Date   

Genealogy event in Israel in November? #sephardic

Arandi Melgar <arandi.melgar@...>
 

If anyone knows about some event or conference on Jewish genealogy in
Israel in November 2016, I would appreciate any information. I'll be
in Israel for some own affairs. Thanks.

Arandi A. Melgar

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Genealogy event in Israel in November? #sephardic

Arandi Melgar <arandi.melgar@...>
 

If anyone knows about some event or conference on Jewish genealogy in
Israel in November 2016, I would appreciate any information. I'll be
in Israel for some own affairs. Thanks.

Arandi A. Melgar

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


(US) The Learning Channel Announces Renewal of Who Do You Think You Are and Long Lost Family #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Learning Channel (TLC) announced on June 9 that Who Do You Think You Are
and Long Lost Family have both been renewed for another season. Who Do You
Think You Are? follows celebrities as they embark on personal journeys of
self-discovery to trace their family trees. Long Lost Family features the
stories of people who have suffered a lifetime of separation >from their
family members.

To read more see: http://tinyurl.com/z5a67to
Original url:
http://www.shedmedia.com/news/1018/TLC-Renews-Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are-and-Long-Lost-Family.aspx

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (US) The Learning Channel Announces Renewal of Who Do You Think You Are and Long Lost Family #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Learning Channel (TLC) announced on June 9 that Who Do You Think You Are
and Long Lost Family have both been renewed for another season. Who Do You
Think You Are? follows celebrities as they embark on personal journeys of
self-discovery to trace their family trees. Long Lost Family features the
stories of people who have suffered a lifetime of separation >from their
family members.

To read more see: http://tinyurl.com/z5a67to
Original url:
http://www.shedmedia.com/news/1018/TLC-Renews-Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are-and-Long-Lost-Family.aspx

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Searching for Jewish Ancestors in Czarist Russia #general

Eli Pridonoff <elipridonoff@...>
 

Hi,

I'm looking for help in locating information about my ancestors that
were born in St. Petersburg around the year 1888. Could anyone help
me with a "personal research service"?

Thank you,
Eli Pridonoff

MODERATOR: Recommendations privately to Eli, please.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for Jewish Ancestors in Czarist Russia #general

Eli Pridonoff <elipridonoff@...>
 

Hi,

I'm looking for help in locating information about my ancestors that
were born in St. Petersburg around the year 1888. Could anyone help
me with a "personal research service"?

Thank you,
Eli Pridonoff

MODERATOR: Recommendations privately to Eli, please.


WEINSTEIN / WAJNSZTAJN / WINNICKI family from Suwalki gub., with connections to Paris and London #general

 

I've posted elsewhere regarding this particular long-running search, but I'm
posting here with slightly new information which I hope will mean something
to somebody!

I'm looking for descendants of a family named WEINSTEIN/WAJNSZTAJN/WINNICKI
from Suwalki gubernia, Poland (towns: Augustow, Przerosl and Suwalki).
In particular I'm trying to find out a male WEINSTEIN who had a brother
called Nisel/Nusen/Nathan WEINSTEIN (b. 1870) living in Paris. Nisel
WEINSTEIN is supposed to have had connections to the Ballet Russes, and
worked as a circusmaster.

This man's parents were, I think, Abel WEINSTEIN/WINNICKI and Froma nee
CZARNIECKA. He had a sister called Chaja Raszka who married a man named
Fajwel FINKOWICZ in Suwalki in 1882. The family also had connections to
Czestochowa.

I believe this man was living in England by 1913 when he and his niece
travelled to Paris to meet his brother but I don't know his first name or
anything else about him.

If this information means anything to you, or you have any ideas about how I
might find out more about him, I'd love to hear >from you.

Many thanks,

Naomi Leon
(Brighton, England)

Surnames: WEINSTEIN/WAJNSZTAJN/WINNICKI, SLOMKOWICZ, SPICMAN
Towns: Augustow, Przerosl, Suwalki, Czestochowa, Paris, London

MODERATOR: Information specific to Naomi's search should be
communicated directly to her. Ideas for research techniques and/or
data sources - that might be of more general interest - may be
communicated to the group.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WEINSTEIN / WAJNSZTAJN / WINNICKI family from Suwalki gub., with connections to Paris and London #general

 

I've posted elsewhere regarding this particular long-running search, but I'm
posting here with slightly new information which I hope will mean something
to somebody!

I'm looking for descendants of a family named WEINSTEIN/WAJNSZTAJN/WINNICKI
from Suwalki gubernia, Poland (towns: Augustow, Przerosl and Suwalki).
In particular I'm trying to find out a male WEINSTEIN who had a brother
called Nisel/Nusen/Nathan WEINSTEIN (b. 1870) living in Paris. Nisel
WEINSTEIN is supposed to have had connections to the Ballet Russes, and
worked as a circusmaster.

This man's parents were, I think, Abel WEINSTEIN/WINNICKI and Froma nee
CZARNIECKA. He had a sister called Chaja Raszka who married a man named
Fajwel FINKOWICZ in Suwalki in 1882. The family also had connections to
Czestochowa.

I believe this man was living in England by 1913 when he and his niece
travelled to Paris to meet his brother but I don't know his first name or
anything else about him.

If this information means anything to you, or you have any ideas about how I
might find out more about him, I'd love to hear >from you.

Many thanks,

Naomi Leon
(Brighton, England)

Surnames: WEINSTEIN/WAJNSZTAJN/WINNICKI, SLOMKOWICZ, SPICMAN
Towns: Augustow, Przerosl, Suwalki, Czestochowa, Paris, London

MODERATOR: Information specific to Naomi's search should be
communicated directly to her. Ideas for research techniques and/or
data sources - that might be of more general interest - may be
communicated to the group.


Findmypast offering Free Access to All US Censuses #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Findmypast is offering free access to all US censuses - 1790-1940.
Registration is required with your name, email address and password. No
credit card information is required. No cut-off date was mentioned on the
site.

This was announced on the findmypast blog

Go to:
http://www.findmypast.com/index/census-records?_ga=1.76589341.922071994.1458759583
[the shortened URL is http://tw.gs/42Tfa5 - MODERATOR]

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Findmypast offering Free Access to All US Censuses #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Findmypast is offering free access to all US censuses - 1790-1940.
Registration is required with your name, email address and password. No
credit card information is required. No cut-off date was mentioned on the
site.

This was announced on the findmypast blog

Go to:
http://www.findmypast.com/index/census-records?_ga=1.76589341.922071994.1458759583
[the shortened URL is http://tw.gs/42Tfa5 - MODERATOR]

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


"Record Searcher" (as distinct from professional genealogist) at Salt Lake #general

David Birnbaum
 

Does anyone have experience with hiring a "certified record searcher" to
look through records at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City and
just copy ones with the family names that interest you - as distinct
from a professional genealogist? The former requires far less expertise
and as such is generally said to be budgeted lower.

Please reply privately to Birnbaum.David@...

David BIRNBAUM
REHOVOT, Israel

Presently researching MAUTLINGER, WEISZBERG, CZIMENT and STEINBACH
in Hungary


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "Record Searcher" (as distinct from professional genealogist) at Salt Lake #general

David Birnbaum
 

Does anyone have experience with hiring a "certified record searcher" to
look through records at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City and
just copy ones with the family names that interest you - as distinct
from a professional genealogist? The former requires far less expertise
and as such is generally said to be budgeted lower.

Please reply privately to Birnbaum.David@...

David BIRNBAUM
REHOVOT, Israel

Presently researching MAUTLINGER, WEISZBERG, CZIMENT and STEINBACH
in Hungary


This week's Yizkor book spotlight on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is "Self-Defense in Dubossar," (http://bit.ly/1UnV7tE) a
small town in Moldova whose Jewish population number 5,219 in 1897. Yehayahu
Kantor recounts, in this excerpt >from the full article, how Jewish
self-defense groups fought back. In addition to the translation in the
online JewishGen Yizkor book collection, it is also available for purchase
in published book form >from the Yizkor Books in Print Project
(http://bit.ly/1VKTb3i).

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1112370238785130:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book spotlight on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is "Self-Defense in Dubossar," (http://bit.ly/1UnV7tE) a
small town in Moldova whose Jewish population number 5,219 in 1897. Yehayahu
Kantor recounts, in this excerpt >from the full article, how Jewish
self-defense groups fought back. In addition to the translation in the
online JewishGen Yizkor book collection, it is also available for purchase
in published book form >from the Yizkor Books in Print Project
(http://bit.ly/1VKTb3i).

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1112370238785130:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Dates of living for KAHN-Cologne, Frankfurt, Bronx, NY #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

Hi,

I'm looking for the dates of birth and death of KAHN, Nelly, born abt.
1900 in COLOGNE and married to BAER, Henry, of Frankfurt/Main. Mr.Henry
BAER lived 18.10.1898-3.2.1963 and has been a doctor in Bronx.

thank you for your help

greatings, Hansmartin Unger, Switzerland- @BOXE



















Hansmartin Unger Rorschacherstr.275a CH-9016 st.gallen 0041 71 288 68 67


German SIG #Germany Re: Dates of living for KAHN-Cologne, Frankfurt, Bronx, NY #germany

Hansmartin Unger <hansmartin.unger@...>
 

Hi,

I'm looking for the dates of birth and death of KAHN, Nelly, born abt.
1900 in COLOGNE and married to BAER, Henry, of Frankfurt/Main. Mr.Henry
BAER lived 18.10.1898-3.2.1963 and has been a doctor in Bronx.

thank you for your help

greatings, Hansmartin Unger, Switzerland- @BOXE



















Hansmartin Unger Rorschacherstr.275a CH-9016 st.gallen 0041 71 288 68 67


FW: Bessarabia Revision Lists #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Here is an addition to my yesterday's message about Revisions.
I am often asked if everything in the records are translated, and also is it
possible that our translated records have errors.

These records are not straight forward hand writings. They could be written
in 1859 for example, but corrected, edited in 1863, 1866, etc. Our policy
of translating is that we are trying to translate everything, but additions
are usually in so small script, written in different ink, not always
visible, almost impossible to read, and of course we cannot spend time on
one record to decipher the whole writing. Occasionally can tell about the
family movement >from one place to another, listing in another town, having
special privileges for farmers, etc. etc. That is why I can tell that
there are might be parts of records not transcribed. That is why might be
important for a researcher to obtain the original record in Russian and see
if anything was missed.

As far as errors, I can tell you that some were made by a person who wrote
the original record... Sometimes the age is wrong, because 15 years old
person has a child of 10 years old... or so, also some names might be
misspelled, and that is before the translation. We have men's section at
the left and women's on the right, and occasionally the surnames on the left
and right are somewhat different. Our rule is to translate the record as
is, and if we think there is an error to mark our opinion in the comment.

Also we are NOT trying to find a surname or name which are close to the one
written in Russian... we are transcribing names phonetically. If you see a
surname in our database like VASERMAN - that is a correct transcription of a
surname written in Russian. Usually you will not find names with letter
"W", because there is no Russian letter (sound) which is transcribed as "W".
I still did not answer my question if our translators with first and second
readers can make a mistake... the answer is yes, it is still possible,
although unlikely with surnames, names.

Please let me know if you have any questions,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2016 10:43 PM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Bessarabia Revision Lists

To all Bessarabia/Moldova researchers:

I want to let you know what is going on with the Bessarabia Revision
Project.

You may saw already the latest update of the Revision records which will be
send to JewishGen by the end of the month.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/databases/RevisionMay2016.pdf

...


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia FW: Bessarabia Revision Lists #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

Here is an addition to my yesterday's message about Revisions.
I am often asked if everything in the records are translated, and also is it
possible that our translated records have errors.

These records are not straight forward hand writings. They could be written
in 1859 for example, but corrected, edited in 1863, 1866, etc. Our policy
of translating is that we are trying to translate everything, but additions
are usually in so small script, written in different ink, not always
visible, almost impossible to read, and of course we cannot spend time on
one record to decipher the whole writing. Occasionally can tell about the
family movement >from one place to another, listing in another town, having
special privileges for farmers, etc. etc. That is why I can tell that
there are might be parts of records not transcribed. That is why might be
important for a researcher to obtain the original record in Russian and see
if anything was missed.

As far as errors, I can tell you that some were made by a person who wrote
the original record... Sometimes the age is wrong, because 15 years old
person has a child of 10 years old... or so, also some names might be
misspelled, and that is before the translation. We have men's section at
the left and women's on the right, and occasionally the surnames on the left
and right are somewhat different. Our rule is to translate the record as
is, and if we think there is an error to mark our opinion in the comment.

Also we are NOT trying to find a surname or name which are close to the one
written in Russian... we are transcribing names phonetically. If you see a
surname in our database like VASERMAN - that is a correct transcription of a
surname written in Russian. Usually you will not find names with letter
"W", because there is no Russian letter (sound) which is transcribed as "W".
I still did not answer my question if our translators with first and second
readers can make a mistake... the answer is yes, it is still possible,
although unlikely with surnames, names.

Please let me know if you have any questions,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator

-----Original Message-----
From: Bessarabia SIG [mailto:bessarabia@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 09, 2016 10:43 PM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Bessarabia Revision Lists

To all Bessarabia/Moldova researchers:

I want to let you know what is going on with the Bessarabia Revision
Project.

You may saw already the latest update of the Revision records which will be
send to JewishGen by the end of the month.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/files/databases/RevisionMay2016.pdf

...


Research at the Bucharest archives #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <soring0412@...>
 

I've had an unexpected trip to Bucharest. I've used a fraction of the
time to visit the Bucharest branch of the National archives to look
for lost relatives (for that one needs weeks not hours) and also to
get an impression of what is available there.
Here's a short report - >from my memory, so if I'm not 100% accurate,
you'll have to forgive me :-).
1. Beware of the steps. If you have problem with steps, that's not the
place for you. There are broken steps to the building. There are steps
from the building entrance to the study room.
2. As soon as the guy in charge of the study room was found, I was
accepted inside the study room and given a permit.
3. The archives have stuff up to 1913.
4. One can order 5 registers per day - for the next bussiness day.
There's some tedious paperwork to make - but the guy in charge have
brought me immediately what I've asked (indexes).
5. The indexes are called opise. There are special registers for these
opise. Up to 1895 - the opise list the names following the record
number. After that, they are alphabetical. Up to 1895 there are no
opise for the death registers.
6. The marriage opise registers (I've looked for the years 1885-1897)
hold 2-3 years each. I don't know about births - since there are much
more births, could be even a register per year.
7. There are roughly 1000 - 1500 marriages per year. Of course, most
aren't Jewish. Took me some 30 minutes to quickly glance for the
Jewish marriages for one year. After two hours, I've decided that I've
had enough...
8. One is allowed to take photos for a 7 RON tax per day. But - you
need to pay at the post office or a bank.
9. The good news - the person in charge of the study room told me they
intend to digitize the indexes and make them public. He thinks it will
be finished in a year plus. He thinks they would like to digitize all
records. No guarantee about that or when it will happen.
10. The bad news - as you might understand, it's quite cumbersome to
research your Bucharest ancestors. It simply takes a long time to find
records.

Regards,

Sorin Goldenberg

Israel


Romania SIG #Romania Research at the Bucharest archives #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <soring0412@...>
 

I've had an unexpected trip to Bucharest. I've used a fraction of the
time to visit the Bucharest branch of the National archives to look
for lost relatives (for that one needs weeks not hours) and also to
get an impression of what is available there.
Here's a short report - >from my memory, so if I'm not 100% accurate,
you'll have to forgive me :-).
1. Beware of the steps. If you have problem with steps, that's not the
place for you. There are broken steps to the building. There are steps
from the building entrance to the study room.
2. As soon as the guy in charge of the study room was found, I was
accepted inside the study room and given a permit.
3. The archives have stuff up to 1913.
4. One can order 5 registers per day - for the next bussiness day.
There's some tedious paperwork to make - but the guy in charge have
brought me immediately what I've asked (indexes).
5. The indexes are called opise. There are special registers for these
opise. Up to 1895 - the opise list the names following the record
number. After that, they are alphabetical. Up to 1895 there are no
opise for the death registers.
6. The marriage opise registers (I've looked for the years 1885-1897)
hold 2-3 years each. I don't know about births - since there are much
more births, could be even a register per year.
7. There are roughly 1000 - 1500 marriages per year. Of course, most
aren't Jewish. Took me some 30 minutes to quickly glance for the
Jewish marriages for one year. After two hours, I've decided that I've
had enough...
8. One is allowed to take photos for a 7 RON tax per day. But - you
need to pay at the post office or a bank.
9. The good news - the person in charge of the study room told me they
intend to digitize the indexes and make them public. He thinks it will
be finished in a year plus. He thinks they would like to digitize all
records. No guarantee about that or when it will happen.
10. The bad news - as you might understand, it's quite cumbersome to
research your Bucharest ancestors. It simply takes a long time to find
records.

Regards,

Sorin Goldenberg

Israel