Date   

Names - Czarist Russia #general

LenLW <lenlw@...>
 

A recent book contained the information about a practice regarding the
naming of sons in Czarist Russia. Under the laws at that time, a son was
excused >from military service if he was an 'only son'. Therefore, some
Jewish families would list sons, after the first, with different parents -
different family names. This way, they could avoid service.

Any comments?

The source is Eliach, Yaffa. " There Once Was A World; A 900 Year Chronicle
Of The Shtetl Of Eishyshok". New York, N.Y.: Little Brown, 1998.

Leonard Nadler lenlw@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Names - Czarist Russia #general

LenLW <lenlw@...>
 

A recent book contained the information about a practice regarding the
naming of sons in Czarist Russia. Under the laws at that time, a son was
excused >from military service if he was an 'only son'. Therefore, some
Jewish families would list sons, after the first, with different parents -
different family names. This way, they could avoid service.

Any comments?

The source is Eliach, Yaffa. " There Once Was A World; A 900 Year Chronicle
Of The Shtetl Of Eishyshok". New York, N.Y.: Little Brown, 1998.

Leonard Nadler lenlw@aol.com


Moscow Archives #general

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

Earlier today I wrote the following message to Jewishgen:

In April of last year I told you about the book: Dorit Sallis and Marek
Web, eds. "Jewish Documentary Resources in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus"
published by the Jewish Theological Seminary.

I told you of my surprise and delight when I found an archive listing for
my grandfather's first cousin, Gregor (Zvi) Aleksandrovich Belkowskii, on
the first page that randomly appeared when I started leafing through the
book when it arrived in the mail.(Gregor was a "notorious" Russian Zionist.)

Soon I wrote to Rochelle Rubinstein, archivist at the World Zionist
Organization (WZO) in Jerusalem to tell her about this archive. She was
very interested because WZO is always eager to augment its collections.
She said that WZO has a contact in Moscow whom she would ask to look for
the "Belkowskii" archive, which was said in the Sallis and Web book to be
located at the State Archives of the Russian Federation.

Two days ago, I reminded Ms. Rubinstein of this part of our correpondence
and this morning I was disappointed when she told me:

"The director of the CZA did visit the archive in Moscow where there is
material of Belkowsky, towards the end of last year, but unfortunately,
they were unable even to locate the relevant list at the time of his visit,
never mind the actual material."

If people like the director of the CZA can't find an archive known to
exist in Moscow, what chance do ordinary people like you and me stand?

Although this message had not yet been published in the digest, I received
from a knowledgeable source an explanation for the failure to find the
Belkowski archive or even a listing. It seems that the information given
in the Sallis and Web book is out of date, and many archives mentioned have
been shifted to other places.

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@aol.com
99/02/16


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Moscow Archives #general

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

Earlier today I wrote the following message to Jewishgen:

In April of last year I told you about the book: Dorit Sallis and Marek
Web, eds. "Jewish Documentary Resources in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus"
published by the Jewish Theological Seminary.

I told you of my surprise and delight when I found an archive listing for
my grandfather's first cousin, Gregor (Zvi) Aleksandrovich Belkowskii, on
the first page that randomly appeared when I started leafing through the
book when it arrived in the mail.(Gregor was a "notorious" Russian Zionist.)

Soon I wrote to Rochelle Rubinstein, archivist at the World Zionist
Organization (WZO) in Jerusalem to tell her about this archive. She was
very interested because WZO is always eager to augment its collections.
She said that WZO has a contact in Moscow whom she would ask to look for
the "Belkowskii" archive, which was said in the Sallis and Web book to be
located at the State Archives of the Russian Federation.

Two days ago, I reminded Ms. Rubinstein of this part of our correpondence
and this morning I was disappointed when she told me:

"The director of the CZA did visit the archive in Moscow where there is
material of Belkowsky, towards the end of last year, but unfortunately,
they were unable even to locate the relevant list at the time of his visit,
never mind the actual material."

If people like the director of the CZA can't find an archive known to
exist in Moscow, what chance do ordinary people like you and me stand?

Although this message had not yet been published in the digest, I received
from a knowledgeable source an explanation for the failure to find the
Belkowski archive or even a listing. It seems that the information given
in the Sallis and Web book is out of date, and many archives mentioned have
been shifted to other places.

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
NFatouros@aol.com
99/02/16


Searching EISENSTARK from Warsaw #general

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

Searching EISENSTARK >from Warsaw. My mother-in-law's family came from
Warsaw, Poland. Chaim and Yudis EISENSTARK emigrated to NYC in the 1920's
with their sons Samuel, and David and daughter Rose born about 1902. Rose
married Harry HANS in NYC about 1929. Many other family member died in the
Holocaust. Any information would be most welcome. Email me privately,
please. Thank you.
Alexandra Vozick Hans


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching EISENSTARK from Warsaw #general

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

Searching EISENSTARK >from Warsaw. My mother-in-law's family came from
Warsaw, Poland. Chaim and Yudis EISENSTARK emigrated to NYC in the 1920's
with their sons Samuel, and David and daughter Rose born about 1902. Rose
married Harry HANS in NYC about 1929. Many other family member died in the
Holocaust. Any information would be most welcome. Email me privately,
please. Thank you.
Alexandra Vozick Hans


Obuda records (question) #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

Szuletesi anyakonyve (Birth records >from Obuda, Budapest III)
Hazasok anyakonyve (Marriage Records).

Are these the only birth and marriage records which are done in a tabular
form listing the names and dates or are there actual certificates
(like in the U.S.) for each specific marriage or birth?


Konscriptoion Torvenyhatosag neve
My great great grandfather is listed under Izraelitak nevsora 850; Sorszam 9;
Elektora 15; Koszeg Altofen 1261/B szamhoz based on this is there any
other information I can get about him?
thanks Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org


continuation Obuda research #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

The Birth records show my great Grandfathers Sister Rosa Strausz in the
following way:

Rosa Strausz born August 20, 1868 Index number D47 #86

Does that refer to a birth register (the list form that I mentioned above ?
Or does that refer to an individual birth record for Rosa?

Thank again,

many thanks to all of you who have sent comments!
Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org


Welcome, and an essay on a print-shop #lithuania

A.W.Cassel <awcassel@...>
 

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_002E_01BE5ABE.24C92280
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Welcome, Monty Starr; glad you found the group. It would be interesting =
to hear more about your family's odyssey. Also, is Tevye, whom you =
mention, connected with the Keidaner Society in Israel? It would be a =
big plus if we could bring some of the members of that group into our =
circle.

As for the Vilnius archives, I have had some success there. A researcher =
in Vilnius named Regina Kopilevich, who also works as a guide there, =
looked over the Keidan vital-statistics records there for me, and turned =
up more than a dozen birth, marriage and death records for members of my =
family. If you would like her address, message me and I'll be happy to =
pass it along.

I'm also including tonight a copy of a new translation >from the Keidan =
Yizkor Book, which was published in Israel in 1977. A very fine =
translator in Israel named Chaim Charutz has converted several of the =
articles in the Yizkor book >from Hebrew to English. I'm doing some light =
editing, and will share them with the group as they are ready. This =
first is a short piece about the printing house which existed in Keidan =
between the wars. The building where it stood was pointed out to me when =
I visited Keidan in 1995; it was described as "Movshovitz's drukerai" =
(printing press). But as we read here, there were actually two partners =
who set it up and ran it:=20

Cheers to all,

Andy=20

The Hebrew printing press in Keidan

By Advocate Sh. Shibolet

After World War I, when the Jews of Keidan began to return >from their =
places of exile, two Torah students decided to set up a small printing =
press to serve needs of the community. They were Alter Movshovitz and =
Mottel Kagan, who had previously been a teacher in Keidan. Indeed, even =
before the war, there was a machine used by the owner of the stationery =
shop to print greeting cards, invitations and notices which were ordered =
from him. The shop owner set the type manually and operated the printer =
by himself.

This was not the intention of our two partners. They began seeking =
clients who were interested in printing Biblical books and commentaries. =
For this purpose they purchased a printing press and typesetting =
systems.

The two worked not only as typesetters and printers of their =
compositions. All the work of installation, editing, and proofreading =
for typographical and author errors fell on the heads of these Torah =
students. They were sometimes forced to travel the rocky road of reading =
existing works of literature and Torah commentary in order to check the =
written materials which they received, and to correct what they deemed =
to be errors.=20

The reputation of the Keidan printing press was very high among scholars =
and writers throughout Lithuania, as well as in other countries. The =
story was told of the rabbi of Vekshne, who later became rabbi of =
Keidan. He was the late Rabbi Shlomo Feinsilber, who traveled to Kovno =
to find a printer for a manuscript in his possession. In Kovno, he was =
told that if he wanted to publish a Torah commentary, he should go to =
the Keidan printers. He indeed had his manuscript printed in Keidan and, =
while he was there, he was invited by the Keidaners to apply for the =
position of chief rabbi.

The printer developed and grew, and even employed many workers. The =
press' manual typesetting system could not keep up with the increased =
demand for printing. So Mottel Kagan traveled to Kovno to buy a used =
typesetting machine >from one of the larger printers. There, he was told =
by a friend and former student >from his teaching days, that if the =
printing press had enough work to require a typesetting machine, they =
should try to purchase a new American Linotype machine.

The owners of the Printing Press did buy the first Linotype machine, and =
the Keidan printers grew as producers of both religious and secular =
literature. An extensive list of books were printed there during the =
press' life, and it became a great source for lovers of Hebrew =
literature.



------=_NextPart_000_002E_01BE5ABE.24C92280
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>

<META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
http-equiv=3DContent-Type><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 =
HTML//EN">
<META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Welcome, Monty Starr; glad you found =
the group. It=20
would be interesting to hear more about your family's odyssey.&nbsp; =
Also, is=20
Tevye, whom you mention, connected with the Keidaner Society in Israel? =
It would=20
be a big plus if we could bring some of the members of that group into =
our=20
circle.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>As for the Vilnius archives, I have had =
some=20
success there. A researcher in Vilnius named Regina Kopilevich, who also =
works=20
as a guide there, looked over the Keidan vital-statistics records there =
for me,=20
and turned up more than a dozen birth, marriage and death records for =
members of=20
my family. If you would like her address, message me and I'll be happy =
to pass=20
it along.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>I'm also including tonight a copy of a =
new=20
translation >from the Keidan Yizkor Book, which was published in Israel =
in 1977.=20
A very fine translator in Israel named Chaim Charutz has converted =
several of=20
the articles in the Yizkor book >from Hebrew to English. I'm doing some =
light=20
editing, and will share them with the group as they are ready. This =
first is a=20
short piece about the printing house which existed in Keidan between the =
wars.=20
The building where it stood was pointed out to me when I visited Keidan =
in 1995;=20
it was described as &quot;Movshovitz's drukerai&quot; (printing&nbsp; =
press).=20
But as we read here, there were actually two partners who set it up and =
ran it:=20
</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Cheers to all,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Andy </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><B><FONT face=3D"Times New Roman" size=3D5>
<P>The Hebrew printing press in Keidan</P></B></FONT><FONT=20
face=3D"Times New Roman">
<P>By Advocate Sh. Shibolet</P>
<P>After World War I, when the Jews of Keidan began to return >from their =
places=20
of exile, two Torah students decided to set up a small printing press to =
serve=20
needs of the community. They were Alter Movshovitz and Mottel Kagan, who =
had=20
previously been a teacher in Keidan. Indeed, even before the war, there =
was a=20
machine used by the owner of the stationery shop to print greeting =
cards,=20
invitations and notices which were ordered >from him. The shop owner set =
the type=20
manually and operated the printer by himself.</P>
<P>This was not the intention of our two partners. They began seeking =
clients=20
who were interested in printing Biblical books and commentaries. For =
this=20
purpose they purchased a printing press and typesetting systems.</P>
<P>The two worked not only as typesetters and printers of their =
compositions.=20
All the work of installation, editing, and proofreading for =
typographical and=20
author errors fell on the heads of these Torah students. They were =
sometimes=20
forced to travel the rocky road of reading existing works of literature =
and=20
Torah commentary in order to check the written materials which they =
received,=20
and to correct what they deemed to be errors. </P>
<P>The reputation of the Keidan printing press was very high among =
scholars and=20
writers throughout Lithuania, as well as in other countries. The story =
was told=20
of the rabbi of Vekshne, who later became rabbi of Keidan. He was the =
late Rabbi=20
Shlomo Feinsilber, who traveled to Kovno to find a printer for a =
manuscript in=20
his possession. In Kovno, he was told that if he wanted to publish a =
Torah=20
commentary, he should go to the Keidan printers. He indeed had his =
manuscript=20
printed in Keidan and, while he was there, he was invited by the =
Keidaners to=20
apply for the position of chief rabbi.</P>
<P>The printer developed and grew, and even employed many workers. The =
press'=20
manual typesetting system could not keep up with the increased demand =
for=20
printing. So Mottel Kagan traveled to Kovno to buy a used typesetting =
machine=20
from one of the larger printers. There, he was told by a friend and =
former=20
student >from his teaching days, that if the printing press had enough =
work to=20
require a typesetting machine, they should try to purchase a new =
American=20
Linotype machine.</P>
<P>The owners of the Printing Press did buy the first Linotype machine, =
and the=20
Keidan printers grew as producers of both religious and secular =
literature. An=20
extensive list of books were printed there during the press' life, and =
it became=20
a great source for lovers of Hebrew literature.</FONT></P></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>

------=_NextPart_000_002E_01BE5ABE.24C92280--


Hungary SIG #Hungary Obuda records (question) #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

Szuletesi anyakonyve (Birth records >from Obuda, Budapest III)
Hazasok anyakonyve (Marriage Records).

Are these the only birth and marriage records which are done in a tabular
form listing the names and dates or are there actual certificates
(like in the U.S.) for each specific marriage or birth?


Konscriptoion Torvenyhatosag neve
My great great grandfather is listed under Izraelitak nevsora 850; Sorszam 9;
Elektora 15; Koszeg Altofen 1261/B szamhoz based on this is there any
other information I can get about him?
thanks Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org


Hungary SIG #Hungary continuation Obuda research #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

The Birth records show my great Grandfathers Sister Rosa Strausz in the
following way:

Rosa Strausz born August 20, 1868 Index number D47 #86

Does that refer to a birth register (the list form that I mentioned above ?
Or does that refer to an individual birth record for Rosa?

Thank again,

many thanks to all of you who have sent comments!
Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org


Keidan Jews #Keidan #Lithuania Welcome, and an essay on a print-shop #lithuania

A.W.Cassel <awcassel@...>
 

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_002E_01BE5ABE.24C92280
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Welcome, Monty Starr; glad you found the group. It would be interesting =
to hear more about your family's odyssey. Also, is Tevye, whom you =
mention, connected with the Keidaner Society in Israel? It would be a =
big plus if we could bring some of the members of that group into our =
circle.

As for the Vilnius archives, I have had some success there. A researcher =
in Vilnius named Regina Kopilevich, who also works as a guide there, =
looked over the Keidan vital-statistics records there for me, and turned =
up more than a dozen birth, marriage and death records for members of my =
family. If you would like her address, message me and I'll be happy to =
pass it along.

I'm also including tonight a copy of a new translation >from the Keidan =
Yizkor Book, which was published in Israel in 1977. A very fine =
translator in Israel named Chaim Charutz has converted several of the =
articles in the Yizkor book >from Hebrew to English. I'm doing some light =
editing, and will share them with the group as they are ready. This =
first is a short piece about the printing house which existed in Keidan =
between the wars. The building where it stood was pointed out to me when =
I visited Keidan in 1995; it was described as "Movshovitz's drukerai" =
(printing press). But as we read here, there were actually two partners =
who set it up and ran it:=20

Cheers to all,

Andy=20

The Hebrew printing press in Keidan

By Advocate Sh. Shibolet

After World War I, when the Jews of Keidan began to return >from their =
places of exile, two Torah students decided to set up a small printing =
press to serve needs of the community. They were Alter Movshovitz and =
Mottel Kagan, who had previously been a teacher in Keidan. Indeed, even =
before the war, there was a machine used by the owner of the stationery =
shop to print greeting cards, invitations and notices which were ordered =
from him. The shop owner set the type manually and operated the printer =
by himself.

This was not the intention of our two partners. They began seeking =
clients who were interested in printing Biblical books and commentaries. =
For this purpose they purchased a printing press and typesetting =
systems.

The two worked not only as typesetters and printers of their =
compositions. All the work of installation, editing, and proofreading =
for typographical and author errors fell on the heads of these Torah =
students. They were sometimes forced to travel the rocky road of reading =
existing works of literature and Torah commentary in order to check the =
written materials which they received, and to correct what they deemed =
to be errors.=20

The reputation of the Keidan printing press was very high among scholars =
and writers throughout Lithuania, as well as in other countries. The =
story was told of the rabbi of Vekshne, who later became rabbi of =
Keidan. He was the late Rabbi Shlomo Feinsilber, who traveled to Kovno =
to find a printer for a manuscript in his possession. In Kovno, he was =
told that if he wanted to publish a Torah commentary, he should go to =
the Keidan printers. He indeed had his manuscript printed in Keidan and, =
while he was there, he was invited by the Keidaners to apply for the =
position of chief rabbi.

The printer developed and grew, and even employed many workers. The =
press' manual typesetting system could not keep up with the increased =
demand for printing. So Mottel Kagan traveled to Kovno to buy a used =
typesetting machine >from one of the larger printers. There, he was told =
by a friend and former student >from his teaching days, that if the =
printing press had enough work to require a typesetting machine, they =
should try to purchase a new American Linotype machine.

The owners of the Printing Press did buy the first Linotype machine, and =
the Keidan printers grew as producers of both religious and secular =
literature. An extensive list of books were printed there during the =
press' life, and it became a great source for lovers of Hebrew =
literature.



------=_NextPart_000_002E_01BE5ABE.24C92280
Content-Type: text/html;
charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>

<META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
http-equiv=3DContent-Type><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 =
HTML//EN">
<META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Welcome, Monty Starr; glad you found =
the group. It=20
would be interesting to hear more about your family's odyssey.&nbsp; =
Also, is=20
Tevye, whom you mention, connected with the Keidaner Society in Israel? =
It would=20
be a big plus if we could bring some of the members of that group into =
our=20
circle.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>As for the Vilnius archives, I have had =
some=20
success there. A researcher in Vilnius named Regina Kopilevich, who also =
works=20
as a guide there, looked over the Keidan vital-statistics records there =
for me,=20
and turned up more than a dozen birth, marriage and death records for =
members of=20
my family. If you would like her address, message me and I'll be happy =
to pass=20
it along.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>I'm also including tonight a copy of a =
new=20
translation >from the Keidan Yizkor Book, which was published in Israel =
in 1977.=20
A very fine translator in Israel named Chaim Charutz has converted =
several of=20
the articles in the Yizkor book >from Hebrew to English. I'm doing some =
light=20
editing, and will share them with the group as they are ready. This =
first is a=20
short piece about the printing house which existed in Keidan between the =
wars.=20
The building where it stood was pointed out to me when I visited Keidan =
in 1995;=20
it was described as &quot;Movshovitz's drukerai&quot; (printing&nbsp; =
press).=20
But as we read here, there were actually two partners who set it up and =
ran it:=20
</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Cheers to all,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Andy </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><B><FONT face=3D"Times New Roman" size=3D5>
<P>The Hebrew printing press in Keidan</P></B></FONT><FONT=20
face=3D"Times New Roman">
<P>By Advocate Sh. Shibolet</P>
<P>After World War I, when the Jews of Keidan began to return >from their =
places=20
of exile, two Torah students decided to set up a small printing press to =
serve=20
needs of the community. They were Alter Movshovitz and Mottel Kagan, who =
had=20
previously been a teacher in Keidan. Indeed, even before the war, there =
was a=20
machine used by the owner of the stationery shop to print greeting =
cards,=20
invitations and notices which were ordered >from him. The shop owner set =
the type=20
manually and operated the printer by himself.</P>
<P>This was not the intention of our two partners. They began seeking =
clients=20
who were interested in printing Biblical books and commentaries. For =
this=20
purpose they purchased a printing press and typesetting systems.</P>
<P>The two worked not only as typesetters and printers of their =
compositions.=20
All the work of installation, editing, and proofreading for =
typographical and=20
author errors fell on the heads of these Torah students. They were =
sometimes=20
forced to travel the rocky road of reading existing works of literature =
and=20
Torah commentary in order to check the written materials which they =
received,=20
and to correct what they deemed to be errors. </P>
<P>The reputation of the Keidan printing press was very high among =
scholars and=20
writers throughout Lithuania, as well as in other countries. The story =
was told=20
of the rabbi of Vekshne, who later became rabbi of Keidan. He was the =
late Rabbi=20
Shlomo Feinsilber, who traveled to Kovno to find a printer for a =
manuscript in=20
his possession. In Kovno, he was told that if he wanted to publish a =
Torah=20
commentary, he should go to the Keidan printers. He indeed had his =
manuscript=20
printed in Keidan and, while he was there, he was invited by the =
Keidaners to=20
apply for the position of chief rabbi.</P>
<P>The printer developed and grew, and even employed many workers. The =
press'=20
manual typesetting system could not keep up with the increased demand =
for=20
printing. So Mottel Kagan traveled to Kovno to buy a used typesetting =
machine=20
from one of the larger printers. There, he was told by a friend and =
former=20
student >from his teaching days, that if the printing press had enough =
work to=20
require a typesetting machine, they should try to purchase a new =
American=20
Linotype machine.</P>
<P>The owners of the Printing Press did buy the first Linotype machine, =
and the=20
Keidan printers grew as producers of both religious and secular =
literature. An=20
extensive list of books were printed there during the press' life, and =
it became=20
a great source for lovers of Hebrew literature.</FONT></P></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>

------=_NextPart_000_002E_01BE5ABE.24C92280--


Marriage records, Obuda #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

Are the ONLY marriage records at Magyar Orszagos Leveltar >from 1851-95?
If that is true, where can I get marriage records for the 1830s?

Thanks, Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org

mod.- Magyar Orszagos Leveltar is the Hungarian National Archives. The writer's question implies that the marriage records prior to 1851 are extant and available somewhere. Perhaps he knows something that is not commonly known? In fact, there are a few towns (Trenscen or Tolcsva) that have Jewish metrical records that start >from the beginning of the nineteenth century, but as a rule most record keeping required by the government did not begin until the 1850s, and to a lesser extent the 1830s. On the other hand, non-governmental records such as Pinkasim recording Brisim performed by a Mohel or burials registered in the Pinkasim of the various Chevra Kadisha societies may date >from the earliest times such events occurred. However, such books are very rare. Some may be found in the Central Archives of the Jewish People housed in the Jewish National Library builing on the Givat Ram campus of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, others are in the libraries or archives of JTS, Yehiva University and other sites. There are even some which are in the hands of collectors or the descendants of the record-keepers. Another project on the table is to compile a list of these Pinkasim for Hungarian locations and inform the group how to access the information contained in them. LS


Hungarian Holocaust Names Project #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

Dear H-SIG-ers,

I have just read a letter by Dr Saul Issroff <saul@swico.demon.co.uk>
dated 1999.02.16. 02:19:45 on the Lithuanian Holocaust Names Project. I
thought: why shouldn't we do the same with the Hungarian names?

Actually, there was an attempt to publish the names of Hungarian martyrs:

Shemot-Nevek-Names joint project by Serge Klarefeld Foundations, Szol a kakas
mar and Yad Vashem. It was coordinated by Dr. Prof. Gabriel Bar-Shaked. If I
am well informed, they project was discontinued for lack of funds and interest,
though they have material ready for printing.

We know that about 550 000 to 600 000 Jews >from the 1941 territory of Hungary
have been murdered, yet their names are not available anywhere. You know of
our efforts to collect and publish names of the Jewish martyrs of the Holocaust
(e,g, Szentes, Szegvar, Gyor, Tatabanya).

So I propose a new project for H-SIG to preserve the names of our martyrs: to
collect and publish on WWW their names. Eventually and ideally we will have all
the names by 2004, the 60th anniversary of the deportation of Hungarian Jews.

It would mean that we will have 5 years to complete the project, and about 100 000
to 120 000 names a year. H-SIG has 300 plus members, so each of us have to
take 300-400 names a year.

Many of the Yizkor Books have names of martyrs: we could use them.

Do you think it is feasible and realistic?

Regards,

Gyuri


Hungary SIG #Hungary Marriage records, Obuda #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

Are the ONLY marriage records at Magyar Orszagos Leveltar >from 1851-95?
If that is true, where can I get marriage records for the 1830s?

Thanks, Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org

mod.- Magyar Orszagos Leveltar is the Hungarian National Archives. The writer's question implies that the marriage records prior to 1851 are extant and available somewhere. Perhaps he knows something that is not commonly known? In fact, there are a few towns (Trenscen or Tolcsva) that have Jewish metrical records that start >from the beginning of the nineteenth century, but as a rule most record keeping required by the government did not begin until the 1850s, and to a lesser extent the 1830s. On the other hand, non-governmental records such as Pinkasim recording Brisim performed by a Mohel or burials registered in the Pinkasim of the various Chevra Kadisha societies may date >from the earliest times such events occurred. However, such books are very rare. Some may be found in the Central Archives of the Jewish People housed in the Jewish National Library builing on the Givat Ram campus of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, others are in the libraries or archives of JTS, Yehiva University and other sites. There are even some which are in the hands of collectors or the descendants of the record-keepers. Another project on the table is to compile a list of these Pinkasim for Hungarian locations and inform the group how to access the information contained in them. LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Holocaust Names Project #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

Dear H-SIG-ers,

I have just read a letter by Dr Saul Issroff <saul@swico.demon.co.uk>
dated 1999.02.16. 02:19:45 on the Lithuanian Holocaust Names Project. I
thought: why shouldn't we do the same with the Hungarian names?

Actually, there was an attempt to publish the names of Hungarian martyrs:

Shemot-Nevek-Names joint project by Serge Klarefeld Foundations, Szol a kakas
mar and Yad Vashem. It was coordinated by Dr. Prof. Gabriel Bar-Shaked. If I
am well informed, they project was discontinued for lack of funds and interest,
though they have material ready for printing.

We know that about 550 000 to 600 000 Jews >from the 1941 territory of Hungary
have been murdered, yet their names are not available anywhere. You know of
our efforts to collect and publish names of the Jewish martyrs of the Holocaust
(e,g, Szentes, Szegvar, Gyor, Tatabanya).

So I propose a new project for H-SIG to preserve the names of our martyrs: to
collect and publish on WWW their names. Eventually and ideally we will have all
the names by 2004, the 60th anniversary of the deportation of Hungarian Jews.

It would mean that we will have 5 years to complete the project, and about 100 000
to 120 000 names a year. H-SIG has 300 plus members, so each of us have to
take 300-400 names a year.

Many of the Yizkor Books have names of martyrs: we could use them.

Do you think it is feasible and realistic?

Regards,

Gyuri


Searching HUBERGRITZ from Odessa #general

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

I am searching out information on Chaim Lazar and Bessie HUBERGRITZ from
Odessa. He may have been a baker. They were born before 1876, married
before 1886 and died before 1906, most likely in a pogrom.
They had relatives named BEREZOFSKY and KAZAN-CHAZAN who took in their
children: Masha born, March 12, 1886, Chia and Masai.
Masha married Chunah VOZICK January 13, 1904 in Odessa.
Any information about any of these people is most appreciated,
please email me privately. Thank you very much.

Alexandra VOZICK HANS


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching HUBERGRITZ from Odessa #general

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

I am searching out information on Chaim Lazar and Bessie HUBERGRITZ from
Odessa. He may have been a baker. They were born before 1876, married
before 1886 and died before 1906, most likely in a pogrom.
They had relatives named BEREZOFSKY and KAZAN-CHAZAN who took in their
children: Masha born, March 12, 1886, Chia and Masai.
Masha married Chunah VOZICK January 13, 1904 in Odessa.
Any information about any of these people is most appreciated,
please email me privately. Thank you very much.

Alexandra VOZICK HANS


Determining "Real" Name #general

Ken Stone <ken@...>
 

My grandfather was Harry Stone (1879-1961.) On his death certificate his
father is listed as "Zacharia (halevi)" with the parentheses just as it
appears.

I am trying to determine Harry's "real" name and place of origin. All I
have to this point is Podolsk, Russia as birthplace. What clues are in his
father's name as listed? Is Zacharia Halevi the name of my great
grandfather? Zacharia is listed as Sam Stone on my family tree. If Halevi
is valid how did we get >from Halevi to Stone?

Any help is appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ken Stone
ken@instrumental.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Determining "Real" Name #general

Ken Stone <ken@...>
 

My grandfather was Harry Stone (1879-1961.) On his death certificate his
father is listed as "Zacharia (halevi)" with the parentheses just as it
appears.

I am trying to determine Harry's "real" name and place of origin. All I
have to this point is Podolsk, Russia as birthplace. What clues are in his
father's name as listed? Is Zacharia Halevi the name of my great
grandfather? Zacharia is listed as Sam Stone on my family tree. If Halevi
is valid how did we get >from Halevi to Stone?

Any help is appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ken Stone
ken@instrumental.com