Date   

Re: Hebrew names #translation #hungary

rich.meyersburg@...
 

Hi,  I am by no means an expert, but the writing is old German script.  What I see on the left is the name Fani Weis g. Taub and I can't make out the rest of the letters.  Based on that I can tell you that the Fani Weisz g. Taub means Fani Weisz, geborne (born) Taub, as you already know.  I can't help you with the town name or the remaining writing.  Since the document is in handwritten Old German, I would suggest you also post it on the German discussion group and request a translation.  It might help if you posted it with a picture showing the headings of the columns.  In that case, you may be directed to use ViewMate and follow those protocols.

I have had good luck with getting BMD date translated from handwritten old German following those steps.

Rich Meyersburg
Laurel, MD 


Re: Passage from Jaffa to LeHavre to Ellis Island #courland #latvia #russia

Sherri Bobish
 


Hi Roberta,

Have you tried searching passenger manifests using a soundex search?  A very quick soundex search on Ancestry for surname SHORE finds alternative spellings, i.e. Schur, and many others.

Hope this helps,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Re: Searching for records of RUSSMAN from Pinsk #belarus #names

Sherri Bobish
 


S. Geller,

Have you tried searching passenger manifest databases using a soundex search?  The surname may have had a somewhat different spelling at that point, or been transcribed incorrectly into the searchable index.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Re: 1936 Hungary birth records #general #hungary

mark reichard
 

Hi,
    We spent  5 days at the Zemplen County Records Center in Satoraljaujhely about 4-5 years ago with Karesz and a young Masters student from Israel referred by her Professor at the University of Haifa, who is a Reichard descendant and was aware of our research project.  Her Professor wanted her to get experience in the field. We used two lap top computers to record the information and then merged the data at the end of the project.  As a result we obtained about 100 "hits" on my family, which we hadn't been able to do previously on our own.  We also toured the "new" cemetery in Satoraljaujhely and were able to walk the whole site, since it had been recently cleared,. finding our family members' tombstones in one specific area,  Karesz speaks multiple languages and also has worked as a tour guide, He took us to see nearby locations of Jewish interest.  He is great to work with, knows the Record Center documentation system and is very accommodating.  We rented a 2 bedroom condo nearby which we shared and it worked out very well. The people at the Records Center speak very little English and we do not speak Hungarian, hence it was very important to the success of our research study to have Karesz with us.
    My grandfather was born in Tolcsva in 1873 and went to the US in 1891. My great-great-grandfather and great-great-great-father were born in Satoraljaujhely.

                     
                                                                Regards, Mark Reichard.  


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

susiekrumholz@...
 

My grandfather's last name was "Yellen" but his family that came at different times were named "Levin"!  Think we might be related????


Re: FamilySearch Christening records in 1870's New York #usa #general

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 



On Jul 20, 2020, at 11:07 AM, Phil Karlin <philk@...> wrote:
Thank you Barbara.
So do you think that the "christening" was not one per se, but merely that the dataset included christenings, so a christening was assumed to have occurred by the dataset builder?

I’d guess that the birth info was included in a pile that included births as well as christenings… and then it was entered into a record book they created an all-inclusive title. 

I THINK THAT RECORDING CHRISTENINGS IN AMERICAN CIVIL RECORDS WOULD BE EXTREMELY RARE.   WONDER WHAT OTHER RESEARCHES KNOW?

When Covid 19 is in our memories, you’ll have to visit a FHL and call for the records… it would be interesting to see if the “christenings" were christenings in fact or that was the only  evidence of birth

Keep in mind that I gave Rebeke as an example. The same thing happened for her siblings - they have christenings too.  
       
             same city, same time frame  -  1868 - 1879

Is there information on the record image that's not in the index?
Depends on the record… some have more info, others less… these births were mostly at home, 
not all midwives were literate…. some were precise in entering info, others sloppy… some returned the cards in a timely way, others procrastinated (and in some cases, never returned them..  I think I read that 20% of births in the time frame you are working with were never recorded.  

You will have to call up each image when we can finally go to the centers.

I'd love to know any or all of these facts from the image:

Who made the original record? Birth location (hospital or home, street address). usually at home

Date - birthdate vs. christening date vs. recording date.* 

Was there a doctor or midwife attending and their name?   

*Although the record we're looking at is dated July 29 1870, she appears on the 1870 Census, dated July 15, which says she was born in May.  

People were notorious for not remembering DOB’s  — I’ve been at this for over 50 years… I see records where each and every time someone entered his OWN birthday it was different than the last time.   (just like spelling…..

And what if "christening" just means "naming" and I'm worked up in a lather over nothing, LOL?
      
 Keep my address… and when you find out please let me know.

Barbara Mannlein
Tucson, AZ


Re: Hebrew Translation for two Tombstones #names #translation

Malka
 

Hi Linda,

 

The one on the right-

 

Here lies or here is buried (abbreviation on top on both sides o the star of David)

My husband and our dear father

Our teaching rabbi (abbreviation) Ze’ev son of reb Zvi

Passed 30 Shevat 5697

May his soul be gathered in eternal lie (abbreviation on bottom)

 

The one on the left–

Here lies or here is buried (Abbreviation on top)

Favel (Feivel?) Zevulun son of Israel Z’L

Passed 26 Shveat 5697

May his soul be gathered in eternal life (abbreviation on bottom)

 

Shalom, Malka Chosnek

 

 


Subj: ViewMate translation request - Polish #translation

Paul Moverman
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM83105
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.
Paul Moverman
Milford, NH USA


Subj: ViewMate translation request - Polish #translation

Paul Moverman
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM83113
Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page.

Thank you very much.
Paul Moverman
Milford, NH USA


Re: Ballasagyarmat: what census records are there? #hungary

emmabcole@...
 

Julia - you are an absolute marvel and extremely kind, thank you so much, what a wonderful list full of fascinating information, I certainly hadn't got as far as working out numbers of children or produce/occupation.
I wonder now, though, if my family can have been living in Balassa at that time. Jakab was born in 1815 I think, so would have been about 33, and his wife Fani was born in 1812 so would have been about 36. There are no couples on there that fit this profile. They were in Balassa by January 1851, however, when my great grandfather Lipot's younger brother Adolph was born, and I should look again for his brother Armin who I think would have been born in the 1850s too. I will now see if I can find the 1848 for Obuda which is where I think Fani was from, perhaps that's where they were in 1848?!
Huge thanks again Julia
Emma


Re: "adoption" to avoid the czar's army #general #lithuania

erikagottfried53@...
 

I applaud  Emily Garbers approach to genealogical research and her admonition to take into account historical context when approaching a question or a problem.  I would add to this that it can be helpful to broaden context even further to include the zeitgeist of a place and time. Though this approach is much fuzzier than looking into specific events and laws to frame a time, it can yield some interesting results and hypotheses to explain a mystery.  As an example, I offer this story from the early 1970s, almost a caricature of the spirit of those tumultuous political and cultural times (though, as we are being sharply reminded, perhaps no times aren't tumultuous):  
 
I grew up in Seattle. My closest friend as a teenager, in the early 1970s,  belonged to a family of four--her parents, herself, and her brother, who was two years younger than she.  Their surname was Poll.  
 
Susan, a newly-recruited feminist enthusiast, no longer wanted to use her father’s surname, so she changed her surname to Catherine (her middle name). Orabelle, her mother, also as a feminist, took back her maiden name, Connelly. Meanwhile, Bernard, her husband, in solidarity with the new movements celebrating ethnic pride and immigrant ancestors, decided to change his name back to his family’s original name, Polishuk.  Tom, the son, a curmudgeon, stubbornly refused to change his last name just because the others had, so he stuck with Poll
 
There you have it, ladies and gentlemen:  Four members of the same nuclear family with four different surnames—all occasioned by the politics and culture of their times.

Erika Gottfried (married but kept my family surname)
Teaneck, New Jersey


Re: greek jews #sephardic

Ina Getzoff
 

Susie:
It is probably possible that some of your ancestors who fled way back (you don't say how far back your research has gone) may have gone to Greece instead of the Ottoman Empire and there is a mix of family members from the Greek Isles somewhere in the family. Where did your family go and when? Remember-when the Spanish Inquisition started in March, 1492 some of the people that fled either went to Portugal or because the Sultan of Turkey offered asylum that is where they went. Can you give us some additional information. 
 
My paternal side of the family came from Istanbul, Turkey but a great aunt came from Salonika, Greece. 
Ina Getzoff
Delray Beach, Fla.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
w


Re: Yiddish or Hebrew name for IDA #belarus #names

agnesblum@...
 

Hi Marilyn,

My great-great grandmother Ida Zacharowicz was born in Russia and emigrated to the U.S. in 1890. Ida was NOT too anglicized to be given to a Jewish girl! In fact Ida was quite popular for Ashkenazi girls at the time. Below are a few of the famous Jewish Idas from the late 19th early 20th century, so it stands that there were even more non-famous ones!

Ida Cohen Rosenthal, co-founder of Maidenform, b. 1886 in Rakov, Russia
Ida Kaminska, actress known as the "Mother of the Jewish stage", b. 1899 Ukraine
Ida Maze, the Yiddish writer, b. 1893 in Ugli, Belarus
Ida Demel, writer and patroness of the arts, b. 1870 in Germany
Ida Rubenstein , ballet dancer, b. 1883 in Ukraine
Ida Haendel, pianist, b. 1928, Poland
Ida Ginsburg ,founder of the Detroit chapter of National Council of Jewish Women, b. 1865, USA

As for the corresponding Hebrew name, I would guess Yehudit, or Adah.

Agnes

-----

Agnes Blum
Bethesda

BLUM, ZACHAROWICZ, SACHS/SACKS, SPEICHLER, ROTHBERG, KIER/KIERSCH


Re: Percentages of ancestry - my Ashkenazi father seems to be partly of Italian/Greek descent? #dna

Kenneth Ryesky
 

Following the Roman conquest of Jerusalem and the dispersion, many Jews were taken to Italy.  Jewish slave labor built the Coleseum and other Roman tourist trap monuments.
 
So it is not so much a matter of Jews having Italian DNA as it is Italians having Jewish DNA.
 
-- Ken Ryesky
Petach Tikva, ISRAEL
 

--
Ken Ryesky,  Petach Tikva, Israel     kenneth.ryesky@...


Re: FamilySearch Christening records in 1870's New York #usa #general

Phil Karlin
 

Thank you Barbara.
So do you think that the "christening" was not one per se, but merely that the dataset included christenings, so a christening was assumed to have occurred by the dataset builder?
Keep in mind that I gave Rebeke as an example. The same thing happened for her siblings - they have christenings too. 

Is there information on the record image that's not in the index?
I'd love to know any or all of these facts from the image: Who made the original record? Birth location (hospital or home, street address). Date - birthdate vs. christening date vs. recording date.*  Was there a doctor or midwife attending and their name?

*Although the record we're looking at is dated July 29 1870, she appears on the 1870 Census, dated July 15, which says she was born in May.

And what if "christening" just means "naming" and I'm worked up in a lather over nothing, LOL?


Re: Train travel Ukraine 19th-20th Century/ #ukraine

Sharon Taylor
 

Since the trip you described took place in 1914, it’s likely that they were being evacuated or that they chose to flee as the Russian army advanced. The Austrian government was active in evacuating civilians from the war zone, moving them west to Vienna, Bohemia and Moravia. During this time, the military had priority for train travel, so civilians were often left stranded for hours or even days until a train became available for their use. Villagers along the way brought food to the stranded travelers during long delays. Yizkor books in JewishGen’s collection have several firsthand accounts by Jews who fled Galicia during this time.

Sharon Taylor
Philadelphia, PA
Researching NEMETH, BLOCH, INGIER in Mariampol/ Stanislawow Galicia and WIESNER, FLEISIG in Kulikow/Lemberg Galicia


Re: Ballasagyarmat: what census records are there? #hungary

JPmiaou@...
 

10. Name: Samuel Waisz Jr., age: 29, birthplace: Hungary, Bgy, residence: ditto, income source: vinegar-maker, behavior: good, children under 10: daughter
Rézi his wife, 25, ditto

21. Samuel Waisz Sr., 55, Hungary, BGyarm., with merchandise, 2 daughters
Josefa his wife, 53
Moraham?, 23, with skins?
Izsák, 17, with merchandise
Jakab, 14

31. Izsak Waisz, 27, furrier?
32. Leopold Waisz, 42, day-laborer, 1? son
Liebes his wife, 35
Emanël?, 12

69. Rosalie Waisz widow, 48, tavern-keeper, 2 daughters
Moses Lebel, 24
Janos, 24

85. Jakab Waisz, 46, merchant
Leni his wife, 38

101. Israel Vaisz, 40, merchant, 1 son, 1 daughter
Rezi? his wife, 38
Moricz, 10

112. Hersel Waisz, 56, with rags, 3 sons, 1 daughter
Hani his wife, 40

128. Israel Weisz, 58, merchant, 2 daughters
Marie his wife, 50
David, 15
Samu, 11
Salamon Lebl? Weisz, 35, merchant
Leni his wife, 22

133. Jakab Waisz, 32, merchant (retailer?)
Beni? his wife, 26

139. Fülep Waisz, 51, merchat, 2 sons, 4 daughters
Fani his wife, 37

142. Ischák? Weisz, 60
Resi his wife, 50
Samuel, 25

145. Mihály Weisz, 45, with skins, 1 son, 4 daughters
Fani his wife, 30
Markusz, 10


161. Juli Weisz widow, 60, with fruit, 1 daughter

167. Marton Weisz widower, 74
Moritz, 38, with merchandise, 1 son, 3 daughters
Rosi his wife, 38

173. Josef Weisz Jr., 50, buyer (agent), 3 daughters
Leni his wife, 40

174. Simon Weisz, 22, with skins
Kati his wife, 25
Kati mother, 50

179. Hermann Weisz, 35, merchant with skins, 1 son, 1 daughter
Toni his wife, 30

184. Abraham Weisz, 38, with milk?, 3 sons, 1 daughter
Hani his wife, 35

191. Leopold Weisz widower, 67
Daniel epileptic, 26

197. Edel Weisz widow, 50, Hungary, in Nyitra
Adolf, 20, from Szügy, glazier
Moritz, 22, deformed in the leg

205. Fáni Weisz widow, 50, 1 daughter
Gábor, 22, with rags

221. Marie Waisz widow, 60

223. Henrik Weisz, 26, with skins
Moses Weisz, 19

237. Simon Vaisz, 42, with rags, 1 son, 1 daughter
Hani his wife, 40
Gaspar, 12

248. Abraham Vaisz Jr., 34, sheep-seller?, 2 daughters
Regina his wife, 30

249. Fáni Vaisz widow, 50

---
Julia
. /\ /\
.>*.*<


Re: FamilySearch Christening records in 1870's New York #usa #general

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

But those were not recorded in NYC records, b/c they were not contemporaneous..  The LDS baptisms were recorded ONLY in LDS records NOT municipal records.

Barbara Mannlein
Tucson, AZ.


On Jul 20, 2020, at 9:33 AM, David Oseas via groups.jewishgen.org <doseas=yahoo.com@...> wrote:

For a period of time, the LDS church engaged in the controversial practice of posthumous baptism of Jewish individuals:  https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/ldsagree.html  They have since stopped the practice.

Regards,
David Oseas _._,_._,_


Hungarian Elementary School Yearbook records #hungary #education

Ed Zwieback <ed.zwieback@...>
 

I received several pages from "Elementary School Yearbooks" for years 1894-98, for grades 1-3.  These are formal printed pages with up to 40 student names (all boys) and their scores in up to 14 subjects. I have lost contact with my source and don't know where these came from.  I have never seen any records like these.  I welcome any info on where these books can be accessed.  I'll be happy to send these pages to anyone interested.

Ed Zwieback
California
http://ezwieback.com/ZFN-p/index.htm


Re: Hebrew Translation for two Tombstones #names #translation

esriel@...
 

The left one reads:

Feivel Zevulun, son of Yisrael, died Shvat 26, 5697

The right one:

My husband and our dear father (Rabbi) Zeev, son of Tzvi, died Shvat 10, 5697

Normally the American names started with the same letter as the Jewish.

So Feivel became Phillip. The second one, I assume, was called Wolf (translation of Zeev in German or Yiddish) and so he became William