Date   

FW: buenos aires and Voscoboinik (fwd) #latinamerica

Weisskirch, Rob <rweisskirch@...>
 

Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 06:24:22 -0500 (EST)
From: Larry Goldblatt <goldblat@...>
To: latamsig@...
Subject: buenos aires and Voscoboinik

dear memebers of the latam sig,

i have relatives in buenos aires. one name is VOSCOBOINIK. the family
lived in the the ukraine before emigrating to south america. i know
that a VOSCOBOINIK attended medical school in buenos aires in the
1970's and then went to france for further study. i would like to locate
him. there are other names as well.
i would very much appreciate someone contacting me >from buenos aires who
might know this cousin as well as others or who might be willing to help
me.

thank you.

sincerely,

larry s. GOLDBLATT, m.d.
new york city

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goldblat __ __ ____ ___ ___
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goldblat@... /__)/__) / / / / /_ /\ / /_
/
/ / \ / / / / /__ / \/ /___ /
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Latin America #LatinAmerica FW: buenos aires and Voscoboinik (fwd) #latinamerica

Weisskirch, Rob <rweisskirch@...>
 

Date: Sun, 7 Feb 1999 06:24:22 -0500 (EST)
From: Larry Goldblatt <goldblat@...>
To: latamsig@...
Subject: buenos aires and Voscoboinik

dear memebers of the latam sig,

i have relatives in buenos aires. one name is VOSCOBOINIK. the family
lived in the the ukraine before emigrating to south america. i know
that a VOSCOBOINIK attended medical school in buenos aires in the
1970's and then went to france for further study. i would like to locate
him. there are other names as well.
i would very much appreciate someone contacting me >from buenos aires who
might know this cousin as well as others or who might be willing to help
me.

thank you.

sincerely,

larry s. GOLDBLATT, m.d.
new york city

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
goldblat __ __ ____ ___ ___
____
goldblat@... /__)/__) / / / / /_ /\ / /_
/
/ / \ / / / / /__ / \/ /___ /
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----


Re: Jews in Argentina & Uruguay #latinamerica

SelmaN@...
 

In a message dated 99-02-05 12:36:40 EST,Graciela Spivak wrote:
<< . My dad was denied admittance to a golf club because he was Jewish... and
on and on. It took me years of living in the USA before I was able to say
without fear, Yes, I am Jewish. >>

Many things have changed in the USA too - since WWII. Because our last name
was not "particularly Jewish" and I "didn't look Jewish", I remember my mother
telling me that if anyone asked I didn't have to say I was Jewish. If you can
find a copy of "Gentlemens' Agreement" with Gregory Peck, it was a very early
movie on the subject -- and way way ahead of its time.
Looking for Jewish families in Argentina and Uruguay
GALOON/GALUN
FIDEL
DEUTSCH
The families came >from Kolki, Volhynia Gubernia (now Ukraine) and had some
connection with the business of horsehair dressing, importing/exporting
horsehair and pig bristles; they may have been furriers also.
Selma Neubauer
Philadelphia, PA
SelmaN@...


Latin America #LatinAmerica Re: Jews in Argentina & Uruguay #latinamerica

SelmaN@...
 

In a message dated 99-02-05 12:36:40 EST,Graciela Spivak wrote:
<< . My dad was denied admittance to a golf club because he was Jewish... and
on and on. It took me years of living in the USA before I was able to say
without fear, Yes, I am Jewish. >>

Many things have changed in the USA too - since WWII. Because our last name
was not "particularly Jewish" and I "didn't look Jewish", I remember my mother
telling me that if anyone asked I didn't have to say I was Jewish. If you can
find a copy of "Gentlemens' Agreement" with Gregory Peck, it was a very early
movie on the subject -- and way way ahead of its time.
Looking for Jewish families in Argentina and Uruguay
GALOON/GALUN
FIDEL
DEUTSCH
The families came >from Kolki, Volhynia Gubernia (now Ukraine) and had some
connection with the business of horsehair dressing, importing/exporting
horsehair and pig bristles; they may have been furriers also.
Selma Neubauer
Philadelphia, PA
SelmaN@...


* Toleranzpatent - Act of Emancipation #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

A few weeks ago somebody was interested in the details of the
Austro-Hungarian act of emancipation of Jews. Down below are two articles I
found in the Encyclopedia Judaica.

Enjoy and cheers
Tom

-----

TOLERANZPATENT, edict of tolerance issued by Emperor Joseph II on Jan. 2,
1782 for Vienna and Lower Austria (and subsequently for other provinces of
the empire). It was one of a series of patents granted to the major,
non-Catholic denominations of Austria, guaranteeing existing rights and
obligations and laying down additional ones.

The final version was less liberal than Joseph II's original drafts. The
Toleranzpatent confirmed existing restrictions against any increase in the
number of tolerated Jews; however, they were encouraged to engage in
large-scale business, to set up factories, and to learn trades (although
becoming a master craftsman remained prohibited); to establish schools and
attend universities. Upperclass Jews were encouraged to integrate socially.
The concluding article exhorted the Jews to be thankful and not to misuse
their privileges, particularly not to offend Christianity in public, an
offense which would result in expulsion. At the same time insult or
violence done to a Jew would be punished.

With its leitmotif of making the Jews useful to society and the state
through education and the abolishment of economic restrictions, the
Toleranzpatent influenced much contemporary legislation in Germany.
Although welcomed by N. H. Wessely and other luminaries of the Haskalah, it
was viewed with misgiving in conservative Jewish circles, in particular by
Ezekiel Landau, who characterized it as a gezerah ("a disaster"); he was
especially troubled by the order that within two years no document in
Hebrew would be legally valid. Even Moses Mendelssohn expressed misgivings
over the new type of Christian enticement. Nonetheless, the edict was a
significant milestone on the road to full emancipation.

Bibliography:
P. P. Bernard, in: Austrian History Yearbook, 4-5 (1968-69), 101-19

-----

EMANCIPATION IN AUSTRIA AND HUNGARY. The first period of emancipation in
Austria made no change in the status of the Jews. But on the basis of the
general constitution of the empire (March 4, 1849), which contained an
article on "civic and political rights" being "not dependent on religion,"
all restrictions on Jews were abolished. With the abrogation of this
constitution on Dec. 31, 1851, however, the ancient disabilities were
renewed in aspects of life ranging >from the acquisition of real estate
(Oct. 20, 1853) to the employment of mate and female Christian domestics,
It was only during the 1860s that emancipatory laws were reinstituted. On
Dec. 21, 1867, emancipation was achieved in Austria with the promulgation
of the new fundamental laws in which article 14 assured "complete freedom
of religion and conscience for all" and that "the benefits derived from
civic and political rights were not dependent on faith and religion." "in
any event," the article continued, "religious faith should not collide with
the fulfilment of civic obligations."

In Hungary the townspeople tended to oppose granting rights to the Jews,
whose numbers were constantly increasing. However, the lower aristocracy,
whose economic progress was connected with the commercial activity of the
Jews, and who were generally the standard-bearers of national liberalism,
actively supported the Jews. As a result of their influence the demand "to
give to the Jews all those rights >from which the non-aristocratic
population benefits" was included in the instructions of the provincial
assemblies to their delegates in parliament, These instructions resulted in
the law making the Jewish religion a "government recognized religion,"
abolishing the "tolerance-tax," and declaring "the Jews equal in their
civic rights to the other citizens who were not of the nobility."
Therefore, public and government offices, including positions in the war
ministry, which were not reserved for the nobility, could be occupied by
Jews (1840). The Upper House however did not ratify the law, and the king
would not even agree to the abolition of the "tolerance-tax."

The Austrian government consented only to the extension of the right of
residence to the Jews. Magyarization was made a prerequisite for Hungarian
Jewry before it could achieve emancipation. The Jews have "to speak the
language of Hungary and to sing its songs" so as "to cleave to the
fatherland, which we have acquired for ourselves." But Orthodoxy, in the
words of a Moses Sofer, claimed that emancipation "having III the same
rights as the other inhabitants of our country -- proves that it is the
Will of God to maintain His people in the Exile for a prolonged period,
therefore the Jews should be roused to ask for mercy and pray for
Redemption.

The assimilationists and reformers claimed that declarations of the
Orthodox had "strengthened the opponents of equality," and had caused the
Upper House in 1844 to deny even the abolition of the "tolerance-tax"
(abolished two years later by the Austrian government, after exacting
"compensation" >from the Jews for losses anticipated as a result of the
abolition), Direct negotiations conducted by the Jews with the Austrian
government, without taking into consideration the national rule in Hungary,
angered the Hungarian nationalists and brought about a deterioration in
their relations with the Jews.

During the first days of the Revolution in 1848, the Hungarian Parliament
deliberated on the issue of equality for the Jews. Even the Liberals, who
in principle demanded it, were mostly of the opinion that such equality
must be gradual and conditional to preliminary "reform" of the Jews. The
Parliamentary Assembly, on March 14, 1848, decided to grant to the Jews the
right to vote, but had to rescind this decision because of demonstrations
and riots against Jews in several Hungarian towns (in most cases in
connection with the admission of the Jews into the National Guard)[***].
The riots were not suppressed by the government, which even exerted
pressure on the Jews to relinquish their rights "of their own free will."
The patriotic activity, however, of many Jews during Hungary's war of
independence created a bond between the Hungarian national cause and the
Jews, strengthened by severe fines imposed on the Jewish communities by the
victorious Austrians. On July 28, 1849, the government presented a motion
to the Founding Assembly in Szegedin (Szeged) stating that "every believer
in the Mosaic faith born on the soil of Hungary, or who has settled on it
legally, shall benefit >from all those civic and political rights which the
believers of other religions enjoy."

This emancipation turned out to be only a gesture, because the rule of the
Hungarian government was rapidly disintegrating. Jewish emancipation was to
become, legal only with the establishment of Austria-Hungary as a dual
monarchy. The two Hungarian houses of parliament, on Dec, 20/27, 1867,
declared one of the fundamental laws of Hungary to be that "the Israelite
inhabitants are equal to the Christian inhabitants in their civic and
political rights" (art. 1) and that "all the laws, usages, and decrees
which are in contradiction with these are hereby abrogated" (art. 2)

Bibliography:
N. Katzburg, in: Antishemiyyut be-Hungaryah 1867-1914, (1969)

-----

[***] NB >from me: remember my former diatribe about being a "Hungarian
Jew"? Well all these laws of emancipation were abolished after WWI. Hungary
was also one of the first countries to implement "numerus clausus". That
much for the Magyar tolerance of Jews!!!
.


Hungary SIG #Hungary * Toleranzpatent - Act of Emancipation #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear all,

A few weeks ago somebody was interested in the details of the
Austro-Hungarian act of emancipation of Jews. Down below are two articles I
found in the Encyclopedia Judaica.

Enjoy and cheers
Tom

-----

TOLERANZPATENT, edict of tolerance issued by Emperor Joseph II on Jan. 2,
1782 for Vienna and Lower Austria (and subsequently for other provinces of
the empire). It was one of a series of patents granted to the major,
non-Catholic denominations of Austria, guaranteeing existing rights and
obligations and laying down additional ones.

The final version was less liberal than Joseph II's original drafts. The
Toleranzpatent confirmed existing restrictions against any increase in the
number of tolerated Jews; however, they were encouraged to engage in
large-scale business, to set up factories, and to learn trades (although
becoming a master craftsman remained prohibited); to establish schools and
attend universities. Upperclass Jews were encouraged to integrate socially.
The concluding article exhorted the Jews to be thankful and not to misuse
their privileges, particularly not to offend Christianity in public, an
offense which would result in expulsion. At the same time insult or
violence done to a Jew would be punished.

With its leitmotif of making the Jews useful to society and the state
through education and the abolishment of economic restrictions, the
Toleranzpatent influenced much contemporary legislation in Germany.
Although welcomed by N. H. Wessely and other luminaries of the Haskalah, it
was viewed with misgiving in conservative Jewish circles, in particular by
Ezekiel Landau, who characterized it as a gezerah ("a disaster"); he was
especially troubled by the order that within two years no document in
Hebrew would be legally valid. Even Moses Mendelssohn expressed misgivings
over the new type of Christian enticement. Nonetheless, the edict was a
significant milestone on the road to full emancipation.

Bibliography:
P. P. Bernard, in: Austrian History Yearbook, 4-5 (1968-69), 101-19

-----

EMANCIPATION IN AUSTRIA AND HUNGARY. The first period of emancipation in
Austria made no change in the status of the Jews. But on the basis of the
general constitution of the empire (March 4, 1849), which contained an
article on "civic and political rights" being "not dependent on religion,"
all restrictions on Jews were abolished. With the abrogation of this
constitution on Dec. 31, 1851, however, the ancient disabilities were
renewed in aspects of life ranging >from the acquisition of real estate
(Oct. 20, 1853) to the employment of mate and female Christian domestics,
It was only during the 1860s that emancipatory laws were reinstituted. On
Dec. 21, 1867, emancipation was achieved in Austria with the promulgation
of the new fundamental laws in which article 14 assured "complete freedom
of religion and conscience for all" and that "the benefits derived from
civic and political rights were not dependent on faith and religion." "in
any event," the article continued, "religious faith should not collide with
the fulfilment of civic obligations."

In Hungary the townspeople tended to oppose granting rights to the Jews,
whose numbers were constantly increasing. However, the lower aristocracy,
whose economic progress was connected with the commercial activity of the
Jews, and who were generally the standard-bearers of national liberalism,
actively supported the Jews. As a result of their influence the demand "to
give to the Jews all those rights >from which the non-aristocratic
population benefits" was included in the instructions of the provincial
assemblies to their delegates in parliament, These instructions resulted in
the law making the Jewish religion a "government recognized religion,"
abolishing the "tolerance-tax," and declaring "the Jews equal in their
civic rights to the other citizens who were not of the nobility."
Therefore, public and government offices, including positions in the war
ministry, which were not reserved for the nobility, could be occupied by
Jews (1840). The Upper House however did not ratify the law, and the king
would not even agree to the abolition of the "tolerance-tax."

The Austrian government consented only to the extension of the right of
residence to the Jews. Magyarization was made a prerequisite for Hungarian
Jewry before it could achieve emancipation. The Jews have "to speak the
language of Hungary and to sing its songs" so as "to cleave to the
fatherland, which we have acquired for ourselves." But Orthodoxy, in the
words of a Moses Sofer, claimed that emancipation "having III the same
rights as the other inhabitants of our country -- proves that it is the
Will of God to maintain His people in the Exile for a prolonged period,
therefore the Jews should be roused to ask for mercy and pray for
Redemption.

The assimilationists and reformers claimed that declarations of the
Orthodox had "strengthened the opponents of equality," and had caused the
Upper House in 1844 to deny even the abolition of the "tolerance-tax"
(abolished two years later by the Austrian government, after exacting
"compensation" >from the Jews for losses anticipated as a result of the
abolition), Direct negotiations conducted by the Jews with the Austrian
government, without taking into consideration the national rule in Hungary,
angered the Hungarian nationalists and brought about a deterioration in
their relations with the Jews.

During the first days of the Revolution in 1848, the Hungarian Parliament
deliberated on the issue of equality for the Jews. Even the Liberals, who
in principle demanded it, were mostly of the opinion that such equality
must be gradual and conditional to preliminary "reform" of the Jews. The
Parliamentary Assembly, on March 14, 1848, decided to grant to the Jews the
right to vote, but had to rescind this decision because of demonstrations
and riots against Jews in several Hungarian towns (in most cases in
connection with the admission of the Jews into the National Guard)[***].
The riots were not suppressed by the government, which even exerted
pressure on the Jews to relinquish their rights "of their own free will."
The patriotic activity, however, of many Jews during Hungary's war of
independence created a bond between the Hungarian national cause and the
Jews, strengthened by severe fines imposed on the Jewish communities by the
victorious Austrians. On July 28, 1849, the government presented a motion
to the Founding Assembly in Szegedin (Szeged) stating that "every believer
in the Mosaic faith born on the soil of Hungary, or who has settled on it
legally, shall benefit >from all those civic and political rights which the
believers of other religions enjoy."

This emancipation turned out to be only a gesture, because the rule of the
Hungarian government was rapidly disintegrating. Jewish emancipation was to
become, legal only with the establishment of Austria-Hungary as a dual
monarchy. The two Hungarian houses of parliament, on Dec, 20/27, 1867,
declared one of the fundamental laws of Hungary to be that "the Israelite
inhabitants are equal to the Christian inhabitants in their civic and
political rights" (art. 1) and that "all the laws, usages, and decrees
which are in contradiction with these are hereby abrogated" (art. 2)

Bibliography:
N. Katzburg, in: Antishemiyyut be-Hungaryah 1867-1914, (1969)

-----

[***] NB >from me: remember my former diatribe about being a "Hungarian
Jew"? Well all these laws of emancipation were abolished after WWI. Hungary
was also one of the first countries to implement "numerus clausus". That
much for the Magyar tolerance of Jews!!!
.


Searching POURPLE, Holland #general

Howard Lerner <Howard.lerner@...>
 

Trying to trace Surname POURPLE >from Holland. I know some relations born in
Rotterdam. Any help appreciated

Howard Lerner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching POURPLE, Holland #general

Howard Lerner <Howard.lerner@...>
 

Trying to trace Surname POURPLE >from Holland. I know some relations born in
Rotterdam. Any help appreciated

Howard Lerner


KATZ #general

Skadish32@...
 

I am looking for the origins of the name KATZ. How old is the name, what are
its origins. Could you help?

Scott Kadish

MODERATOR NOTE: Please consult the Discussion Group Archives at our site
to find posts about this topic.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KATZ #general

Skadish32@...
 

I am looking for the origins of the name KATZ. How old is the name, what are
its origins. Could you help?

Scott Kadish

MODERATOR NOTE: Please consult the Discussion Group Archives at our site
to find posts about this topic.


Re: Inquiries on MUSICANT, NAVIDSON AND SCHNEIDERMAN #belarus

myarom <myarom@...>
 

When I lived in Israel 20 years ago, I worked with a Leon Muzicant, though
I thought he was >from Romania. He was the General Manager of Contahal, Ltd.
in Tel Aviv. He would be in his late 50's now. Perhaps he's related?

myarom@...


Jeffrey A. Levy wrote:
My family is >from the Belarusian shtetls of Luninets and Kozanhorodok.
The
names are MUSICANT (and variants) NAVIDSON AND SCHNEIDERMAN.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Inquiries on MUSICANT, NAVIDSON AND SCHNEIDERMAN #belarus

myarom <myarom@...>
 

When I lived in Israel 20 years ago, I worked with a Leon Muzicant, though
I thought he was >from Romania. He was the General Manager of Contahal, Ltd.
in Tel Aviv. He would be in his late 50's now. Perhaps he's related?

myarom@...


Jeffrey A. Levy wrote:
My family is >from the Belarusian shtetls of Luninets and Kozanhorodok.
The
names are MUSICANT (and variants) NAVIDSON AND SCHNEIDERMAN.


Looking for copy of Obituary from Chicago Tribune #general

McCarthy
 

Hi! I'm new to this list and looking for some resource assistance:

I found my relatives in the Chicago Tribune Obituary Data Base:

Edward FERBER (d. April 1998)
Sylvia (GREENSPAN) FERBER (d.March 1997)

I am trying to find an on-line source to view their actual obituaries

Is there a way to find an obituary for Charles FERBER who died in April
1960 in Chicago, IL? He was living with relatives in Oaklawn, IL but was
buried in NY.

Barbara (FERBER) MCCARTHY
Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA
ga4mccarthys@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for copy of Obituary from Chicago Tribune #general

McCarthy
 

Hi! I'm new to this list and looking for some resource assistance:

I found my relatives in the Chicago Tribune Obituary Data Base:

Edward FERBER (d. April 1998)
Sylvia (GREENSPAN) FERBER (d.March 1997)

I am trying to find an on-line source to view their actual obituaries

Is there a way to find an obituary for Charles FERBER who died in April
1960 in Chicago, IL? He was living with relatives in Oaklawn, IL but was
buried in NY.

Barbara (FERBER) MCCARTHY
Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA
ga4mccarthys@...


CARLIN Family Grows by Leaps #general

Larry Fried <larry@...>
 

Just want to announce that while research FRIED Family, I kept adding my
maternal family as well, and like a pin ball bouncing off names, CARLIN
family members showed up in New York City, Monticello NY, and Nashville TN,
and still coming out of the woodwork looking for each other. It has really
been rewarding and look forward to the continued growth.
Researching:
CARLIN >from Russia
FRIED >from Poland
RESNICK >from Russia
Thanks again to all who have helped and given support.

Larry Fried


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen CARLIN Family Grows by Leaps #general

Larry Fried <larry@...>
 

Just want to announce that while research FRIED Family, I kept adding my
maternal family as well, and like a pin ball bouncing off names, CARLIN
family members showed up in New York City, Monticello NY, and Nashville TN,
and still coming out of the woodwork looking for each other. It has really
been rewarding and look forward to the continued growth.
Researching:
CARLIN >from Russia
FRIED >from Poland
RESNICK >from Russia
Thanks again to all who have helped and given support.

Larry Fried


Florida ID #general

IsraelP <p2o5rock@...>
 

A few weeks back, I asked for help determining if a "whowhere"
listing that had only a first initial was the person I thought it might
be. Several people took the specifics but came back empty.

Now comes Jan Weinmann who suggested I try the Broward
County property tax database at http://www.bcpa.net/search.htm.
In about ten seconds the information came up with names of both
man and wife (the wife's name had also been a matter of some
speculation), together with more financial information than I felt
comfortable knowing. (At least I know that if he doesn't answer,
it's not because he can't afford the postage.)

All that remained was to confirm that the complex named in the
database matched the "whowhere" street address - which
Bernard Kouchel did for me.

So thanx to Jan and to everyone else who offered to help out.

Israel Pickholtz


Slonimer Yeshivaner Yeshiva #general

ANDREW LOEWENSTEIN <loewensa@...>
 

Many members of my maternal grandmother's family (KAMENETSKY) attended the
Slonimer Yeshiva in Slonim. Does anyone have any information about this
institution? I recall once hearing that the school has moved to Israel
and is now called something like the Rabbinical College of Slonim. Does
anyone think that they might still have records dating back to the 19th
century?

Thanks,
Andrew Loewenstein loewensa@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Florida ID #general

IsraelP <p2o5rock@...>
 

A few weeks back, I asked for help determining if a "whowhere"
listing that had only a first initial was the person I thought it might
be. Several people took the specifics but came back empty.

Now comes Jan Weinmann who suggested I try the Broward
County property tax database at http://www.bcpa.net/search.htm.
In about ten seconds the information came up with names of both
man and wife (the wife's name had also been a matter of some
speculation), together with more financial information than I felt
comfortable knowing. (At least I know that if he doesn't answer,
it's not because he can't afford the postage.)

All that remained was to confirm that the complex named in the
database matched the "whowhere" street address - which
Bernard Kouchel did for me.

So thanx to Jan and to everyone else who offered to help out.

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Slonimer Yeshivaner Yeshiva #general

ANDREW LOEWENSTEIN <loewensa@...>
 

Many members of my maternal grandmother's family (KAMENETSKY) attended the
Slonimer Yeshiva in Slonim. Does anyone have any information about this
institution? I recall once hearing that the school has moved to Israel
and is now called something like the Rabbinical College of Slonim. Does
anyone think that they might still have records dating back to the 19th
century?

Thanks,
Andrew Loewenstein loewensa@...