Although you won't have time for
research, I'd appreciate it if you'd keep your ears open for any information
on the shtetl of Tetiev, located near Uman. If you learn anything about it
(that's where my Strakoffsky relatives lived before emigrating to the U.S.
around 1900) please let me know. Best wishes for a safe trip and a happy New
Year.

Gail Lebowitz
Atlantq, GA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Welcome #ukraine

The Mouallems <mouallem@...>
 

I am happy to be a part of the Ukraine SIG. I have been hoping that
there would be a separate group like this one. My Lukashevsky ancestors
were >from Kiyev. As a member of the Belarus SIG, I have learned a
tremendous amount >from other researchers and I am sure that this list
will be just as rewarding.

Carole Mouallem
Bayside, NY

Also researching:
Domashevsky - ODESSA>NY
Tzivin - Kiyev>US


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Welcoming Ukraine SIG #ukraine

GLebo111@...
 

Hi David,

Hope you have a great time on your trip. Although you won't have time for
research, I'd appreciate it if you'd keep your ears open for any information
on the shtetl of Tetiev, located near Uman. If you learn anything about it
(that's where my Strakoffsky relatives lived before emigrating to the U.S.
around 1900) please let me know. Best wishes for a safe trip and a happy New
Year.

Gail Lebowitz
Atlantq, GA


Salasnik and Trotzki from Berdichev #ukraine

Udi Cain
 

Dear UkraineGenners,

If you have some patience to "hearing" my "bobbe mises", than here they are:
My father's paternal grandmother's, Chana Zelda Salasnik's, family came to
Eretz Israel in the 1860s'.
Her grandfather, Arie Leib Salasnitski, was born in Berdichev in 1810.
Her father, Dov Ber Salasnik, was a watches/clocks dealer in Zhitomir. Her
mother Miriam Batia (nee Trotski), was the daughter of Sarah and Sinai
Trotski.
Chana Zelda's oldest brother, Isaac, was born in 1856, and when his parents
went to Eretz Israel, they left him with his uncle, Abraham Salasnik, who
had an estate and also dealt with iron (they lost all their fortune in the
revolution of 1917), Isaac's son, was maybe a General, I have photos of a
young man >from 1911 and the written on them: Moshe Jacob Salasnik, that was
maybe Isaac's son.
We know nothing with regard to Isaac's descendants, does anyone know?

Regards >from Jerusalem, Udi Cain.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Salasnik and Trotzki from Berdichev #ukraine

Udi Cain
 

Dear UkraineGenners,

If you have some patience to "hearing" my "bobbe mises", than here they are:
My father's paternal grandmother's, Chana Zelda Salasnik's, family came to
Eretz Israel in the 1860s'.
Her grandfather, Arie Leib Salasnitski, was born in Berdichev in 1810.
Her father, Dov Ber Salasnik, was a watches/clocks dealer in Zhitomir. Her
mother Miriam Batia (nee Trotski), was the daughter of Sarah and Sinai
Trotski.
Chana Zelda's oldest brother, Isaac, was born in 1856, and when his parents
went to Eretz Israel, they left him with his uncle, Abraham Salasnik, who
had an estate and also dealt with iron (they lost all their fortune in the
revolution of 1917), Isaac's son, was maybe a General, I have photos of a
young man >from 1911 and the written on them: Moshe Jacob Salasnik, that was
maybe Isaac's son.
We know nothing with regard to Isaac's descendants, does anyone know?

Regards >from Jerusalem, Udi Cain.


Mazel Tov! #ukraine

AdamRDavis@...
 

I've very pleased that there is now an organization of scale to handle
research in all of the Ukrainian gubernias. Are there plans to construct an
umbrella web site for the SIG and a unified ALL UKRAINE DATABASE, merging the
data files >from all of the regional research groups?

Similar efforts by the Litvak and Belarus SIGs have been well received and
very useful to researchers.

Is there a member of the sig interested in serving as web master?

Adam Davis
Chicago

Wexler, Berlin, Dichter, Eisenberg/Aizenberg, Buslik, Shpock, Smertenko,
Dobzhevich, Seltzer, Rachlin,


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mazel Tov! #ukraine

AdamRDavis@...
 

I've very pleased that there is now an organization of scale to handle
research in all of the Ukrainian gubernias. Are there plans to construct an
umbrella web site for the SIG and a unified ALL UKRAINE DATABASE, merging the
data files >from all of the regional research groups?

Similar efforts by the Litvak and Belarus SIGs have been well received and
very useful to researchers.

Is there a member of the sig interested in serving as web master?

Adam Davis
Chicago

Wexler, Berlin, Dichter, Eisenberg/Aizenberg, Buslik, Shpock, Smertenko,
Dobzhevich, Seltzer, Rachlin,