Date   

Re: Wolverhampton #general

Baruch Pinnick <bpinnick@...>
 

Stephen G. Esrati wrote:
Question 1: Why would immigrants have gone to
Wolverhampton? What was there? Was there a Jewish
community?
Question 2: Was Ward Street in a Jewish area?
Shalom all,

For those none-Britishers in the group, a brief explanation about
Wolverhampton: it is a fairly large city in the English West Midlands
about 10-15 miles north-west of Birmingham, and part of the greater
Birmingham conurbation. It has a soccer club (Wolverhampton Wanderers, or
"Wolves") with a most respectable history.

Birmingham has had a significant Jewish community for a long time and there
have been Jews in Wolverhampton as well. I don't know much about the
latter community, except that it seemed to have been an organised kehilla
at one time. I remember even 10 years ago someone >from Birmingham going to
Wolverhampton on Purim night to read the Megilla to the remaining Jews
there. I have at least one relative by marriage >from Wolverhampton. But
there are hardly any Jews there now. Certainly, it would have been a place
for Jewish immigrants, if not all that many. Close to Birmingham, in a
heavily-industrialised region, and central to moving around Britain if
one's ancestors were traders.

I doubt very much - although I'm no mavin - if there was ever a Jewish area
of Wolverhampton.

Baruch Pinnick
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel

Researching: MASLIN (Svislovisk/Babruysk/Minsk Belarus), CANTEROWITZ
(Babruysk/Minsk), CREVINSKI, CARSON (both England >from Europe), TANNENBERG
(town of same name, Germany), PONTOFEL (Plotsk, Poland), MODELE (Odessa?),
PINNICK/PENIG etc (Plotsk, Poland), MICHAEL LEVI (rare name!) (Berlin
1830s), GOLDSTEIN and WARSHAVSKY (Poland, presumed Warsaw, 1800s)


Re: Wolyn #general

Alexander Sharon <sharon@...>
 

Phoenixxph@aol.com wrote:
Regarding my previous messages about Wolyn. I have already received a
response that has me rethinking things.
"Volhynia --
Russian gubernia, until 1917, in Pale. Polish province of Wolyn between
the wars. Today, northwestern Ukraine. Chief city: Zhitomer."

So if my grandmother came >from Russia in 1909 and the copy of her ticket
on the Red Star Line says Russia but doesn't say anything about Wolyn but
it's her 1920 marriage license that says she is >from Wolyn Russia, this
could explain some of the confusion?

The copy of the ticket is very faded, but here is what it looks like it
says:
Appx. 9 letters long the first letter of the word starts with either an N
or M, it looks like there is an ow and perhaps an r next. I think this is
followed by the letters pa and ends with t. What location could this be?

If anyone has any idea of what this location is could they please let me
know?

Well, here goes another Jewish shtetl puzzle with a approximate nine
letters >from which eight are unknown or at at least are not certain.

How about Nowograd (Novograd) Volynskiy, Phoebe? Coordinates: 5036-2737.

As to your grandmother memory about Wolyn. When she left Russia, she
probably didn't take Red Lane ship directly >from Novograd. When she went
aboard the liner in the western European port, she was just a lady from
Russia, this was sufficient for shipping company, since one way ticket has
been paid. Shipping clerk wouldn't be able to write down name of Novograd
Wolynskiy anyway. When your grandma got married, she was probably asked on
the marriage application to provide the name of the town, she was from.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wolverhampton #general

Baruch Pinnick <bpinnick@...>
 

Stephen G. Esrati wrote:
Question 1: Why would immigrants have gone to
Wolverhampton? What was there? Was there a Jewish
community?
Question 2: Was Ward Street in a Jewish area?
Shalom all,

For those none-Britishers in the group, a brief explanation about
Wolverhampton: it is a fairly large city in the English West Midlands
about 10-15 miles north-west of Birmingham, and part of the greater
Birmingham conurbation. It has a soccer club (Wolverhampton Wanderers, or
"Wolves") with a most respectable history.

Birmingham has had a significant Jewish community for a long time and there
have been Jews in Wolverhampton as well. I don't know much about the
latter community, except that it seemed to have been an organised kehilla
at one time. I remember even 10 years ago someone >from Birmingham going to
Wolverhampton on Purim night to read the Megilla to the remaining Jews
there. I have at least one relative by marriage >from Wolverhampton. But
there are hardly any Jews there now. Certainly, it would have been a place
for Jewish immigrants, if not all that many. Close to Birmingham, in a
heavily-industrialised region, and central to moving around Britain if
one's ancestors were traders.

I doubt very much - although I'm no mavin - if there was ever a Jewish area
of Wolverhampton.

Baruch Pinnick
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel

Researching: MASLIN (Svislovisk/Babruysk/Minsk Belarus), CANTEROWITZ
(Babruysk/Minsk), CREVINSKI, CARSON (both England >from Europe), TANNENBERG
(town of same name, Germany), PONTOFEL (Plotsk, Poland), MODELE (Odessa?),
PINNICK/PENIG etc (Plotsk, Poland), MICHAEL LEVI (rare name!) (Berlin
1830s), GOLDSTEIN and WARSHAVSKY (Poland, presumed Warsaw, 1800s)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wolyn #general

Alexander Sharon <sharon@...>
 

Phoenixxph@aol.com wrote:
Regarding my previous messages about Wolyn. I have already received a
response that has me rethinking things.
"Volhynia --
Russian gubernia, until 1917, in Pale. Polish province of Wolyn between
the wars. Today, northwestern Ukraine. Chief city: Zhitomer."

So if my grandmother came >from Russia in 1909 and the copy of her ticket
on the Red Star Line says Russia but doesn't say anything about Wolyn but
it's her 1920 marriage license that says she is >from Wolyn Russia, this
could explain some of the confusion?

The copy of the ticket is very faded, but here is what it looks like it
says:
Appx. 9 letters long the first letter of the word starts with either an N
or M, it looks like there is an ow and perhaps an r next. I think this is
followed by the letters pa and ends with t. What location could this be?

If anyone has any idea of what this location is could they please let me
know?

Well, here goes another Jewish shtetl puzzle with a approximate nine
letters >from which eight are unknown or at at least are not certain.

How about Nowograd (Novograd) Volynskiy, Phoebe? Coordinates: 5036-2737.

As to your grandmother memory about Wolyn. When she left Russia, she
probably didn't take Red Lane ship directly >from Novograd. When she went
aboard the liner in the western European port, she was just a lady from
Russia, this was sufficient for shipping company, since one way ticket has
been paid. Shipping clerk wouldn't be able to write down name of Novograd
Wolynskiy anyway. When your grandma got married, she was probably asked on
the marriage application to provide the name of the town, she was from.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary


Re: Birth certificates from England #general

RobStrum@...
 

Thank you to everyone who sent me info on English birth certificates, what
to expect >from them, and where/how to obtain them.
It's greatly appreciated!

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobStrum@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is closed.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Birth certificates from England #general

RobStrum@...
 

Thank you to everyone who sent me info on English birth certificates, what
to expect >from them, and where/how to obtain them.
It's greatly appreciated!

Robert Strumwasser
Sharon, MA, USA
RobStrum@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is closed.


Re: Azonka Russia #general

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Fran,

You are searching for town that was called in the past Yozuvka. Previous
name was also Stalino (in the mid -30ies) and after the "uncle Jo" long
awaited death, it has been renamed Donetsk. Donetsk is not just a town, it
is actually a conglomerate of many towns, very similar in nature to the
German Ruhr, French Lille, British Manchester or Polish Upper Silesia
regions, where several mining towns (build around the foundries, coal
mines and factories) are joined into a huge metropolitan area.

Yuzovka, as I recall story >from my childhood was very popular, since
famous small, fat and bold guy by name Nikita S. Krushchev, who became
lately Soviet prime minister, 1st secretary of the Soviet communist party,
and collection of the other numerous titles, has started his professional
life in this town. As legend was told, town was established and named by an
English capitalist. I've discovered lately that this "English " capitalist
was a Welshman John Hughes, who in 1872 established there an ironworks to
produce rails for the Russian railroad network. Russian actually never
figure out that beside the English people, British Islands are also
populated by the other nationalities. I should admit that some of our
Genners have very same perceptions about the diversification of the
population within the Russia, and are very pleasantly surprised when folks
like Lithuanian or Belarussian are suddenly show up.

Jewish people could arrive in Yuzovka any time - town was located in
Ukraine, within Pale territory, and Czarist Government have probably
encouraged skilled people to move in. Tailors were definitely skilled
people. I believe that any size town could support a tailor, in those
times only tailor and shoemaker could provide cloth and boots - "ready
made" cloth and boots were not yet available. Unfortunately, i cannot help
with other questions.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary

Fran Stark <franstark@sprintmail.com> wrote in message ...

Dear Group,
I just received my grandfathers naturalization papers. The writing is
hard to decipher, however, it looks like my grandfather was born in
either Azonka, Russia or Azovka, Russia on March 15, 1877. If the
fourth letter is in fact a 'v' and not an 'n' then the place would
probably be Yuzovka, Ukraine as this was his last place of residence.
Can someone please tell me
a) When did the first Jews arrive in Yuzovka? >from what I have been able
to learn, the town was founded in 1869.
b) How large did a town need to be to support a tailor? I know my great
grandfather was a tailor and don't think that Yuzovka was very large
until the 1890's.
c) Any guesses on the town if in fact it is Azonka?
d) Where do I go next? My great-grandfather was born around 1836. If
Yuzovka was not a town until 1869 how do I find where he was born? He
died in 1908 and never naturalized. Any and all suggestions
appreciated.


Re: Internees, Texas, WWII #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

While I cannot comment on the practice in any parts of the US, I do know
of one early wartime immigrant in Canada who was interned, along with
various non-Jewish Germans and Austrians, for several months before he
could persuade the authorities that he was not a participating Nazi! I
don't know whether the Canadian authorities didn't believe at first that
he was Jewish, but the fact that he had come >from Austria was enough.
Maybe the US government occasionally did the same.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Azonka Russia #general

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Fran,

You are searching for town that was called in the past Yozuvka. Previous
name was also Stalino (in the mid -30ies) and after the "uncle Jo" long
awaited death, it has been renamed Donetsk. Donetsk is not just a town, it
is actually a conglomerate of many towns, very similar in nature to the
German Ruhr, French Lille, British Manchester or Polish Upper Silesia
regions, where several mining towns (build around the foundries, coal
mines and factories) are joined into a huge metropolitan area.

Yuzovka, as I recall story >from my childhood was very popular, since
famous small, fat and bold guy by name Nikita S. Krushchev, who became
lately Soviet prime minister, 1st secretary of the Soviet communist party,
and collection of the other numerous titles, has started his professional
life in this town. As legend was told, town was established and named by an
English capitalist. I've discovered lately that this "English " capitalist
was a Welshman John Hughes, who in 1872 established there an ironworks to
produce rails for the Russian railroad network. Russian actually never
figure out that beside the English people, British Islands are also
populated by the other nationalities. I should admit that some of our
Genners have very same perceptions about the diversification of the
population within the Russia, and are very pleasantly surprised when folks
like Lithuanian or Belarussian are suddenly show up.

Jewish people could arrive in Yuzovka any time - town was located in
Ukraine, within Pale territory, and Czarist Government have probably
encouraged skilled people to move in. Tailors were definitely skilled
people. I believe that any size town could support a tailor, in those
times only tailor and shoemaker could provide cloth and boots - "ready
made" cloth and boots were not yet available. Unfortunately, i cannot help
with other questions.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary

Fran Stark <franstark@sprintmail.com> wrote in message ...

Dear Group,
I just received my grandfathers naturalization papers. The writing is
hard to decipher, however, it looks like my grandfather was born in
either Azonka, Russia or Azovka, Russia on March 15, 1877. If the
fourth letter is in fact a 'v' and not an 'n' then the place would
probably be Yuzovka, Ukraine as this was his last place of residence.
Can someone please tell me
a) When did the first Jews arrive in Yuzovka? >from what I have been able
to learn, the town was founded in 1869.
b) How large did a town need to be to support a tailor? I know my great
grandfather was a tailor and don't think that Yuzovka was very large
until the 1890's.
c) Any guesses on the town if in fact it is Azonka?
d) Where do I go next? My great-grandfather was born around 1836. If
Yuzovka was not a town until 1869 how do I find where he was born? He
died in 1908 and never naturalized. Any and all suggestions
appreciated.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Internees, Texas, WWII #general

Roberta Sheps <roberta_l_sheps@...>
 

While I cannot comment on the practice in any parts of the US, I do know
of one early wartime immigrant in Canada who was interned, along with
various non-Jewish Germans and Austrians, for several months before he
could persuade the authorities that he was not a participating Nazi! I
don't know whether the Canadian authorities didn't believe at first that
he was Jewish, but the fact that he had come >from Austria was enough.
Maybe the US government occasionally did the same.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England


Re: Membership fees--credit card #latvia

MWhippman@...
 

In a message dated 20/11/99 08:31:18 GMT Standard Time, werle@pacificnet.net
writes:


Since we signed an agreement with JewishGen, the Latvia SIG does, in fact,
have the ability to receive credit card payment through JeiwshGen, although
not for regular 'dues'. Contributions can be earmarked for the Latvia SIG,
and used to support any projects of genealogical interest (and I assume
that archival records would qualify). I gave Mike Getz a copy of the
agreement at the summer seminar in New York. I am not sure what needs to
be done to activate this account (and how to request reimbursement for
projects), but I am sure that the JewishGen support team (or Carol Skydell)
could offer assistance to the current officers in this regard.
Dear Mike,

This seems such a good idea. Is there anyway to activate it?
I have been contacting anyone I can think of who might want to subscribe but
those abroad face the most horrendous bank charges to the point of it not
being ecomonic. For example the bank charge on membership this end is about
15-18 dollars [8-10 pounds]

Best always, Constance


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Membership fees--credit card #latvia

MWhippman@...
 

In a message dated 20/11/99 08:31:18 GMT Standard Time, werle@pacificnet.net
writes:


Since we signed an agreement with JewishGen, the Latvia SIG does, in fact,
have the ability to receive credit card payment through JeiwshGen, although
not for regular 'dues'. Contributions can be earmarked for the Latvia SIG,
and used to support any projects of genealogical interest (and I assume
that archival records would qualify). I gave Mike Getz a copy of the
agreement at the summer seminar in New York. I am not sure what needs to
be done to activate this account (and how to request reimbursement for
projects), but I am sure that the JewishGen support team (or Carol Skydell)
could offer assistance to the current officers in this regard.
Dear Mike,

This seems such a good idea. Is there anyway to activate it?
I have been contacting anyone I can think of who might want to subscribe but
those abroad face the most horrendous bank charges to the point of it not
being ecomonic. For example the bank charge on membership this end is about
15-18 dollars [8-10 pounds]

Best always, Constance


Latvia Archival Holdings listed #general

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

The complete listing of the Jewish files held at the Latvian State
Historical Archives is now up and can be found on the Riga page.

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/riga/rigapage.htm

It should be helpful to all researching Latvia to know what years are
missing and what areas are listed.
It is hoped that this marks the beginning of data sharing and that
databasing of names >from these lists will soon be possible.

Arlene Beare
Riga Archives Representative for Latvia SIG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Latvia Archival Holdings listed #general

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

The complete listing of the Jewish files held at the Latvian State
Historical Archives is now up and can be found on the Riga page.

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/riga/rigapage.htm

It should be helpful to all researching Latvia to know what years are
missing and what areas are listed.
It is hoped that this marks the beginning of data sharing and that
databasing of names >from these lists will soon be possible.

Arlene Beare
Riga Archives Representative for Latvia SIG


Re: Lithuanians from Riga? #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Many Jews >from Lithuania went to live in Latvia. My grandparents on one
side originated in Birzai and went to settle in Riga.
Have you checked the Jews Temporary Shelter to see if they are listed?
Passenger manifests >from Latvia to England are more difficult. We are
looking into it and the archives believe that there may be records. They
are looking into it in St Petersburg.
Prof Aubrey Newman >from Leicester University who has done extensive work on
Jewish Emigration Patterns has students researching this at the moment.

Arlene Beare
Moderator

At 11:20 PM 11/21/99 -0800, you wrote:
I had always thought that both my mother's and father's parents were
Litvaks. My father and his parents and siblings definitely came to the U.S.
from Lithuania...I have a copy of the passenger manifest >from 1906, and some
copies of their naturalization papers.

The problem is finding where my mother's parents came from. She immigrated
from England in 1929 to Canada and then to the U.S. I recently met for the
first time a 2nd cousin once removed, who was visiting here >from London.
When I asked him where his grandfather came from, he said he thought it was
Riga to England. This would have been sometime in the 1890's. Is it
possible that Litvaks were >from Riga?

Further to this question, is it possible to find immigration records (i.e.
passenger manifests)>from Eastern Europe to England in the 1890's. I have
already had researchers search the naturalization records, and evidently my
g-grandparents and grandparents did not become naturalized, since they could
not be found.

Thank you,
Marcia Katzel DeVries
marciadv@msn.com

Searching:
BRAUER: Lithuania? > England
BOOKATZ: Riga? or Birzai,Lithuania? > England,Cleveland,Philadelphia
KATZEL: Vilkomir,Lithuania > Cleveland
BURSTEIN: Bogoslaviskis,Lithuania > Cleveland, Indianapolis
GOLDSTEIN:Bogoslaviskis,Lithuania > Cleveland



---
This SIG (latvia@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to latvia as: arl@dircon.co.uk
To unsubscribe send email to $subst('Email.Unsub')


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Lithuanians from Riga? #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

Many Jews >from Lithuania went to live in Latvia. My grandparents on one
side originated in Birzai and went to settle in Riga.
Have you checked the Jews Temporary Shelter to see if they are listed?
Passenger manifests >from Latvia to England are more difficult. We are
looking into it and the archives believe that there may be records. They
are looking into it in St Petersburg.
Prof Aubrey Newman >from Leicester University who has done extensive work on
Jewish Emigration Patterns has students researching this at the moment.

Arlene Beare
Moderator

At 11:20 PM 11/21/99 -0800, you wrote:
I had always thought that both my mother's and father's parents were
Litvaks. My father and his parents and siblings definitely came to the U.S.
from Lithuania...I have a copy of the passenger manifest >from 1906, and some
copies of their naturalization papers.

The problem is finding where my mother's parents came from. She immigrated
from England in 1929 to Canada and then to the U.S. I recently met for the
first time a 2nd cousin once removed, who was visiting here >from London.
When I asked him where his grandfather came from, he said he thought it was
Riga to England. This would have been sometime in the 1890's. Is it
possible that Litvaks were >from Riga?

Further to this question, is it possible to find immigration records (i.e.
passenger manifests)>from Eastern Europe to England in the 1890's. I have
already had researchers search the naturalization records, and evidently my
g-grandparents and grandparents did not become naturalized, since they could
not be found.

Thank you,
Marcia Katzel DeVries
marciadv@msn.com

Searching:
BRAUER: Lithuania? > England
BOOKATZ: Riga? or Birzai,Lithuania? > England,Cleveland,Philadelphia
KATZEL: Vilkomir,Lithuania > Cleveland
BURSTEIN: Bogoslaviskis,Lithuania > Cleveland, Indianapolis
GOLDSTEIN:Bogoslaviskis,Lithuania > Cleveland



---
This SIG (latvia@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org

You are currently subscribed to latvia as: arl@dircon.co.uk
To unsubscribe send email to $subst('Email.Unsub')


A "thanksgiving" message from JewishGen #general

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

As those of us in the United States plan for our visits with family
and friends... we hope that you can find some time to make JewishGen a
part of your family gatherings for several reasons.

JewishGen began a grassroots effort several years ago to begin to get
more and more of us involved in "preserving our history for future
generations". If you peruse the JewishGen website today, you will
see that this massive effort is paying off.... as more and more
information becomes available to the Jewish community worldwide.
There is a cast of thousands now who are participating with JewishGen...
who have become part of our driving force.... and we know that there is
not a soul who comes by here when "visiting JewishGen on the internet"
who is not impressed and overwhelmed.

We believe you owe it to yourselves and your family and your fellow
JewishGen'rs to begin the process of introducing JewishGen to your
family members, your friends... and your acquaintances. What a better
way to say "thanks" or to celebrate a "thanksgiving" than to show
others what information is available to them so they too can learn
more about their history, their families... and perhaps.... a
"thanksgiving" might occur this holiday season as perhaps one more
family can be re-united after years of separation. This is our goal...
and should be the goal of all of us out there.

What you can do... several things.... surely...

Introduce them to the JGFF which now boasts 28,346 researchers,
161,466 records, 51,034 unique surnames, 16,549 unique towns.

Introduce them to the FTJP which now has 988,267 names >from 819
researchers. But most important... spend some time this weekend to
get your database ready to submit your tree so that your names can be
disseminated to the most people through the recently signed tripartite
agreement between JewishGen, IAJGS and Beth Hatefutsoth.

Show them the Yizkor Translation Project and the ShtetLinks site and
get involved in working with others >from your ancestral villages to
make information available.

Show them the Holocaust Global Registry and make sure every survivor,
everyone still looking for a survivor are represented in this renowned
database.

Show them the JewishGen site.... the SIGS, the databases, search all
of JewishGen by following the link at the bottom of our home page..
so that you can see the wealth of information JewishGen brings to the
general public through over 7500 pages of information in addition to
the databases...

Discuss the phenomenal opportunity of traveling with your family
to your ancestral shtetls through JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers...
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/ and share with those
you love one of the most breathaking and memorial experiences of
a lifetime!

Give thanks to those who are working behind the scenes, on center
stage, in the peanut gallery who have made a difference in your
personal research by making a contribution in their honor.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors0.html

And most important... please include JewishGen in your generous giving
this year so we can continue to grow and expand to meet the needs of
our community.... that we can embark into this new millenium with the
technology to address the projects and partnerships we are working so
hard behind the scenes to develop for Jewish continuity into the next
century. http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/

We at JewishGen give our thanks to all of you for your energies, your
ideas, your creativity and your support over these so many years. Let
us us all say a few prayers of "thanksgiving" for the friendships we
have made, for the information we have garnered, for the contacts we
hope to make... and for the unity and the spirit of sharing and giving
which has been JewishGen's hallmark throughout these many years.

May we embrace this season... and this new millenium with vigor and
with this continued spirit of working together throughout the world...
"to preserver our history for future generations."

We wish everyone safety in their travels... and a wonderful sense of
"being" with family and friends this holiday season!

Susan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A "thanksgiving" message from JewishGen #general

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

As those of us in the United States plan for our visits with family
and friends... we hope that you can find some time to make JewishGen a
part of your family gatherings for several reasons.

JewishGen began a grassroots effort several years ago to begin to get
more and more of us involved in "preserving our history for future
generations". If you peruse the JewishGen website today, you will
see that this massive effort is paying off.... as more and more
information becomes available to the Jewish community worldwide.
There is a cast of thousands now who are participating with JewishGen...
who have become part of our driving force.... and we know that there is
not a soul who comes by here when "visiting JewishGen on the internet"
who is not impressed and overwhelmed.

We believe you owe it to yourselves and your family and your fellow
JewishGen'rs to begin the process of introducing JewishGen to your
family members, your friends... and your acquaintances. What a better
way to say "thanks" or to celebrate a "thanksgiving" than to show
others what information is available to them so they too can learn
more about their history, their families... and perhaps.... a
"thanksgiving" might occur this holiday season as perhaps one more
family can be re-united after years of separation. This is our goal...
and should be the goal of all of us out there.

What you can do... several things.... surely...

Introduce them to the JGFF which now boasts 28,346 researchers,
161,466 records, 51,034 unique surnames, 16,549 unique towns.

Introduce them to the FTJP which now has 988,267 names >from 819
researchers. But most important... spend some time this weekend to
get your database ready to submit your tree so that your names can be
disseminated to the most people through the recently signed tripartite
agreement between JewishGen, IAJGS and Beth Hatefutsoth.

Show them the Yizkor Translation Project and the ShtetLinks site and
get involved in working with others >from your ancestral villages to
make information available.

Show them the Holocaust Global Registry and make sure every survivor,
everyone still looking for a survivor are represented in this renowned
database.

Show them the JewishGen site.... the SIGS, the databases, search all
of JewishGen by following the link at the bottom of our home page..
so that you can see the wealth of information JewishGen brings to the
general public through over 7500 pages of information in addition to
the databases...

Discuss the phenomenal opportunity of traveling with your family
to your ancestral shtetls through JewishGen ShtetlSchleppers...
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlschleppers/ and share with those
you love one of the most breathaking and memorial experiences of
a lifetime!

Give thanks to those who are working behind the scenes, on center
stage, in the peanut gallery who have made a difference in your
personal research by making a contribution in their honor.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors0.html

And most important... please include JewishGen in your generous giving
this year so we can continue to grow and expand to meet the needs of
our community.... that we can embark into this new millenium with the
technology to address the projects and partnerships we are working so
hard behind the scenes to develop for Jewish continuity into the next
century. http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/

We at JewishGen give our thanks to all of you for your energies, your
ideas, your creativity and your support over these so many years. Let
us us all say a few prayers of "thanksgiving" for the friendships we
have made, for the information we have garnered, for the contacts we
hope to make... and for the unity and the spirit of sharing and giving
which has been JewishGen's hallmark throughout these many years.

May we embrace this season... and this new millenium with vigor and
with this continued spirit of working together throughout the world...
"to preserver our history for future generations."

We wish everyone safety in their travels... and a wonderful sense of
"being" with family and friends this holiday season!

Susan


Archival Holdings listed #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I feel sure all Latvian researchers will be pleased to learn that the
complete listing of the Jewish files held at the Latvian State Historical
Archives is now up and can be found on the Riga page.

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/riga/rigapage.htm

It should be helpful to all researching Latvia to know what years are
missing and what areas are listed.
It is hoped that this marks the beginning and that databasing of names from
these lists will soon be possible.

Arlene Beare
Riga Archives Representative for Latvia SIG


Latvia SIG #Latvia Archival Holdings listed #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I feel sure all Latvian researchers will be pleased to learn that the
complete listing of the Jewish files held at the Latvian State Historical
Archives is now up and can be found on the Riga page.

http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/riga/rigapage.htm

It should be helpful to all researching Latvia to know what years are
missing and what areas are listed.
It is hoped that this marks the beginning and that databasing of names from
these lists will soon be possible.

Arlene Beare
Riga Archives Representative for Latvia SIG