Date   

Re: Rita Permut #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rpollero@...>
 

I'd like to thank SIG members who have written to express their
concern and offers of help to Rita Permut, Gesher Galicia member and
volunteer in charge of back issues.

I am happy to report that Rita is now back in Maryland. She was badly
injured in a fall on the cruise ship while returning >from Antarctica.
She was hospitalized in Tierra del Fuego while in Argentina, and again
now in Maryland for a short time until she undergoes rehabilitation.

Rita's daughter asked that there be no visitors at this time, although
cards and well wishes are welcome. Send cards to her home address.
Rita is member 184 and her address is in the Gesher Galicia Family
Finder.

Please do NOT send e-mail messages to Rita at this time. She is
unable to read her e-mail and her daughter is pretty busy helping her,
as you might well imagine.

I will inform the membership when Suzan has obtained the back issues
from Rita's daughter.
Shelley Kellerman Pollero
<rpollero@umd5.umd.edu>
Severna Park, Maryland
Gesher Galicia Coordinator

Researching in Galicia: KELLERMAN (Brzozow, Sanok); BLECHNER (Dukla,
Rymanow, Cergowa); BIRNBACH, KAMPEL, ROSER, GROSS (Judaszowka, Rudnik,
Nisko, Lezajsk)

Elsewhere: BASSIOR, BECHER (Zamosc); TENENBAUM (Kobrin); COHN,
LEKHERZAK (Vitebsk)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Rita Permut #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rpollero@...>
 

I'd like to thank SIG members who have written to express their
concern and offers of help to Rita Permut, Gesher Galicia member and
volunteer in charge of back issues.

I am happy to report that Rita is now back in Maryland. She was badly
injured in a fall on the cruise ship while returning >from Antarctica.
She was hospitalized in Tierra del Fuego while in Argentina, and again
now in Maryland for a short time until she undergoes rehabilitation.

Rita's daughter asked that there be no visitors at this time, although
cards and well wishes are welcome. Send cards to her home address.
Rita is member 184 and her address is in the Gesher Galicia Family
Finder.

Please do NOT send e-mail messages to Rita at this time. She is
unable to read her e-mail and her daughter is pretty busy helping her,
as you might well imagine.

I will inform the membership when Suzan has obtained the back issues
from Rita's daughter.
Shelley Kellerman Pollero
<rpollero@umd5.umd.edu>
Severna Park, Maryland
Gesher Galicia Coordinator

Researching in Galicia: KELLERMAN (Brzozow, Sanok); BLECHNER (Dukla,
Rymanow, Cergowa); BIRNBACH, KAMPEL, ROSER, GROSS (Judaszowka, Rudnik,
Nisko, Lezajsk)

Elsewhere: BASSIOR, BECHER (Zamosc); TENENBAUM (Kobrin); COHN,
LEKHERZAK (Vitebsk)


Re: YIVO's Guide to Landsmanschaftn #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rpollero@...>
 

Lenore Tishman wrote:

Hello, Galicia S.I.G Discussion Group members (Fellow Galitz-niks!)
Here's a good resource, listed in Suzan Wynne's book.
YIVO has published A GUIDE TO YIVO's LANDSMANSCHAFTEN ARCHIVE by
Rosaline Schwartz and Susan Milamed. NY: YIVO Institute for
Jewish Research, 1986. Ten Bucks [$10.00], says the Internet,
will get you a copy >from The Jewish Book Center of Workmen's
Circle. Further, it describes this book as follows:
"YIVO'S Landmanshaften Archive house materials >from over 800
societies. Records include everything >from anniversary
celebrations and banquet programs to minutes of society
meetings and cemetery maps. This finder's aid also provides
historical information on the societies and geographic
information on their home towns."
Phone the Book Center at 1-800-922-2558, EXT. 285 to order this
book #4677 sc $10
Lenore Tishman (#889)
Sarasota, Florida
Reply to: <tishmom@sprintmail.com>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: YIVO's Guide to Landsmanschaftn #galicia

Shelley K. Pollero <rpollero@...>
 

Lenore Tishman wrote:

Hello, Galicia S.I.G Discussion Group members (Fellow Galitz-niks!)
Here's a good resource, listed in Suzan Wynne's book.
YIVO has published A GUIDE TO YIVO's LANDSMANSCHAFTEN ARCHIVE by
Rosaline Schwartz and Susan Milamed. NY: YIVO Institute for
Jewish Research, 1986. Ten Bucks [$10.00], says the Internet,
will get you a copy >from The Jewish Book Center of Workmen's
Circle. Further, it describes this book as follows:
"YIVO'S Landmanshaften Archive house materials >from over 800
societies. Records include everything >from anniversary
celebrations and banquet programs to minutes of society
meetings and cemetery maps. This finder's aid also provides
historical information on the societies and geographic
information on their home towns."
Phone the Book Center at 1-800-922-2558, EXT. 285 to order this
book #4677 sc $10
Lenore Tishman (#889)
Sarasota, Florida
Reply to: <tishmom@sprintmail.com>


Need help at Cong. Beth, Bethesda, MD #general

Faerosen@...
 

Dear Jewishgenners

am hopeing that someone who is a member of Congregation Beth of Montgomery
County in Bethesda, Maryland and can help me.
I know that in January of 1986 Kaddish was said for Max ROSHINSKY. This is
my Grandfather's name and I would like to find out who said Kaddish.
I wrote to Congregation Beth a couple of years ago and they never answered
my letter.
Thanks
Fae Rosen
Huntington Beach, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help at Cong. Beth, Bethesda, MD #general

Faerosen@...
 

Dear Jewishgenners

am hopeing that someone who is a member of Congregation Beth of Montgomery
County in Bethesda, Maryland and can help me.
I know that in January of 1986 Kaddish was said for Max ROSHINSKY. This is
my Grandfather's name and I would like to find out who said Kaddish.
I wrote to Congregation Beth a couple of years ago and they never answered
my letter.
Thanks
Fae Rosen
Huntington Beach, CA


Re: Draft Question #general

Vcharny@...
 

In a message dated 3/14/99 12:04:56 AM Central Standard Time, Jessica Schein
<jesshschein@worldnet.att.net> writes:

<<
How would you assess the likelihood that a 26-year-old would be drafted
in 1903, especially if he came >from a larger town or city (supposedly
Minsk)? Let's assume that he was single (which is odd). What was the age
cohort that was drafted? Would his single status have stacked the deck
against him?

To put it succinctly, how probable is his story of changing his name to
escape the Czar's draft committee?
>>

In 1903 to the Russian Army drafted people born between Oct.1 1881 and Oct.1
1882

In Minsk gubernia more than 850 Jews avoided draft in 1903 (and officials
found out about it). For Minsk gubernia that supplied Russian Army with total
numbers of draftees about 10,000 yearly (Jews and non-Jews) it would seem
quite noticeable.

Nevertheless the Russian Army did not suffer >from this. Even more: for the
same mentioned period of 1903 in Russia 3.5% more Jews had been drafted than
required by norm. Makeup for Jews skipped military service was made by other
Jews, plus Jews had to make up for skipped service converted Jews as well.
Physical/medical requirements for military service was less restrictive for
Jews than non-Jews. Jewish men immigrated >from Russia were not excluded from
draft lists, so it made higher percentage of Russian Jews who had to serve in
the Army.

Meanwhile the Russian government made profit >from it. Jewish families of
skipped military service draftees (parents and step parents, brothers and
half-brothers and even their sisters until 1904) were fined of total amount of
300 rubles that costed for many of them lost of the property. Possibly most
of those draftees hid somewhere or immigrated.

Altogether it explains why many Jews couldn't immigrate leaving the rest of
the family behind to suffer even more. Similar policy later was in use in
Soviet Union to hold immigration.

The data I compiled was published in local official periodicals of that time.
Of course there were not published lists of draftees and their families that
weren't caught on breaking the law as well as different exceptions.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Draft Question #general

Vcharny@...
 

In a message dated 3/14/99 12:04:56 AM Central Standard Time, Jessica Schein
<jesshschein@worldnet.att.net> writes:

<<
How would you assess the likelihood that a 26-year-old would be drafted
in 1903, especially if he came >from a larger town or city (supposedly
Minsk)? Let's assume that he was single (which is odd). What was the age
cohort that was drafted? Would his single status have stacked the deck
against him?

To put it succinctly, how probable is his story of changing his name to
escape the Czar's draft committee?
>>

In 1903 to the Russian Army drafted people born between Oct.1 1881 and Oct.1
1882

In Minsk gubernia more than 850 Jews avoided draft in 1903 (and officials
found out about it). For Minsk gubernia that supplied Russian Army with total
numbers of draftees about 10,000 yearly (Jews and non-Jews) it would seem
quite noticeable.

Nevertheless the Russian Army did not suffer >from this. Even more: for the
same mentioned period of 1903 in Russia 3.5% more Jews had been drafted than
required by norm. Makeup for Jews skipped military service was made by other
Jews, plus Jews had to make up for skipped service converted Jews as well.
Physical/medical requirements for military service was less restrictive for
Jews than non-Jews. Jewish men immigrated >from Russia were not excluded from
draft lists, so it made higher percentage of Russian Jews who had to serve in
the Army.

Meanwhile the Russian government made profit >from it. Jewish families of
skipped military service draftees (parents and step parents, brothers and
half-brothers and even their sisters until 1904) were fined of total amount of
300 rubles that costed for many of them lost of the property. Possibly most
of those draftees hid somewhere or immigrated.

Altogether it explains why many Jews couldn't immigrate leaving the rest of
the family behind to suffer even more. Similar policy later was in use in
Soviet Union to hold immigration.

The data I compiled was published in local official periodicals of that time.
Of course there were not published lists of draftees and their families that
weren't caught on breaking the law as well as different exceptions.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


Alternate Surnames #general

Maria Krane
 

Hello Genners,

As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. I realize that
the Jews went through a period of "trying on" names and they shifted back
and forth, and so on. My question is this; should I look at others who
have this "second" surname although they don't have the "other" first
surname? For example, my surname is KREIN and the second surname is OKIN.
Should I seriously consider looking at others in the same town with the
surname Okin, even though their "other" surnames may be NISEN and/or
ABELSOHN? I'm trying different sorting techniques with these surnames and
looking at the fathers'names for clues too. Thanks for any suggestions.

Regards,
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Fl.
MariaKrane@aol.com

researching: KREYN/KREIN/OKIN/SCHULDNER in Vegery, Lithuania,
KREIN/SCHULDNER in Zagare, Lithuania,
KATZ/HOFFMAN/RACHMAN/REMER in Salakas, Lithuania and
HOFFMAN/RACHMAN in Svir, Belarus.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Alternate Surnames #general

Maria Krane
 

Hello Genners,

As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. I realize that
the Jews went through a period of "trying on" names and they shifted back
and forth, and so on. My question is this; should I look at others who
have this "second" surname although they don't have the "other" first
surname? For example, my surname is KREIN and the second surname is OKIN.
Should I seriously consider looking at others in the same town with the
surname Okin, even though their "other" surnames may be NISEN and/or
ABELSOHN? I'm trying different sorting techniques with these surnames and
looking at the fathers'names for clues too. Thanks for any suggestions.

Regards,
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Fl.
MariaKrane@aol.com

researching: KREYN/KREIN/OKIN/SCHULDNER in Vegery, Lithuania,
KREIN/SCHULDNER in Zagare, Lithuania,
KATZ/HOFFMAN/RACHMAN/REMER in Salakas, Lithuania and
HOFFMAN/RACHMAN in Svir, Belarus.


19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 8-13, 1999- Bulletin #17 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Check out the article, Genealogical Resources in New York City -- Abound for
19th Annual Conference. The article, written by Paul Silverstone and Estelle
Guzik, JGS (NY) Executive Council members, appeared in the Winter 1998 issue
of Avotaynu. The article has been reproduced (and updated) for the Conference
web site and can be found at http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf

A copy of the Conference registration application can be printed directly from
the web site (http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf). Check out the latest updated
list of lectures planned. The Conference will be held at the Mariott Marquis
Hotel, located in the heart of revitalized Times Square -- accessible to all
archives, libraries and resources for genealogical research. Provide the
Conference information when you make your reservations with the hotel and
airlines in order to receive the special rates for attendees.

Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)
PS If you have any questions, the Conference email address is:
nyc99conf@aol.com
For questions related to New York repositories, email jgsny@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 8-13, 1999- Bulletin #17 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Check out the article, Genealogical Resources in New York City -- Abound for
19th Annual Conference. The article, written by Paul Silverstone and Estelle
Guzik, JGS (NY) Executive Council members, appeared in the Winter 1998 issue
of Avotaynu. The article has been reproduced (and updated) for the Conference
web site and can be found at http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf

A copy of the Conference registration application can be printed directly from
the web site (http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf). Check out the latest updated
list of lectures planned. The Conference will be held at the Mariott Marquis
Hotel, located in the heart of revitalized Times Square -- accessible to all
archives, libraries and resources for genealogical research. Provide the
Conference information when you make your reservations with the hotel and
airlines in order to receive the special rates for attendees.

Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)
PS If you have any questions, the Conference email address is:
nyc99conf@aol.com
For questions related to New York repositories, email jgsny@aol.com


Re: hats, beards, coats, names! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Warren Blatt wrote:

Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@Brown.edu> wrote:

No, no, a thousand times no! These are names of Latin and Greek origin,
going back to the Roman Empire! Augusta, Valentina and Magdalina are so
utterly unJewish (sound like Eastern orthodox Christians -- but could be
other Christians, too) that I would be very surprised if their owners were
Jews -- unless they were ethnic Jews who had converted to Christianity and
adopted Christian names?
I've actually seen quite a few Jewish "Augusta"s. It was not an
uncommon Jewish name in late-19th and early 20th-century America.
True, no doubt; but the time frame makes an enormous difference, and that
fact is highly relevant when doing stuff like genealogy. Late 19th and
early 20th-century America included quite a number of German-Jewish
immigrants (often fully assimilated to German culture before they came
here) and of course their descendantswould have been named after them. I
believe the name Augusta was quite common in Germany at that time.

But the original inquiry involved Jews who had already emigrated to
England in the mid- 19th century and who had received their names in the
first half of that century, at a time when a name like Augusta would have
been far less common among Jews. (As for Valentina and Magdalena, back in
that time-frame this would have been even less likely than Augusta- which
is not to say it couldn't happen -- Never say never! -- but highly
unlikely.) Oone should always take the historical and geographic context
into consideration when trying to answer this kind of question. The
answer is rarely homogeneous or global, but is likely to be different in
different times and places.

"Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis" as the old saying goes.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: hats, beards, coats, names! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Warren Blatt wrote:

Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@Brown.edu> wrote:

No, no, a thousand times no! These are names of Latin and Greek origin,
going back to the Roman Empire! Augusta, Valentina and Magdalina are so
utterly unJewish (sound like Eastern orthodox Christians -- but could be
other Christians, too) that I would be very surprised if their owners were
Jews -- unless they were ethnic Jews who had converted to Christianity and
adopted Christian names?
I've actually seen quite a few Jewish "Augusta"s. It was not an
uncommon Jewish name in late-19th and early 20th-century America.
True, no doubt; but the time frame makes an enormous difference, and that
fact is highly relevant when doing stuff like genealogy. Late 19th and
early 20th-century America included quite a number of German-Jewish
immigrants (often fully assimilated to German culture before they came
here) and of course their descendantswould have been named after them. I
believe the name Augusta was quite common in Germany at that time.

But the original inquiry involved Jews who had already emigrated to
England in the mid- 19th century and who had received their names in the
first half of that century, at a time when a name like Augusta would have
been far less common among Jews. (As for Valentina and Magdalena, back in
that time-frame this would have been even less likely than Augusta- which
is not to say it couldn't happen -- Never say never! -- but highly
unlikely.) Oone should always take the historical and geographic context
into consideration when trying to answer this kind of question. The
answer is rarely homogeneous or global, but is likely to be different in
different times and places.

"Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis" as the old saying goes.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Re: Value of a Zloty #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

The value of a zloty......
On our shtetlinks web page...
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm

We have the wonderful memories of a man who was born in Zmigrod.......what
it was like to grow up in a Galician shtetl......

..I quote some of these memories as I think they answer what a zloty would
be worth about 1935-40....

"........A cutter could make 1 zloty per day (2 kilos of bread was 1/2
zloty, a Kilo sugar was almost a zloty). "



PhyllisKramer, Wilton Conn, Savannah Ga and NYC ......
searching
KRAMER, WISNER >from Jasienica Rosielna, Poland
STECHER/STECKLER, TRACHMAN, FEIR/FEUER, KORNREICH (Zmigrod & Rymanow, Pol)
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL (Strzyzow & Dubiecko, Pol)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN, MAURER, MERL, WEICH (Rogatin & Bolechov, Ukr)
LINDNER, FISCHER, LAZAROWICH (Iasi, Romania)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Value of a Zloty #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

The value of a zloty......
On our shtetlinks web page...
http://www.jewishgen.org/shtetlinks/zmigrod/zmigrod.htm

We have the wonderful memories of a man who was born in Zmigrod.......what
it was like to grow up in a Galician shtetl......

..I quote some of these memories as I think they answer what a zloty would
be worth about 1935-40....

"........A cutter could make 1 zloty per day (2 kilos of bread was 1/2
zloty, a Kilo sugar was almost a zloty). "



PhyllisKramer, Wilton Conn, Savannah Ga and NYC ......
searching
KRAMER, WISNER >from Jasienica Rosielna, Poland
STECHER/STECKLER, TRACHMAN, FEIR/FEUER, KORNREICH (Zmigrod & Rymanow, Pol)
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL (Strzyzow & Dubiecko, Pol)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN, MAURER, MERL, WEICH (Rogatin & Bolechov, Ukr)
LINDNER, FISCHER, LAZAROWICH (Iasi, Romania)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Rabbis in Belarus #belarus

E.Doberstein <edoberst@...>
 

After finally discovering the names of my maternal Grandparents, from
Svarycewicze,[near Pinsk], Belarus. I have been unable to go back any
further. My Mother said that her Grandfather was a Rabbi, but not which
Grandfather ! Her parents' names were : Shaindle MODACK and Isaac DRYZUN.My
question to the group is : Does anyone know of a book , or list of Rabbis
in Belarus, covering the time-period
1850-1920 ?

Evelyn Doberstein
Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada

E-mail <edoberst@compusmart.ab.ca>

MODERATOR NOTE: About a month ago, someone posted a message about a book
of Rabbis >from Russia. Check out the SIG message archives. Also check
out <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/deych.htm>, Jewish Religious
Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854. There were two people listed
with the name DREIZIN. This database is linked on the Belarus SIG website
as well as the JewishGen website. Both sites have valuable information
in help researchers and I urge those of you who haven't explored the
various links to those sites to do so at once.


Rabbis in Belarus #belarus

E.Doberstein <edoberst@...>
 

After finally discovering the names of my maternal Grandparents, from
Svarycewicze,[near Pinsk], Belarus. I have been unable to go back any
further. My Mother said that her Grandfather was a Rabbi, but not which
Grandfather ! Her parents' names were : Shaindle MODACK and Isaac DRYZUN.My
question to the group is : Does anyone know of a book , or list of Rabbis
in Belarus, covering the time-period
1850-1920 ?

Evelyn Doberstein
Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada

E-mail <edoberst@compusmart.ab.ca>

MODERATOR NOTE: About a month ago, someone posted a message about a book
of Rabbis >from Russia. Check out the SIG message archives. Also check
out <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/deych.htm>, Jewish Religious
Personnel in the Russian Empire, 1853-1854. There were two people listed
with the name DREIZIN. This database is linked on the Belarus SIG website
as well as the JewishGen website. Both sites have valuable information
in help researchers and I urge those of you who haven't explored the
various links to those sites to do so at once.


Re: Alternate Surnames #poland

Carol Baker <carolcbaker@...>
 

In a message dated 3/15/99 8:32:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
MariaKrane@aol.com writes:

<<
Hello Genners,
As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. My question is this;
should I look at others who have this "second" surname although they don't have the
"other" first surname? For example, my surname is Krein and the second surname
is Okin. Should I seriously consider looking at others in the same town with
the surname Okin, even though their "other" surnames may be Nisen and/or Abelsohn?

Dear Maria,

I think you misunderstood the significance of Surname2 in the Vegeriai 1858
Revision List (a field not original to the document but added by the inputters
in an attempt to make searching easier.) It simply means that a family by the
name of OKIN was living with a family by the name of KREYN when the census
taker came by in 1858. They may or may not have been related.

In the same town, my GREENBLATT family is listed with the FAYN family at #44,
but in this case the record clearly states that Wolf FAYN is the brother of
Erukhim GREENBLATT (Grinblatt).

When the 1858 Revision List is added to the ALD, the "Surname2" field name
will be changed to read "Other Families in the Household"

Hope this helps.

Carol Baker
Siauliai District Coordinator

LIPSCHITZ, WEGER - Vegeriai and Siauliai, Lithuania & Johannesburg
GREENBLATT - Vegeriai, Lithuania
TUORREA/TVERIA - Gargzdai, Lithuania


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Alternate Surnames #lithuania

Carol Baker <carolcbaker@...>
 

In a message dated 3/15/99 8:32:29 AM Pacific Standard Time,
MariaKrane@aol.com writes:

<<
Hello Genners,
As I went through the 1858 Revision List for the town of Vegery in
Lithuania, I noted that our family had a second surname. My question is this;
should I look at others who have this "second" surname although they don't have the
"other" first surname? For example, my surname is Krein and the second surname
is Okin. Should I seriously consider looking at others in the same town with
the surname Okin, even though their "other" surnames may be Nisen and/or Abelsohn?

Dear Maria,

I think you misunderstood the significance of Surname2 in the Vegeriai 1858
Revision List (a field not original to the document but added by the inputters
in an attempt to make searching easier.) It simply means that a family by the
name of OKIN was living with a family by the name of KREYN when the census
taker came by in 1858. They may or may not have been related.

In the same town, my GREENBLATT family is listed with the FAYN family at #44,
but in this case the record clearly states that Wolf FAYN is the brother of
Erukhim GREENBLATT (Grinblatt).

When the 1858 Revision List is added to the ALD, the "Surname2" field name
will be changed to read "Other Families in the Household"

Hope this helps.

Carol Baker
Siauliai District Coordinator

LIPSCHITZ, WEGER - Vegeriai and Siauliai, Lithuania & Johannesburg
GREENBLATT - Vegeriai, Lithuania
TUORREA/TVERIA - Gargzdai, Lithuania