Date   

Marriage records, Obuda #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

Are the ONLY marriage records at Magyar Orszagos Leveltar >from 1851-95?
If that is true, where can I get marriage records for the 1830s?

Thanks, Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org

mod.- Magyar Orszagos Leveltar is the Hungarian National Archives. The writer's question implies that the marriage records prior to 1851 are extant and available somewhere. Perhaps he knows something that is not commonly known? In fact, there are a few towns (Trenscen or Tolcsva) that have Jewish metrical records that start >from the beginning of the nineteenth century, but as a rule most record keeping required by the government did not begin until the 1850s, and to a lesser extent the 1830s. On the other hand, non-governmental records such as Pinkasim recording Brisim performed by a Mohel or burials registered in the Pinkasim of the various Chevra Kadisha societies may date >from the earliest times such events occurred. However, such books are very rare. Some may be found in the Central Archives of the Jewish People housed in the Jewish National Library builing on the Givat Ram campus of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, others are in the libraries or archives of JTS, Yehiva University and other sites. There are even some which are in the hands of collectors or the descendants of the record-keepers. Another project on the table is to compile a list of these Pinkasim for Hungarian locations and inform the group how to access the information contained in them. LS


Hungarian Holocaust Names Project #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

Dear H-SIG-ers,

I have just read a letter by Dr Saul Issroff <saul@swico.demon.co.uk>
dated 1999.02.16. 02:19:45 on the Lithuanian Holocaust Names Project. I
thought: why shouldn't we do the same with the Hungarian names?

Actually, there was an attempt to publish the names of Hungarian martyrs:

Shemot-Nevek-Names joint project by Serge Klarefeld Foundations, Szol a kakas
mar and Yad Vashem. It was coordinated by Dr. Prof. Gabriel Bar-Shaked. If I
am well informed, they project was discontinued for lack of funds and interest,
though they have material ready for printing.

We know that about 550 000 to 600 000 Jews >from the 1941 territory of Hungary
have been murdered, yet their names are not available anywhere. You know of
our efforts to collect and publish names of the Jewish martyrs of the Holocaust
(e,g, Szentes, Szegvar, Gyor, Tatabanya).

So I propose a new project for H-SIG to preserve the names of our martyrs: to
collect and publish on WWW their names. Eventually and ideally we will have all
the names by 2004, the 60th anniversary of the deportation of Hungarian Jews.

It would mean that we will have 5 years to complete the project, and about 100 000
to 120 000 names a year. H-SIG has 300 plus members, so each of us have to
take 300-400 names a year.

Many of the Yizkor Books have names of martyrs: we could use them.

Do you think it is feasible and realistic?

Regards,

Gyuri


Hungary SIG #Hungary Marriage records, Obuda #hungary

Alan E. Strauss <ah448@...>
 

Are the ONLY marriage records at Magyar Orszagos Leveltar >from 1851-95?
If that is true, where can I get marriage records for the 1830s?

Thanks, Anschel Strauss

--
____________________
Alan Strauss
ah448@osfn.org

mod.- Magyar Orszagos Leveltar is the Hungarian National Archives. The writer's question implies that the marriage records prior to 1851 are extant and available somewhere. Perhaps he knows something that is not commonly known? In fact, there are a few towns (Trenscen or Tolcsva) that have Jewish metrical records that start >from the beginning of the nineteenth century, but as a rule most record keeping required by the government did not begin until the 1850s, and to a lesser extent the 1830s. On the other hand, non-governmental records such as Pinkasim recording Brisim performed by a Mohel or burials registered in the Pinkasim of the various Chevra Kadisha societies may date >from the earliest times such events occurred. However, such books are very rare. Some may be found in the Central Archives of the Jewish People housed in the Jewish National Library builing on the Givat Ram campus of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, others are in the libraries or archives of JTS, Yehiva University and other sites. There are even some which are in the hands of collectors or the descendants of the record-keepers. Another project on the table is to compile a list of these Pinkasim for Hungarian locations and inform the group how to access the information contained in them. LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Holocaust Names Project #hungary

Ujlaki Gyorgy <ujlaki.gyorgy@...>
 

Dear H-SIG-ers,

I have just read a letter by Dr Saul Issroff <saul@swico.demon.co.uk>
dated 1999.02.16. 02:19:45 on the Lithuanian Holocaust Names Project. I
thought: why shouldn't we do the same with the Hungarian names?

Actually, there was an attempt to publish the names of Hungarian martyrs:

Shemot-Nevek-Names joint project by Serge Klarefeld Foundations, Szol a kakas
mar and Yad Vashem. It was coordinated by Dr. Prof. Gabriel Bar-Shaked. If I
am well informed, they project was discontinued for lack of funds and interest,
though they have material ready for printing.

We know that about 550 000 to 600 000 Jews >from the 1941 territory of Hungary
have been murdered, yet their names are not available anywhere. You know of
our efforts to collect and publish names of the Jewish martyrs of the Holocaust
(e,g, Szentes, Szegvar, Gyor, Tatabanya).

So I propose a new project for H-SIG to preserve the names of our martyrs: to
collect and publish on WWW their names. Eventually and ideally we will have all
the names by 2004, the 60th anniversary of the deportation of Hungarian Jews.

It would mean that we will have 5 years to complete the project, and about 100 000
to 120 000 names a year. H-SIG has 300 plus members, so each of us have to
take 300-400 names a year.

Many of the Yizkor Books have names of martyrs: we could use them.

Do you think it is feasible and realistic?

Regards,

Gyuri


Searching HUBERGRITZ from Odessa #general

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

I am searching out information on Chaim Lazar and Bessie HUBERGRITZ from
Odessa. He may have been a baker. They were born before 1876, married
before 1886 and died before 1906, most likely in a pogrom.
They had relatives named BEREZOFSKY and KAZAN-CHAZAN who took in their
children: Masha born, March 12, 1886, Chia and Masai.
Masha married Chunah VOZICK January 13, 1904 in Odessa.
Any information about any of these people is most appreciated,
please email me privately. Thank you very much.

Alexandra VOZICK HANS


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching HUBERGRITZ from Odessa #general

Alexandra Vozick Hans <vozick@...>
 

I am searching out information on Chaim Lazar and Bessie HUBERGRITZ from
Odessa. He may have been a baker. They were born before 1876, married
before 1886 and died before 1906, most likely in a pogrom.
They had relatives named BEREZOFSKY and KAZAN-CHAZAN who took in their
children: Masha born, March 12, 1886, Chia and Masai.
Masha married Chunah VOZICK January 13, 1904 in Odessa.
Any information about any of these people is most appreciated,
please email me privately. Thank you very much.

Alexandra VOZICK HANS


Determining "Real" Name #general

Ken Stone <ken@...>
 

My grandfather was Harry Stone (1879-1961.) On his death certificate his
father is listed as "Zacharia (halevi)" with the parentheses just as it
appears.

I am trying to determine Harry's "real" name and place of origin. All I
have to this point is Podolsk, Russia as birthplace. What clues are in his
father's name as listed? Is Zacharia Halevi the name of my great
grandfather? Zacharia is listed as Sam Stone on my family tree. If Halevi
is valid how did we get >from Halevi to Stone?

Any help is appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ken Stone
ken@instrumental.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Determining "Real" Name #general

Ken Stone <ken@...>
 

My grandfather was Harry Stone (1879-1961.) On his death certificate his
father is listed as "Zacharia (halevi)" with the parentheses just as it
appears.

I am trying to determine Harry's "real" name and place of origin. All I
have to this point is Podolsk, Russia as birthplace. What clues are in his
father's name as listed? Is Zacharia Halevi the name of my great
grandfather? Zacharia is listed as Sam Stone on my family tree. If Halevi
is valid how did we get >from Halevi to Stone?

Any help is appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ken Stone
ken@instrumental.com


Re: SSDI -> What? #general

cat2steve@...
 

Linda Birnbaum <birnbaum@ibm.net>

I have requested SSDI information (and received it) for my
grandmother, who never worked. The surname was her married
name (at the time she filed the application).
What I received in the mail was a copy of her application for
social security benefits. It is my understanding that if I
person has worked, there would be more information.
Two Comments here...

There is also a Claims File (may not be exact title) for each
person that details their work history, where they worked, how
much they earned, etc. Unfortunately, this File is usually
destroyed about 5 years after a person's death. I tried to
get my father's 5 and a half years after he died, and it was
already gone. So act quickly!

Second,

I received the SS-5 for a grandaunt of mine, which listed
her mother's name as "unknown." A person doesn't remember
her own mother's name? I was a little taken aback by this.

Steve Snyder
cat2steve@juno.com
Reston, Virginia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SSDI -> What? #general

cat2steve@...
 

Linda Birnbaum <birnbaum@ibm.net>

I have requested SSDI information (and received it) for my
grandmother, who never worked. The surname was her married
name (at the time she filed the application).
What I received in the mail was a copy of her application for
social security benefits. It is my understanding that if I
person has worked, there would be more information.
Two Comments here...

There is also a Claims File (may not be exact title) for each
person that details their work history, where they worked, how
much they earned, etc. Unfortunately, this File is usually
destroyed about 5 years after a person's death. I tried to
get my father's 5 and a half years after he died, and it was
already gone. So act quickly!

Second,

I received the SS-5 for a grandaunt of mine, which listed
her mother's name as "unknown." A person doesn't remember
her own mother's name? I was a little taken aback by this.

Steve Snyder
cat2steve@juno.com
Reston, Virginia


Re: widow as head of household #general

Dolores Palomo <sphinx@...>
 

In 1860 census for NY I found my ggmother, a widow and recent
immigrant, as head of household for her children and several other young
people who might have been dtr & son-in-law or other relatives. NYC
directories list widows - for example, Ida Levy, wid Gabriel Hirsch
Levy.
Dolores Palomo


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: widow as head of household #general

Dolores Palomo <sphinx@...>
 

In 1860 census for NY I found my ggmother, a widow and recent
immigrant, as head of household for her children and several other young
people who might have been dtr & son-in-law or other relatives. NYC
directories list widows - for example, Ida Levy, wid Gabriel Hirsch
Levy.
Dolores Palomo


Re: Deportation to Minsk #belarus

Dr Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Charlotte gives a figure of 800,000 people killed in this area. I would
be interested in any references to the numbers of Jews killed in or
around Minsk. On a visit in 1997 our guide indicated a figure of around
600,000 people. The one reference to this in the Encyclopaedia of the
Holocaust, entry by Shalom Cholawski, where he quotes an unspecified
Soviet source as estimating the number of people killed in Maly
Trostinets at over two hundred thousand. The monument at Bolshoi
Trostinets gives a figure of 201,500 peaceful citizens, partisans and
red army prisoners of war. ( No Jews were mentioned in Soviet times,
this has probably now been changed).

I also find her reference to 'Israeli Government erecting memorial
plaques' a little unusual. I cannot talk about Byelorus with any
authority, but in Lithuania the plaques were originally erected in
Soviet times, and under independent Lithuania these have been put up by
the Lithuanian Government , usually under the advice and control of the
Jewish Community in Vilnius. I would personally be most surprised if
there is any Israeli government involvement in anything like this.

Dr Saul Issroff
<saul@swico.demon.co.uk>

Charlotte Guthmann Opfermann (charlotteo@aol.com) wrote:

There are several mass graves near Minsk, where groups of several hundred
inmates were led into woodsey clearings and shot.
The Israel government has recently started to locate such sites, fence them
off, and erect commemorative markers.
These locations are very hard to find...local people are loath to talk about
it and pretend not to know.
There is also a 'cemetery for hundreds of Belarussian villages destroyed by
the Wehrmacht' named CHATYN. Some of these villages were never re-built or re-
settled.
There is a LONG side at Chatyn, about two city blocks long, with names of such
ghettos and concentration camps and each has a central marker, listing
thousands (as many as 800,000) dead.


Speakers sought #general

Sallyann Sack <sallyannsack@...>
 

Shirley Wilcox, president of the (U.S.)National Genealogical Society has
asked me to publicize the following:

"NGS is now accepting program proposals (due March 18, 1999) for the Year
2000 Conference-in-the States to be held May 31-June 3, 2000 in
Providence, Rhode Island."

"The focus of this conference will be the nature and extent of
immigration into New Englad over the centuries and the diverse culture
that has resulted."

"Possible lecture topics include...all immigrant groups and their
origins..." "Prsentations that demonstrate the use of computer software
and other technological tools in research and publication of family
history are particularly sought."

Questions may be directed to Joyce S. Pendery at <JPendery@aol.com>.

Sallyann Amdur Sack, editor
AVOTAYNU, the International Review of Jewish Genealogy


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Deportation to Minsk #belarus

Dr Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Charlotte gives a figure of 800,000 people killed in this area. I would
be interested in any references to the numbers of Jews killed in or
around Minsk. On a visit in 1997 our guide indicated a figure of around
600,000 people. The one reference to this in the Encyclopaedia of the
Holocaust, entry by Shalom Cholawski, where he quotes an unspecified
Soviet source as estimating the number of people killed in Maly
Trostinets at over two hundred thousand. The monument at Bolshoi
Trostinets gives a figure of 201,500 peaceful citizens, partisans and
red army prisoners of war. ( No Jews were mentioned in Soviet times,
this has probably now been changed).

I also find her reference to 'Israeli Government erecting memorial
plaques' a little unusual. I cannot talk about Byelorus with any
authority, but in Lithuania the plaques were originally erected in
Soviet times, and under independent Lithuania these have been put up by
the Lithuanian Government , usually under the advice and control of the
Jewish Community in Vilnius. I would personally be most surprised if
there is any Israeli government involvement in anything like this.

Dr Saul Issroff
<saul@swico.demon.co.uk>

Charlotte Guthmann Opfermann (charlotteo@aol.com) wrote:

There are several mass graves near Minsk, where groups of several hundred
inmates were led into woodsey clearings and shot.
The Israel government has recently started to locate such sites, fence them
off, and erect commemorative markers.
These locations are very hard to find...local people are loath to talk about
it and pretend not to know.
There is also a 'cemetery for hundreds of Belarussian villages destroyed by
the Wehrmacht' named CHATYN. Some of these villages were never re-built or re-
settled.
There is a LONG side at Chatyn, about two city blocks long, with names of such
ghettos and concentration camps and each has a central marker, listing
thousands (as many as 800,000) dead.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Speakers sought #general

Sallyann Sack <sallyannsack@...>
 

Shirley Wilcox, president of the (U.S.)National Genealogical Society has
asked me to publicize the following:

"NGS is now accepting program proposals (due March 18, 1999) for the Year
2000 Conference-in-the States to be held May 31-June 3, 2000 in
Providence, Rhode Island."

"The focus of this conference will be the nature and extent of
immigration into New Englad over the centuries and the diverse culture
that has resulted."

"Possible lecture topics include...all immigrant groups and their
origins..." "Prsentations that demonstrate the use of computer software
and other technological tools in research and publication of family
history are particularly sought."

Questions may be directed to Joyce S. Pendery at <JPendery@aol.com>.

Sallyann Amdur Sack, editor
AVOTAYNU, the International Review of Jewish Genealogy


Zichron Kadashim #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Is there anyone out there who is familiar with a book called Zichron
Kadashim: L'Yehudi Carpataros-Marmarosh >from the UC Berkeley Library. The author is Shlomo Rozman. The book, which appears to be written in Yiddish, has a number of photo illustrations and includes a list of towns and a memorial list of persons who perished. I can read a number of the names and places but they don't seem to be arranged in any kind of alphabetical order. There's a lengthy table of contents, but no index.

It would be easier for me to try to find names if I had some idea of the
contents and organization of this work.

Vivian Kahn

mod. Hopefully, others can assist you with your question. If not, I am familiar with the book and I can assist (however, you'll have to take a number). In general, this books is a Yizkor book for the region of Subcarpathian Ruthenia (AKA as Karpatho-Rus or Zakarpatskaya Oblast). The emphasis is on the Chassdic communities there, but of course, the information on the ghettoization, deportation and afterwards is applicable to all the Jews >from that region. LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Zichron Kadashim #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Is there anyone out there who is familiar with a book called Zichron
Kadashim: L'Yehudi Carpataros-Marmarosh >from the UC Berkeley Library. The author is Shlomo Rozman. The book, which appears to be written in Yiddish, has a number of photo illustrations and includes a list of towns and a memorial list of persons who perished. I can read a number of the names and places but they don't seem to be arranged in any kind of alphabetical order. There's a lengthy table of contents, but no index.

It would be easier for me to try to find names if I had some idea of the
contents and organization of this work.

Vivian Kahn

mod. Hopefully, others can assist you with your question. If not, I am familiar with the book and I can assist (however, you'll have to take a number). In general, this books is a Yizkor book for the region of Subcarpathian Ruthenia (AKA as Karpatho-Rus or Zakarpatskaya Oblast). The emphasis is on the Chassdic communities there, but of course, the information on the ghettoization, deportation and afterwards is applicable to all the Jews >from that region. LS


Re: Suni #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Dear Genners,

As Michael Bernet suggest , it can be that the name Suni is a nickname for
Sonya. I find few names that match perhaps also the nickname Suni. The names
Sheine, Sini, Shinlin, it can also came >from the name Zina or Zani. But I
think that the name Suni is a corruption of the name Jenny, and why ? in
Yiddish we write the name Jenny with the next letters :
Shin-Ayin-Nun-Nun-Yud and >from the Yiddish name Shanny to Suni is a short way.
Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


* address request #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello all,

I need to correspond with the Beate Klarsfeld Foundation. Does anybody
knows their email address or URL of their site? Please answer in private.

Thanks in advance
Tom