Date   

Please send messages in plain text #latvia

Claire Petersky <petersky@...>
 

I think I've requested this before, but I'll do it again.

Please send messages in plain text. If you have fancy formatting, you will
render your messages unreadable to those who operate only in plain text.

Many, many thanks.

Claire Petersky (petersky@halcyon.com)
under construction: http://www.halcyon.com/petersky


Latvia SIG #Latvia Please send messages in plain text #latvia

Claire Petersky <petersky@...>
 

I think I've requested this before, but I'll do it again.

Please send messages in plain text. If you have fancy formatting, you will
render your messages unreadable to those who operate only in plain text.

Many, many thanks.

Claire Petersky (petersky@halcyon.com)
under construction: http://www.halcyon.com/petersky


Hodia? Hoditz? #general

IsraelP <p2o5rock@...>
 

We have a 1951 grave with the woman's Jewish name
heh-aleph-dalet-yud-ayin. (No, not every Anna is Chana.)
Then it may be heh-aleph-dalet-yud-tsadi.

This is seems Yiddish rather than Hebrew. Is it another
Judith derivative or >from the Hodel (Esh-Dat) family
or what?

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hodia? Hoditz? #general

IsraelP <p2o5rock@...>
 

We have a 1951 grave with the woman's Jewish name
heh-aleph-dalet-yud-ayin. (No, not every Anna is Chana.)
Then it may be heh-aleph-dalet-yud-tsadi.

This is seems Yiddish rather than Hebrew. Is it another
Judith derivative or >from the Hodel (Esh-Dat) family
or what?

Israel Pickholtz


Ustilug/Nistilla #general

ssroth@...
 

I have been following Ricki Zunk's notes about the town of Nistilla
with interest as I too have heard of it in my family stories. Since I
could not find any information on it in all the usual sources I gave up
thinking I had heard wrong. When I saw the information Ricki posted
pointed to Ustilug I decided to look on a map and lo and behold it was
right next to Ludmir (Vladimir Volynski) where the rest of the family
was from.
The Jews of Vladimir called their town Ludmir. Does anyone out there
know if the Jews called Ustilug, Nistilla? Thanks

Sheree Roth

Searching:
MOSCOVICS - Velke Kapusany. FRIED - ROTH - UVEGI, Uzhgorod.
JAKUBOVICS-Velke Kapusany. SMULOVICS- Porubka, Slovakia.
SCHOENBERGER, Benatina, Slovakia. SEGAL, Kremenets. KELMER, Austria.
SILVERMAN - LEHRER, Vladimir Volynskiy. SHUSTERMAN, Dziunkow, Kiev.
WACHNOVETSKY- Kulichkov, and Pogrebishche,Kiev. BUCKSTERN- Any.
ROSENSTOCK - EINHORN - KRIEGFELD, Oleyevo Korolevka.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ustilug/Nistilla #general

ssroth@...
 

I have been following Ricki Zunk's notes about the town of Nistilla
with interest as I too have heard of it in my family stories. Since I
could not find any information on it in all the usual sources I gave up
thinking I had heard wrong. When I saw the information Ricki posted
pointed to Ustilug I decided to look on a map and lo and behold it was
right next to Ludmir (Vladimir Volynski) where the rest of the family
was from.
The Jews of Vladimir called their town Ludmir. Does anyone out there
know if the Jews called Ustilug, Nistilla? Thanks

Sheree Roth

Searching:
MOSCOVICS - Velke Kapusany. FRIED - ROTH - UVEGI, Uzhgorod.
JAKUBOVICS-Velke Kapusany. SMULOVICS- Porubka, Slovakia.
SCHOENBERGER, Benatina, Slovakia. SEGAL, Kremenets. KELMER, Austria.
SILVERMAN - LEHRER, Vladimir Volynskiy. SHUSTERMAN, Dziunkow, Kiev.
WACHNOVETSKY- Kulichkov, and Pogrebishche,Kiev. BUCKSTERN- Any.
ROSENSTOCK - EINHORN - KRIEGFELD, Oleyevo Korolevka.


Re: cemetery help #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

Hi All:

I have the booklet that Jonina is talking about. It is not available to
the general public for sale. Matthews is a company that makes bronze
cemetery markers.

The list of names, both male and female is helpful, but not all that
complete. There is a page which shows all of the Hebrew letters and
tells what their names are too. Unfortunately, as a non-Hebrew reader,
several of the letters shown there look very much alike to me (and I'm
sure to others), making it difficult to use that as a way to "read" the
inscriptions. Also, other than a small list of phrases, there really
isn't much help there. It's a great place to start, but it needs more
help that is in the booklet to begin with.

Ricki Zunk

Jonina Duker wrote:

Until someone who knows how to do such things puts up a web site,
people might want to see if the following book is still in print. Book
of Life: a directory of Hebrew names and dates. >from Matthews Memorial
Division, 1315 Liberty Ave. Pgh PA 15226. 1958 (I bought mine in 1991 so
possible ...). 43 pages, last page is a large chart of the Hebrew
letters, both forms, the book includes inscription terms and
abbreviations, dates (week, month, year ), and lists of names with
transliterations with a coding system tied in to make it easy for English
readers. (Disclaimer to save the moderator >from having to write it ... I
have no commercial connection to Matthews.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: cemetery help #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

Hi All:

I have the booklet that Jonina is talking about. It is not available to
the general public for sale. Matthews is a company that makes bronze
cemetery markers.

The list of names, both male and female is helpful, but not all that
complete. There is a page which shows all of the Hebrew letters and
tells what their names are too. Unfortunately, as a non-Hebrew reader,
several of the letters shown there look very much alike to me (and I'm
sure to others), making it difficult to use that as a way to "read" the
inscriptions. Also, other than a small list of phrases, there really
isn't much help there. It's a great place to start, but it needs more
help that is in the booklet to begin with.

Ricki Zunk

Jonina Duker wrote:

Until someone who knows how to do such things puts up a web site,
people might want to see if the following book is still in print. Book
of Life: a directory of Hebrew names and dates. >from Matthews Memorial
Division, 1315 Liberty Ave. Pgh PA 15226. 1958 (I bought mine in 1991 so
possible ...). 43 pages, last page is a large chart of the Hebrew
letters, both forms, the book includes inscription terms and
abbreviations, dates (week, month, year ), and lists of names with
transliterations with a coding system tied in to make it easy for English
readers. (Disclaimer to save the moderator >from having to write it ... I
have no commercial connection to Matthews.)


Re: Priveleged information #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

Although I have never requested information >from a funeral home, when I
write for copies of death, birth or wedding certificates I tell them I
am the closest living relative. I try to send some document which shows
the linkage of names to me.

The New Jersey Death certificates lists the funeral home, cemetery,
parents names and person who provided the information.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado

Israel Pickholtz wrote:
A New Jersey funeral home claims that it is not allowed to tell me
in what cemetery a person is buried, who are the next of kin and
even whether or not they did the funeral, unless I prove I am next of
kin. They say this is the law.
In this day and age??


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Priveleged information #general

Herb <herbiem@...>
 

Although I have never requested information >from a funeral home, when I
write for copies of death, birth or wedding certificates I tell them I
am the closest living relative. I try to send some document which shows
the linkage of names to me.

The New Jersey Death certificates lists the funeral home, cemetery,
parents names and person who provided the information.

Herb Meyers
Boulder, Colorado

Israel Pickholtz wrote:
A New Jersey funeral home claims that it is not allowed to tell me
in what cemetery a person is buried, who are the next of kin and
even whether or not they did the funeral, unless I prove I am next of
kin. They say this is the law.
In this day and age??


Re: Jewish trades and migration in Poland #general

JJG613 <jjg613@...>
 

This is the puzzler... The family name was Lakumski. The translation,
according to the Polish Names book, is something to do with salmon ( as in
Laks = lox).
Which Polish names book are you referring to? I checked my copy of Beider's
Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Kingdom of Poland and could find no
reference to the surname LAKUMSKI. I tried alternate spellings but still no
luck.

The closest thing I found was LAKOWSKI, which comes >from the Polish "Lak"
meaning sealing wax.

Laks does equate to salmon, but I'm not so sure tha is relavent to your family.

Good luck,

Jonathan Goldmacher
New York, NY

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Towns Leader
Przasnysz & Pultusk Shtetl CO-OPs


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish trades and migration in Poland #general

JJG613 <jjg613@...>
 

This is the puzzler... The family name was Lakumski. The translation,
according to the Polish Names book, is something to do with salmon ( as in
Laks = lox).
Which Polish names book are you referring to? I checked my copy of Beider's
Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the Kingdom of Poland and could find no
reference to the surname LAKUMSKI. I tried alternate spellings but still no
luck.

The closest thing I found was LAKOWSKI, which comes >from the Polish "Lak"
meaning sealing wax.

Laks does equate to salmon, but I'm not so sure tha is relavent to your family.

Good luck,

Jonathan Goldmacher
New York, NY

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
Towns Leader
Przasnysz & Pultusk Shtetl CO-OPs


Re: Jekabspils, Latvia #general

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

Janet Reagan wrote:

My gggm, Leah JACOBSON (YAACOBSON) was born in Jacobstadt/Jekabpils,
Latvia sometime between 1790 and 1800. Supposedly the shtetl was named
for her family. Information on Latvia that I have found seems to focus on
Riga.
Does anyone out there know of this family? I am curious to know why the
name would be given in honor of a family in the 18th century?
This is really a family-myth like so many other stories told by your
ancestors. Jacobstadt/Jekabpils was found in 1650 by the duke Jacob of
Kurland and it was probably after him it got it's name. Jacob of Kurland
lived between 1610 and 1682 and was the son of duke Wilhelm of Kurland. At
the time he ruled over Kurland he even established colonies in Africa and
America!

Adam Katzeff
Malmö, Sweden
adam.katzeff@mail.bip.net

Searching:
GOLDBERG: Lithuania; Parnu and Tallinn, Estonia; Sweden
KARSON: Glasgow, Scotland
KATZEFF: Lithuania; Cesis, Latvia; Parnu and Tallinn, Estonia; Sweden;
Denmark; Glagow, Scotland; Boston, MA, USA
NEMZOFF: Belarus; Parnu, Estonia; Sweden; Denmark; St Petersburg, Russia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SV: Jekabspils, Latvia #general

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

Janet Reagan wrote:

My gggm, Leah JACOBSON (YAACOBSON) was born in Jacobstadt/Jekabpils,
Latvia sometime between 1790 and 1800. Supposedly the shtetl was named
for her family. Information on Latvia that I have found seems to focus on
Riga.
Does anyone out there know of this family? I am curious to know why the
name would be given in honor of a family in the 18th century?
This is really a family-myth like so many other stories told by your
ancestors. Jacobstadt/Jekabpils was found in 1650 by the duke Jacob of
Kurland and it was probably after him it got it's name. Jacob of Kurland
lived between 1610 and 1682 and was the son of duke Wilhelm of Kurland. At
the time he ruled over Kurland he even established colonies in Africa and
America!

Adam Katzeff
Malmö, Sweden
adam.katzeff@mail.bip.net

Searching:
GOLDBERG: Lithuania; Parnu and Tallinn, Estonia; Sweden
KARSON: Glasgow, Scotland
KATZEFF: Lithuania; Cesis, Latvia; Parnu and Tallinn, Estonia; Sweden;
Denmark; Glagow, Scotland; Boston, MA, USA
NEMZOFF: Belarus; Parnu, Estonia; Sweden; Denmark; St Petersburg, Russia


Re: Cuisine and Genealogy #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

I believe that David's idea has merit. It seems that my family and the
family of my husband's enjoy many of the same foods, but they have
different names for those foods. Also, there are some minor variations
in the seasonings and condiments we use >from each side (applesauce or
sour cream with potato latkes; salt and pepper or cinnamon and sugar on
the matzo brie; sugar or no sugar in the gefilte fish, etc.). There are
lots of ways to look at this subject, and it might prove helpful to know
the differences and where they come from.

At present moment there is a project ongoing at the Univ. of Miami,
wherein they are trying to amass ethnic recipes and use them to explain
some of the backgrounds of various ethnic groups. It looks like an
interesting way to study culture and ethnicity.

Ricki Zunk
Kendall (Miami), FL

David Goldman wrote:


One of the recent postings moved me to want to raise the issue of how
making an inventory of traditional foods in a family could assist in
identifying roots in a particular country or region. It would be possible
that by identifying traditional family foods served on the sabbath and
especially holidays (including what foods are or are not permitted to eat
on Passover), one could determine the origin of one's ancestors that may
hitherto be unknown. This is not fool proof of course, since a number of
Jewish traditional foods are common throughout the diaspora.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cuisine and Genealogy #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

I believe that David's idea has merit. It seems that my family and the
family of my husband's enjoy many of the same foods, but they have
different names for those foods. Also, there are some minor variations
in the seasonings and condiments we use >from each side (applesauce or
sour cream with potato latkes; salt and pepper or cinnamon and sugar on
the matzo brie; sugar or no sugar in the gefilte fish, etc.). There are
lots of ways to look at this subject, and it might prove helpful to know
the differences and where they come from.

At present moment there is a project ongoing at the Univ. of Miami,
wherein they are trying to amass ethnic recipes and use them to explain
some of the backgrounds of various ethnic groups. It looks like an
interesting way to study culture and ethnicity.

Ricki Zunk
Kendall (Miami), FL

David Goldman wrote:


One of the recent postings moved me to want to raise the issue of how
making an inventory of traditional foods in a family could assist in
identifying roots in a particular country or region. It would be possible
that by identifying traditional family foods served on the sabbath and
especially holidays (including what foods are or are not permitted to eat
on Passover), one could determine the origin of one's ancestors that may
hitherto be unknown. This is not fool proof of course, since a number of
Jewish traditional foods are common throughout the diaspora.


Re: Cuisine and Genealogy #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-03-07 02:28:31 EST, davic@pop.erols.com writes:

<< One of the recent postings moved me to want to raise the issue of how
making an inventory of traditional foods in a family could assist in
identifying roots in a particular country or region. It would be possible
that by identifying traditional family foods served on the sabbath and
especially holidays (including what foods are or are not permitted to eat
on Passover), one could determine the origin of one's ancestors that may
hitherto be unknown. This is not fool proof of course, since a number of
Jewish traditional foods are common throughout the diaspora. >>

Yes, but limited. German Jews eat fresh peas on Pesach but not dried ones,
further east dried ones are also forbidden. Sefardim eat beans and peas on
Pesach and rice . . . Recipes differ: cholent ingredients tend to be regional
but the inter-family difference within one locale is likely to be greater than
the inter-locsation difference (wives were often taken >from distant cities and
they brought their own cooking skills and preferences with them and passed
them on to their dayghters.

Names can be more revealing than ingredients: What's Cholent in East Europe
is Vahmin around the Mediterranean and Eingekochtes in Germany. What's Challe
in most of Europe (incl. Frankfurt/Oder) is Daatscher in Frankfurt/Main and
Berches in Nurnberg/Pegnitz.

Cholent is said to be a name of French orifin (J. please correct if I'm
wrong), >from Chau lente, heat slowly. Maybe. would make sense.

I don't think it can help much in finding family locations of origin, it may
be of help when you have two uncles >from Galicia and know that one had a wife
from Litta and the other one had come >from Hungary, and can't recall which was
which.
Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cuisine and Genealogy #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-03-07 02:28:31 EST, davic@pop.erols.com writes:

<< One of the recent postings moved me to want to raise the issue of how
making an inventory of traditional foods in a family could assist in
identifying roots in a particular country or region. It would be possible
that by identifying traditional family foods served on the sabbath and
especially holidays (including what foods are or are not permitted to eat
on Passover), one could determine the origin of one's ancestors that may
hitherto be unknown. This is not fool proof of course, since a number of
Jewish traditional foods are common throughout the diaspora. >>

Yes, but limited. German Jews eat fresh peas on Pesach but not dried ones,
further east dried ones are also forbidden. Sefardim eat beans and peas on
Pesach and rice . . . Recipes differ: cholent ingredients tend to be regional
but the inter-family difference within one locale is likely to be greater than
the inter-locsation difference (wives were often taken >from distant cities and
they brought their own cooking skills and preferences with them and passed
them on to their dayghters.

Names can be more revealing than ingredients: What's Cholent in East Europe
is Vahmin around the Mediterranean and Eingekochtes in Germany. What's Challe
in most of Europe (incl. Frankfurt/Oder) is Daatscher in Frankfurt/Main and
Berches in Nurnberg/Pegnitz.

Cholent is said to be a name of French orifin (J. please correct if I'm
wrong), >from Chau lente, heat slowly. Maybe. would make sense.

I don't think it can help much in finding family locations of origin, it may
be of help when you have two uncles >from Galicia and know that one had a wife
from Litta and the other one had come >from Hungary, and can't recall which was
which.
Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Tombstone Translations #general

Marc Raizman <mraizman@...>
 

Mr. Zunk: One way to deal with the problem would be to copy the words on
a sheet of paper and then find a scanner and have it placed as a
file on the Internet. This would enable those who know Hebrew to
translate the wording and send you the answer. If this is "Greek" to
you, why not ask someone who is computer-knowledgeable. Best.
Marc Raizman

Ricki L. Zunk wrote:

I've been getting lots of information about different parts of some of
my family structure through the use of cemetery records and tombstone
inscriptions. They are a wonderful source of help.

Unfortunately, I cannot read, write, or speak Hebrew (I know, I know,
but leave the lectures until later). So, everytime I need to have a
Hebrew inscription translated, I have to find someone who can. I've
also noted that in several cases, I have gotten different translations
from different people regarding the very same inscription. That can
really be confusing.
SNIP


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tombstone Translations #general

Marc Raizman <mraizman@...>
 

Mr. Zunk: One way to deal with the problem would be to copy the words on
a sheet of paper and then find a scanner and have it placed as a
file on the Internet. This would enable those who know Hebrew to
translate the wording and send you the answer. If this is "Greek" to
you, why not ask someone who is computer-knowledgeable. Best.
Marc Raizman

Ricki L. Zunk wrote:

I've been getting lots of information about different parts of some of
my family structure through the use of cemetery records and tombstone
inscriptions. They are a wonderful source of help.

Unfortunately, I cannot read, write, or speak Hebrew (I know, I know,
but leave the lectures until later). So, everytime I need to have a
Hebrew inscription translated, I have to find someone who can. I've
also noted that in several cases, I have gotten different translations
from different people regarding the very same inscription. That can
really be confusing.
SNIP