Date   

Records entry for Brazil #general

דוד נ.א.
 

Shalom
I'm looking for Gad Trobitz, he traveled to Brazil in 1912, then joined his wife
Esther. She died there in 1946, and he returned to Israel. I am looking for
information about them in Brazil. There is such a thing registrations entry /
Immigration to Brazil? There is access to them? There is it databases?
Thank you
David Nesher
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Records entry for Brazil #general

דוד נ.א.
 

Shalom
I'm looking for Gad Trobitz, he traveled to Brazil in 1912, then joined his wife
Esther. She died there in 1946, and he returned to Israel. I am looking for
information about them in Brazil. There is such a thing registrations entry /
Immigration to Brazil? There is access to them? There is it databases?
Thank you
David Nesher
Israel


Dating New York City directories #general

David Laskin
 

Hello Genners,
I am researching a distant relative who first appears in the New York
City phone directory in 1949. I am trying to establish an exact
timeline of her life. Does anyone know when exactly during the course
of each year the directories were updated and how closely they reflect
the date of a person's move. For example, if Ethel was in the 1949
directory, does that mean she had probably moved to NYC in 1948?

Thanks for any light you can shed on this.
David Laskin, Seattle, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Dating New York City directories #general

David Laskin
 

Hello Genners,
I am researching a distant relative who first appears in the New York
City phone directory in 1949. I am trying to establish an exact
timeline of her life. Does anyone know when exactly during the course
of each year the directories were updated and how closely they reflect
the date of a person's move. For example, if Ethel was in the 1949
directory, does that mean she had probably moved to NYC in 1948?

Thanks for any light you can shed on this.
David Laskin, Seattle, WA


Re: She died in a fire - additional information #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

I forgot to mention something. On the 1930 census, that Rose was 50 years old (b.
abt 1880) and on the 1940 census, thats Rose was 63 (b. abt 1877).

Shelley Mitchell


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: She died in a fire - additional information #general

Shelley Mitchell
 

I forgot to mention something. On the 1930 census, that Rose was 50 years old (b.
abt 1880) and on the 1940 census, thats Rose was 63 (b. abt 1877).

Shelley Mitchell


Naturalization verification notations on passenger manifests #general

Russ Maurer
 

In the JewishGen infofile on passenger manifest markings in the occupation column
(http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/occ/), it is stated that the
naturalization verification markings start with the district number (one or two
digits) followed by the application number (most commonly six digits). I am finding
that this longer number is usually, or maybe always, the certificate of arrival
number, not the application number. I could provide any number of examples. I
have yet to find one that I can verify as an application number, at least as far as
the New York City area. If anyone can provide an example where the notation is
definitely an application number, I would like to know about it.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, OH


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Naturalization verification notations on passenger manifests #general

Russ Maurer
 

In the JewishGen infofile on passenger manifest markings in the occupation column
(http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/occ/), it is stated that the
naturalization verification markings start with the district number (one or two
digits) followed by the application number (most commonly six digits). I am finding
that this longer number is usually, or maybe always, the certificate of arrival
number, not the application number. I could provide any number of examples. I
have yet to find one that I can verify as an application number, at least as far as
the New York City area. If anyone can provide an example where the notation is
definitely an application number, I would like to know about it.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, OH


Journal of Multidisciplinary Research--Special Issue on Genealogy and Family History #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Journal of Multidisciplinary Research has published a special issue on
Genealogy and Family History. It is an internationally peer-reviewed open
access journal. There are articles included by Jewish genealogists that we
are familiar with. This issue is guest edited by Arnon Hershkovitz >from Tel
Aviv University. Arnon calls this issue,rigorous, multi-faceted research
in a growing but underrepresented field of academic research.

There are six articles:

- Critical Family History: Situating Family within Contexts of Power
Relationships by Christine E. Sleeter

- Memory and Belonging: The Social Construction of a Collective Memory during the
Intercultural Transition of Immigrants >from Argentina in Israel by Yaakov M. Bayer

- Recuperating Ethnic Identity through Critical Genealogy by Christine Scodari

- 200 Years of Scottish Jewry: A Demographic and Genealogical Profile by
Kenneth Collins, Neville Lamdan, and Michael Tobias

- The Genealogis's Information World: Creating Information in the Pursuit
of a Hobby by Crystal Fulton

- Review of Genealogia Cubana: San Isidoro de Holguin: Padron de las casas y
familias de este Pueblo de San Isidoro de Holguin hecho en el mes de Febrero del
ano del Senor del 1735, by W. Navarrete and M. D. Espino by Lourdes Del Pino

The Journal is available free. To download the journal go to:
http://www.jmrpublication.org/portals/jmr/Issues/JMR8-1.pdf

Thank you to Dianne Richard, editor of UpFront with NGS for informing us
about this special edition of the journal.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Journal of Multidisciplinary Research--Special Issue on Genealogy and Family History #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Journal of Multidisciplinary Research has published a special issue on
Genealogy and Family History. It is an internationally peer-reviewed open
access journal. There are articles included by Jewish genealogists that we
are familiar with. This issue is guest edited by Arnon Hershkovitz >from Tel
Aviv University. Arnon calls this issue,rigorous, multi-faceted research
in a growing but underrepresented field of academic research.

There are six articles:

- Critical Family History: Situating Family within Contexts of Power
Relationships by Christine E. Sleeter

- Memory and Belonging: The Social Construction of a Collective Memory during the
Intercultural Transition of Immigrants >from Argentina in Israel by Yaakov M. Bayer

- Recuperating Ethnic Identity through Critical Genealogy by Christine Scodari

- 200 Years of Scottish Jewry: A Demographic and Genealogical Profile by
Kenneth Collins, Neville Lamdan, and Michael Tobias

- The Genealogis's Information World: Creating Information in the Pursuit
of a Hobby by Crystal Fulton

- Review of Genealogia Cubana: San Isidoro de Holguin: Padron de las casas y
familias de este Pueblo de San Isidoro de Holguin hecho en el mes de Febrero del
ano del Senor del 1735, by W. Navarrete and M. D. Espino by Lourdes Del Pino

The Journal is available free. To download the journal go to:
http://www.jmrpublication.org/portals/jmr/Issues/JMR8-1.pdf

Thank you to Dianne Richard, editor of UpFront with NGS for informing us
about this special edition of the journal.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Russian West Point and Medals?? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Ann Rabinowitz wrote:
I believe that 1917 was the first opportunity that Jews had to become officers
in the Russian military and many rose to the rank of General after that. It was
also the first time that they were allowed entrance into the military academies.
Actually, Joseph Trumpeldor, the hero of Tel Hai, received his St. George order
awarded for his bravery in Russo-Japan war and officer commission in 1906.

In a year 1917 with abdication of Nicolas II, Russian Empire has ceased to exist,
and Jew in a new Russia could become a supreme commander of the Red Army, as Lev
Trotsky did.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian West Point and Medals?? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Ann Rabinowitz wrote:
I believe that 1917 was the first opportunity that Jews had to become officers
in the Russian military and many rose to the rank of General after that. It was
also the first time that they were allowed entrance into the military academies.
Actually, Joseph Trumpeldor, the hero of Tel Hai, received his St. George order
awarded for his bravery in Russo-Japan war and officer commission in 1906.

In a year 1917 with abdication of Nicolas II, Russian Empire has ceased to exist,
and Jew in a new Russia could become a supreme commander of the Red Army, as Lev
Trotsky did.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: Research in Aram-Tsova (Haleb) in Syria. #general

Jeff at SG
 

There are some databases for Syria in the Syria section of
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/databases.html

Also Sarina Roffe is quite knowledgeable about what is available about
Aleppo records. I'll send you her email privately.

Jeff Malka
Website: http://www.SephardicGen.com

<davidnead@...> wrote:

This is the first time I happen to explore the family >from Aram-Tsova
(Haleb) in Syria. Is there a database containing searchable records
of Syria? Is Syria were vital records? Were census? Would they survive?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Research in Aram-Tsova (Haleb) in Syria. #general

Jeff at SG
 

There are some databases for Syria in the Syria section of
http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/databases.html

Also Sarina Roffe is quite knowledgeable about what is available about
Aleppo records. I'll send you her email privately.

Jeff Malka
Website: http://www.SephardicGen.com

<davidnead@...> wrote:

This is the first time I happen to explore the family >from Aram-Tsova
(Haleb) in Syria. Is there a database containing searchable records
of Syria? Is Syria were vital records? Were census? Would they survive?


New Holocaust-period records on the All Galicia Database #general

Tony Kahane <tkahane@...>
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the addition to the All Galicia
Database of two important sets of Holocaust records. This database is
free and available to all, at: http://search.geshergalicia.org

1. Debica-area Holocaust-period death testimonies. Rzeszow State
Archive, Fond 881, Sygn. 1 (791 records)
These are testimonies, provided by people who survived, of Jews who
died during the Holocaust - all but a handful of them murdered. They
were gathered after the end of the war in Europe. The records are in a
single file, divided into volumes with town names, which appear to
refer to the places where the testimonies were gathered. The people
named in the records, though, came >from a wide range of localities in
the Debica area. Each testimony is signed by two witnesses.

In indexing these records, we have extracted the following information:
Names of person, names of parents, town of origin, date of testimony
(where given), reported date of death, reported place of death,
reported cause of death, and the names (where the signatures are
legible) of the two people signing the form of testimony.

The reported places of death include:
Bagienica (near Dabrowa), Baranowa, Belzec, Biala Podlaska, Biecz,
Biesiadka, Bochnia, Borki, Borki Nizinskie, Borowa, Brzezany,
Brzostek, Chorzelow, Chrzastow, Czermin, Dabrowa, Debica, Deborzyn,
Debowa (near Jodlowa), Dubienka, Dukla, Dulabka, Dulcza, Frysztak,
Gebiczyn, Gliwice, Golce, Gorlice, Gorzejowa, Grabiny, Halbow, Horbow,
Hrubieszow, Janow, Jarocin, Jaslo, Jastrzebia, Jawiszow, Jaworze,
Jaworze Gorne, Jazwiny, Jedlicze, Jodlowa, Kamienica, Kamionka
Strumilowa, Kolaczyce, Kozlow (near Debica), Krajowice (Jaslo),
Krakow, Krakow-Plaszow, Krzeszow, Lubaczow, Lubaczowa, Lwow, Lysakow,
Majdanek, Miedzyrzec, Mielec, Nadworna, Nagoszyn, Nizna Laka,
Oleszyce, Olpiny, Opacionka, Oswiecim [Auschwitz], Padew, Parkosz,
Pilznionka, Pilzno, Plaszow, Podborze, Podleszany, Polaniec, Przeclaw,
Przeczyca (Jodlowa), Pustkow, Radomysl Wielke, Rawa Ruska, Ropczyce,
Roza , Rozwadow, Rudniki, Rymanow, Rzeszow, Sedziszow, Skarzysko,
Sokolow (Rzeszow district), Straszecin, Stroza, Szczucin, Szerzyny,
Tarnobrzeg, Tarnow, Ulanow, Wiewiorka, Wlodawa, Wojslaw, Wola Lubecka,
Wolka Tanewska, Zagorze, Zaklikow, and Zdziary.

2. Doctors' Questionnaires, 1941-1943 (133 records)
These are detailed, four-page forms (some with face photos) that
Jewish medical and health-care workers were obliged to complete under
the Nazi occupation., sometimes in duplicate or triplicate. The people
named include doctors, dentists, dental technicians, nurses, midwives,
radiologists, cosmeticians, medical students and others.

All these forms were completed in eastern Galician towns. Yad Vashem
holds a set of 2,001 questionnaires of the same type, also from
eastern Galicia, which were indexed for JewishGen some ten years ago
and are described and can be searched on JewishGen's web site:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/0132_polish_medical_questionnaires.html
(MODERATOR: http://tinyurl.com/jy9bfza )

The records Gesher Galicia has now transcribed consist of 121
questionnaires held in the Przemysl State Archive (Fond 154, IGW102,
Sygn. 31-33) and 12 questionnaires >from AGAD, Warsaw (Fond 424, Sygn.
9, 13, 17, 64, 97 and 179).

Gesher Galicia has fully indexed these records, extracting the
following information:
Names of person, date and place of birth, place of residence and
street address, marital status, occupation, institution and town of
practice, spouse's name and date of birth, children's names and
ages/dates of birth, names of grandparents [not the parents], date of
professional examination, and period and place of studies.

The places of birth include:
Bajkowce, Biala (Silesia), Bolechow, Brody, Brzezany, Brzozow,
Buczacz, Budzanow, Czortkow, Czortkow-Wygnanka, Czyszki, Dabrowice,
Dawidow, Dolina, Drohobycz, Graz, Grzymalow, Jaroslaw, Jezierna,
Kalisz, Kalusz, Kolonice, Korzec, Kozowa, Krakow, Krystynopol,
Lezajsk, Lodz, Lwow, Mielec, Mogilany, Monasterzec, Nadworna, Neumarkt
(Nowy Targ), Nosow, Piotrkow, Podhajce, Podwoloczyska, Przemysl,
Rohatyn, Rozniatow, Rzeszow, Sanok, Serwery, Sieniawa, Skalat,
Stanislawow, Stara Sol, Stryj, Swistelniki, Tarnopol, Tarnow, Vienna,
Warsaw, Wojnilow, Wygnanka, Zakliczyn, Zalanow, Zalozce, Zamosc,
Zarnowiec, Zawoj, Zbaraz, Zborow, and Zwiahel.

Tony Kahane
Chair & Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
http://www.geshergalicia.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Holocaust-period records on the All Galicia Database #general

Tony Kahane <tkahane@...>
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the addition to the All Galicia
Database of two important sets of Holocaust records. This database is
free and available to all, at: http://search.geshergalicia.org

1. Debica-area Holocaust-period death testimonies. Rzeszow State
Archive, Fond 881, Sygn. 1 (791 records)
These are testimonies, provided by people who survived, of Jews who
died during the Holocaust - all but a handful of them murdered. They
were gathered after the end of the war in Europe. The records are in a
single file, divided into volumes with town names, which appear to
refer to the places where the testimonies were gathered. The people
named in the records, though, came >from a wide range of localities in
the Debica area. Each testimony is signed by two witnesses.

In indexing these records, we have extracted the following information:
Names of person, names of parents, town of origin, date of testimony
(where given), reported date of death, reported place of death,
reported cause of death, and the names (where the signatures are
legible) of the two people signing the form of testimony.

The reported places of death include:
Bagienica (near Dabrowa), Baranowa, Belzec, Biala Podlaska, Biecz,
Biesiadka, Bochnia, Borki, Borki Nizinskie, Borowa, Brzezany,
Brzostek, Chorzelow, Chrzastow, Czermin, Dabrowa, Debica, Deborzyn,
Debowa (near Jodlowa), Dubienka, Dukla, Dulabka, Dulcza, Frysztak,
Gebiczyn, Gliwice, Golce, Gorlice, Gorzejowa, Grabiny, Halbow, Horbow,
Hrubieszow, Janow, Jarocin, Jaslo, Jastrzebia, Jawiszow, Jaworze,
Jaworze Gorne, Jazwiny, Jedlicze, Jodlowa, Kamienica, Kamionka
Strumilowa, Kolaczyce, Kozlow (near Debica), Krajowice (Jaslo),
Krakow, Krakow-Plaszow, Krzeszow, Lubaczow, Lubaczowa, Lwow, Lysakow,
Majdanek, Miedzyrzec, Mielec, Nadworna, Nagoszyn, Nizna Laka,
Oleszyce, Olpiny, Opacionka, Oswiecim [Auschwitz], Padew, Parkosz,
Pilznionka, Pilzno, Plaszow, Podborze, Podleszany, Polaniec, Przeclaw,
Przeczyca (Jodlowa), Pustkow, Radomysl Wielke, Rawa Ruska, Ropczyce,
Roza , Rozwadow, Rudniki, Rymanow, Rzeszow, Sedziszow, Skarzysko,
Sokolow (Rzeszow district), Straszecin, Stroza, Szczucin, Szerzyny,
Tarnobrzeg, Tarnow, Ulanow, Wiewiorka, Wlodawa, Wojslaw, Wola Lubecka,
Wolka Tanewska, Zagorze, Zaklikow, and Zdziary.

2. Doctors' Questionnaires, 1941-1943 (133 records)
These are detailed, four-page forms (some with face photos) that
Jewish medical and health-care workers were obliged to complete under
the Nazi occupation., sometimes in duplicate or triplicate. The people
named include doctors, dentists, dental technicians, nurses, midwives,
radiologists, cosmeticians, medical students and others.

All these forms were completed in eastern Galician towns. Yad Vashem
holds a set of 2,001 questionnaires of the same type, also from
eastern Galicia, which were indexed for JewishGen some ten years ago
and are described and can be searched on JewishGen's web site:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/0132_polish_medical_questionnaires.html
(MODERATOR: http://tinyurl.com/jy9bfza )

The records Gesher Galicia has now transcribed consist of 121
questionnaires held in the Przemysl State Archive (Fond 154, IGW102,
Sygn. 31-33) and 12 questionnaires >from AGAD, Warsaw (Fond 424, Sygn.
9, 13, 17, 64, 97 and 179).

Gesher Galicia has fully indexed these records, extracting the
following information:
Names of person, date and place of birth, place of residence and
street address, marital status, occupation, institution and town of
practice, spouse's name and date of birth, children's names and
ages/dates of birth, names of grandparents [not the parents], date of
professional examination, and period and place of studies.

The places of birth include:
Bajkowce, Biala (Silesia), Bolechow, Brody, Brzezany, Brzozow,
Buczacz, Budzanow, Czortkow, Czortkow-Wygnanka, Czyszki, Dabrowice,
Dawidow, Dolina, Drohobycz, Graz, Grzymalow, Jaroslaw, Jezierna,
Kalisz, Kalusz, Kolonice, Korzec, Kozowa, Krakow, Krystynopol,
Lezajsk, Lodz, Lwow, Mielec, Mogilany, Monasterzec, Nadworna, Neumarkt
(Nowy Targ), Nosow, Piotrkow, Podhajce, Podwoloczyska, Przemysl,
Rohatyn, Rozniatow, Rzeszow, Sanok, Serwery, Sieniawa, Skalat,
Stanislawow, Stara Sol, Stryj, Swistelniki, Tarnopol, Tarnow, Vienna,
Warsaw, Wojnilow, Wygnanka, Zakliczyn, Zalanow, Zalozce, Zamosc,
Zarnowiec, Zawoj, Zbaraz, Zborow, and Zwiahel.

Tony Kahane
Chair & Research Coordinator, Gesher Galicia
http://www.geshergalicia.org


(Canada)Jewish Museum & Archives of British Columbia Digitize Documentary Heritage Communities Fonds #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia digitized and posted
online the Seidelman Documentary Heritage Communities Program Family Fonds.
The fond includes records, photos, financial records and more spanning the
years 1889-1975. This was able to be done due to the financial support from
Library and Archives Canada.

To view the online records go to:
http://archives.jewishmuseum.ca/seidelman-family-fonds

The Museum also has an online exhibit on World War 1 calling it Letters Home
which may be viewed at: http://jewishmuseum.ca/exhibit/letters-home/
Which includes the letters of Edward Joseph Seidelman.

Thank you to Gail Dever and Genealogy a la carte for informing us about the
new trove of family history for this part of Canada.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Canada)Jewish Museum & Archives of British Columbia Digitize Documentary Heritage Communities Fonds #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia digitized and posted
online the Seidelman Documentary Heritage Communities Program Family Fonds.
The fond includes records, photos, financial records and more spanning the
years 1889-1975. This was able to be done due to the financial support from
Library and Archives Canada.

To view the online records go to:
http://archives.jewishmuseum.ca/seidelman-family-fonds

The Museum also has an online exhibit on World War 1 calling it Letters Home
which may be viewed at: http://jewishmuseum.ca/exhibit/letters-home/
Which includes the letters of Edward Joseph Seidelman.

Thank you to Gail Dever and Genealogy a la carte for informing us about the
new trove of family history for this part of Canada.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


German and French View Mate Translation #galicia

Sally Vetstein <svetter@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in German and French for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49307

This is a letter about a relative who was moving to Belgium and it is a
reference of sorts for being allowed to stay in the country. This is a
document >from Altona, Germany to Police in Brussels Belgium for a relative
wishing to live there. Part of the notes are in French. I am looking for as
complete a translation as possible.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.


Sally Vetstein


Viewmate Translation: French #galicia

Sally Vetstein <svetter@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49308
Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

I would like a translation of the French for this partial record of
foreigner arrival in Belgium for my cousin.

Sally Vetstein