Date   

Translation Needed #poland

Glenda Zuckerman <gzbird@...>
 

I've posted a vital record for which I need a translation from
Russian to English.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53065

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

--
Glenda Zuckerman

Cukierman, Schwartz, Cukier, Rosenstein, Zhukofski, Feinerman, Reider,
Kaltract, goldschmidt, Cohen


JRI Poland #Poland Translation Needed #poland

Glenda Zuckerman <gzbird@...>
 

I've posted a vital record for which I need a translation from
Russian to English.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM53065

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

--
Glenda Zuckerman

Cukierman, Schwartz, Cukier, Rosenstein, Zhukofski, Feinerman, Reider,
Kaltract, goldschmidt, Cohen


JGFF - reminder #general

Alexander Sharon
 

JGFF (JewishGen Family Finder) is most popular JG database available for all
genealogists.

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/

For complete information about the JGFF database, please see the
JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JewishGen Family Finder.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JGFF/FAQ/

If you require JGFF assistance, please visit JGFF Help desk at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/FAQ/jgffhelp.htm

There are few more points in addition to rules listed in above JGFF sites:

1. When adding town name(s) and system reject it, please search for town names
already listed in JGFF system, perhaps you have misspelled it or place town
in the incorrect country (Typical: Russia instead of Ukraine, Belarus or
Moldova).

Rule: use only modern town name within modern country borders.

2. Use JewishGen Gazetteer as much as possible
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp

JG Gazetteer, based on USBGN (United States Board of the Geographical Names)
provided unique FEAT # which allows JGFF editor to enter correct town with
correct coordinates into JGFF database.

If place name is not listed in the Gazetteer, please provide detailed
description where information about the town and its Jewish characteristics
can be located.

Please do not make location references such as classical "pinskaminska
kibernia" or refer JGFF editor to Google or other Internet search engines.

Suggestion: Do you research first but call JGFF Help when you are lost.

3. We are trying our best, but sometime we also hit the wall, and in this case
we recommend to contact JG discussion group: there are many very helpful and
very smart experienced Genners can provide suggestions and recommendations.

4. Do not forget write simple "thank you" to editor in reply when your issue
has been solved. I am volunteer JGFF editor.

5. I'll post on this forum periodical updates on added JGFF towns and
surnames associated with those towns. Galicia towns updates will be also
posted on Galicia discussion group.

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGFF - reminder #general

Alexander Sharon
 

JGFF (JewishGen Family Finder) is most popular JG database available for all
genealogists.

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/

For complete information about the JGFF database, please see the
JGFF FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions about the JewishGen Family Finder.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JGFF/FAQ/

If you require JGFF assistance, please visit JGFF Help desk at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/FAQ/jgffhelp.htm

There are few more points in addition to rules listed in above JGFF sites:

1. When adding town name(s) and system reject it, please search for town names
already listed in JGFF system, perhaps you have misspelled it or place town
in the incorrect country (Typical: Russia instead of Ukraine, Belarus or
Moldova).

Rule: use only modern town name within modern country borders.

2. Use JewishGen Gazetteer as much as possible
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp

JG Gazetteer, based on USBGN (United States Board of the Geographical Names)
provided unique FEAT # which allows JGFF editor to enter correct town with
correct coordinates into JGFF database.

If place name is not listed in the Gazetteer, please provide detailed
description where information about the town and its Jewish characteristics
can be located.

Please do not make location references such as classical "pinskaminska
kibernia" or refer JGFF editor to Google or other Internet search engines.

Suggestion: Do you research first but call JGFF Help when you are lost.

3. We are trying our best, but sometime we also hit the wall, and in this case
we recommend to contact JG discussion group: there are many very helpful and
very smart experienced Genners can provide suggestions and recommendations.

4. Do not forget write simple "thank you" to editor in reply when your issue
has been solved. I am volunteer JGFF editor.

5. I'll post on this forum periodical updates on added JGFF towns and
surnames associated with those towns. Galicia towns updates will be also
posted on Galicia discussion group.

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Re: Shtetl vs. Dorf #general

Jules Levin
 

Nice piece, Alexander. For the record the exact equivalent of shtetl in
Italian is borghetto, often shortened to "ghetto". The foundry
explanation for the Venice ghetto is a bobbemaysa perpetuated by the
Venice tourist agency, in spite of the fact that there are borghetto's
and ghetto's all over Italy, some of them indeed former Jewish ghettos.
For example, Goricia on the Slovenian border, still preserves the gate
that locked the Jewish ghetto at night.

Jules Levin

On 2/3/2017 8:53 AM, Alexander Sharon a.sharon@shaw.ca wrote:
Irene Berman wrote:
Messages to this discussion group often use the term "shtetl" when apparently
referring to villages rather than towns in Eastern Europe.

The author Irving Stone addressed this term in his introduction to his
magnificent history of the Jewish socialist movement in early twentieth century
in New York City, "The World of Our Fathers", published in the 1950's. He wrote
that the term "shtetl" was (and still is) commonly used erroneously for
smallish villages when the correct term was "dorf". The word "shtetl" properly
referred to larger communities such as towns.
Dorf (English: thorp) identifies a village, in general, a place with a church but
without a market.

This is not what shtetl (or settlement) was all about since market was the
central to all shtetls.

Shtetls (literally small towns) were known as Miasteczko (Polish) and
Miestieczko (Russian).

Towns with significant Jewish population were referred by Jews as Shtot.

The difference between the town (Lat. Civitas) and the small town or settlement
(Lat. Oppidum) was based primarily on the fact that shtetl was smaller than the
town.

Smaller towns (shtetls) due to the distance to major urban centers had an
important function for the supply of products and services for the nearest rural
environment.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Shtetl vs. Dorf #general

Jules Levin
 

Nice piece, Alexander. For the record the exact equivalent of shtetl in
Italian is borghetto, often shortened to "ghetto". The foundry
explanation for the Venice ghetto is a bobbemaysa perpetuated by the
Venice tourist agency, in spite of the fact that there are borghetto's
and ghetto's all over Italy, some of them indeed former Jewish ghettos.
For example, Goricia on the Slovenian border, still preserves the gate
that locked the Jewish ghetto at night.

Jules Levin

On 2/3/2017 8:53 AM, Alexander Sharon a.sharon@shaw.ca wrote:
Irene Berman wrote:
Messages to this discussion group often use the term "shtetl" when apparently
referring to villages rather than towns in Eastern Europe.

The author Irving Stone addressed this term in his introduction to his
magnificent history of the Jewish socialist movement in early twentieth century
in New York City, "The World of Our Fathers", published in the 1950's. He wrote
that the term "shtetl" was (and still is) commonly used erroneously for
smallish villages when the correct term was "dorf". The word "shtetl" properly
referred to larger communities such as towns.
Dorf (English: thorp) identifies a village, in general, a place with a church but
without a market.

This is not what shtetl (or settlement) was all about since market was the
central to all shtetls.

Shtetls (literally small towns) were known as Miasteczko (Polish) and
Miestieczko (Russian).

Towns with significant Jewish population were referred by Jews as Shtot.

The difference between the town (Lat. Civitas) and the small town or settlement
(Lat. Oppidum) was based primarily on the fact that shtetl was smaller than the
town.

Smaller towns (shtetls) due to the distance to major urban centers had an
important function for the supply of products and services for the nearest rural
environment.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


(Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #ukraine

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German-occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR)
which includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's hope that
posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run camp
in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, that one has to know the
persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's
last name into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name, or
the letter with which it begins, you can click on the letter and it will
display all the prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name?for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine (Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #ukraine

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German-occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR)
which includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's hope that
posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run camp
in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, that one has to know the
persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's
last name into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name, or
the letter with which it begins, you can click on the letter and it will
display all the prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name?for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


(Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #hungary

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German-occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.



Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR)
which includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's hope that
posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run camp
in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.



The new database is being made accessible in five languages



To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727



Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, that one has to know the
persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's
last name into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name, or
the letter with which it begins, you can click on the letter and it will
display all the prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2



The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.

Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.



The database is available for free.



If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.



Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Hungary SIG #Hungary (Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #hungary

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German-occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.



Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR)
which includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's hope that
posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run camp
in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.



The new database is being made accessible in five languages



To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727



Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, that one has to know the
persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's
last name into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name, or
the letter with which it begins, you can click on the letter and it will
display all the prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2



The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.

Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.



The database is available for free.



If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.



Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Towns named Kosow #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Following announcement of the English translation of Kosow Poleski (presently
Kosava, Belarus), I'd like on this occasion review the situation with other
Kosow named towns, including places in Galicia.

When one searches JG Gazetteer for towns named Kosow (Kossow), a multitude of
places with such names are popping up. Towns names are associated with the
"kos", the common named blackbird (Turdus merula) in Polish. Bird is tied up
to many folks legends and superstitions.

For example, it was believed in Poland that lightning does not strike the
house in which blackbird resides.

English superstition claims that when a young girl on Valentine's Day will
see a blackbird, she will marry a pastor. Irish proverb says: "There'll be
white blackbirds before an unwilling woman ties the knot".

Beside the Kosow Poleski, mentioned earlier, JewishGen recognized another
two other Jewish communities associated with name Kosow.

The largest one is Jewish community of Kosow in Stanislawow Province (now
town Kosiv in Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast') with 2,653 residents listed in 1921,
and Kosow Lacki in Ostrow Mazowiecka and Sokolow Podlaski, Poland vicinity
(1,316 Jewish are souls listed in 1921 census).

Forgotten or at least not listed as the established Jewish community is town
Kossow in Czortkow district, of Tarnopol Province in Eastern Galicia.

Town Kossow had Jewish population of 121 souls (out of total town residents
2,446 or 5%) according to 1900 Galicia census. Jewish town's population has
decreased following WWI to 81 souls (1921 Poland census) out of 2,407 of
total population number).

I'm wondering how many folks researching Kossow in Czortkow (Tarnopol) region
have been automatically redirected to Kosow in Stanislawow Province.

Town is listed in JG Gazetteer under name Kosov at 4906 2538, 9.5 miles
distance NW >from Chortkiv (Czortkow).

Since we are already dealing with Czortkow research, there is another town
missing >from JGFF Jewish communities listings

Town name is Nagorzanka (currently known as Naguzhanka at 4903 2547), located
within couple of miles distance >from the established Jewish communities of
Wygnanka and Czortkow.

Nagorzanka had according to 1900 Galicia census, 99 Jewish residents, just
short one person >from the magic number 100 (8.2 % of the total number of
residents). Number of Jewish resident has been reduced to 51 following WWI
(Poland 1921 census).

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Towns named Kosow #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Following announcement of the English translation of Kosow Poleski (presently
Kosava, Belarus), I'd like on this occasion review the situation with other
Kosow named towns, including places in Galicia.

When one searches JG Gazetteer for towns named Kosow (Kossow), a multitude of
places with such names are popping up. Towns names are associated with the
"kos", the common named blackbird (Turdus merula) in Polish. Bird is tied up
to many folks legends and superstitions.

For example, it was believed in Poland that lightning does not strike the
house in which blackbird resides.

English superstition claims that when a young girl on Valentine's Day will
see a blackbird, she will marry a pastor. Irish proverb says: "There'll be
white blackbirds before an unwilling woman ties the knot".

Beside the Kosow Poleski, mentioned earlier, JewishGen recognized another
two other Jewish communities associated with name Kosow.

The largest one is Jewish community of Kosow in Stanislawow Province (now
town Kosiv in Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast') with 2,653 residents listed in 1921,
and Kosow Lacki in Ostrow Mazowiecka and Sokolow Podlaski, Poland vicinity
(1,316 Jewish are souls listed in 1921 census).

Forgotten or at least not listed as the established Jewish community is town
Kossow in Czortkow district, of Tarnopol Province in Eastern Galicia.

Town Kossow had Jewish population of 121 souls (out of total town residents
2,446 or 5%) according to 1900 Galicia census. Jewish town's population has
decreased following WWI to 81 souls (1921 Poland census) out of 2,407 of
total population number).

I'm wondering how many folks researching Kossow in Czortkow (Tarnopol) region
have been automatically redirected to Kosow in Stanislawow Province.

Town is listed in JG Gazetteer under name Kosov at 4906 2538, 9.5 miles
distance NW >from Chortkiv (Czortkow).

Since we are already dealing with Czortkow research, there is another town
missing >from JGFF Jewish communities listings

Town name is Nagorzanka (currently known as Naguzhanka at 4903 2547), located
within couple of miles distance >from the established Jewish communities of
Wygnanka and Czortkow.

Nagorzanka had according to 1900 Galicia census, 99 Jewish residents, just
short one person >from the magic number 100 (8.2 % of the total number of
residents). Number of Jewish resident has been reduced to 51 following WWI
(Poland 1921 census).

Best

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on JewishGen's Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is a very short one >from the Yizkor book of Gostynin,
Poland, 65 miles WNW of Warsaw. It reminded me of the last days of the
Jews in Kovel, Poland who are remembered for their writings
(http://bit.ly/gPGbfj )
[MOD. NOTE: original URL - http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kov483.html#Page487 ]
on the walls of the Great Synagogue before they were taken to their deaths.

This excerpt is a last letter >from Avraham Seiff of Gostynin who had been
taken to the concentration camp in Konin about 60 miles further west. He
and the others knew the end was near when the Gestapo came to the camp on
August 7, 1943. As another survivor wrote in the same Yizkor book
(http://bit.ly/2kHFV4p),
[MOD. NOTE: original URL - http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gostynin/gos297.html#Page308 ]
"We decided not to allow ourselves to be led like sheep to the slaughter,
and that as the last choice open to us - if it were to become clear that
the end was near and that we were to be martyred as Jews."

On August 9, they set fire to the camp and then Seiff and others hung themselves.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1308502209171931
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2jFX4eP

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on JewishGen's Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is a very short one >from the Yizkor book of Gostynin,
Poland, 65 miles WNW of Warsaw. It reminded me of the last days of the
Jews in Kovel, Poland who are remembered for their writings
(http://bit.ly/gPGbfj )
[MOD. NOTE: original URL - http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/kovel1/kov483.html#Page487 ]
on the walls of the Great Synagogue before they were taken to their deaths.

This excerpt is a last letter >from Avraham Seiff of Gostynin who had been
taken to the concentration camp in Konin about 60 miles further west. He
and the others knew the end was near when the Gestapo came to the camp on
August 7, 1943. As another survivor wrote in the same Yizkor book
(http://bit.ly/2kHFV4p),
[MOD. NOTE: original URL - http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/gostynin/gos297.html#Page308 ]
"We decided not to allow ourselves to be led like sheep to the slaughter,
and that as the last choice open to us - if it were to become clear that
the end was near and that we were to be martyred as Jews."

On August 9, they set fire to the camp and then Seiff and others hung themselves.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1308502209171931
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2jFX4eP

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Shtetl vs. Dorf #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Irene Berman wrote:
Messages to this discussion group often use the term "shtetl" when apparently
referring to villages rather than towns in Eastern Europe.

The author Irving Stone addressed this term in his introduction to his
magnificent history of the Jewish socialist movement in early twentieth century
in New York City, "The World of Our Fathers", published in the 1950's. He wrote
that the term "shtetl" was (and still is) commonly used erroneously for
smallish villages when the correct term was "dorf". The word "shtetl" properly
referred to larger communities such as towns.
Dorf (English: thorp) identifies a village, in general, a place with a church but
without a market.

This is not what shtetl (or settlement) was all about since market was the
central to all shtetls.

Shtetls (literally small towns) were known as Miasteczko (Polish) and
Miestieczko (Russian).

Towns with significant Jewish population were referred by Jews as Shtot.

The difference between the town (Lat. Civitas) and the small town or settlement
(Lat. Oppidum) was based primarily on the fact that shtetl was smaller than the
town.

Smaller towns (shtetls) due to the distance to major urban centers had an
important function for the supply of products and services for the nearest rural
environment.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Shtetl vs. Dorf #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Irene Berman wrote:
Messages to this discussion group often use the term "shtetl" when apparently
referring to villages rather than towns in Eastern Europe.

The author Irving Stone addressed this term in his introduction to his
magnificent history of the Jewish socialist movement in early twentieth century
in New York City, "The World of Our Fathers", published in the 1950's. He wrote
that the term "shtetl" was (and still is) commonly used erroneously for
smallish villages when the correct term was "dorf". The word "shtetl" properly
referred to larger communities such as towns.
Dorf (English: thorp) identifies a village, in general, a place with a church but
without a market.

This is not what shtetl (or settlement) was all about since market was the
central to all shtetls.

Shtetls (literally small towns) were known as Miasteczko (Polish) and
Miestieczko (Russian).

Towns with significant Jewish population were referred by Jews as Shtot.

The difference between the town (Lat. Civitas) and the small town or settlement
(Lat. Oppidum) was based primarily on the fact that shtetl was smaller than the
town.

Smaller towns (shtetls) due to the distance to major urban centers had an
important function for the supply of products and services for the nearest rural
environment.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


(Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online SITE CITE #germany

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR).
This includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's their hope
that posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run
camp in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, , one has to know the persons'
last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's last name
into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name or the letter
with which it begins you can click on the letter and it will display all the
prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usu=F1 filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


German SIG #Germany (Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online SITE CITE #germany

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online the
names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp
in German occupied Poland. The database includes names, place and date of
birth, nationality, military service and where possible a photograph. If the
person stood trial, judicial documents are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United States.
This was put online by the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (INR).
This includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's their hope
that posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz as a Polish-run
camp in incorrect. The database was gradually extended to include the
information concerning the personnel of other German concentration camps,
finally reaching the number of 25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related
to the Auschwitz concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records access Alert reader who was
able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, , one has to know the persons'
last name. You need to enter one or more letters of the person's last name
into the search mechanism. If you know the person's last name or the letter
with which it begins you can click on the letter and it will display all the
prison guards for that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usu=F1 filtry" means remove filter. If you need
help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com. There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below
the form, the "chart with the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the
database whose name begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's
name-for all information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph
in the file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser it
will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


(Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online
the names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau
death camp in German occupied Poland. The database includes names,
place and date of birth, nationality, military service and where
possible a photograph. If the person stood trial, judicial documents
are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United
States. This was put online by the Polish Institute of National
Remembrance (INR).

This includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's
hope that posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz
as a Polish-run camp is incorrect. The database was gradually
extended to include the information concerning the personnel of
other German concentration camps, finally reaching the number of
25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related to the Auschwitz
concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader
who was able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, one has to
know the persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters
of the person's last name into the search mechanism. If you know
the person's last name or the letter with which it begins you can
click on the letter and it will display all the prison guards for
that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you
need help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com

There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below the form, the "chart with
the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the database whose name
begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's name-for all
information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph in the
file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser
it will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JRI Poland #Poland (Poland) Poland Places Names of Auschwitz Database of Prison Guards Online #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The British Broadcasting System (BBC) posted that Poland has put online
the names of the Nazi SS commanders and guards at Auschwitz-Birkenau
death camp in German occupied Poland. The database includes names,
place and date of birth, nationality, military service and where
possible a photograph. If the person stood trial, judicial documents
are also included.

Information was gathered by Poland, Germany, Austria and the United
States. This was put online by the Polish Institute of National
Remembrance (INR).

This includes about 9,000 names almost all German. It is Poland's
hope that posting the names to prove that referring to Auschwitz
as a Polish-run camp is incorrect. The database was gradually
extended to include the information concerning the personnel of
other German concentration camps, finally reaching the number of
25,000 records, of which 9,686 were related to the Auschwitz
concentration camp personnel.

The new database is being made accessible in five languages

To read more see: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-38797727

Thanks to Yvonne Stern, Brazil, IAJGS Records Access Alert reader
who was able to learn >from Centrum Judaicum-Berlin, one has to
know the persons' last name. You need to enter one or more letters
of the person's last name into the search mechanism. If you know
the person's last name or the letter with which it begins you can
click on the letter and it will display all the prison guards for
that letter. To search go to:
http://pamiec.pl/pa/form/60,Zaloga-SS-KL-Auschwitz.html?page=2

The items on the search page are in three languages: Polish, German and
English. Scroll to the end of the page where you will find the input
"form". The term "wybierz" means "select" The top left box is for the
family name and the right box for the given name.
Filtruj means filter and "usun filtry" means remove filter. If you
need help with translating any part of the website please go to
https://translate.google.com

There are 8,502 entries. If you scroll below the form, the "chart with
the alphabet" click on any letter and those in the database whose name
begins with that letter appears. Click on the person's name-for all
information the INR has in the file. If there is a photograph in the
file it will show an image.

The database is available for free.

If you place the url given above for searching into the Chrome browser
it will translate the entire page.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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