Date   

Re: h-sig digest: January 03, 1999 #hungary

Deborah Z. <dzaccaro@...>
 

Does anybody out there have the AJGS cemetery CDrom and would
be willing to do a lookup? My search on Avotaynu for Danilovics
turned up a match for Danilovich, Danelovich, Danielewicz,
Danielowitz, and Danilowitz, but no area was given and I cannot
afford the CD:( Any and all help appreciated, Deborah Zaccaro


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: h-sig digest: January 03, 1999 #hungary

Deborah Z. <dzaccaro@...>
 

Does anybody out there have the AJGS cemetery CDrom and would
be willing to do a lookup? My search on Avotaynu for Danilovics
turned up a match for Danilovich, Danelovich, Danielewicz,
Danielowitz, and Danilowitz, but no area was given and I cannot
afford the CD:( Any and all help appreciated, Deborah Zaccaro


* Surname adoption in Austria-Hungary #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Cheers all,

Is there any LDS film containing lists of surname adoptions or changes,
which were imposed by the Act of Emancipation? If no LDS film, is there any
other source covering this subject?

Many thanks in advance
b'Shalom
Tom


Hungary SIG #Hungary * Surname adoption in Austria-Hungary #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Cheers all,

Is there any LDS film containing lists of surname adoptions or changes,
which were imposed by the Act of Emancipation? If no LDS film, is there any
other source covering this subject?

Many thanks in advance
b'Shalom
Tom


Re: Frumkin's *crown* #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-01-08 18:16:29 EST, guillo@... writes:

<< preserves at home is the proper bronze-made wax seal, not the sealing! It
seems something to be used more for sealing post parcels than for
authentication. But the point is: why should a *crown* appear on the name
Frumkin? How was it possible for a Jewish russian family to use a royal sign
like this? Hope this time my question is clear. Regards, >>

==I'd guess that at the turn of the century, the Czars were no longer so
autocratic or so paranoid as to forbid a Jew to purt a crown or a mace or a
lion on a seal. They knew the Jews wouldn't usurp their crown

Michael Bernet, New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Personal portion deleted


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Frumkin's *crown* #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-01-08 18:16:29 EST, guillo@... writes:

<< preserves at home is the proper bronze-made wax seal, not the sealing! It
seems something to be used more for sealing post parcels than for
authentication. But the point is: why should a *crown* appear on the name
Frumkin? How was it possible for a Jewish russian family to use a royal sign
like this? Hope this time my question is clear. Regards, >>

==I'd guess that at the turn of the century, the Czars were no longer so
autocratic or so paranoid as to forbid a Jew to purt a crown or a mace or a
lion on a seal. They knew the Jews wouldn't usurp their crown

Michael Bernet, New York

MODERATOR NOTE: Personal portion deleted


Re: Varel Concentration Camp #general

BR1595@...
 

Has anyone heard of a concentration camp or a slave labor
camp in Varel, Germany?

Arlene Rich
Cleveland JGS
Br1595@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Varel Concentration Camp #general

BR1595@...
 

Has anyone heard of a concentration camp or a slave labor
camp in Varel, Germany?

Arlene Rich
Cleveland JGS
Br1595@...


John TRAURIG #general

Phyllis Blumenfeld <plblum@...>
 

Will Steve TRAURIG get in touch with me please. His message has
bounced.



Phyllis Blumenfeld plblum@...
researching:
POPS,FICHTELBERG/Lemberg & Dobromil, Galicia
BERMAN/Nowy Sacz & Gribov - ELANDER/Nowy Sacz & Gribov
TRAURIG/Wisnicz, Zwiec, Israel
BERNSTEIN/Lomza & Przasnysz & NYC
BLUMENFELD/Iasi & Podul Ilieu, Romania - SUSSMAN/Podul Ilieu
SCHNALL/Russia?, NYC, Tuckahoe, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen John TRAURIG #general

Phyllis Blumenfeld <plblum@...>
 

Will Steve TRAURIG get in touch with me please. His message has
bounced.



Phyllis Blumenfeld plblum@...
researching:
POPS,FICHTELBERG/Lemberg & Dobromil, Galicia
BERMAN/Nowy Sacz & Gribov - ELANDER/Nowy Sacz & Gribov
TRAURIG/Wisnicz, Zwiec, Israel
BERNSTEIN/Lomza & Przasnysz & NYC
BLUMENFELD/Iasi & Podul Ilieu, Romania - SUSSMAN/Podul Ilieu
SCHNALL/Russia?, NYC, Tuckahoe, NY


unsolicited genealogical "publications" and introductions #general

Candice Bradley and Daniel Byrne <djbyrne@...>
 

Re Harold Pollins's post:

If a person sends you a family tree or other genealogical information
unsolicited in the mail, this person has probably sent the same information to
a number of people. If so, the documents are considered a "publication" and
you may reference them. This is the way it works in the U.S. -- the rules may
similar in England because of the internationalization of copyright laws.
(However, although I have a bit of copyright law experience (with a motion
picture studio) I am not a lawyer and therefore not an expert.)

In social science research, the practice is to disclose before the interview
the full use to which you will put any information. It is unethical to use
the information in any other way. If I choose to use interview information
differently, it is my obligation to ask permission.

It seems to me that there is no harm in sending out one's own family tree *if*
any living persons including in your family tree have given permission, and as
long as doing so will not result in harm (e.g. sending out such personal
information as social security numbers and addresses of living persons might
result in "harm").

I have had to think through the consequences of sharing information about
relatively well-known relatives, both living and dead. I have been pressed
on more than one occasion by film historians or biographers to share anecdotes
(translation: dirt) on relatives or ancestors in the motion picture business,
and I have been asked for contact information. One such biographer has
pressed me energetically for "introductions." I will not share family
anecdotes with such folks unless the stories are already in the public domain
and will not embarrass or hurt anyone who is alive. I do not give out contact
info without asking first, and I will not bother these relatives with
"introductions." I have no problem sharing basic genealogical information
because such information is already in the public domain -- censuses, vital
records info etc. are already "published" materials.

I sometimes make my own "introductions" and I have met some wonderful cousins
in the process! I usually write a brief note or email stating who I am,
personally and professionally. Then I describe in a short paragraph our
common relatives and state my interest in communicating about genealogy. I
add that I am aware that the recipient may be too busy to respond. My notes
are brief, polite and personal.

I almost always get a response. The other day I heard >from a cousin whom I
had written back in August. He had misplaced my note but had fully intended
to contact me. He's a wonderful human being, and he's hooked me up with
other cousins and essentially doubled the size of my family tree. I was glad
I had waited patiently for this busy man to respond instead of bombarding him
with unsolicited materials.

Candice Bradley
Appleton, WI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen unsolicited genealogical "publications" and introductions #general

Candice Bradley and Daniel Byrne <djbyrne@...>
 

Re Harold Pollins's post:

If a person sends you a family tree or other genealogical information
unsolicited in the mail, this person has probably sent the same information to
a number of people. If so, the documents are considered a "publication" and
you may reference them. This is the way it works in the U.S. -- the rules may
similar in England because of the internationalization of copyright laws.
(However, although I have a bit of copyright law experience (with a motion
picture studio) I am not a lawyer and therefore not an expert.)

In social science research, the practice is to disclose before the interview
the full use to which you will put any information. It is unethical to use
the information in any other way. If I choose to use interview information
differently, it is my obligation to ask permission.

It seems to me that there is no harm in sending out one's own family tree *if*
any living persons including in your family tree have given permission, and as
long as doing so will not result in harm (e.g. sending out such personal
information as social security numbers and addresses of living persons might
result in "harm").

I have had to think through the consequences of sharing information about
relatively well-known relatives, both living and dead. I have been pressed
on more than one occasion by film historians or biographers to share anecdotes
(translation: dirt) on relatives or ancestors in the motion picture business,
and I have been asked for contact information. One such biographer has
pressed me energetically for "introductions." I will not share family
anecdotes with such folks unless the stories are already in the public domain
and will not embarrass or hurt anyone who is alive. I do not give out contact
info without asking first, and I will not bother these relatives with
"introductions." I have no problem sharing basic genealogical information
because such information is already in the public domain -- censuses, vital
records info etc. are already "published" materials.

I sometimes make my own "introductions" and I have met some wonderful cousins
in the process! I usually write a brief note or email stating who I am,
personally and professionally. Then I describe in a short paragraph our
common relatives and state my interest in communicating about genealogy. I
add that I am aware that the recipient may be too busy to respond. My notes
are brief, polite and personal.

I almost always get a response. The other day I heard >from a cousin whom I
had written back in August. He had misplaced my note but had fully intended
to contact me. He's a wonderful human being, and he's hooked me up with
other cousins and essentially doubled the size of my family tree. I was glad
I had waited patiently for this busy man to respond instead of bombarding him
with unsolicited materials.

Candice Bradley
Appleton, WI


Re: Righteous Among the Nations #general

ada01@...
 

Shalom,

In response to various messages regarding this subject,
please visit Yad Vashem, renewed and remarkable web site,
at:
http://www.yad-vashem.org.il/righteous/index.html

Also read about the recent Jubilee delegation of Righteous
Among the Nations hosted by Yad Vashem at:
http://www.yad-vashem.org.il/yadvashem/magazine/index.html

Ada Holtzman
E-mail: ada01@...
Web site:http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Righteous Among the Nations #general

ada01@...
 

Shalom,

In response to various messages regarding this subject,
please visit Yad Vashem, renewed and remarkable web site,
at:
http://www.yad-vashem.org.il/righteous/index.html

Also read about the recent Jubilee delegation of Righteous
Among the Nations hosted by Yad Vashem at:
http://www.yad-vashem.org.il/yadvashem/magazine/index.html

Ada Holtzman
E-mail: ada01@...
Web site:http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Rue/4017/


Re: Mormon Fam. Hist. Ctrs. in Israel #general

Yehuda Miklaf <mfritz@...>
 

I called the center here about a year ago and they told me that
they do not have a Family History Center here.
Yehuda Miklaf
Jerusalem
<mfritz@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Mormon Fam. Hist. Ctrs. in Israel #general

Yehuda Miklaf <mfritz@...>
 

I called the center here about a year ago and they told me that
they do not have a Family History Center here.
Yehuda Miklaf
Jerusalem
<mfritz@...>


Re: Searching POSTBRIEF, Warszawa #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-01-09 00:46:21 EST, Shirley Flaum writes:

<< Does anyone know the origin of the surname POSTBRIEF, also spelled
POSTBRYF or POSTBRIF. Translated literally >from German, it means
"letter". I've never heard of this surname until today. This is the
surname of someone who probably perished in the Warsaw ghetto and was
married to my father's female first cousin named ROTBAIN. This family
were Chassidim. Thanks to anyone who can enlighten me. >>

==Some possibilities:

==an ancestor was a local postmaster or letter carrier, or a scribe who
would write letters (in German, probably) for the community members who
could write only Hebrew and Yiddish, or someone for whom a postal letter
was of great signicficance (a mail-order groom?) or someone who took the
name >from a pstage stamp for want of any better source

==perhaps a name picked in haste to sound German, to conceal the ancestor
>from authorities, czars, police, creditors, conscription, Nazis . . . .

==an ancestor filled in the wrong line of an official form and Postbrief
became the name >from then on--or the government clek copied the wrong line!

==The corruption of a place name--check out Postbrief in ShtetlSeeker, soundex

==My tendency is always to look at as many possibilities as possible, to
eliminate the improbable, and to look more closely at the most likely answers

Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth; PODERATZKI: Paris, Nurnberg.
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1860) also in
Wurzburg, also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching POSTBRIEF, Warszawa #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 99-01-09 00:46:21 EST, Shirley Flaum writes:

<< Does anyone know the origin of the surname POSTBRIEF, also spelled
POSTBRYF or POSTBRIF. Translated literally >from German, it means
"letter". I've never heard of this surname until today. This is the
surname of someone who probably perished in the Warsaw ghetto and was
married to my father's female first cousin named ROTBAIN. This family
were Chassidim. Thanks to anyone who can enlighten me. >>

==Some possibilities:

==an ancestor was a local postmaster or letter carrier, or a scribe who
would write letters (in German, probably) for the community members who
could write only Hebrew and Yiddish, or someone for whom a postal letter
was of great signicficance (a mail-order groom?) or someone who took the
name >from a pstage stamp for want of any better source

==perhaps a name picked in haste to sound German, to conceal the ancestor
>from authorities, czars, police, creditors, conscription, Nazis . . . .

==an ancestor filled in the wrong line of an official form and Postbrief
became the name >from then on--or the government clek copied the wrong line!

==The corruption of a place name--check out Postbrief in ShtetlSeeker, soundex

==My tendency is always to look at as many possibilities as possible, to
eliminate the improbable, and to look more closely at the most likely answers

Michael Bernet, New York

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET, BERNERTH etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth; PODERATZKI: Paris, Nurnberg.
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF: Frankfurt (Aron Wolf m. Babette Goldschmidt ca 1860) also in
Wurzburg, also Sali WOLF, Rotterdam


Re: Social Security Question #general

WROZI <wrozi@...>
 

I don't know how the old files were, but I had my social security name changed
several times.

My original social security card had my given name, middle name and maiden
surname.name. I changed that when I marrried. That marriage ended and I kept
the married name. I had my re-married years later and again changed my social
security card to the newer married name. My social security number never
changed.

However, as for the drivers license; my first had my given name, middle name
was maiden surname, surname was my married name. After my second marriage,
the drivers license had my given name, for middle name - they used my first
married surname, and the surname is my last married name.

Then, as far as my checking account, the bank issued me new checks with the new
married name, but allowed me to use checks with the old married name - they
said they allow this knowing that it takes time to have all papers changed.
Therefore, I was allowed to use my personal checks with either name imprinted
on it. Go Figure.

So, I can understand why you will have problems in obtaining the correct names.
However, with all the marriages and re-marriages, I would think Social
Security would have the additional information added on to enable all concerned
to have access to the files and the correct changes.

Roslyn Goldman Downey
Winter park, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Social Security Question #general

WROZI <wrozi@...>
 

I don't know how the old files were, but I had my social security name changed
several times.

My original social security card had my given name, middle name and maiden
surname.name. I changed that when I marrried. That marriage ended and I kept
the married name. I had my re-married years later and again changed my social
security card to the newer married name. My social security number never
changed.

However, as for the drivers license; my first had my given name, middle name
was maiden surname, surname was my married name. After my second marriage,
the drivers license had my given name, for middle name - they used my first
married surname, and the surname is my last married name.

Then, as far as my checking account, the bank issued me new checks with the new
married name, but allowed me to use checks with the old married name - they
said they allow this knowing that it takes time to have all papers changed.
Therefore, I was allowed to use my personal checks with either name imprinted
on it. Go Figure.

So, I can understand why you will have problems in obtaining the correct names.
However, with all the marriages and re-marriages, I would think Social
Security would have the additional information added on to enable all concerned
to have access to the files and the correct changes.

Roslyn Goldman Downey
Winter park, FL