Date   

Searching: KAFTAL #general

yldhart <yldhart@...>
 

I am searching for any information about the KAFTAL surname, originating
in Milawa, Poland. My grandfather,Irving was born in Poland on February
22, 1908 and immigrated before he was one year of age. He was the youngest
of the family, and his father was named Baruch. The family settled in New
York City and I am searching for any of his older siblings offspring.

Sherri Kaftal, La Jolla, California
yldhart@ix.netcom.com
Searching: LUCASH-Russia - > New York City 1900-1950


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: KAFTAL #general

yldhart <yldhart@...>
 

I am searching for any information about the KAFTAL surname, originating
in Milawa, Poland. My grandfather,Irving was born in Poland on February
22, 1908 and immigrated before he was one year of age. He was the youngest
of the family, and his father was named Baruch. The family settled in New
York City and I am searching for any of his older siblings offspring.

Sherri Kaftal, La Jolla, California
yldhart@ix.netcom.com
Searching: LUCASH-Russia - > New York City 1900-1950


Re: Second marriage with the sister of the deceased wife #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Especially for a travelling salesperson who might not have had as many
roots and contacts in his new place of residence, it is probably just as
likely that the second wife was a neighbor of a family member, or a
cousin of someone, or a woman who was known to be in need of a match
(hence willing to become a stepmother with the work that entailed and
move away), etc. Without another indication that the wives are sisters
it is probably safest to assume that there was a familial or neigborhood
or some other kind of connection >from the original town -- rather than
assuming it was familial. Related example: when my ggrandmother
travelled >from Minsk to Rypin, Poland to help my grandmother with the
birth of a child, my ggrandmother made a match between a man in Rypin and
a woman (think a relative but detail escapes me) back in Minsk. So the
point is there is going to be some connection, but it may not be the
simplest connection that you are able to deduce.
Jonina Duker

Adam Katzeff wrote:

My gggf married twice in his life. His second marriage, in which my ggf
was born, was with a woman who was 15 years younger than himself. Now I'm
thinking of the possibility that he was married with an older sister of
her in his first marriage. The reason I suspect this is that both he and
his second wife was born in the same shtetl in Lithuania (Tapelau). At the
time of his second marriage he wasn't living Lithuania anymore ....snip... >My question is: Why did my gggf married a woman >from his homevillage when
he was living far away >from there? Is it a likely explanation that it was
because she was a sister of his first (deceased) wife?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Second marriage with the sister of the deceased wife #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Especially for a travelling salesperson who might not have had as many
roots and contacts in his new place of residence, it is probably just as
likely that the second wife was a neighbor of a family member, or a
cousin of someone, or a woman who was known to be in need of a match
(hence willing to become a stepmother with the work that entailed and
move away), etc. Without another indication that the wives are sisters
it is probably safest to assume that there was a familial or neigborhood
or some other kind of connection >from the original town -- rather than
assuming it was familial. Related example: when my ggrandmother
travelled >from Minsk to Rypin, Poland to help my grandmother with the
birth of a child, my ggrandmother made a match between a man in Rypin and
a woman (think a relative but detail escapes me) back in Minsk. So the
point is there is going to be some connection, but it may not be the
simplest connection that you are able to deduce.
Jonina Duker

Adam Katzeff wrote:

My gggf married twice in his life. His second marriage, in which my ggf
was born, was with a woman who was 15 years younger than himself. Now I'm
thinking of the possibility that he was married with an older sister of
her in his first marriage. The reason I suspect this is that both he and
his second wife was born in the same shtetl in Lithuania (Tapelau). At the
time of his second marriage he wasn't living Lithuania anymore ....snip... >My question is: Why did my gggf married a woman >from his homevillage when
he was living far away >from there? Is it a likely explanation that it was
because she was a sister of his first (deceased) wife?


RE Place of origin listed in Russian records #general

Bert Lazerow <lazer@...>
 

Allan Shuchat wrote:
a person's place of origin is often a part of the record.... Is this
generally the actual birthplace of the individual or the most recent
residence before moving to the location where the record was made?
Neither. This is the place to which the individual is officially
registered. It cost money to change your registration, so my KIMELMAN
family were still "townspeople of Vitebsk" in 1910, though they had
lived in Nezhin Ukraine since at least 1852, and the parents of many of
them had been born in Nezhin.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA
lazer@acusd.edu


Re: place of origin in Russian records #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Alan Schuhat asked
Is this generally the actual birthplace of the individual or the most
recent residence before moving to the location where the record was made?
This is not >from personal experience, merely >from hearing lectures ...
supposedly there were points in time that Jews were registered in
specific towns and on occasion generations later, despite the fact that
no one had lived there for generations, were unable to get the
registrations changed. So for your example, depending on circumstance,
it might be neither A (place of birth) nor B (place of residence) but Z
(place of ancestor's residence at the time of registration). Simferopol
is a new family town for me (RACHMAN family) and I am slowly learning
about the unusual history of Jews in the Crimean Peninsual; possibly,
that history introduced some unusual wrinkles.
Jonina Duker


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE Place of origin listed in Russian records #general

Bert Lazerow <lazer@...>
 

Allan Shuchat wrote:
a person's place of origin is often a part of the record.... Is this
generally the actual birthplace of the individual or the most recent
residence before moving to the location where the record was made?
Neither. This is the place to which the individual is officially
registered. It cost money to change your registration, so my KIMELMAN
family were still "townspeople of Vitebsk" in 1910, though they had
lived in Nezhin Ukraine since at least 1852, and the parents of many of
them had been born in Nezhin.
Bert
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego CA
lazer@acusd.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: place of origin in Russian records #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

Alan Schuhat asked
Is this generally the actual birthplace of the individual or the most
recent residence before moving to the location where the record was made?
This is not >from personal experience, merely >from hearing lectures ...
supposedly there were points in time that Jews were registered in
specific towns and on occasion generations later, despite the fact that
no one had lived there for generations, were unable to get the
registrations changed. So for your example, depending on circumstance,
it might be neither A (place of birth) nor B (place of residence) but Z
(place of ancestor's residence at the time of registration). Simferopol
is a new family town for me (RACHMAN family) and I am slowly learning
about the unusual history of Jews in the Crimean Peninsual; possibly,
that history introduced some unusual wrinkles.
Jonina Duker


LASZKY Vienna and Urzedow in Lublin Province Poland #general

carol zsolnay <CZSOLNAY@...>
 

Today in Chicago I attended the powerful photo exhibit written about on
JewGen recently called " Images of Polish Jews And I Still See Their Faces"
(Mon-Sun 11am-4pm at the Polish Museum of America in Chicago until
2/28/99). It originated at the Shalom Foundation in Warsaw, Poland after a
call was put out in 1994 to gather >from Poland and elsewhere photos of
Polish Jews before WWII. Supposedly the exhibit is moving to Florida next.
The exhibit could be a treasure trove for people searching for ancestors in
Poland. The huge book of the same title has photos and a big index in the
back of the names of all people identified in the photos.

I took special note of one photo in the exhibit because I thought that
JewGen may be a way to reunite a photo album with the family for whom it
was meant. Here are the details:

There was a physician in Vienna as of 1940 and his wife named Dr. Ludwig
Israel and Sara LASZKY. Ludwig was born in the ~early 1870s. They had
children in the US as of the 1930s. In 1941 Dr. and Mrs. were moved/sent
to Urzedow in Lubin Province, Poland. There they made friends with the
non-Jewish pharmacist. Sometime after that, Ludwig and his wife were given
a day's notice to leave the city by train/transport. Dr. LASZKY came to
the pharmacist and gave him the LASZKY family photos he had brought with
him >from Vienna to Poland. He also gave the pharmacist the address of his
children in the US with instructions to send the photos after the war. At
the end of the war, the pharmacist's home was ransacked and the address was
lost in the chaos, but the photos were saved. The descendants of the
pharmacist saved the p[hotos and gave them to the Shalom Foundation in
hopes of returning them to the family of Ludwig and Sara LASZKY. (To make
this story sadder, the couple was shot and killed at the train station in
Krasnik when they refused to be separated for the transport.)

Soooo, if the name LASZKY rings a bell, let me know and I will find out
were to write to learn more.

Sincerely,

Carol Adler Zsolnay at czsolnay@msn.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LASZKY Vienna and Urzedow in Lublin Province Poland #general

carol zsolnay <CZSOLNAY@...>
 

Today in Chicago I attended the powerful photo exhibit written about on
JewGen recently called " Images of Polish Jews And I Still See Their Faces"
(Mon-Sun 11am-4pm at the Polish Museum of America in Chicago until
2/28/99). It originated at the Shalom Foundation in Warsaw, Poland after a
call was put out in 1994 to gather >from Poland and elsewhere photos of
Polish Jews before WWII. Supposedly the exhibit is moving to Florida next.
The exhibit could be a treasure trove for people searching for ancestors in
Poland. The huge book of the same title has photos and a big index in the
back of the names of all people identified in the photos.

I took special note of one photo in the exhibit because I thought that
JewGen may be a way to reunite a photo album with the family for whom it
was meant. Here are the details:

There was a physician in Vienna as of 1940 and his wife named Dr. Ludwig
Israel and Sara LASZKY. Ludwig was born in the ~early 1870s. They had
children in the US as of the 1930s. In 1941 Dr. and Mrs. were moved/sent
to Urzedow in Lubin Province, Poland. There they made friends with the
non-Jewish pharmacist. Sometime after that, Ludwig and his wife were given
a day's notice to leave the city by train/transport. Dr. LASZKY came to
the pharmacist and gave him the LASZKY family photos he had brought with
him >from Vienna to Poland. He also gave the pharmacist the address of his
children in the US with instructions to send the photos after the war. At
the end of the war, the pharmacist's home was ransacked and the address was
lost in the chaos, but the photos were saved. The descendants of the
pharmacist saved the p[hotos and gave them to the Shalom Foundation in
hopes of returning them to the family of Ludwig and Sara LASZKY. (To make
this story sadder, the couple was shot and killed at the train station in
Krasnik when they refused to be separated for the transport.)

Soooo, if the name LASZKY rings a bell, let me know and I will find out
were to write to learn more.

Sincerely,

Carol Adler Zsolnay at czsolnay@msn.com


JGSLA February 1999 Meeting Announcement - Updated #general

Richard Hoffman <RHHOFFMAN@...>
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles will be
held

Date: Monday, Monday, February 22, 1999 at the

Location: Los Angeles Family History Library, 10777 Santa Monica Blvd.,
Los Angeles, CA 90064

Time: 6:00 PM

Program: Annual Assisted Research Night

The Los Angeles Family History Library (FHL) is the largest branch of the
Salt Lake City headquartered Family History Library. It houses over 12,000
bound volumes and 70,000 rolls of microfilm on permanent loan.
The FHL also houses the 400 + book collection of the JGSLA. Experienced
JGSLA members will be on hand to assist you in using the Library's
resources.

Important Notice: This meeting is open to members of the JGSLA who have
paid-up dues for 1999. Dues may be paid at the door.

For additional information about JGSLA, please visit our webpage at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsla.

Richard H. Hoffman
Publicity Chairperson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA February 1999 Meeting Announcement - Updated #general

Richard Hoffman <RHHOFFMAN@...>
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles will be
held

Date: Monday, Monday, February 22, 1999 at the

Location: Los Angeles Family History Library, 10777 Santa Monica Blvd.,
Los Angeles, CA 90064

Time: 6:00 PM

Program: Annual Assisted Research Night

The Los Angeles Family History Library (FHL) is the largest branch of the
Salt Lake City headquartered Family History Library. It houses over 12,000
bound volumes and 70,000 rolls of microfilm on permanent loan.
The FHL also houses the 400 + book collection of the JGSLA. Experienced
JGSLA members will be on hand to assist you in using the Library's
resources.

Important Notice: This meeting is open to members of the JGSLA who have
paid-up dues for 1999. Dues may be paid at the door.

For additional information about JGSLA, please visit our webpage at
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsla.

Richard H. Hoffman
Publicity Chairperson


Re: Searching RUSS from Grimaylov #galicia

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

I am writing in response to Ron Russ' s recent message about his Grandfather
Emil RUSS >from Grimaylov.

Although his message was, as the moderator said, "a model of conciseness,"
I suggest that the next time he or anyone else writes an inquiry, that he or
she add at least one of the spelling variants of his or her town name, if any
is known.

As for Grimaylov, which I learned is also "Gzhimalov." and also
Rymalow, and Grimalow, I do enjoy fooling around with letters, words and
names and often substitute "w" for a "v" or an "o" for an "i" and vice versa,
and play other sorts of tricks, but I think it would not have occurred to me
to substitute a "z" for an "r," so I might not have found a word about his
town had I not indulged in this sort of fun.

I did find a mention of Grimaylov (or Gzhimalov) in Jack Kuglemass and
Jonathan Boyarin, ">from A Ruined Garden." Unfortunately, the town name
appears only in passing, in a chapter by S. Ansky,(aka Solomon Seinwil
Rapoport) "In Korostkov During the First World War." The chapter is taken
from Sefer Khorostkov (Chorostkow) and begins:
">from Gzhimalov I traveled to Khorostkov, a sizable town of over 140
families. ...."

I am not familiar with the Sefer Khorostkov, but this sentence
suggests that in a previous chapter, Ansky may have talked about being in
Gzhimalov and described the town.

I tried to find out whether there was a Yizkor book for Mr. Russ'
town, as he spelled it, and according to an alternate spelling, but now,
having checked all my yizkor book lists, I don't think such a book was ever
created for it.

Maybe someone in the Galicia Society can help him if he or she has a copy
of the Sefer Khorostkov. I notice that in "The Galitzianer Family Finder"
there is a list of several people are also interested in Grimaylov and who
might have information about it. But I've been told I can't give out their
names because such lists are available only to Gesher Galicia members. (Maybe
joining the Society would be worthwhile for Mr. Russ and other subscribers to
this mail group. It is a good, intelligent, and active Special Interest
Group, and it regularly issues interesting bulletins, as well as an annual
superbly organized Family Finder.)

Still, maybe Mr. Russ should do a search through Jewishgen's discussion
group archives (at http://www.jewishgen.org/) to find out in another way who
might interested in and know something about Grimaylov.

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
Bloomington, IN USA
NFatouros@aol.com
99/02/16

BELKOWSKY of Tel-Aviv, Odessa, Kiev, Moscow, Berdichev; LEVY, WEIL, WILLARD
of Mulhouse, Altkirch, Seppois le Bas, Alsace; FELDMAN of "Chelsetz?" (
Kulczyce or Kulchitse or Kulcici?), near L'viv; MEEROVNA of Berdichev(?);
RAPPAPORT or RAPOPORT of Jaffa, Palestine, Podvolochisk and Ternopil; SAS, of
Podwolochisk; ROTHSTEIN, LIBERMAN >from Kiev and Moscow; ZUSMAN or SUSSMAN of
Tel-Aviv and Odessa.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: RE: Searching RUSS from Grimaylov #galicia

NFatouros@...
 

Dear People,

I am writing in response to Ron Russ' s recent message about his Grandfather
Emil RUSS >from Grimaylov.

Although his message was, as the moderator said, "a model of conciseness,"
I suggest that the next time he or anyone else writes an inquiry, that he or
she add at least one of the spelling variants of his or her town name, if any
is known.

As for Grimaylov, which I learned is also "Gzhimalov." and also
Rymalow, and Grimalow, I do enjoy fooling around with letters, words and
names and often substitute "w" for a "v" or an "o" for an "i" and vice versa,
and play other sorts of tricks, but I think it would not have occurred to me
to substitute a "z" for an "r," so I might not have found a word about his
town had I not indulged in this sort of fun.

I did find a mention of Grimaylov (or Gzhimalov) in Jack Kuglemass and
Jonathan Boyarin, ">from A Ruined Garden." Unfortunately, the town name
appears only in passing, in a chapter by S. Ansky,(aka Solomon Seinwil
Rapoport) "In Korostkov During the First World War." The chapter is taken
from Sefer Khorostkov (Chorostkow) and begins:
">from Gzhimalov I traveled to Khorostkov, a sizable town of over 140
families. ...."

I am not familiar with the Sefer Khorostkov, but this sentence
suggests that in a previous chapter, Ansky may have talked about being in
Gzhimalov and described the town.

I tried to find out whether there was a Yizkor book for Mr. Russ'
town, as he spelled it, and according to an alternate spelling, but now,
having checked all my yizkor book lists, I don't think such a book was ever
created for it.

Maybe someone in the Galicia Society can help him if he or she has a copy
of the Sefer Khorostkov. I notice that in "The Galitzianer Family Finder"
there is a list of several people are also interested in Grimaylov and who
might have information about it. But I've been told I can't give out their
names because such lists are available only to Gesher Galicia members. (Maybe
joining the Society would be worthwhile for Mr. Russ and other subscribers to
this mail group. It is a good, intelligent, and active Special Interest
Group, and it regularly issues interesting bulletins, as well as an annual
superbly organized Family Finder.)

Still, maybe Mr. Russ should do a search through Jewishgen's discussion
group archives (at http://www.jewishgen.org/) to find out in another way who
might interested in and know something about Grimaylov.

Naomi
Naomi Fatouros
Bloomington, IN USA
NFatouros@aol.com
99/02/16

BELKOWSKY of Tel-Aviv, Odessa, Kiev, Moscow, Berdichev; LEVY, WEIL, WILLARD
of Mulhouse, Altkirch, Seppois le Bas, Alsace; FELDMAN of "Chelsetz?" (
Kulczyce or Kulchitse or Kulcici?), near L'viv; MEEROVNA of Berdichev(?);
RAPPAPORT or RAPOPORT of Jaffa, Palestine, Podvolochisk and Ternopil; SAS, of
Podwolochisk; ROTHSTEIN, LIBERMAN >from Kiev and Moscow; ZUSMAN or SUSSMAN of
Tel-Aviv and Odessa.


The Center For Jewish Research in NYC #galicia

Wildpom@...
 

If anyone would like to see their website, the address is: http://www.cjh.org

This is truly a splendid state-of-the-art complex. There aren't any photos on
their website as yet, but there are several lovely artists renderings of the
interior and exterior. It is the new home for the Leo Baeck Institute, Yivo,
The Jewish Historical Society, and Yeshiva University Museum.

Michele V. Pomerantz
Secaucus, NJ
Reply to: Wildpom@aol.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia The Center For Jewish Research in NYC #galicia

Wildpom@...
 

If anyone would like to see their website, the address is: http://www.cjh.org

This is truly a splendid state-of-the-art complex. There aren't any photos on
their website as yet, but there are several lovely artists renderings of the
interior and exterior. It is the new home for the Leo Baeck Institute, Yivo,
The Jewish Historical Society, and Yeshiva University Museum.

Michele V. Pomerantz
Secaucus, NJ
Reply to: Wildpom@aol.com


Re: Seeking modern name&country:Michalovce #general

C.O.M.E. Racing <come@...>
 

The current name and country are Michalovce, Slovakia.

Mary Blumenstein
Melbourne, Australia

Researching: BAUM/ Satoraljaujhely, Hungary. BERNER/KATZ/ Beregovo,Ukraine.
BLUMENSTEIN/IvanoFrankovsk,Ukraine.GOLDFARB/MONCIASZParczew,Poland.
HELLINGER/Michalovce,Kosice,Slovakia.NEUMAN/NEUMANN/Kvakovce,
Michalovce, Slovakia

HLurie wrote:

I am seeking the modern name & country of a town that had many names.
I would like to place this name in the JGFF.
The names of this town are: Michalovce; Nagymhaly; Nodmiha/Mihailovce;
Salog; > and Slavkovce. The countries this town was supposed to be in
were: Hungary, > N.E. Slovakia,Czech.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking modern name&country:Michalovce #general

C.O.M.E. Racing <come@...>
 

The current name and country are Michalovce, Slovakia.

Mary Blumenstein
Melbourne, Australia

Researching: BAUM/ Satoraljaujhely, Hungary. BERNER/KATZ/ Beregovo,Ukraine.
BLUMENSTEIN/IvanoFrankovsk,Ukraine.GOLDFARB/MONCIASZParczew,Poland.
HELLINGER/Michalovce,Kosice,Slovakia.NEUMAN/NEUMANN/Kvakovce,
Michalovce, Slovakia

HLurie wrote:

I am seeking the modern name & country of a town that had many names.
I would like to place this name in the JGFF.
The names of this town are: Michalovce; Nagymhaly; Nodmiha/Mihailovce;
Salog; > and Slavkovce. The countries this town was supposed to be in
were: Hungary, > N.E. Slovakia,Czech.


Where is my brother Freddie/Ephriam GROSSMAN / Fred GROSS buried? #general

IGross6643@...
 

My brother and I lived in Brooklyn in 1941. I was drafted in the us army
and sent overseas. He went to California. When I came back >from the army
and tried to find him and couldn't for 58 years . I looked for him and
could not find him, lately I found out that he died 4 years ago and he is
buried in a non Jewish cemetery . All I know is that he is buried in Los
Angeles Cal and the date of his death.
Could you help me find what cemetery the date of death is June 29, 1994
his name Freddie Grossman or Fred Gross or Ephriam Grossman

Isaac D. Grossman
NJ
igross6643@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Where is my brother Freddie/Ephriam GROSSMAN / Fred GROSS buried? #general

IGross6643@...
 

My brother and I lived in Brooklyn in 1941. I was drafted in the us army
and sent overseas. He went to California. When I came back >from the army
and tried to find him and couldn't for 58 years . I looked for him and
could not find him, lately I found out that he died 4 years ago and he is
buried in a non Jewish cemetery . All I know is that he is buried in Los
Angeles Cal and the date of his death.
Could you help me find what cemetery the date of death is June 29, 1994
his name Freddie Grossman or Fred Gross or Ephriam Grossman

Isaac D. Grossman
NJ
igross6643@aol.com