Date   

Re: Searching: Michala LEIBOVITCH, b. 1885, Russia to Buenos Aires #general

Simon Barak
 

To seek people in Argentina you only have to reach http://www.telecom.com.ar/guia/
write down the name and press search. The result is here
PIK ZULEMA
Av P Goyena XXXX
Capital Federal
ARGENTINA
Tel (01) XXXXXXX

Simon Barak

GenieMona@aol.com wrote:

looking for information about Michala LEIBOVITC. Her granddaughter was Zulema
PIK...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching: Michala LEIBOVITCH, b. 1885, Russia to Buenos Aires #general

Simon Barak
 

To seek people in Argentina you only have to reach http://www.telecom.com.ar/guia/
write down the name and press search. The result is here
PIK ZULEMA
Av P Goyena XXXX
Capital Federal
ARGENTINA
Tel (01) XXXXXXX

Simon Barak

GenieMona@aol.com wrote:

looking for information about Michala LEIBOVITC. Her granddaughter was Zulema
PIK...


Searching: Dr. Wilhelm LOEWENTAHL, Alliance Israelite Universelle #general

M Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

Hello to all.

In my search of my family history I came across the name of Dr. Wilhelm
LOEWENTAHL, who was a key figure in the Alliance Israelite and in the
decision of the Baron Maurice de Hirsch to found the Jewish Colonization
Association responsible for the settlement of Eastern European Jews in
Argentina.
The possible link with my family is through my great-grandmother Berta
LEVENTHAL. >from the dates, he might be her brother or cousin, if
anything.

Does anybody know how to reach information on him? or if there exists
accessible records >from the Alliance or the JCA during the 1880s and
1890s?
Any help will be gratefully received.

Mario Schejtman
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Dr. Wilhelm LOEWENTAHL, Alliance Israelite Universelle #general

M Schejtman <mario_m@...>
 

Hello to all.

In my search of my family history I came across the name of Dr. Wilhelm
LOEWENTAHL, who was a key figure in the Alliance Israelite and in the
decision of the Baron Maurice de Hirsch to found the Jewish Colonization
Association responsible for the settlement of Eastern European Jews in
Argentina.
The possible link with my family is through my great-grandmother Berta
LEVENTHAL. >from the dates, he might be her brother or cousin, if
anything.

Does anybody know how to reach information on him? or if there exists
accessible records >from the Alliance or the JCA during the 1880s and
1890s?
Any help will be gratefully received.

Mario Schejtman
Jerusalem, Israel


Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild #general

Kathy Stice <kms2135@...>
 

Just a note to let everyone know of a change in the URL for
the above-mentioned Web site. ISTG is now located at
<http://istg.rootsweb.com/

If you've never visited this site, please do.
It's full of lots of information on passenger lists.

Kathy Stice


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild #general

Kathy Stice <kms2135@...>
 

Just a note to let everyone know of a change in the URL for
the above-mentioned Web site. ISTG is now located at
<http://istg.rootsweb.com/

If you've never visited this site, please do.
It's full of lots of information on passenger lists.

Kathy Stice


Surname SCHAFFEL #general

Gerson Schaffel <gerfred@...>
 

While going through some old files I found a faded newspaper
clipping which stated, in response to a question, as follows:

"SCHAFFEL had its source as a medieval German nickname. The
ancestor was an artisan who manufactured vats and tubs. His
surname evolved >from his nickname. "Schaff-el" meant "Little vat
or tub maker" in early dialectical German."

from my limited German I had assumed that SCHAFFEL was derived
from the German word for "sheepskin" (Schaffell) or connoted the
occupation of shepherd.

Any comments >from some of our etymologically knowledgeable
JewishGenners?

--
Gerson Schaffel
Belmont, MA
gerfred@iname.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname SCHAFFEL #general

Gerson Schaffel <gerfred@...>
 

While going through some old files I found a faded newspaper
clipping which stated, in response to a question, as follows:

"SCHAFFEL had its source as a medieval German nickname. The
ancestor was an artisan who manufactured vats and tubs. His
surname evolved >from his nickname. "Schaff-el" meant "Little vat
or tub maker" in early dialectical German."

from my limited German I had assumed that SCHAFFEL was derived
from the German word for "sheepskin" (Schaffell) or connoted the
occupation of shepherd.

Any comments >from some of our etymologically knowledgeable
JewishGenners?

--
Gerson Schaffel
Belmont, MA
gerfred@iname.com


Moshav Arugot #general

Jerry Segal <j.segal@...>
 

Does anyone here know anyone living in the Moshav Arugot in Israel? If
so, please write to me.

Jerry Segal


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Moshav Arugot #general

Jerry Segal <j.segal@...>
 

Does anyone here know anyone living in the Moshav Arugot in Israel? If
so, please write to me.

Jerry Segal


Pre registration Jewish births in England #general

Ellie Weld <ellieweld@...>
 

Michael Bernet has expressed puzzlement over the query about pre
registration Jewish births in England (though his questions do sound faintly
sarcastic to me). My understanding of the original query -- though I may be
quite wrong -- is that there were no official government birth registrations
or certificates in England before 1837. Non-Jews would have been listed in
the Church of England parish registers, but where would one be able to find
Jewish birth records pre-dating 1837? In some cases, it has been suggested
to me, they may have been included in these same parish registers, but I
should imagine this would vary >from place to place.

Of course I may have completely misunderstood the original query, in which
case I should be interested to know what was meant.

Ellie Weld

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pre registration Jewish births in England #general

Ellie Weld <ellieweld@...>
 

Michael Bernet has expressed puzzlement over the query about pre
registration Jewish births in England (though his questions do sound faintly
sarcastic to me). My understanding of the original query -- though I may be
quite wrong -- is that there were no official government birth registrations
or certificates in England before 1837. Non-Jews would have been listed in
the Church of England parish registers, but where would one be able to find
Jewish birth records pre-dating 1837? In some cases, it has been suggested
to me, they may have been included in these same parish registers, but I
should imagine this would vary >from place to place.

Of course I may have completely misunderstood the original query, in which
case I should be interested to know what was meant.

Ellie Weld

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.


Re: Yiddish equivalents #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Susan Weiner <SBWeiner@aol.com> wrote:

What are the likely Yiddish equivalents for the following names --
Louis, Meyer, Celia, Golda, Mildred, Max, Harry, Ida?

I'm seeking this info for use in looking up some of my relatives
in the index to passenger arrivals.

Of course there are no absolute "Yiddish equivalents" of any name.
Names don't "translate" into other languages. Jewish immigrants
from Eastern Europe to America were free to take any name they
pleased after immigration. They would typically chose an American
name that sounded similar or starts with the same first letter or
sound as one of their Hebrew or Yiddish names, and was fashionable
at that time. There are no definitive rules for these name
transformations, only patterns, based on which English names were
popular in America at the time of immigration.

I am currently studying this Hebrew-to-English given name
correlation for East European immigrants to America, based on
tombstones in early 20th-century landsmanshaft cemeteries in
New York and Boston. Tombstones are a great source of this type
of information, because they contain both the Hebrew and the
English given name. Post-1906 U.S. naturalization documents are
another source of this type of information: they contain both the
European immigrant (Yiddish) name, and the new American name.

Below are the statistics that I've calculated for the English
given names which you ask about. But first, something to bear
in mind: Tombstones most often contain a person's Hebrew name
(i.e. religious name), while passenger lists contain a person's
Yiddish name (i.e. secular name). There are various correlations
between the relgious and secular name -- a much more direct
relationship than that between either of them and the American
English name. For details, see my article "Jewish Given Names
in Eastern Europe and the U.S." in the most recent issue of
"Avotaynu" (XIV:3, Fall 1998, pages 9-15).

For the English names you asked about, here are the corresponding
Hebrew names which I found in my tombstone study:

Louis -- 64% were Leib / Yehudah Leib / Arya Leib
24% were Eliezer (Lazer), 5% Lipman / Lipa,
2% Eliahu, 1% Levi, 1% Lemel, 2% other

NOTE that a multitude of spelling varients of these names might
be found on a passenger manifest: Leib, Lejb, Leyb, Laib, or any
of its diminutives: Leibish, Label, Leibka, etc.

The spelling found on a passenger manifest is likely to reflect the
phonetics of the language of the *ship*, rather than the language
of the passenger. For instance, on a German ship (one sailing from
Hamburg or Bremen), names would more likely be spelled using German
phonetic spelling -- for example: "Leibusch" instead of a Polish
spelling like "Lejbusz".

Meyer -- Meyer is a Hebrew name, also used as a secular name.
100% of those with the English name Meyer were also
Meir in Hebrew in my study.

NOTE that many people have Hebrew "double names" on tombstones --
two names that may or may not be related. Examples of unrelated
double names found were Meir Dov, Meir Avraham, Beniamin Meir, etc.
The new American name could be based on either Hebrew name.

Don't forget to look for all the various European spelling
varients of this name: Mejer, Maier, Majer, etc.

Celia -- 24% Tzirul, 18% Tzipa / Tzipora, 12% Sima,
6% Tzivia, 6% Sarah, and 24% various others:
Sosye, Shifra, Silka, Simcha, Zelda, Zisel, Glika...

Golda -- is a Yiddish name.
100% were Golda

Mildred -- This was not a popular name among immigrants.
There weren't enough in my study to be statistically
significant. There were single exmaples of the Hebrew
names Matla and Malka.

Max --- 64% were Mordechai,
17% Menachem / Mendel,
5% Moshe, 5% Mayer,
9% others: Elimelech, Menashe, Michel, Manes

Harry -- 63% were Hersh / Hershel / Tzvi,
9% Aharon, 4% Chaim, 4% Gershon, 4% Henoch,
4% Yitzchak, 3% Avraham, 3% Yechezkel / Chaskel,
Also: Arya, Yechiel, Hilel, Naftali, Nechemiah, other

Ida --- 76% were Chaya,
8% Ita / Eta / Etel / Aidel / Yetta / Yehudit,
6% Hadas / Hadassah / Ester,
Also: Yocheved, Hena, Hinda, others

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish equivalents #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Susan Weiner <SBWeiner@aol.com> wrote:

What are the likely Yiddish equivalents for the following names --
Louis, Meyer, Celia, Golda, Mildred, Max, Harry, Ida?

I'm seeking this info for use in looking up some of my relatives
in the index to passenger arrivals.

Of course there are no absolute "Yiddish equivalents" of any name.
Names don't "translate" into other languages. Jewish immigrants
from Eastern Europe to America were free to take any name they
pleased after immigration. They would typically chose an American
name that sounded similar or starts with the same first letter or
sound as one of their Hebrew or Yiddish names, and was fashionable
at that time. There are no definitive rules for these name
transformations, only patterns, based on which English names were
popular in America at the time of immigration.

I am currently studying this Hebrew-to-English given name
correlation for East European immigrants to America, based on
tombstones in early 20th-century landsmanshaft cemeteries in
New York and Boston. Tombstones are a great source of this type
of information, because they contain both the Hebrew and the
English given name. Post-1906 U.S. naturalization documents are
another source of this type of information: they contain both the
European immigrant (Yiddish) name, and the new American name.

Below are the statistics that I've calculated for the English
given names which you ask about. But first, something to bear
in mind: Tombstones most often contain a person's Hebrew name
(i.e. religious name), while passenger lists contain a person's
Yiddish name (i.e. secular name). There are various correlations
between the relgious and secular name -- a much more direct
relationship than that between either of them and the American
English name. For details, see my article "Jewish Given Names
in Eastern Europe and the U.S." in the most recent issue of
"Avotaynu" (XIV:3, Fall 1998, pages 9-15).

For the English names you asked about, here are the corresponding
Hebrew names which I found in my tombstone study:

Louis -- 64% were Leib / Yehudah Leib / Arya Leib
24% were Eliezer (Lazer), 5% Lipman / Lipa,
2% Eliahu, 1% Levi, 1% Lemel, 2% other

NOTE that a multitude of spelling varients of these names might
be found on a passenger manifest: Leib, Lejb, Leyb, Laib, or any
of its diminutives: Leibish, Label, Leibka, etc.

The spelling found on a passenger manifest is likely to reflect the
phonetics of the language of the *ship*, rather than the language
of the passenger. For instance, on a German ship (one sailing from
Hamburg or Bremen), names would more likely be spelled using German
phonetic spelling -- for example: "Leibusch" instead of a Polish
spelling like "Lejbusz".

Meyer -- Meyer is a Hebrew name, also used as a secular name.
100% of those with the English name Meyer were also
Meir in Hebrew in my study.

NOTE that many people have Hebrew "double names" on tombstones --
two names that may or may not be related. Examples of unrelated
double names found were Meir Dov, Meir Avraham, Beniamin Meir, etc.
The new American name could be based on either Hebrew name.

Don't forget to look for all the various European spelling
varients of this name: Mejer, Maier, Majer, etc.

Celia -- 24% Tzirul, 18% Tzipa / Tzipora, 12% Sima,
6% Tzivia, 6% Sarah, and 24% various others:
Sosye, Shifra, Silka, Simcha, Zelda, Zisel, Glika...

Golda -- is a Yiddish name.
100% were Golda

Mildred -- This was not a popular name among immigrants.
There weren't enough in my study to be statistically
significant. There were single exmaples of the Hebrew
names Matla and Malka.

Max --- 64% were Mordechai,
17% Menachem / Mendel,
5% Moshe, 5% Mayer,
9% others: Elimelech, Menashe, Michel, Manes

Harry -- 63% were Hersh / Hershel / Tzvi,
9% Aharon, 4% Chaim, 4% Gershon, 4% Henoch,
4% Yitzchak, 3% Avraham, 3% Yechezkel / Chaskel,
Also: Arya, Yechiel, Hilel, Naftali, Nechemiah, other

Ida --- 76% were Chaya,
8% Ita / Eta / Etel / Aidel / Yetta / Yehudit,
6% Hadas / Hadassah / Ester,
Also: Yocheved, Hena, Hinda, others

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Searching: LEVERTOVSKY, Minsk, Odessa, pre-WWII #general

Amy Stark <AStark@...>
 

I am trying to find out about the family "LEVERTOVSKY" residing in Minsk &
Odessa, prior to the Holocaust(WW2).

Thanks you for your help in advance.

Amy Stark


Awareness of LitvakSIG #lithuania

DBH12345
 

We are starting to get some addition attention to our Website:

Jewish History in Lithuania

<http://www.angelfire.com/ut/Luthuanian/indexs1.html>;
-----------------------------------------------------------------
LitvakSIG

New Web-Site: Genealogical information about the Jewish community in
Lithuania. Primary purpose: To acquire, translate and put on the Internet a
searchable database of the Lithuanian Jewish community. Database available.
Must visit!
___________________

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: LEVERTOVSKY, Minsk, Odessa, pre-WWII #general

Amy Stark <AStark@...>
 

I am trying to find out about the family "LEVERTOVSKY" residing in Minsk &
Odessa, prior to the Holocaust(WW2).

Thanks you for your help in advance.

Amy Stark


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Awareness of LitvakSIG #lithuania

DBH12345
 

We are starting to get some addition attention to our Website:

Jewish History in Lithuania

<http://www.angelfire.com/ut/Luthuanian/indexs1.html>;
-----------------------------------------------------------------
LitvakSIG

New Web-Site: Genealogical information about the Jewish community in
Lithuania. Primary purpose: To acquire, translate and put on the Internet a
searchable database of the Lithuanian Jewish community. Database available.
Must visit!
___________________

David Hoffman
Co-Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuanian Jewish Website #lithuania

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Fred Klein posted the name of an excellent website in yesterday's
Digest. Unfortunately, the moderator assumed his URL was a typo. It is
correct: <www.angelfire.com/ut/Luthuanian>. A Hole in the Heart, which
appears on that site can also be accessed through the ShtetLinks
Directory at <www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks>. Go to Lithuania and click
on Kedaini (Keidan) to read this story.

Chuck Weinstein
San Mateo, California
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuanian Jewish Website #lithuania

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Fred Klein posted the name of an excellent website in yesterday's
Digest. Unfortunately, the moderator assumed his URL was a typo. It is
correct: <www.angelfire.com/ut/Luthuanian>. A Hole in the Heart, which
appears on that site can also be accessed through the ShtetLinks
Directory at <www.jewishgen.org/ShtetLinks>. Go to Lithuania and click
on Kedaini (Keidan) to read this story.

Chuck Weinstein
San Mateo, California
cweinstein@jewishgen.org