Date   

Re: Gravestones #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

I think I have written a note of thanks direct to every individual who offered
suggestions and help re the gravestones of my great grandparents Miriam &
Nechamia KAMINSKY, but in case I have left anyone out "Thanks" again. Your
help - without doubt - helps us very amateur family genealogists move forward
one more tiny step.

Rica B Goldberg (Mrs)
Manchester, England

KAMINSKY >from Yanova near Kovna, Lithuania: DIAMOND (Probably DIMONT or
similar) >from Kovno, Lithuania: Chaim ESTRY - a glazier >from Poland:
GOLDBERG possibly Schelenger/Shlesinger/Shloozitel >from Kovno, Lithuania:
COHEN >from Poland!!!!! BERLINSKY >from ??????? LEVY >from Krosniewice,
Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Gravestones #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Dear Genners

I think I have written a note of thanks direct to every individual who offered
suggestions and help re the gravestones of my great grandparents Miriam &
Nechamia KAMINSKY, but in case I have left anyone out "Thanks" again. Your
help - without doubt - helps us very amateur family genealogists move forward
one more tiny step.

Rica B Goldberg (Mrs)
Manchester, England

KAMINSKY >from Yanova near Kovna, Lithuania: DIAMOND (Probably DIMONT or
similar) >from Kovno, Lithuania: Chaim ESTRY - a glazier >from Poland:
GOLDBERG possibly Schelenger/Shlesinger/Shloozitel >from Kovno, Lithuania:
COHEN >from Poland!!!!! BERLINSKY >from ??????? LEVY >from Krosniewice,
Poland


encyclopedias #general

M Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

Genners!!!

I have been reading incoming mails for quite a while now.

Some people seem to regard this as an on line 24 hour help with all
kinds of non relevant questions.

Some of these questions and answers will never ever help anyone with
their family search or with tracking lost relatives (like the cheese
debate for one).

Others ask questions, instead of opening up a regular encyclopedia or an
enc.. Judaica. (who was Ahad Ha'am or Montefiore).

I know that not everyone is up on their Jewish or zionist history, but
come on! Why bother everyone with questions that are easily answered by
other means?

Good luck with all your searches

Merav Schejtman
Jerusalem Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen encyclopedias #general

M Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

Genners!!!

I have been reading incoming mails for quite a while now.

Some people seem to regard this as an on line 24 hour help with all
kinds of non relevant questions.

Some of these questions and answers will never ever help anyone with
their family search or with tracking lost relatives (like the cheese
debate for one).

Others ask questions, instead of opening up a regular encyclopedia or an
enc.. Judaica. (who was Ahad Ha'am or Montefiore).

I know that not everyone is up on their Jewish or zionist history, but
come on! Why bother everyone with questions that are easily answered by
other means?

Good luck with all your searches

Merav Schejtman
Jerusalem Israel


BELARUS WEBSITE UPDATED #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The Belarus SIG Website has now been updated - be sure to check it out!

<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/>

A lot of new information has been added!


--
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@paikin.dk


Belarus SIG #Belarus BELARUS WEBSITE UPDATED #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The Belarus SIG Website has now been updated - be sure to check it out!

<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/>

A lot of new information has been added!


--
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@paikin.dk


Re: Minsk/Pinsk #belarus

Steven Chall <steven.chall@...>
 

Richard Wolpoe writes:
I would be interested in information on my Father's Parents.
Chayim Chaykel (Hyman) Wolpof he migrated >from Minsk to Woodbine, NJ,
(courtesy of Baron de Hirsch) then Philadephia, PA then Brownsville/
Brooklyn, NY
///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\Richard and other new researchers,

Take your time exploring our site. We have a wide variety of databases
to *assist* you in your research. Remember that JewishGen (as an
organization) does *not* "do research"; we provide resources for you.
Have you looked at our JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF)? Even if you don't
find anything now, someone else may find *you* next week. Have you tried
our ShtetlSeeker (JGSS)? Our newest database is the Family Tree of the
Jewish People (FTJP). I hope you also checked out some of the SIGs (Moderator: especially the Belarus SIG site:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/>); new ones are often getting started.
You can search any of our data bases at no charge.

Most of the general questions asked by newcomers to our site are answered
in the JewishGen FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions), available at:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>
or by e-mail for those without Web access. For instructions on how to
obtain copies of the FAQ or other InfoFiles by e-mail, send an e-mail to:
index@mail.jewishgen.org

We strongly recommend that all readers of the JewishGen Discussion Group
(Moderator: and the Belarus SIG Discussion Group)
and users of the other resources of JewishGen read the FAQ. Informed
contributors make the Discussion Group a more useful resource, and
knowledge of the information contained in the FAQ will help you in your
own research.

Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN
for the JewishGen Support Team


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Minsk/Pinsk #belarus

Steven Chall <steven.chall@...>
 

Richard Wolpoe writes:
I would be interested in information on my Father's Parents.
Chayim Chaykel (Hyman) Wolpof he migrated >from Minsk to Woodbine, NJ,
(courtesy of Baron de Hirsch) then Philadephia, PA then Brownsville/
Brooklyn, NY
///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\\///\\Richard and other new researchers,

Take your time exploring our site. We have a wide variety of databases
to *assist* you in your research. Remember that JewishGen (as an
organization) does *not* "do research"; we provide resources for you.
Have you looked at our JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF)? Even if you don't
find anything now, someone else may find *you* next week. Have you tried
our ShtetlSeeker (JGSS)? Our newest database is the Family Tree of the
Jewish People (FTJP). I hope you also checked out some of the SIGs (Moderator: especially the Belarus SIG site:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/>); new ones are often getting started.
You can search any of our data bases at no charge.

Most of the general questions asked by newcomers to our site are answered
in the JewishGen FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions), available at:
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>
or by e-mail for those without Web access. For instructions on how to
obtain copies of the FAQ or other InfoFiles by e-mail, send an e-mail to:
index@mail.jewishgen.org

We strongly recommend that all readers of the JewishGen Discussion Group
(Moderator: and the Belarus SIG Discussion Group)
and users of the other resources of JewishGen read the FAQ. Informed
contributors make the Discussion Group a more useful resource, and
knowledge of the information contained in the FAQ will help you in your
own research.

Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN
for the JewishGen Support Team


fundraising projects for yizkor books #lithuania

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

It gives the Yizkor Book Project great pleasure to announce that three
new fundraising projects have been added to our JewishGenerosity page at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizkortrans.html>.

Tax-deductible donations can now be made for the translation of the yizkor
books >from Goniadz, Poland, Grodno, Belarus, and Rzeszow, Poland. Susanne
Scheraga is coordinating the translation of SEFER YIZKOR GONIADZ, Miriam
Margolyes is coordinating the translation of the GRODNO yizkor book, and
Marian Rubin is coordinating the translation of the RZESZOW yizkor book.

Donations may also be made to the Dokshitsy, Belarus yizkor book
translation project, coordinated by Joel Alpert, and to the Gargzdai,
Lithuania yizkor book project, coordinated by Kevin Ossey.

For more information on the Yizkor Book Project and how you can raise
tax-deductible funds for the translation of a yizkor book, click on to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation.html>.

Our list of translations can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>. Please check this
site frequently as the list expands weekly.

Joyce Field
Translations Manager
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania fundraising projects for yizkor books #lithuania

JoyceField <jfield@...>
 

It gives the Yizkor Book Project great pleasure to announce that three
new fundraising projects have been added to our JewishGenerosity page at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizkortrans.html>.

Tax-deductible donations can now be made for the translation of the yizkor
books >from Goniadz, Poland, Grodno, Belarus, and Rzeszow, Poland. Susanne
Scheraga is coordinating the translation of SEFER YIZKOR GONIADZ, Miriam
Margolyes is coordinating the translation of the GRODNO yizkor book, and
Marian Rubin is coordinating the translation of the RZESZOW yizkor book.

Donations may also be made to the Dokshitsy, Belarus yizkor book
translation project, coordinated by Joel Alpert, and to the Gargzdai,
Lithuania yizkor book project, coordinated by Kevin Ossey.

For more information on the Yizkor Book Project and how you can raise
tax-deductible funds for the translation of a yizkor book, click on to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation.html>.

Our list of translations can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>. Please check this
site frequently as the list expands weekly.

Joyce Field
Translations Manager
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project


"If I Forget Thee" #lithuania

Sidney and Olga Zabludoff <sozablud@...>
 

I would like to announce publication of "IF I FORGET THEE: The
destruction of the shtetl Butrimantz" by Riva Lozansky and other
witnesses. Edited by Olga Zabludoff and Lily Poritz Miller, this book is
the only comprehensive material available in English on the Lithuanian
shtetl of Butrimonys (Butrimantz or Baltrimantz in Yiddish). This new
title includes four chapters of detailed testimonies; a brief history of
the shtetl; a Victims list of almost 200 families; 33 pages of
photographs; and additional front and end material. The book has been
endorsed by Neal Sher, Michael Berenbaum, Moshe Sanbar and Joseph
Melamed.

Price is $14.95 (US$), plus $2.95 shipping ($3.95 international
shipping).

ISBN 0-9669349-0-3. Available >from Remembrance Books, 2129 Bancroft
Place, NW, Washington, DC 20008, USA. Tel.: (202) 265-4977; Fax.: (202)
265-0577.

E-mail: sozablud@netkonnect.net

All proceeds >from sales of the book are being donated to a fund for the
restoration and preservation of the Butrimantz mass graves sites and old
Jewish cemetery.

Olga Zabludoff

Washington, DC


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "If I Forget Thee" #lithuania

Sidney and Olga Zabludoff <sozablud@...>
 

I would like to announce publication of "IF I FORGET THEE: The
destruction of the shtetl Butrimantz" by Riva Lozansky and other
witnesses. Edited by Olga Zabludoff and Lily Poritz Miller, this book is
the only comprehensive material available in English on the Lithuanian
shtetl of Butrimonys (Butrimantz or Baltrimantz in Yiddish). This new
title includes four chapters of detailed testimonies; a brief history of
the shtetl; a Victims list of almost 200 families; 33 pages of
photographs; and additional front and end material. The book has been
endorsed by Neal Sher, Michael Berenbaum, Moshe Sanbar and Joseph
Melamed.

Price is $14.95 (US$), plus $2.95 shipping ($3.95 international
shipping).

ISBN 0-9669349-0-3. Available >from Remembrance Books, 2129 Bancroft
Place, NW, Washington, DC 20008, USA. Tel.: (202) 265-4977; Fax.: (202)
265-0577.

E-mail: sozablud@netkonnect.net

All proceeds >from sales of the book are being donated to a fund for the
restoration and preservation of the Butrimantz mass graves sites and old
Jewish cemetery.

Olga Zabludoff

Washington, DC


NEW ISSUE OF THE NEWSLETTER! #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The Belarus SIG Online Newsletter - Issue 2 - February 1999 is now uploaded
and ready.

You can access it either by clicking on the Newsletter icon on the Belarus
SIG Website:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/>

or go directly to it at the address:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_no_2.htm>

If you choose the first option you will be taken to the "Newsletter Front
Page" which in the future will list first the newest issue, and below the
back issues.

At the bottom of the "Newsletter Front Page" there is a NetMind box in
which you can type in your e-mail address and then submit to update service
which is free of charge.

If you do that, you will automatically be notified whenever a new issue is
published or if any changes are made.

We are working to give you the option of downloading the Newsletter as a
file for distribution to those with interest in the Belarus, but without
access to the Internet. When we have found the best way to do that, we will
let you know. For the time being you can chose "File|Print".

In this issue you will find:

First of all we would like to call your attention to two different
suggestions as to how your personal genealogical interest in Belarus might
be translated into benefits for the Jewish Community of Belarus - which
really needs our help.

By a strange coincidence we have received two separate articles on journeys
to Kozanhorodok. The one journey also encompassed a visit to Luninets - and
therefore we have put a link to an article >from The Columbus Dispatch
(January 23, 1997) which is an interview with a WWII survivor from
Luninets: "A survivor's story".

You can also find an account of Jewish life in a shtetl in Europe given by
Cheyna Rogovin Chertow (born 1912), who shares her memories of Belakoritz
and Wolozyn 1912-1931 with us.

We also bring an article on "Settlers in Yekaterinoslav Guberniya",
although you might thing that it is a little out of place on the Belarus
SIG. However, we found that is was very appropriate, as it tells how Jews
were encouraged to leave the crowded and economically poor centers in the
north (e.g Belarus) and establish new settlements in Novorussia. Thus, you
might be inspired to look for an missing ancestor in a place where you
might never have imagined!

Our SIG Coordinator, David M. Fox, relates the newest plans and
undertakings in his letter, and keeps us updated on new records uncovered
in the Minsk Archive.

Many have responded with enthusiasm to the request (in the first issue of
the Newsletter) for help to identify unknown persons depicted in old
photos. We have therefore decided to make it a special feature of the
Belarus SIG Newsletter and the Belarus website. So read more about that -
and if you have such enigmatic photos, send them to us for publication, and
give as much information as you possibly can about the photos.

We would like to have some feed-back on the Newsletter:

First, we would like to have your comments, questions, reports of errors etc.

Second, we would appreciate your evaluation of the Newsletter. An Online
Newsletter is something new and special. It gives ample possibilities for
"publishing" a lot of beautiful and interesting photos etc, which in a
normal printed edition would be much too expensive. However, you might find
that some of the articles are too slow to access, because of the many
photos. You can, of course, in your browser choose the option NOT to
display images! But then there is not much point in publishing them in the
first place. So the problem is to strike the golden mean!

Third, we would appreciate any suggestions for the future issues - contents
or otherwise.

If you will help us with any - or all - please send an e-mail to:
elsebeth@paikin.dk


Best regards

----
Elsebeth Paikin, Assistant Editor
Belarus SIG Online Newsletter
elsebeth@paikin.dk
----
--
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@paikin.dk


Belarus SIG #Belarus NEW ISSUE OF THE NEWSLETTER! #belarus

Elsebeth Paikin
 

The Belarus SIG Online Newsletter - Issue 2 - February 1999 is now uploaded
and ready.

You can access it either by clicking on the Newsletter icon on the Belarus
SIG Website:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/>

or go directly to it at the address:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_no_2.htm>

If you choose the first option you will be taken to the "Newsletter Front
Page" which in the future will list first the newest issue, and below the
back issues.

At the bottom of the "Newsletter Front Page" there is a NetMind box in
which you can type in your e-mail address and then submit to update service
which is free of charge.

If you do that, you will automatically be notified whenever a new issue is
published or if any changes are made.

We are working to give you the option of downloading the Newsletter as a
file for distribution to those with interest in the Belarus, but without
access to the Internet. When we have found the best way to do that, we will
let you know. For the time being you can chose "File|Print".

In this issue you will find:

First of all we would like to call your attention to two different
suggestions as to how your personal genealogical interest in Belarus might
be translated into benefits for the Jewish Community of Belarus - which
really needs our help.

By a strange coincidence we have received two separate articles on journeys
to Kozanhorodok. The one journey also encompassed a visit to Luninets - and
therefore we have put a link to an article >from The Columbus Dispatch
(January 23, 1997) which is an interview with a WWII survivor from
Luninets: "A survivor's story".

You can also find an account of Jewish life in a shtetl in Europe given by
Cheyna Rogovin Chertow (born 1912), who shares her memories of Belakoritz
and Wolozyn 1912-1931 with us.

We also bring an article on "Settlers in Yekaterinoslav Guberniya",
although you might thing that it is a little out of place on the Belarus
SIG. However, we found that is was very appropriate, as it tells how Jews
were encouraged to leave the crowded and economically poor centers in the
north (e.g Belarus) and establish new settlements in Novorussia. Thus, you
might be inspired to look for an missing ancestor in a place where you
might never have imagined!

Our SIG Coordinator, David M. Fox, relates the newest plans and
undertakings in his letter, and keeps us updated on new records uncovered
in the Minsk Archive.

Many have responded with enthusiasm to the request (in the first issue of
the Newsletter) for help to identify unknown persons depicted in old
photos. We have therefore decided to make it a special feature of the
Belarus SIG Newsletter and the Belarus website. So read more about that -
and if you have such enigmatic photos, send them to us for publication, and
give as much information as you possibly can about the photos.

We would like to have some feed-back on the Newsletter:

First, we would like to have your comments, questions, reports of errors etc.

Second, we would appreciate your evaluation of the Newsletter. An Online
Newsletter is something new and special. It gives ample possibilities for
"publishing" a lot of beautiful and interesting photos etc, which in a
normal printed edition would be much too expensive. However, you might find
that some of the articles are too slow to access, because of the many
photos. You can, of course, in your browser choose the option NOT to
display images! But then there is not much point in publishing them in the
first place. So the problem is to strike the golden mean!

Third, we would appreciate any suggestions for the future issues - contents
or otherwise.

If you will help us with any - or all - please send an e-mail to:
elsebeth@paikin.dk


Best regards

----
Elsebeth Paikin, Assistant Editor
Belarus SIG Online Newsletter
elsebeth@paikin.dk
----
--
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark,
e-mail: elsebeth@paikin.dk


Re: School in Warsaw #general

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

"Larry E. Oppenheimer" wrote:

My great grandfather attended the "Gimnasium of Warshow" around 1875. Is
there any source of information about the school? Does it still exist?

Thanks.
Larry

Larry E. Oppenheimer
loppen@tiac.net
Very interesting question and tough one to answer in the same time. Ken
Stone has also touched a very similar subject about schooling of girls
in Imperial Austria.

I have forwarded Larry's question to some Polish friends of mine and to
few Polish discussion groups associated with history and culture, and as
I have suspected no one provided a meaningful answer.

I came across Warsaw Gimnasium (Gimnazjum warszawskie) in the
publication by Polish writer Stefan Zeromski. In one of his novels he
describes russiffication of the Polish schooling system in a
governemental Warsaw Gimnasium and fight of the patriotic Polish
students against the oppression.

I have been researching information about E.Orzeszkowa gimnasium in
Lodz, where >from my late mother-in-law graduated in 1938. No one could
help me with information about the gimnaazium records and even the
building where school used to be located (closed as W.W.II has started)
was debatable, despite the fact that I've managed to locate some of the
alumni and teachers.

Records of Warsaw Gimnasium, should be located in Polish Government
Archives - you should write to them with the question to confirm this,
since Warsaw was nearly destroyed during W.W.II. Another possibility, if
Polish Archives have no data, is to approach Russian central Archives in
moscow - after all, schooll was under the Russian tzarist
administration.

While researching for 'my' gimnasium in Lodz, I've acquired some
knowledge of the Russia and Russian Poland schooling system. First
Russian "european style" school for the noblemen teenagers was known as
"Lycee" in vicinity of St. Petersburg (Russian national poet Pushkin has
attended this school). Subsequently, schooling system adopted German
educational 'program' - schools were now known as classical 'gimnazia' -
classical (Latin, Greek plus modern language, usually French), preparing
kids for law and medical universities faculties and "real" gimnazia,
where in emphasis were on science, mathematics and modern languages
(German was most popular due to Germany leading technological
development), those schools were preparing kids to enter technological
universities (Politechnic Universities). Schools were own by the
government. As Russia has developed it's middle class, number of
schools has grown dramatically and many schools were mushrooming in the
provincial cities. Ladies were admitted to the separate, "women"
gimnazium, an in addition, private schools with full board were
established to cater for the needs of the provincial youngsters.

Situation in Russian Poland was a bit different. Till January 1863
Uprising, private Polish schools were covering educational needs.
Following The January Uprising against Russia, Russian have closed all
private Polish schools, remaining Warsaw and Vilna Gimnasium (main
cities of the Russian Poland) were following strict curriculum of
Russian Government educational system. Poles were forced to study in
Moscow, St. Petersburg and Kiev due to closure or limited admission to
the Warsaw University.

Gimnasia in independent Poland (following 1918) were both, private and
public. Gimnasia which my mother-in law have been attending in Lodz, was
a private gimnasium for a young Jewish ladies >from an assimilated
families. There were also private Hebrew High schools in a number of
Polish cities.

I hope this help.

Alexander Sharon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: School in Warsaw #general

Alexander Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

"Larry E. Oppenheimer" wrote:

My great grandfather attended the "Gimnasium of Warshow" around 1875. Is
there any source of information about the school? Does it still exist?

Thanks.
Larry

Larry E. Oppenheimer
loppen@tiac.net
Very interesting question and tough one to answer in the same time. Ken
Stone has also touched a very similar subject about schooling of girls
in Imperial Austria.

I have forwarded Larry's question to some Polish friends of mine and to
few Polish discussion groups associated with history and culture, and as
I have suspected no one provided a meaningful answer.

I came across Warsaw Gimnasium (Gimnazjum warszawskie) in the
publication by Polish writer Stefan Zeromski. In one of his novels he
describes russiffication of the Polish schooling system in a
governemental Warsaw Gimnasium and fight of the patriotic Polish
students against the oppression.

I have been researching information about E.Orzeszkowa gimnasium in
Lodz, where >from my late mother-in-law graduated in 1938. No one could
help me with information about the gimnaazium records and even the
building where school used to be located (closed as W.W.II has started)
was debatable, despite the fact that I've managed to locate some of the
alumni and teachers.

Records of Warsaw Gimnasium, should be located in Polish Government
Archives - you should write to them with the question to confirm this,
since Warsaw was nearly destroyed during W.W.II. Another possibility, if
Polish Archives have no data, is to approach Russian central Archives in
moscow - after all, schooll was under the Russian tzarist
administration.

While researching for 'my' gimnasium in Lodz, I've acquired some
knowledge of the Russia and Russian Poland schooling system. First
Russian "european style" school for the noblemen teenagers was known as
"Lycee" in vicinity of St. Petersburg (Russian national poet Pushkin has
attended this school). Subsequently, schooling system adopted German
educational 'program' - schools were now known as classical 'gimnazia' -
classical (Latin, Greek plus modern language, usually French), preparing
kids for law and medical universities faculties and "real" gimnazia,
where in emphasis were on science, mathematics and modern languages
(German was most popular due to Germany leading technological
development), those schools were preparing kids to enter technological
universities (Politechnic Universities). Schools were own by the
government. As Russia has developed it's middle class, number of
schools has grown dramatically and many schools were mushrooming in the
provincial cities. Ladies were admitted to the separate, "women"
gimnazium, an in addition, private schools with full board were
established to cater for the needs of the provincial youngsters.

Situation in Russian Poland was a bit different. Till January 1863
Uprising, private Polish schools were covering educational needs.
Following The January Uprising against Russia, Russian have closed all
private Polish schools, remaining Warsaw and Vilna Gimnasium (main
cities of the Russian Poland) were following strict curriculum of
Russian Government educational system. Poles were forced to study in
Moscow, St. Petersburg and Kiev due to closure or limited admission to
the Warsaw University.

Gimnasia in independent Poland (following 1918) were both, private and
public. Gimnasia which my mother-in law have been attending in Lodz, was
a private gimnasium for a young Jewish ladies >from an assimilated
families. There were also private Hebrew High schools in a number of
Polish cities.

I hope this help.

Alexander Sharon


Seeking SOBELMAN and SCHWARTZ #general

Steallight <steallight@...>
 

I am looking for any information regarding Leopold and Sam SOBELMAN of St.
Louis MO. Also any info re Lillian SCHWARTZ. 1914 address was 1484
Blackstone. Please e-mail if you can help

thanks
Stev Lenon
Palmetto Fl 34221


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking SOBELMAN and SCHWARTZ #general

Steallight <steallight@...>
 

I am looking for any information regarding Leopold and Sam SOBELMAN of St.
Louis MO. Also any info re Lillian SCHWARTZ. 1914 address was 1484
Blackstone. Please e-mail if you can help

thanks
Stev Lenon
Palmetto Fl 34221


Town of Vegery (Vegeriai) in Lithuania #lithuania

Maria Krane
 

Hello Everyone,
One of the towns I am researching is Vegeriai in Lithuania. Does
anyone have any information on this town? It appears to have been a very
small town and I haven't been able to find a lot of information about it. If
anyone has any information or knows where I can get it, please let me know.
Thank you.
Regards,
Maria Krane
Pembroke Pines, Florida
MariaKrane@aol.com
researching: KREYN/KREIN/OKIN/SCHULDNER >from Vegery, SCHULDNER/KREYN from
Zagare, HOFFMAN, REMER, KATZ >from Salakas all in Lithuania and HOFFMAN from
Svir, Belarus


Re: Immigration #austria-czech

Marion Hattenbach Bernstein
 

Before 1880 this percent was around 10%, after 1910 percent fall
to 30...50%.
Anybody knows why?

Roman Tunkel
There are really two reasons: One was the Russian Revolution, which made
getting out harder and gave some Jews hope that oppressive conditions would
change. The other is World War I and the shift of attitude toward
immigrants. American policy took a strong anti-immigrant turn after WWI.

(My apologies -- I left out my name and identification)

Marion H. Bernstein
San Antonio, TX
hlb@texas.net