Date   

New Articles on IGRA website- Yagolnitzer Connection, Part 2 and Notes on Ukraine Pogrom List #general

Elena Bazes
 

IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association) has posted two new articles on its
website- “Yagolnitzer Connection - Part 2”, by Jeffrey Knishbacher and “Notes
Regarding the Database-Ukraine Pogroms List of Victims”, by Ellen Stepak

“Yagolnitzer Connection - Part 2”, by Jeffrey Knishbacher

This article continues on >from where Part 1 left off to describe recent research
on a very large and prominent immigrant family in Rhode Island and beyond, many
from the area of Kamenetz Podolsk in the SW of Czarist Russia and adjacent areas
that have shifted in sovereignty between Romania, Russia, the USSR, and now
independent Moldova and Ukraine. It includes information attempting to reestablish
lost connections between members of this family, known by at least four surname
variants—Egolnitzer, Iegelnitzer, Yagolnitzer and Jagolinzer.

“Notes Regarding the Database-Ukraine Pogroms List of Victims”, by Ellen Stepak

A list of Ukraine pogrom victims was recently added to the IGRA databases on its
website. Many thousands of Jews were murdered in the pogroms of 1918-1920,
immediately following World War One, and during the Russian Revolution. This
article gives in depth information by Ellen Stepak about the list itself and her
preparation of the list.

These articles can be viewed for free for a week, after which time
only IGRA members will have access to them.

Before viewing the article, please register for free on the IGRA website

http://genealogy.org.il/

To view the Yagolnitzer article go to:
http://genealogy.org.il/2017/01/24/yagolnitzer-connection-part-2-jeffrey-knisbacher/
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/jqpbjxj )

To view the Ukraine pogrom article go to:
http://genealogy.org.il/2017/01/06/notes-regarding-database-ukraine-pogroms-list-victims-ellen-stepak/
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/zgcs3ph )

Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Articles on IGRA website- Yagolnitzer Connection, Part 2 and Notes on Ukraine Pogrom List #general

Elena Bazes
 

IGRA (Israel Genealogy Research Association) has posted two new articles on its
website- “Yagolnitzer Connection - Part 2”, by Jeffrey Knishbacher and “Notes
Regarding the Database-Ukraine Pogroms List of Victims”, by Ellen Stepak

“Yagolnitzer Connection - Part 2”, by Jeffrey Knishbacher

This article continues on >from where Part 1 left off to describe recent research
on a very large and prominent immigrant family in Rhode Island and beyond, many
from the area of Kamenetz Podolsk in the SW of Czarist Russia and adjacent areas
that have shifted in sovereignty between Romania, Russia, the USSR, and now
independent Moldova and Ukraine. It includes information attempting to reestablish
lost connections between members of this family, known by at least four surname
variants—Egolnitzer, Iegelnitzer, Yagolnitzer and Jagolinzer.

“Notes Regarding the Database-Ukraine Pogroms List of Victims”, by Ellen Stepak

A list of Ukraine pogrom victims was recently added to the IGRA databases on its
website. Many thousands of Jews were murdered in the pogroms of 1918-1920,
immediately following World War One, and during the Russian Revolution. This
article gives in depth information by Ellen Stepak about the list itself and her
preparation of the list.

These articles can be viewed for free for a week, after which time
only IGRA members will have access to them.

Before viewing the article, please register for free on the IGRA website

http://genealogy.org.il/

To view the Yagolnitzer article go to:
http://genealogy.org.il/2017/01/24/yagolnitzer-connection-part-2-jeffrey-knisbacher/
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/jqpbjxj )

To view the Ukraine pogrom article go to:
http://genealogy.org.il/2017/01/06/notes-regarding-database-ukraine-pogroms-list-victims-ellen-stepak/
(MODERATOR: https://tinyurl.com/zgcs3ph )

Elena Biegel Bazes
IGRA Publicity Chairperson


ELSE GRUN (previously KEIL) nee LINDNER married to LEOPOLD GRUN. #general

Roy Star <roystar20@...>
 

I am still seeking answers if anyone can help me. Have you come across the name
Else GRUN nee LINDNER. (1888-1943) ? Previously married to a Mr.KEIL. She married
Leopold GRUN (1882-1942) in 1920 in Skotschau,Slaskie. Divorced him in 1931. He
survived Dachau and moved to Israel in 1940. She originally came >from Skotschau,
Slaskie but lived in VIENNA around late 1930-1939. Her address was : 15/15
Liechtenstein Str., Vienna 9. With and without her husband! She came to London in
1939. She was well known to my late father when she was living in North London
towards the end of her life. I cannot find any immigration records, or Census
records in the UK. I found her grave in North London which has no Hebrew, and does
not show her fathers name. It shows her married name GRUN and her maiden name
LINDNER. Her UK death certificate gives her addresses in London and Vienna.
My paternal great-grandmother was Ruchel GRUN >from Tarnopol. I cannot determine if
she was related to Leopold GRUN. I cannot trace Else' parents either, so she
'stands alone' with Leopold just outside my family tree! Can anyone help with more
details on either Else or Leopold?

I have written to organisations in Vienna who could not help, and to a
descendent of Leopold's in Israel, who has not responded.
Please reply to : roystar20@gmail.com

Roy Star (London)

Also researching : STARISOLLER (various spellings) Tarnopol & Zbaraz ;
WAINSTAIN Lithuania ; GERSHCOWIT Poland ; GRADNER Bialystok ;
WARMAN Galicia ; CZYGLIK (Galicia).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ELSE GRUN (previously KEIL) nee LINDNER married to LEOPOLD GRUN. #general

Roy Star <roystar20@...>
 

I am still seeking answers if anyone can help me. Have you come across the name
Else GRUN nee LINDNER. (1888-1943) ? Previously married to a Mr.KEIL. She married
Leopold GRUN (1882-1942) in 1920 in Skotschau,Slaskie. Divorced him in 1931. He
survived Dachau and moved to Israel in 1940. She originally came >from Skotschau,
Slaskie but lived in VIENNA around late 1930-1939. Her address was : 15/15
Liechtenstein Str., Vienna 9. With and without her husband! She came to London in
1939. She was well known to my late father when she was living in North London
towards the end of her life. I cannot find any immigration records, or Census
records in the UK. I found her grave in North London which has no Hebrew, and does
not show her fathers name. It shows her married name GRUN and her maiden name
LINDNER. Her UK death certificate gives her addresses in London and Vienna.
My paternal great-grandmother was Ruchel GRUN >from Tarnopol. I cannot determine if
she was related to Leopold GRUN. I cannot trace Else' parents either, so she
'stands alone' with Leopold just outside my family tree! Can anyone help with more
details on either Else or Leopold?

I have written to organisations in Vienna who could not help, and to a
descendent of Leopold's in Israel, who has not responded.
Please reply to : roystar20@gmail.com

Roy Star (London)

Also researching : STARISOLLER (various spellings) Tarnopol & Zbaraz ;
WAINSTAIN Lithuania ; GERSHCOWIT Poland ; GRADNER Bialystok ;
WARMAN Galicia ; CZYGLIK (Galicia).


Polish Jews in Simferopol in WWII? #general

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

One of the big mysteries I have been trying to resolve since I began researching
my family almost a decade ago is where exactly in all the vast Soviet Union my
late father and grandparents were during World War II, and where and when exactly
my grandfather was killed. My father was only three years old when the Germans
invaded his native Poland, and he and his parents fled into "Russia." When Russia
went to war against Germany in mid-1941, my grandfather volunteered to fight
with the Red Army, and was apparently killed almost immediately. My grandmother
also died young (after the war) and my father simply never knew where exactly
he had been in Russia or when or where his father was killed.

A couple of years ago I received a document >from Poland which told me that early
in 1940 the family was in a town called Kizel, in the Ural Mountains. Now, thanks
to the wonderful people at the U.S. Holocaust Museum, I have received a document
that for the first time tells me more: This document, >from a health organization
in Poland that took care of survivors just after the war, says they were first in
the Urals (it doesn't specify Kizel, just the Urals), then in Simferopol,Ukraine,
and then (my grandmother and father only) in Urgencz (Urgench), Uzbekistan. It
also says that my grandfather's last place of residence was Simferopol, which
suggests he enlisted >from there. It does not say anything about where or when he
was killed.

So now I am desperate to discover more. Does anyone know anything about, or can
anyone suggest sources of information about Polish Jews in Kizel, Simferopol
or Urgench during World War II? These three places are vast distances >from one
another-- how or why would the family have gone or been sent >from one to the other?
Are there any lists of the movements of Polish Jews across the Soviet Union during
the war? And if my grandfather joined the Red Army >from Simferopol, is there a list
of any soldiers/volunteers of any kind >from that area? Where would he have been
deployed >from there, and in what capacity? As a Polish Jewish refugee who
volunteered, would he have served with Russian soldiers, or in a separate unit?
And, most importantly, where and when exactly was he killed? Is there somewhere I
could write to obtain information?

Please note that I have searched the Russian Defense Ministry's OBD Memorial for
every possible variation of my grandfather's name, and I've found nothing. I've
also searched other sources (listed in detail below). Any information or
suggestions to help me find something would be most gratefully received!

Thanking you most kindly in advance,
Miriam BULWAR David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

P.S. My grandfather's name was Abram Itzhak BULWAR, born 1900, Lodz,son of Szmul
Aron and Estera (nee ROZENBERG), killed mid- to late 1941, somewhere in "Russia."
My grandmother was Miriam (nee FRENKIEL)and my father was Tolek (Teofil) BULWAR.

The sites I have searched are as follows (in line with a request from
the discussion group moderator, I'm not including the URLs):

JewishGen, JRI-Poland, Yad Vashem, the U.S. Holocaust Museum, Fold3,
Ancestry, FamilySearch and also:

OBD, the Russian Defense Ministry site, which lists over a million fallen
Red Army soldiers.

Alexander Zaslavsky's Book of Electronic Memory, which lists more than
100,000 fallen Jewish Red Army soldiers.

Benjamin Meirchak's partial list of Jewish military casualties in WWII.

The Pobediteli website, which provides a multimedia history of the Eastern
Front and lists over a million surviving (in 2005) WWII Red Army veterans.

The Israeli Museum of the Jewish Soldier in World War II, which lists
soldiers and partisans who fought for the Allies.

The Martyrology list of Jewish soldiers killed in the Siege of Leningrad.

The Kresy Siberia Virtual Museum, which lists people deported or persecuted
in the pre-war eastern borderlands of Poland, but also contains complete
listings of Polish military unit personnel.

The Toldot website listing people buried in Jewish cemeteries in Russia.

Assorted lists and partial lists >from Marilyn Robinson's JewishGem blog.

MODERATOR NOTE: As Miriam has done above, adding the sources which have
already been checked, when asking for assistance is very helpful. Information like
this may provide additional resources for other Genners and also gives Genners
who can help with the question information so that they do not duplicate research
which has already been done. Thank you, Miriam.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Jews in Simferopol in WWII? #general

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

One of the big mysteries I have been trying to resolve since I began researching
my family almost a decade ago is where exactly in all the vast Soviet Union my
late father and grandparents were during World War II, and where and when exactly
my grandfather was killed. My father was only three years old when the Germans
invaded his native Poland, and he and his parents fled into "Russia." When Russia
went to war against Germany in mid-1941, my grandfather volunteered to fight
with the Red Army, and was apparently killed almost immediately. My grandmother
also died young (after the war) and my father simply never knew where exactly
he had been in Russia or when or where his father was killed.

A couple of years ago I received a document >from Poland which told me that early
in 1940 the family was in a town called Kizel, in the Ural Mountains. Now, thanks
to the wonderful people at the U.S. Holocaust Museum, I have received a document
that for the first time tells me more: This document, >from a health organization
in Poland that took care of survivors just after the war, says they were first in
the Urals (it doesn't specify Kizel, just the Urals), then in Simferopol,Ukraine,
and then (my grandmother and father only) in Urgencz (Urgench), Uzbekistan. It
also says that my grandfather's last place of residence was Simferopol, which
suggests he enlisted >from there. It does not say anything about where or when he
was killed.

So now I am desperate to discover more. Does anyone know anything about, or can
anyone suggest sources of information about Polish Jews in Kizel, Simferopol
or Urgench during World War II? These three places are vast distances >from one
another-- how or why would the family have gone or been sent >from one to the other?
Are there any lists of the movements of Polish Jews across the Soviet Union during
the war? And if my grandfather joined the Red Army >from Simferopol, is there a list
of any soldiers/volunteers of any kind >from that area? Where would he have been
deployed >from there, and in what capacity? As a Polish Jewish refugee who
volunteered, would he have served with Russian soldiers, or in a separate unit?
And, most importantly, where and when exactly was he killed? Is there somewhere I
could write to obtain information?

Please note that I have searched the Russian Defense Ministry's OBD Memorial for
every possible variation of my grandfather's name, and I've found nothing. I've
also searched other sources (listed in detail below). Any information or
suggestions to help me find something would be most gratefully received!

Thanking you most kindly in advance,
Miriam BULWAR David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

P.S. My grandfather's name was Abram Itzhak BULWAR, born 1900, Lodz,son of Szmul
Aron and Estera (nee ROZENBERG), killed mid- to late 1941, somewhere in "Russia."
My grandmother was Miriam (nee FRENKIEL)and my father was Tolek (Teofil) BULWAR.

The sites I have searched are as follows (in line with a request from
the discussion group moderator, I'm not including the URLs):

JewishGen, JRI-Poland, Yad Vashem, the U.S. Holocaust Museum, Fold3,
Ancestry, FamilySearch and also:

OBD, the Russian Defense Ministry site, which lists over a million fallen
Red Army soldiers.

Alexander Zaslavsky's Book of Electronic Memory, which lists more than
100,000 fallen Jewish Red Army soldiers.

Benjamin Meirchak's partial list of Jewish military casualties in WWII.

The Pobediteli website, which provides a multimedia history of the Eastern
Front and lists over a million surviving (in 2005) WWII Red Army veterans.

The Israeli Museum of the Jewish Soldier in World War II, which lists
soldiers and partisans who fought for the Allies.

The Martyrology list of Jewish soldiers killed in the Siege of Leningrad.

The Kresy Siberia Virtual Museum, which lists people deported or persecuted
in the pre-war eastern borderlands of Poland, but also contains complete
listings of Polish military unit personnel.

The Toldot website listing people buried in Jewish cemeteries in Russia.

Assorted lists and partial lists >from Marilyn Robinson's JewishGem blog.

MODERATOR NOTE: As Miriam has done above, adding the sources which have
already been checked, when asking for assistance is very helpful. Information like
this may provide additional resources for other Genners and also gives Genners
who can help with the question information so that they do not duplicate research
which has already been done. Thank you, Miriam.


More about Cosmos and other similar restaurants in postwar London SITE CITE #germany

Diana da Costa
 

The Cosmo restaurant was not the only restaurant run by, and popular with,
German-Jewish refugees. Diagonally opposite was the Dorice. If you put in
either restaurant into the search engine of the AJR Newsletter:

http://www.ajr.org.uk/pdfjournals

you will get many hits as both restaurants frequently advertised in
the Newsletter.

[Also a mention of Cosmo in an AJR article >from 29 September, year??, about
commemorative plaques. http://www.ajr.org.uk/Frank_schon_plaque?q=3DCosmo
"Through our plaque scheme we are honouring prominent Jewish emigres from
Nazism who made a significant contribution to their adopted homeland. ....

....We have also installed a plaque in memory of the Cosmo restaurant in
Swiss Cottage, in London, a famous meeting place for the refugees."]

[Also this >from a letter to the Editor - October, 2009
http://www.ajr.org.uk/journal/issue.Oct09/letters?q=Cosmo
Gastronomic Memories
"Sir - Regarding the Cosmo Restaurant in Finchley Road, I believe it was
originally called the Cosmopolitan Restaurant, as we Northerners called it.
It became the Cosmo as the letters ‘politan’ gradually fell off and were not
replaced. " ]

Equally, a "google" search will also achieve many further links.

Another haunt was Schmidt's in Charlotte Street, a stone's throw >from the
Bloomsbury part of London, a German restaurant with a shop downstairs
selling German fare. I don't think it was Jewish owned but also had a
popular following >from the German-Jewish community as well as the nearby
general student community as it offered cheap and plentiful food in its
upstairs restaurant.

Alas, all three restaurants are no more but for those of us still around,
these restaurants invoke many childhood and young adult memories of Weiner
schnitzel, sauerbraten, Hungarian goulash, Koenigsberger klopse, apple
strudel.............................

Diana (Mohr) Gomes da Costa, Kent & formerly London dianadacosta@btinternet.com

Researcher number: 166938
Researches include ARNSTEIN, BACH, BASS, BERLIN, COHN, DITTMANN, FLACHFELD,
GUETERMANN, HAHN, HELLMANN, HIRSCHMANN, KOHN, KRAILSHEIMER, KUGLER, LOEWI,
MANES, MARX, MENDEL, MORGENTHAU, MOHR, ROSENFELD, ROSENWALD, UHLMANN,
WEIKERSHEIMER and ZIRNDORFER - all originally >from Bavaria, mainly Furth,
Nurnberg and Bamberg as listed in the JGFF database.


German SIG #Germany More about Cosmos and other similar restaurants in postwar London SITE CITE #germany

Diana da Costa
 

The Cosmo restaurant was not the only restaurant run by, and popular with,
German-Jewish refugees. Diagonally opposite was the Dorice. If you put in
either restaurant into the search engine of the AJR Newsletter:

http://www.ajr.org.uk/pdfjournals

you will get many hits as both restaurants frequently advertised in
the Newsletter.

[Also a mention of Cosmo in an AJR article >from 29 September, year??, about
commemorative plaques. http://www.ajr.org.uk/Frank_schon_plaque?q=3DCosmo
"Through our plaque scheme we are honouring prominent Jewish emigres from
Nazism who made a significant contribution to their adopted homeland. ....

....We have also installed a plaque in memory of the Cosmo restaurant in
Swiss Cottage, in London, a famous meeting place for the refugees."]

[Also this >from a letter to the Editor - October, 2009
http://www.ajr.org.uk/journal/issue.Oct09/letters?q=Cosmo
Gastronomic Memories
"Sir - Regarding the Cosmo Restaurant in Finchley Road, I believe it was
originally called the Cosmopolitan Restaurant, as we Northerners called it.
It became the Cosmo as the letters ‘politan’ gradually fell off and were not
replaced. " ]

Equally, a "google" search will also achieve many further links.

Another haunt was Schmidt's in Charlotte Street, a stone's throw >from the
Bloomsbury part of London, a German restaurant with a shop downstairs
selling German fare. I don't think it was Jewish owned but also had a
popular following >from the German-Jewish community as well as the nearby
general student community as it offered cheap and plentiful food in its
upstairs restaurant.

Alas, all three restaurants are no more but for those of us still around,
these restaurants invoke many childhood and young adult memories of Weiner
schnitzel, sauerbraten, Hungarian goulash, Koenigsberger klopse, apple
strudel.............................

Diana (Mohr) Gomes da Costa, Kent & formerly London dianadacosta@btinternet.com

Researcher number: 166938
Researches include ARNSTEIN, BACH, BASS, BERLIN, COHN, DITTMANN, FLACHFELD,
GUETERMANN, HAHN, HELLMANN, HIRSCHMANN, KOHN, KRAILSHEIMER, KUGLER, LOEWI,
MANES, MARX, MENDEL, MORGENTHAU, MOHR, ROSENFELD, ROSENWALD, UHLMANN,
WEIKERSHEIMER and ZIRNDORFER - all originally >from Bavaria, mainly Furth,
Nurnberg and Bamberg as listed in the JGFF database.


Cemetery in Nusfalau, Romania #hungary

Steve Stein
 

There is a Jewish cemetery in Nusfalau (a.k.a. Szilagynagyfalu), in Salaj
County in Transylvania. It is not in great condition but has several good
quality, legible headstones, among them that of my great-great-grandfather.
I visited this cemetery in 2000 and to my recollection, the cemetery is on
the outskirts of town and was fenced but not locked.

Recently, a family member visited Nusfalau but found the cemetery to be
locked, she could not get in. It appeared that the fence had been built up
since 2000. I am wondering if anyone is familiar with the area, and can
offer suggestions on whom to contact to gain entry. Another relative is
planning to visit in a few months. In particular, we are looking to get a
better photo of GGGF's stone. Thanks.

Steve Stein
Highland Park, New Jersey USA

Moderator: Nusfalau, Romania, was formerly Nagyfalu, Szilagy, Hungary.
This could be a good project for JOWBR. Please contact me off-list if you would be
interested in working on such an effort.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Cemetery in Nusfalau, Romania #hungary

Steve Stein
 

There is a Jewish cemetery in Nusfalau (a.k.a. Szilagynagyfalu), in Salaj
County in Transylvania. It is not in great condition but has several good
quality, legible headstones, among them that of my great-great-grandfather.
I visited this cemetery in 2000 and to my recollection, the cemetery is on
the outskirts of town and was fenced but not locked.

Recently, a family member visited Nusfalau but found the cemetery to be
locked, she could not get in. It appeared that the fence had been built up
since 2000. I am wondering if anyone is familiar with the area, and can
offer suggestions on whom to contact to gain entry. Another relative is
planning to visit in a few months. In particular, we are looking to get a
better photo of GGGF's stone. Thanks.

Steve Stein
Highland Park, New Jersey USA

Moderator: Nusfalau, Romania, was formerly Nagyfalu, Szilagy, Hungary.
This could be a good project for JOWBR. Please contact me off-list if you would be
interested in working on such an effort.


Kosice Area Vital Records - update #hungary

Peter Absolon
 

Shalom,

I'm happy to announce that I finished acquiring and transcribing all
available vital records >from Kosice Area (basically all towns and
villages in former Abauj-Torna county, belonging now to Slovakia).

As you can see >from the project status page (http://hsig.absolon.eu),
next database update will include 323 marriage records and 677 death
records >from 95 different registry books. As the records have to
undergo quality control checks, it may take some time until they
appear online.

The 1540 birth records are already available as part of JewishGen
Hungary Database.

So now it is time to start with the records available for city of
Kosice. In other words, another 70 books (covering years 1895-1915)
will have to be flipped through, photographed and transcribed. While
I'm doing it free of charge as my gift to the community, there are
still costs to be paid (various archive fees etc).

Therefore I'd like to ask you again for your kind contributions to
"Hungarian SIG General Fund" to help finalize this project (please
don't forget to send me the donation receipts afterwards for tracking
purposes).

Kind regards,
Peter Absolon
Kosice, Slovakia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Kosice Area Vital Records - update #hungary

Peter Absolon
 

Shalom,

I'm happy to announce that I finished acquiring and transcribing all
available vital records >from Kosice Area (basically all towns and
villages in former Abauj-Torna county, belonging now to Slovakia).

As you can see >from the project status page (http://hsig.absolon.eu),
next database update will include 323 marriage records and 677 death
records >from 95 different registry books. As the records have to
undergo quality control checks, it may take some time until they
appear online.

The 1540 birth records are already available as part of JewishGen
Hungary Database.

So now it is time to start with the records available for city of
Kosice. In other words, another 70 books (covering years 1895-1915)
will have to be flipped through, photographed and transcribed. While
I'm doing it free of charge as my gift to the community, there are
still costs to be paid (various archive fees etc).

Therefore I'd like to ask you again for your kind contributions to
"Hungarian SIG General Fund" to help finalize this project (please
don't forget to send me the donation receipts afterwards for tracking
purposes).

Kind regards,
Peter Absolon
Kosice, Slovakia


Re: Cosmos [sic] restaurant in NW London in the early 1940s : actually Cosmo #germany

Peter Lowe <Peter.Lowe@...>
 

Judith Elam asked about the Cosmos restaurant in NW London, and could
not find it on the Internet.

It was in fact called Cosmo, and was in Finchley Road. It is recognized
as a significant meeting place for refugees.

see:
http://www.hamhigh.co.uk/news/finchley_road_restaurant_remembered_as_saviour_for_jews_fleeing_fascism_1_3047713
( or http://tinyurl.com/j8g5m5c )

https://www.holocaustremembrance.com/media-room/news-archive/association-jewish-refugees-ajr-honors-cosmo-london
( or http://tinyurl.com/hfh2gum )

Peter Lowe, Hertford, England peter.lowe@danesbury.co.uk


German SIG #Germany Re: Cosmos [sic] restaurant in NW London in the early 1940s : actually Cosmo #germany

Peter Lowe <Peter.Lowe@...>
 

Judith Elam asked about the Cosmos restaurant in NW London, and could
not find it on the Internet.

It was in fact called Cosmo, and was in Finchley Road. It is recognized
as a significant meeting place for refugees.

see:
http://www.hamhigh.co.uk/news/finchley_road_restaurant_remembered_as_saviour_for_jews_fleeing_fascism_1_3047713
( or http://tinyurl.com/j8g5m5c )

https://www.holocaustremembrance.com/media-room/news-archive/association-jewish-refugees-ajr-honors-cosmo-london
( or http://tinyurl.com/hfh2gum )

Peter Lowe, Hertford, England peter.lowe@danesbury.co.uk


Re: Ios' #ukraine

SarahRose Werner <swerner@...>
 

Huh. An apostrophe is often used when transliterating Cyrillic to indicate
a "soft sign," a Cyrillic letter that has no English equivalent. However,
I'm not sure that one would ever have a terminal soft sign following the
Cyrillic letter that would be transliterated as "s."

"Yo" and "Io" are two possible transliterations of the same Cyrillic letter
rather than different spellings.

SarahRose Werner
Saint John NB

Subject: IOS' Why is there a possesive symbol after the IOS
From: Wallachlevinson@aol.com
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 11:42:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear researchers
In doing some given name research I learned that the name Yosef can also be
Iosif or Ios'. Is the apostrophe a way of indicating certain letters are
missing? Why would a compiler of lists of residents of a town use Ios"
instead of Yosef or Iosif. Thank you.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Ios' #ukraine

SarahRose Werner <swerner@...>
 

Huh. An apostrophe is often used when transliterating Cyrillic to indicate
a "soft sign," a Cyrillic letter that has no English equivalent. However,
I'm not sure that one would ever have a terminal soft sign following the
Cyrillic letter that would be transliterated as "s."

"Yo" and "Io" are two possible transliterations of the same Cyrillic letter
rather than different spellings.

SarahRose Werner
Saint John NB

Subject: IOS' Why is there a possesive symbol after the IOS
From: Wallachlevinson@aol.com
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 11:42:13 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear researchers
In doing some given name research I learned that the name Yosef can also be
Iosif or Ios'. Is the apostrophe a way of indicating certain letters are
missing? Why would a compiler of lists of residents of a town use Ios"
instead of Yosef or Iosif. Thank you.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


IOS' Why is there a possessive symbol after the IOS #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Marilyn Levinson, Spring Lake NC asked:
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 11:42:13 -0500

Dear researchers
In doing some given name research I learned that the name Yosef can also be
Iosif or Ios'. Is the apostrophe a way of indicating certain letters are
missing? Why would a compiler of lists of residents of a town use Ios"
instead of Yosef or Iosif. Thank you.

--------------------------------
This is not a possessive symbol, but rather a symbol for a letter in Russian
alphabet, which does not have a letter in English. It is called "soft
sign". In Russian there are TWO signs: "soft sign" and "hard sign".
Unfortunately here I cannot write a word in Cyrillic, but the letter "soft
sign" in Cyrillic looks like "b" (this is not "B").
Also the name Ios' is a nickname, and of course it is >from Iosif, but the
rule of our translations is to translate the names as is, even we may think
it is written wrong.

Yefim Kogan
Project Leader of Bessarabia Revision Lists
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine IOS' Why is there a possessive symbol after the IOS #ukraine

Yefim Kogan
 

Marilyn Levinson, Spring Lake NC asked:
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2017 11:42:13 -0500

Dear researchers
In doing some given name research I learned that the name Yosef can also be
Iosif or Ios'. Is the apostrophe a way of indicating certain letters are
missing? Why would a compiler of lists of residents of a town use Ios"
instead of Yosef or Iosif. Thank you.

--------------------------------
This is not a possessive symbol, but rather a symbol for a letter in Russian
alphabet, which does not have a letter in English. It is called "soft
sign". In Russian there are TWO signs: "soft sign" and "hard sign".
Unfortunately here I cannot write a word in Cyrillic, but the letter "soft
sign" in Cyrillic looks like "b" (this is not "B").
Also the name Ios' is a nickname, and of course it is >from Iosif, but the
rule of our translations is to translate the names as is, even we may think
it is written wrong.

Yefim Kogan
Project Leader of Bessarabia Revision Lists
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator


Viewmate translation from Polish to English #general

charles goldenzon
 

I would be grateful if someone translated this small text in Polish on the
back of a photo of a soldier.

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=52892

Regards,

Charles Goldenzon
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Viewmate translation from Polish to English #general

charles goldenzon
 

I would be grateful if someone translated this small text in Polish on the
back of a photo of a soldier.

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=52892

Regards,

Charles Goldenzon
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

59861 - 59880 of 658717