Date   

(Poland) American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee Archives Warsaw Office Records 1939-1941 #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) recently published in
their ">from the Archives" about their records >from their Warsaw (Poland)
office in 1939-1941. For those researching Jews trapped in German-0occupied
Poland this collection will be invaluable for your research. The documents
are in Polish, Yiddish, German, Hebrew, and English. Genealogically-relevant
information includes about the situation of Jews in cities, towns and
villages across the "General Government-defined as German-occupied Poland.
The collection also includes correspondence with organizations outside of
Poland where the JDC purchased goods for Jews in need.

The collection includes lists of Jews. They include town residents,
refugees, aid recipients, lists of prospective emigrants and relatives
abroad. The files include correspondence written by Jews to JDC offices, as
well as travel authorizations issued to community representatives visiting
the Warsaw offices.

To search the archives go to: www.archives.jdc.org/archives-search.

It is recommended that before you start your search you read the directions
on how to search are included in their blog post at:
http://tinyurl.com/jxdxuoy
Original url:

http://archives.jdc.org/about-us/from-the-archives/holocaust-era-documents-
from-poland.html

While you are researching on the JDC website you might also want to try
their names index. It contains about 500,000 names in their collection. To
search their names index go to:
http://archives.jdc.org/sharedlegacy/search-names/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JRI Poland #Poland (Poland) American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee Archives Warsaw Office Records 1939-1941 #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) recently published in
their ">from the Archives" about their records >from their Warsaw (Poland)
office in 1939-1941. For those researching Jews trapped in German-0occupied
Poland this collection will be invaluable for your research. The documents
are in Polish, Yiddish, German, Hebrew, and English. Genealogically-relevant
information includes about the situation of Jews in cities, towns and
villages across the "General Government-defined as German-occupied Poland.
The collection also includes correspondence with organizations outside of
Poland where the JDC purchased goods for Jews in need.

The collection includes lists of Jews. They include town residents,
refugees, aid recipients, lists of prospective emigrants and relatives
abroad. The files include correspondence written by Jews to JDC offices, as
well as travel authorizations issued to community representatives visiting
the Warsaw offices.

To search the archives go to: www.archives.jdc.org/archives-search.

It is recommended that before you start your search you read the directions
on how to search are included in their blog post at:
http://tinyurl.com/jxdxuoy
Original url:

http://archives.jdc.org/about-us/from-the-archives/holocaust-era-documents-
from-poland.html

While you are researching on the JDC website you might also want to try
their names index. It contains about 500,000 names in their collection. To
search their names index go to:
http://archives.jdc.org/sharedlegacy/search-names/

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Polish Jews in Simferopol in WWII? #poland

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

One of the big mysteries I have been trying to resolve since I began
researching my family almost a decade ago is where exactly in all the
vast Soviet Union my late father and grandparents were during World
War II, and where and when exactly my grandfather was killed. My
father was only three years old when the Germans invaded his native
Poland, and he and his parents fled into "Russia." When Russia went to
war against Germany in mid-1941, my grandfather volunteered to fight
with the Red Army, and was apparently killed almost immediately. My
grandmother also died young (after the war) and my father simply never
knew where exactly he had been in Russia or when or where his father
was killed.

A couple of years ago I received a document >from Poland which told me
that early in 1940 the family was in a town called Kizel, in the Ural
Mountains. Now, thanks to the wonderful people at the U.S. Holocaust
Museum, I have received a document that for the first time tells me
more: This document, >from a health organization in Poland that took
care of survivors just after the war, says they were first in the
Urals (it doesn't specify Kizel, just the Urals), then in Simferopol,
Ukraine, and then (my grandmother and father only) in Urgencz
(Urgench), Uzbekistan. It also says that my grandfather's last place
of residence was Simferopol, which suggests he enlisted >from there. It
does not say anything about where or when he was killed.

So now I am desperate to discover more. Does anyone know anything
about, or can anyone suggest sources of information about Polish Jews
in Kizel, Simferopol or Urgench during World War II? These three
places are vast distances >from one another -- how or why would the
family have gone or been sent >from one to the other? Are there any
lists of the movements of Polish Jews across the Soviet Union during
the war? And if my grandfather joined the Red Army >from Simferopol, is
there a list of any soldiers/volunteers of any kind >from that area?
Where would he have been deployed >from there, and in what capacity? As
a Polish Jewish refugee who volunteered, would he have served with
Russian soldiers, or in a separate unit? And, most importantly, where
and when exactly was he killed? Is there somewhere I could write to
obtain information?

Please note that I have searched the Russian Defense Ministry's OBD
Memorial for every possible variation of my grandfather's name, and
I've found nothing. I've also searched other sources (listed in detail
below). Any information or suggestions to help me find soemthing would
be most gratefully received!

Thanking you most kindly in advance,
Miriam BULWAR David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

P.S. My grandfather's name was Abram Itzhak BULWAR, born 1900, Lodz,
son of Szmul Aron and Estera (nee ROZENBERG), killed mid- to late
1941, somewhere in Russia. My grandmother was Miriam (nee FRENKIEL)
and my father was Tolek (Teofil) BULWAR.

The sites I have searched (in addition to JewishGen, JRI-Poland, Yad
Vashem, the U.S. Holocaust Museum, Fold3, Ancestry and FamilySearch):

OBD, the Russian Defense Ministry site, which lists over a million fallen
Red Army soldiers:
http://www.obd-memorial.ru/html/index.html

Alexander Zaslavsky's Book of Electronic Memory, which lists more than
100,000 fallen Jewish Red Army soldiers:
http://jmemory.org/

Benjamin Meirchak's partial list of Jewish military casualties in WWII:
http://www.zchor.org/meirtchak/volume5.htm

The Pobediteli website, which provides a multimedia history of the Eastern
Front and lists over a million surviving (in 2005) WWII Red Army veterans:
http://english.pobediteli.ru/

The Israeli Museum of the Jewish Soldier in World War II, which lists
soldiers and partisans who fought for the Allies:
http://www.jwmww2.org/show_item.asp?levelId=65021

The Martyrology list of Jewish soldiers killed in the Siege of Leningrad:
http://nameandglory.spb.ru/

The Kresy Siberia Virtual Museum, which lists people deported or persecuted
in the pre-war eastern borderlands of Poland, but also contains complete
listings of Polish military unit personnel:
http://kresy-siberia.org/won/?page_id=3&lang=en

The Toldot website listing people buried in Jewish cemeteries in Russia:
http://toldot.ru/urava/cemetery/?show_result=1&country=165&city=%D0%90%D1%80
%D0%B7%D0%B0%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%81&cemetery=2

Assorted lists and partial lists >from Marilyn Robinson's JewishGem blog:
http://yourjewishgem.blogspot.co.il/ .


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Jews in Simferopol in WWII? #poland

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

One of the big mysteries I have been trying to resolve since I began
researching my family almost a decade ago is where exactly in all the
vast Soviet Union my late father and grandparents were during World
War II, and where and when exactly my grandfather was killed. My
father was only three years old when the Germans invaded his native
Poland, and he and his parents fled into "Russia." When Russia went to
war against Germany in mid-1941, my grandfather volunteered to fight
with the Red Army, and was apparently killed almost immediately. My
grandmother also died young (after the war) and my father simply never
knew where exactly he had been in Russia or when or where his father
was killed.

A couple of years ago I received a document >from Poland which told me
that early in 1940 the family was in a town called Kizel, in the Ural
Mountains. Now, thanks to the wonderful people at the U.S. Holocaust
Museum, I have received a document that for the first time tells me
more: This document, >from a health organization in Poland that took
care of survivors just after the war, says they were first in the
Urals (it doesn't specify Kizel, just the Urals), then in Simferopol,
Ukraine, and then (my grandmother and father only) in Urgencz
(Urgench), Uzbekistan. It also says that my grandfather's last place
of residence was Simferopol, which suggests he enlisted >from there. It
does not say anything about where or when he was killed.

So now I am desperate to discover more. Does anyone know anything
about, or can anyone suggest sources of information about Polish Jews
in Kizel, Simferopol or Urgench during World War II? These three
places are vast distances >from one another -- how or why would the
family have gone or been sent >from one to the other? Are there any
lists of the movements of Polish Jews across the Soviet Union during
the war? And if my grandfather joined the Red Army >from Simferopol, is
there a list of any soldiers/volunteers of any kind >from that area?
Where would he have been deployed >from there, and in what capacity? As
a Polish Jewish refugee who volunteered, would he have served with
Russian soldiers, or in a separate unit? And, most importantly, where
and when exactly was he killed? Is there somewhere I could write to
obtain information?

Please note that I have searched the Russian Defense Ministry's OBD
Memorial for every possible variation of my grandfather's name, and
I've found nothing. I've also searched other sources (listed in detail
below). Any information or suggestions to help me find soemthing would
be most gratefully received!

Thanking you most kindly in advance,
Miriam BULWAR David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.

P.S. My grandfather's name was Abram Itzhak BULWAR, born 1900, Lodz,
son of Szmul Aron and Estera (nee ROZENBERG), killed mid- to late
1941, somewhere in Russia. My grandmother was Miriam (nee FRENKIEL)
and my father was Tolek (Teofil) BULWAR.

The sites I have searched (in addition to JewishGen, JRI-Poland, Yad
Vashem, the U.S. Holocaust Museum, Fold3, Ancestry and FamilySearch):

OBD, the Russian Defense Ministry site, which lists over a million fallen
Red Army soldiers:
http://www.obd-memorial.ru/html/index.html

Alexander Zaslavsky's Book of Electronic Memory, which lists more than
100,000 fallen Jewish Red Army soldiers:
http://jmemory.org/

Benjamin Meirchak's partial list of Jewish military casualties in WWII:
http://www.zchor.org/meirtchak/volume5.htm

The Pobediteli website, which provides a multimedia history of the Eastern
Front and lists over a million surviving (in 2005) WWII Red Army veterans:
http://english.pobediteli.ru/

The Israeli Museum of the Jewish Soldier in World War II, which lists
soldiers and partisans who fought for the Allies:
http://www.jwmww2.org/show_item.asp?levelId=65021

The Martyrology list of Jewish soldiers killed in the Siege of Leningrad:
http://nameandglory.spb.ru/

The Kresy Siberia Virtual Museum, which lists people deported or persecuted
in the pre-war eastern borderlands of Poland, but also contains complete
listings of Polish military unit personnel:
http://kresy-siberia.org/won/?page_id=3&lang=en

The Toldot website listing people buried in Jewish cemeteries in Russia:
http://toldot.ru/urava/cemetery/?show_result=1&country=165&city=%D0%90%D1%80
%D0%B7%D0%B0%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%81&cemetery=2

Assorted lists and partial lists >from Marilyn Robinson's JewishGem blog:
http://yourjewishgem.blogspot.co.il/ .


Seeking the next of kin of Dawid FRYDMAN and Bracha nee KAPLAN (Warsaw) #poland

Orit Lavi
 

Dear Friends

Dawid FRYDMAN resided in Warsaw, and passed away in 1930. He left a wife,
Bracha (possibly his second wife), sons and daughters.
At least one of his sons survived, and lived in Israel (Salomon).

Some of his relatives resided in the USA after the Holocaust (names
unknown).

Any information about the above FRYDMAN family >from Warsaw would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks and regards,

Orit Lavi, Israel


JRI Poland #Poland Seeking the next of kin of Dawid FRYDMAN and Bracha nee KAPLAN (Warsaw) #poland

Orit Lavi
 

Dear Friends

Dawid FRYDMAN resided in Warsaw, and passed away in 1930. He left a wife,
Bracha (possibly his second wife), sons and daughters.
At least one of his sons survived, and lived in Israel (Salomon).

Some of his relatives resided in the USA after the Holocaust (names
unknown).

Any information about the above FRYDMAN family >from Warsaw would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks and regards,

Orit Lavi, Israel


Re: jri-pl digest: January 24, 2017 Yiddish Books #poland

Lily Kohn <fergiecat@...>
 

I did a Google search "Yiddish Booksellers" and found many you can contact.
It may be a long shot but I would search eBay and save the search and have
them email you when/if something is listed. I highly doubt books are for
sale here but The Yiddish Book Center, located on the campus of Hampshire
College in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States has probably the largest
collection of Yiddish books. It was founded by Aaron Lansky who wrote
a wonderful book "Outwitting History" re his quest to collect Yiddish
books >from all over the world in order to rescue them. It's a delightful
read (many funny moments). I have no connection personally or monetarily
to this book; just a recommendation. I know it's not the same as holding
a book in your hand but online on The Yiddish Book Center's site, there
is a Steven Spielberg Digital Yiddish book collection where the books
are downloadable for free and there are quite a few of your grandfather's
titles.

Lily Kohn
Researching DOMOWITZ (Zambrow) MENDELSON (Zagorow) MARKHEIM (Krakow)


JRI Poland #Poland Re: jri-pl digest: January 24, 2017 Yiddish Books #poland

Lily Kohn <fergiecat@...>
 

I did a Google search "Yiddish Booksellers" and found many you can contact.
It may be a long shot but I would search eBay and save the search and have
them email you when/if something is listed. I highly doubt books are for
sale here but The Yiddish Book Center, located on the campus of Hampshire
College in Amherst, Massachusetts, United States has probably the largest
collection of Yiddish books. It was founded by Aaron Lansky who wrote
a wonderful book "Outwitting History" re his quest to collect Yiddish
books >from all over the world in order to rescue them. It's a delightful
read (many funny moments). I have no connection personally or monetarily
to this book; just a recommendation. I know it's not the same as holding
a book in your hand but online on The Yiddish Book Center's site, there
is a Steven Spielberg Digital Yiddish book collection where the books
are downloadable for free and there are quite a few of your grandfather's
titles.

Lily Kohn
Researching DOMOWITZ (Zambrow) MENDELSON (Zagorow) MARKHEIM (Krakow)


Re: Yiddish books #poland

Renee Steinig
 

Mark Wajsenberg <mark306@bezeqint.net> wrote:

<<My grandfather I.M. Wajsenberg (Weissenberg, Vaysenberg) was a
yiddish writer, died in 1939. I am trying to buy, get his books....>>

Eighteen books by Isaac Meir Weissenberg (1881-1938) are part of the
Yiddish Book Center's Stephen Spielberg Digital Yiddish Library
(http://www.yiddishbookcenter.org/collections/digital-yiddish-library).
They can be read online or downloaded as PDFs for free, or purchased
as print copies. I hope this is your "Zayde."

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@gmail.com


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Yiddish books #poland

Renee Steinig
 

Mark Wajsenberg <mark306@bezeqint.net> wrote:

<<My grandfather I.M. Wajsenberg (Weissenberg, Vaysenberg) was a
yiddish writer, died in 1939. I am trying to buy, get his books....>>

Eighteen books by Isaac Meir Weissenberg (1881-1938) are part of the
Yiddish Book Center's Stephen Spielberg Digital Yiddish Library
(http://www.yiddishbookcenter.org/collections/digital-yiddish-library).
They can be read online or downloaded as PDFs for free, or purchased
as print copies. I hope this is your "Zayde."

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@gmail.com


1845 Altona Census indexed SITE CITE #germany

Michael Moritz
 

Dear Hamburg-Altona Researchers,

Familysearch continues to scan and upload more and more of its films
onto its website, and I monitor these for new updates. One new update
I discovered was the 1845 Danish census. As Altona at the time was
under Danish control, it was included in this census.

The film on Familysearch has about 600 images. I went through these
images and based on the column identifying religion, I made a census
of the Jews of Altona.

In total, there are 2,220 Jews recorded.

You can view and download my entire transcription of the Jewish
community at:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/k1p8uwlxjyfgrp7/1845%20Altona%20Census.pdf?dl=0

The first two columns signify the image number in the film online, the
url of which I include in the file, as well as my numbering of each
Jewish family. I identify the relationships as addressed in the
census, and when they weren't mentioned, I put in the notes column my
guess as to the relationship. Also included is age and approximate
year of birth (since the census was done at the beginning of the year,
I subtracted an additional year, since most hadn't had their birthdays yet).

Importantly, the census gave places of birth, which I included. I
also went through the list and verified just about every town listed,
and included the modern name and location of the town.

One additional note: Hamburg/Altona had a fairly large Sephardic
community, and all Sephardic Jews' religions was listed as "Portuguese
Jewish." As a result, I have a column addressing the community,
whether it be the German Jewish community or the Portuguese Jewish
community.

A direct link to the Familysearch microfilm:
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9L6-MX17?mode=g.

This was a long initiative, but it's an exciting project and gives an
amazing insight into the Jewish community of Altona.

If anyone has any comments or questions, I'm glad to help.

Best, Michael Moritz, New York, NY michael.d.moritz@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany 1845 Altona Census indexed SITE CITE #germany

Michael Moritz
 

Dear Hamburg-Altona Researchers,

Familysearch continues to scan and upload more and more of its films
onto its website, and I monitor these for new updates. One new update
I discovered was the 1845 Danish census. As Altona at the time was
under Danish control, it was included in this census.

The film on Familysearch has about 600 images. I went through these
images and based on the column identifying religion, I made a census
of the Jews of Altona.

In total, there are 2,220 Jews recorded.

You can view and download my entire transcription of the Jewish
community at:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/k1p8uwlxjyfgrp7/1845%20Altona%20Census.pdf?dl=0

The first two columns signify the image number in the film online, the
url of which I include in the file, as well as my numbering of each
Jewish family. I identify the relationships as addressed in the
census, and when they weren't mentioned, I put in the notes column my
guess as to the relationship. Also included is age and approximate
year of birth (since the census was done at the beginning of the year,
I subtracted an additional year, since most hadn't had their birthdays yet).

Importantly, the census gave places of birth, which I included. I
also went through the list and verified just about every town listed,
and included the modern name and location of the town.

One additional note: Hamburg/Altona had a fairly large Sephardic
community, and all Sephardic Jews' religions was listed as "Portuguese
Jewish." As a result, I have a column addressing the community,
whether it be the German Jewish community or the Portuguese Jewish
community.

A direct link to the Familysearch microfilm:
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9L6-MX17?mode=g.

This was a long initiative, but it's an exciting project and gives an
amazing insight into the Jewish community of Altona.

If anyone has any comments or questions, I'm glad to help.

Best, Michael Moritz, New York, NY michael.d.moritz@gmail.com


German Jewish History Awards 2017 - Articles in German Canadian press #germany

Yvonne Stern
 


German SIG #Germany German Jewish History Awards 2017 - Articles in German Canadian press #germany

Yvonne Stern
 


Lists of heads of families from the historical Dorohoi county #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <soring0412@...>
 

A very nice finding in the Botosani archives:
A list of heads of families >from all locations of Dorohoi county. In
total, there are 2635 names.
The main concerns of the authorities were the protection (foreign or
Romanian) and place of birth of the people (it only lists if Romania
or not. If outside Romania, when did they arrive).
There aren't too much other details. The place of birth (Romania or
other) or the year of arrival shouldn't be taken as 100% accurate.
The list >from the city of Dorohoi contains also the residence number -
that hints relations between relatives. It also contains if there is a
spouse, number of boys and number of girls.
About 20% of the heads of families lived in the villages (with or
without their families).
For those who already adopted surnames - it will enable finding the
location of your ancestor (especially in the villages).
You can find the list here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rI8gC2-xCB_ghtt-f6iAzs7idur52WCEELYiqV2pTtQ/edit#gid=1450339772


Regards,

Sorin Goldenberg

Israel


New book on Jewish Refugees and JDC in Warsaw during the Holocaust #warsaw #poland

Gary Mokotoff
 

The Joint Distribution Committee has announced a new book on Jewish Refugees
and JDC in Warsaw during the Holocaust. Information can be found at
http://archives.jdc.org/about-us/articles/jewish-refugees-and-jdc-in-warsaw.
html

Gary Mokotoff


Romania SIG #Romania Lists of heads of families from the historical Dorohoi county #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <soring0412@...>
 

A very nice finding in the Botosani archives:
A list of heads of families >from all locations of Dorohoi county. In
total, there are 2635 names.
The main concerns of the authorities were the protection (foreign or
Romanian) and place of birth of the people (it only lists if Romania
or not. If outside Romania, when did they arrive).
There aren't too much other details. The place of birth (Romania or
other) or the year of arrival shouldn't be taken as 100% accurate.
The list >from the city of Dorohoi contains also the residence number -
that hints relations between relatives. It also contains if there is a
spouse, number of boys and number of girls.
About 20% of the heads of families lived in the villages (with or
without their families).
For those who already adopted surnames - it will enable finding the
location of your ancestor (especially in the villages).
You can find the list here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rI8gC2-xCB_ghtt-f6iAzs7idur52WCEELYiqV2pTtQ/edit#gid=1450339772


Regards,

Sorin Goldenberg

Israel


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland New book on Jewish Refugees and JDC in Warsaw during the Holocaust #warsaw #poland

Gary Mokotoff
 

The Joint Distribution Committee has announced a new book on Jewish Refugees
and JDC in Warsaw during the Holocaust. Information can be found at
http://archives.jdc.org/about-us/articles/jewish-refugees-and-jdc-in-warsaw.
html

Gary Mokotoff


IOS' Why is there a possesive symbol after the IOS #ukraine

Marilyn Levinson
 

Dear researchers
In doing some given name research I learned that the name Yosef can also
be Iosif or Ios'. Is the apostrophe a way of indicating certain letters
are missing? Why would a compiler of lists of residents of a town use Ios"
instead of Yosef or Iosif. Thank you.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine IOS' Why is there a possesive symbol after the IOS #ukraine

Marilyn Levinson
 

Dear researchers
In doing some given name research I learned that the name Yosef can also
be Iosif or Ios'. Is the apostrophe a way of indicating certain letters
are missing? Why would a compiler of lists of residents of a town use Ios"
instead of Yosef or Iosif. Thank you.

Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC

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