Date   

Tavrigers in Baltimore #lithuania

ELGOLD1@...
 

Ann Rabinowitz asked for information on Tavrigers (Jews >from Taurage,
Lithuania) who went to Baltimore, MD. I do know that the synagogue Anshe
Emunah, which was located on Hanover Street in Baltimore and was founded in
the 1880s was called the "Tavriger Shul." My great-great grandparents, Kasriel
(John) and Anna Leah Markel (Merkel) were members and lived across the street.
They were >from Raseiniai, however, so there were at least some members who
were not Tavrigers but were >from the larger surrounding area of Lithuania.
There is a short published history of Anshe Emunah which you can get at the
Jewish Museum of Maryland's library (15 Lloyd Street, Baltimore...see their
web site). The synagogue merged with two others and is now called Liberty
Jewish Center. The history is actually a history of Liberty Jewish Center
giving the background of all three shuls. The synagogue has an old burial
ground at the United Hebrew Cemetery on Washington Road, just off the
Baltimore Beltway. I think they call it the Havover section. Hope this helps.
Eric Goldstein
ELGOLD1@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Tavrigers in Baltimore #lithuania

ELGOLD1@...
 

Ann Rabinowitz asked for information on Tavrigers (Jews >from Taurage,
Lithuania) who went to Baltimore, MD. I do know that the synagogue Anshe
Emunah, which was located on Hanover Street in Baltimore and was founded in
the 1880s was called the "Tavriger Shul." My great-great grandparents, Kasriel
(John) and Anna Leah Markel (Merkel) were members and lived across the street.
They were >from Raseiniai, however, so there were at least some members who
were not Tavrigers but were >from the larger surrounding area of Lithuania.
There is a short published history of Anshe Emunah which you can get at the
Jewish Museum of Maryland's library (15 Lloyd Street, Baltimore...see their
web site). The synagogue merged with two others and is now called Liberty
Jewish Center. The history is actually a history of Liberty Jewish Center
giving the background of all three shuls. The synagogue has an old burial
ground at the United Hebrew Cemetery on Washington Road, just off the
Baltimore Beltway. I think they call it the Havover section. Hope this helps.
Eric Goldstein
ELGOLD1@aol.com


Re: Dr. Lev STEINHAUER and other STEINHAUER survivors of Vilna #lithuania

Len613@...
 

In a message dated 3/8/99 10:23:14 PM Eastern Standard Time,
klb@users.mcmedia.com.au writes:

<< saac STEINHAUER - who also possibly emigrated to Israel after the war and
Lipman-Sochor STEINHAUER - possibly emigrated to England/Italy? after the
war - he was described as a businessman/merchant/dealer.

Do any of these names ring any bells with anyone? TIA. >>

I have a friend by the name of Steinhacker -- might this be a variant?

Len Mansky


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Dr. Lev STEINHAUER and other STEINHAUER survivors of Vilna #lithuania

Len613@...
 

In a message dated 3/8/99 10:23:14 PM Eastern Standard Time,
klb@users.mcmedia.com.au writes:

<< saac STEINHAUER - who also possibly emigrated to Israel after the war and
Lipman-Sochor STEINHAUER - possibly emigrated to England/Italy? after the
war - he was described as a businessman/merchant/dealer.

Do any of these names ring any bells with anyone? TIA. >>

I have a friend by the name of Steinhacker -- might this be a variant?

Len Mansky


Re: Vilkomir Uyezd 1858 Revision List Distribution #lithuania

DBH12345
 

In a message dated 3/8/99 7:39:28 PM Pacific Standard Time, HKatz17130@aol.com
writes:

<< I would like to know more about the Vilkomir Uyezd 1858 Revision List
Distribution. Also, how would I make a donation to your group. >>

Dear Henry,

The Vilkomir district research group has acquired, translated and entered
nearly all of the data for ten towns. For a review of the kind of information
which is in the Revision Lists, go to the Introduction to revision lists,
family lists, and censuses at:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/lists.htm>

For donors who have made a significant donation, we are providing the data by
file transfers of Excel spreadsheets, or by diskette.

The group was very fortunate in that all of the major towns' records were
recovered - something not true for other uyezds. We intend to acquire many
more records for additional years, and Jewish community records >from the
Kaunas Archives, so while this data is here, there is a great deal more to do.

The value of having the data yourself is that can search it much more
effectively than on the Internet. See the excellent article on the analysis of
these records by Barry Spinak in the LitvakSIG Online Journal: EXCEL,
SCHMEXCEL, DIG UP THOSE RELATIVES! Go to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/journal.htm>.

Send any contribution, with dues and a notation in the memo field that it is
for the Vilkomir Project to:

LitvakSIG
c/o Peggy Freedman
245 Dalrymple Road
Atlanta, GA 30328

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator LitvakSIG
Coordinator, Vilkomir Uyezd Research Group


PALM BEACH COUNTY :JGSI March meeting #lithuania

Curiousyl@...
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County, Inc.

March Membership Meeting

Date: Wednesday, March 10, 1999

Place: South County Civic Center
16700 Jog Road
Delray Beach, Florida

Time: 1 - 4 P.M.

PROGRAM: MEET THE EXPERTS!

You Have Questions, We Have Answsers.

Our dynamic duo of experts, Genealogist and Author Mona Morris, and Mary
Bordeman, FHC Librarian, will advise and guide us with our personal research
problems.

Mary Bordeman will also elaborate on what holdings are available at the Family
History Center.

Open to members and guests.

For further information, contact:
Al Leeds, Co-President: (561) 496-3354
E-Mail: AlBLeeds@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Vilkomir Uyezd 1858 Revision List Distribution #lithuania

DBH12345
 

In a message dated 3/8/99 7:39:28 PM Pacific Standard Time, HKatz17130@aol.com
writes:

<< I would like to know more about the Vilkomir Uyezd 1858 Revision List
Distribution. Also, how would I make a donation to your group. >>

Dear Henry,

The Vilkomir district research group has acquired, translated and entered
nearly all of the data for ten towns. For a review of the kind of information
which is in the Revision Lists, go to the Introduction to revision lists,
family lists, and censuses at:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/lists.htm>

For donors who have made a significant donation, we are providing the data by
file transfers of Excel spreadsheets, or by diskette.

The group was very fortunate in that all of the major towns' records were
recovered - something not true for other uyezds. We intend to acquire many
more records for additional years, and Jewish community records >from the
Kaunas Archives, so while this data is here, there is a great deal more to do.

The value of having the data yourself is that can search it much more
effectively than on the Internet. See the excellent article on the analysis of
these records by Barry Spinak in the LitvakSIG Online Journal: EXCEL,
SCHMEXCEL, DIG UP THOSE RELATIVES! Go to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak/journal.htm>.

Send any contribution, with dues and a notation in the memo field that it is
for the Vilkomir Project to:

LitvakSIG
c/o Peggy Freedman
245 Dalrymple Road
Atlanta, GA 30328

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator LitvakSIG
Coordinator, Vilkomir Uyezd Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania PALM BEACH COUNTY :JGSI March meeting #lithuania

Curiousyl@...
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Palm Beach County, Inc.

March Membership Meeting

Date: Wednesday, March 10, 1999

Place: South County Civic Center
16700 Jog Road
Delray Beach, Florida

Time: 1 - 4 P.M.

PROGRAM: MEET THE EXPERTS!

You Have Questions, We Have Answsers.

Our dynamic duo of experts, Genealogist and Author Mona Morris, and Mary
Bordeman, FHC Librarian, will advise and guide us with our personal research
problems.

Mary Bordeman will also elaborate on what holdings are available at the Family
History Center.

Open to members and guests.

For further information, contact:
Al Leeds, Co-President: (561) 496-3354
E-Mail: AlBLeeds@aol.com


Cuisine for Geneology #general

Ken Stone <ken@...>
 

I think determining regional cuisine and different names for the same dish
are extremely important for genealogical research.

Switch the scenario to being in Eastern Europe wondering where in America
your ancestors immigrated from. If great grandpa enjoyed wild rice, he may
have been a shtetl dweller in Northern MN. If you heard stories about
grandma picking grapefruit fresh off the trees, maybe she lived in the
Southwest.

Mexican cuisine, Italian, French, BAR-B-CUE, all vary by region. Why
shouldn't old country Jewish food?

Is it a hoagy or sub sandwich? Pop or soda? Thin crust or deep dish?
Casserole or hot dish? Sweet roll or Danish? All these are regional names
for the that particular food.

In Chicago there's a Vienna Red Hot stand on every corner, in Minneapolis
there are none. Street vendors selling roasted nuts and big hot pretzels
with mustard are strictly East coast.

Food provides plenty of clues about where someone is from.

Back to European cuisine and genealogy. I know my grandmother is from
Vienna. She cooked all the classic German dishes but called them by their
Viennese names. Thus spaetzel, the little potato dumplings, are
"knuckle" in Vienna. If I did not know where she was from, but knew about
"knuckle" my research would one day yield someone saying "Oh, that's what
they call spaetzel in Vienna!"

Could not begin to comment on whether corned beef is Irish or Jewish. For
that matter how did pastrami and salami wind up at the Kosher deli?

Ken Stone


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cuisine for Geneology #general

Ken Stone <ken@...>
 

I think determining regional cuisine and different names for the same dish
are extremely important for genealogical research.

Switch the scenario to being in Eastern Europe wondering where in America
your ancestors immigrated from. If great grandpa enjoyed wild rice, he may
have been a shtetl dweller in Northern MN. If you heard stories about
grandma picking grapefruit fresh off the trees, maybe she lived in the
Southwest.

Mexican cuisine, Italian, French, BAR-B-CUE, all vary by region. Why
shouldn't old country Jewish food?

Is it a hoagy or sub sandwich? Pop or soda? Thin crust or deep dish?
Casserole or hot dish? Sweet roll or Danish? All these are regional names
for the that particular food.

In Chicago there's a Vienna Red Hot stand on every corner, in Minneapolis
there are none. Street vendors selling roasted nuts and big hot pretzels
with mustard are strictly East coast.

Food provides plenty of clues about where someone is from.

Back to European cuisine and genealogy. I know my grandmother is from
Vienna. She cooked all the classic German dishes but called them by their
Viennese names. Thus spaetzel, the little potato dumplings, are
"knuckle" in Vienna. If I did not know where she was from, but knew about
"knuckle" my research would one day yield someone saying "Oh, that's what
they call spaetzel in Vienna!"

Could not begin to comment on whether corned beef is Irish or Jewish. For
that matter how did pastrami and salami wind up at the Kosher deli?

Ken Stone


More on the culinary thread #general

Yonatan Ben-David <YoniBenD@...>
 

I think that David Edelman has missed the point. Perhaps he is correct
that both Jews and Italians eat tongue, and that different ethnic groups
sometimes eat similar foods. However, no observant Jew can eat foods
from the Arab grocery unless those foods are certified kosher! Perhaps
Arabs can buy their meat >from a kosher butcher, but the opposite of this
is completely false. Anyway, this is not the forum for discussing the
differences between kosher and non-kosher food, nor those foods
permitted or forbidden to both Muslims and Jews... The idea behind this
culinary thread is that oftentimes the way one cooks is indicitave of
the geographic region >from which one or one's ancestors came. The
methods of preparation, the spices, and even the actual foods themselves
are typical of a certain region, if not country.

When I was studying at university in Boston, I had a very good Catholic
friend. He invited me to his parents' house for dinner, and I was very
pleasantly surprised to find that the meal was stuffed peppers, goulash,
and kugel. Yes - kugel! It turns out that all of this friend's
grandparents had emigrated >from Hungary, and passed their style of
cooking onto their daughter/daughter in law. They had come >from a town
about 20 km >from where my great grandparents had come, and the cooking
was very reminiscent of my own grandmother's cooking. Yet this family
was very Catholic, and knew of no Jewish ancestors...

On a similar note, my grandmother often told a story that when she was
recently married (1930), she and my grandfather were invited to dinner
at the home of another young couple in their neighborhood. My
grandmother said that the food was so deliscious - just like her own
mother's - the meal itself, the seasonings, and the presentation. She
and her neighbour started comparing notes, and discovered that both sets
of their maternal grandparents had come >from the same shtetl in
Lithuania, and later found out that their mothers had known eachother as
children!

So, I do think there is some validity to tracing clues in family
recipes. It isnt foolproof, but it can be interesting...

Yonatan Ben-David
Tel Aviv

Searching for: DAVID and BRENER >from Peatra Neamt, Romania
BRENER >from Sao Paulo, Brazil
KLEIN >from Fehergyarmat and Bezded, Hungary
FISCHER >from Fehergyarmat and Bakca, Hungary
SHARAFSKY >from Vilnius, Lithuania
KULWINSKY / KULVIN >from Vilnius, Lithuania

David Edelman wrote:
I would like to add a word of caution to placing too much stock in
cuisine's connection to geneology: I grew up having beef tongue. My
wife tells me I am the first other person she ever met who also eats
tongue. She is not Jewish, but Northern Italian, where it is also
popular. So, is tongue Jewish, or Northern Italian? Likewise, the
Muslims' dietary laws are similar enough to ours, that
we can go to each others grocers, if need be. So, do not look too
closley at too small a thing, by itself.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More on the culinary thread #general

Yonatan Ben-David <YoniBenD@...>
 

I think that David Edelman has missed the point. Perhaps he is correct
that both Jews and Italians eat tongue, and that different ethnic groups
sometimes eat similar foods. However, no observant Jew can eat foods
from the Arab grocery unless those foods are certified kosher! Perhaps
Arabs can buy their meat >from a kosher butcher, but the opposite of this
is completely false. Anyway, this is not the forum for discussing the
differences between kosher and non-kosher food, nor those foods
permitted or forbidden to both Muslims and Jews... The idea behind this
culinary thread is that oftentimes the way one cooks is indicitave of
the geographic region >from which one or one's ancestors came. The
methods of preparation, the spices, and even the actual foods themselves
are typical of a certain region, if not country.

When I was studying at university in Boston, I had a very good Catholic
friend. He invited me to his parents' house for dinner, and I was very
pleasantly surprised to find that the meal was stuffed peppers, goulash,
and kugel. Yes - kugel! It turns out that all of this friend's
grandparents had emigrated >from Hungary, and passed their style of
cooking onto their daughter/daughter in law. They had come >from a town
about 20 km >from where my great grandparents had come, and the cooking
was very reminiscent of my own grandmother's cooking. Yet this family
was very Catholic, and knew of no Jewish ancestors...

On a similar note, my grandmother often told a story that when she was
recently married (1930), she and my grandfather were invited to dinner
at the home of another young couple in their neighborhood. My
grandmother said that the food was so deliscious - just like her own
mother's - the meal itself, the seasonings, and the presentation. She
and her neighbour started comparing notes, and discovered that both sets
of their maternal grandparents had come >from the same shtetl in
Lithuania, and later found out that their mothers had known eachother as
children!

So, I do think there is some validity to tracing clues in family
recipes. It isnt foolproof, but it can be interesting...

Yonatan Ben-David
Tel Aviv

Searching for: DAVID and BRENER >from Peatra Neamt, Romania
BRENER >from Sao Paulo, Brazil
KLEIN >from Fehergyarmat and Bezded, Hungary
FISCHER >from Fehergyarmat and Bakca, Hungary
SHARAFSKY >from Vilnius, Lithuania
KULWINSKY / KULVIN >from Vilnius, Lithuania

David Edelman wrote:
I would like to add a word of caution to placing too much stock in
cuisine's connection to geneology: I grew up having beef tongue. My
wife tells me I am the first other person she ever met who also eats
tongue. She is not Jewish, but Northern Italian, where it is also
popular. So, is tongue Jewish, or Northern Italian? Likewise, the
Muslims' dietary laws are similar enough to ours, that
we can go to each others grocers, if need be. So, do not look too
closley at too small a thing, by itself.


English-Polish Dictionary Found on the Internet #poland

Steve Levine <gen_news@...>
 

I recently found a nifty little English-Polish dictionary on the Web. It's very useful if you have a contextual idea of what a Polish word might mean and want confirmation. The site is http://galaxy.uci.agh.edu.pl/~polak/slownik/.

--Steve Levine, West Hartford, CT


JRI Poland #Poland English-Polish Dictionary Found on the Internet #poland

Steve Levine <gen_news@...>
 

I recently found a nifty little English-Polish dictionary on the Web. It's very useful if you have a contextual idea of what a Polish word might mean and want confirmation. The site is http://galaxy.uci.agh.edu.pl/~polak/slownik/.

--Steve Levine, West Hartford, CT


Re: Cuisine and Genealogy #general

avrama gingold <rmoderator@...>
 

In 1957, at Louis Guttman's Institute for Applied Social
Research in Jerusalem, a study of new immigrants used
changes in dietary patterns as an index of assimilation.
(I was doing some of the interviewing--on the assumption
that my thick accent would clearly label me as a "new
immigrant.")

avrama

At present moment there is a project ongoing at the Univ. of Miami,
wherein they are trying to amass ethnic recipes and use them to explain
some of the backgrounds of various ethnic groups. It looks like an
interesting way to study culture and ethnicity.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Cuisine and Genealogy #general

avrama gingold <rmoderator@...>
 

In 1957, at Louis Guttman's Institute for Applied Social
Research in Jerusalem, a study of new immigrants used
changes in dietary patterns as an index of assimilation.
(I was doing some of the interviewing--on the assumption
that my thick accent would clearly label me as a "new
immigrant.")

avrama

At present moment there is a project ongoing at the Univ. of Miami,
wherein they are trying to amass ethnic recipes and use them to explain
some of the backgrounds of various ethnic groups. It looks like an
interesting way to study culture and ethnicity.


Help NARA Philadelphia #general

Colonel James J. Becker <jjbecker@...>
 

Seeking help in the Philadelphia Branch of the National Archives to locate
a Petition & Declaration of Naturalization.

The Naturalization occurred in Pittsburgh but I'm told the records are now
stored in the National Archives in Philadelphia.

NAME: Israel Lazar Shapiro or Schapira
Born: Sept 1882/3 in Podkamien, Austria or Poland
Married: Mary Wachs in Pittsburgh (15 Sept 1905)

I'm told that the Naturalization is recorded in the records of the US
District Court Pittsburgh.

If anyone has the time to locate the records and the procedure to obtain
copies >from Philadelphia I would greatly appreciate the help.

Thank You

Jim Becker

jjbecker@erols.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help NARA Philadelphia #general

Colonel James J. Becker <jjbecker@...>
 

Seeking help in the Philadelphia Branch of the National Archives to locate
a Petition & Declaration of Naturalization.

The Naturalization occurred in Pittsburgh but I'm told the records are now
stored in the National Archives in Philadelphia.

NAME: Israel Lazar Shapiro or Schapira
Born: Sept 1882/3 in Podkamien, Austria or Poland
Married: Mary Wachs in Pittsburgh (15 Sept 1905)

I'm told that the Naturalization is recorded in the records of the US
District Court Pittsburgh.

If anyone has the time to locate the records and the procedure to obtain
copies >from Philadelphia I would greatly appreciate the help.

Thank You

Jim Becker

jjbecker@erols.com


Re: Please send messages in plain text #latvia

farran <farran@...>
 

My grandfather, Banis (Barnet) Beytin, deserted the Russian Army and settled
in Brooklyn about 1906-7. He came >from Kraslava which is now in Latvia. Does
any one have informantion about Kraslava?

Bill Farran


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Please send messages in plain text #latvia

farran <farran@...>
 

My grandfather, Banis (Barnet) Beytin, deserted the Russian Army and settled
in Brooklyn about 1906-7. He came >from Kraslava which is now in Latvia. Does
any one have informantion about Kraslava?

Bill Farran