Date   

Re: ShtetLink for Gorlice, Galicia, now Poland #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Marjorie Stamm Rosenfeld wrote:

In conjunction with the JewishGen Web Page Design course I've been
taking, I'm attempting to design some ShtetLink Web pages for Gorlice,
which was in Austrian Galicia and is now in Poland near Nowy Sacz. So
far, the information I have comes >from the Encyclopedia Judaica, the
material >from the Gorlice Yiskor book at the JewishGen site, the
material on the Gorlice cemetery on JewishGen, and JewishGen's Shtetl
Seeker (with its link to MapQuest).

My ex-husband's mother, Sylvia Rosenfeld (nee Ring) was >from Gorlice;
and I'm hoping to have some material >from her family to add--perhaps
even an old photo or two.
SNIP
You might like to add in your work the following links to the Gorlice
(in English):

History of Gorlice (Jews of Gorlice are mentioned in this work):

http://www.minix.gorlice.pl/gorlice/ehistorg.html

City Map

http://www.minix.gorlice.pl/gorlice/plan.html

Gorlice showcase, town attractions

Tourist attractions (including mentioning the synagogue - presently
bakery)

http://www.minix.gorlice.pl/gorlice/eturystyg.html

Names of some other smaller shtetlakh around Gorlice

http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/rich/appendix.htm

and

http://www.malopolska.ipl.net/gorlice/3pl.htm



Alexander Sharon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: ShtetLink for Gorlice, Galicia, now Poland #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

Marjorie Stamm Rosenfeld wrote:

In conjunction with the JewishGen Web Page Design course I've been
taking, I'm attempting to design some ShtetLink Web pages for Gorlice,
which was in Austrian Galicia and is now in Poland near Nowy Sacz. So
far, the information I have comes >from the Encyclopedia Judaica, the
material >from the Gorlice Yiskor book at the JewishGen site, the
material on the Gorlice cemetery on JewishGen, and JewishGen's Shtetl
Seeker (with its link to MapQuest).

My ex-husband's mother, Sylvia Rosenfeld (nee Ring) was >from Gorlice;
and I'm hoping to have some material >from her family to add--perhaps
even an old photo or two.
SNIP
You might like to add in your work the following links to the Gorlice
(in English):

History of Gorlice (Jews of Gorlice are mentioned in this work):

http://www.minix.gorlice.pl/gorlice/ehistorg.html

City Map

http://www.minix.gorlice.pl/gorlice/plan.html

Gorlice showcase, town attractions

Tourist attractions (including mentioning the synagogue - presently
bakery)

http://www.minix.gorlice.pl/gorlice/eturystyg.html

Names of some other smaller shtetlakh around Gorlice

http://www.carpatho-rusyn.org/rich/appendix.htm

and

http://www.malopolska.ipl.net/gorlice/3pl.htm



Alexander Sharon


new e-mail address #general

shimonoz
 

Hello!
Pls. note that I started to use my new address.
shimonoz@inter.net.il

Shimon Ouziel
Tel Aviv Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen new e-mail address #general

shimonoz
 

Hello!
Pls. note that I started to use my new address.
shimonoz@inter.net.il

Shimon Ouziel
Tel Aviv Israel


Lack of "H" in Russian #general

BONUS <yairharu@...>
 

Alexander Sharon's posting on the Russian lack of the letter "H", which
appears in other European languages, was very interesting and informative.

However, he seems to be unaware that English has the exact opposite problem
in that, while most European languages have a guttural sound represented,
usually by "CH" or by "X" or (in Spanish) by "J" (for example, the Scottish
word loch) English does not have this sound. This guttural sound is,
therefore, often represented in English by the letter "H" and is often
pronounced that way.

The examples that Alexander gives to illustrate the use of the Russian "X"
are, for the most part, words that have this guttural sound - Haifa, Hanna
and Haim are all Hebrew names, pronounced with the "CH" or "KH" gutturals,
and represented (and sometimes pronounced) in English as an "H" sound. The
Russian representation is, therefore, closer to the original sound than the
English representation.

All the best,
Chaim Charutz - Petach Tikva, Israel.


MODERATOR NOTE: Although the thread is closed this message
opens up a new view point on the subject and is, therefore
being posted.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lack of "H" in Russian #general

BONUS <yairharu@...>
 

Alexander Sharon's posting on the Russian lack of the letter "H", which
appears in other European languages, was very interesting and informative.

However, he seems to be unaware that English has the exact opposite problem
in that, while most European languages have a guttural sound represented,
usually by "CH" or by "X" or (in Spanish) by "J" (for example, the Scottish
word loch) English does not have this sound. This guttural sound is,
therefore, often represented in English by the letter "H" and is often
pronounced that way.

The examples that Alexander gives to illustrate the use of the Russian "X"
are, for the most part, words that have this guttural sound - Haifa, Hanna
and Haim are all Hebrew names, pronounced with the "CH" or "KH" gutturals,
and represented (and sometimes pronounced) in English as an "H" sound. The
Russian representation is, therefore, closer to the original sound than the
English representation.

All the best,
Chaim Charutz - Petach Tikva, Israel.


MODERATOR NOTE: Although the thread is closed this message
opens up a new view point on the subject and is, therefore
being posted.


Searching ISRAEL -> Australia #general

Mrs M Sprott <sprottm@...>
 

I am trying to find my grandmothers relatives. Her name was Hannah ISRAEL.
She was born in England on the 26.4.1885. Her father's name was Benjamin
Israel. He was born in Palestine in 1851. Her mother's name was Rachel
DANIEL. She was born in Palestine in 1853. They were married in Palestine
in 1873, and they went to England to live, and had 17 children. She came
to Australia in 1901, and met my grandfather on the same ship has her, and
was married in Sydney in 1901. Do you have anyone in Australia with that
surname who has grandparents the same as grandma's? Regards Monica Sprott


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching ISRAEL -> Australia #general

Mrs M Sprott <sprottm@...>
 

I am trying to find my grandmothers relatives. Her name was Hannah ISRAEL.
She was born in England on the 26.4.1885. Her father's name was Benjamin
Israel. He was born in Palestine in 1851. Her mother's name was Rachel
DANIEL. She was born in Palestine in 1853. They were married in Palestine
in 1873, and they went to England to live, and had 17 children. She came
to Australia in 1901, and met my grandfather on the same ship has her, and
was married in Sydney in 1901. Do you have anyone in Australia with that
surname who has grandparents the same as grandma's? Regards Monica Sprott


FINKELSTEIN of Minneapollis #general

Paul Silverstone <paulh@...>
 

I am searching for the FINKELSTEIN family who lived in
Minneapolis::

Peter Finkelstein (1874-1939) m. Mary
a. Minnie (b 1904)
b. Katie (b. 1905)
c. Pearl (b. 1907)
d. Lawrence (b. 1911)
e. Carl (b. 1913)


Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FINKELSTEIN of Minneapollis #general

Paul Silverstone <paulh@...>
 

I am searching for the FINKELSTEIN family who lived in
Minneapolis::

Peter Finkelstein (1874-1939) m. Mary
a. Minnie (b 1904)
b. Katie (b. 1905)
c. Pearl (b. 1907)
d. Lawrence (b. 1911)
e. Carl (b. 1913)


Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


Re: Pronouncing the A'yin #general

David Ziants <davidz@...>
 

The moderator wrote concerning the relevance of Hebrew (or Yiddish)
pronunciation to genealogy:
MODERATOR NOTE: The original question was allowed because it was
deemed of genealogical value. The pronunciation of a word, when
transliterated into English or another language might change it
enough to make it difficult for a researcher to link it to a known
family name. ... Snipped...
Apart >from the aspect of difficulty in matching names because of different
pronunciations, there is another relevance to genealogy which hopefully
has been exemplified in this thread. This is the ability to *sometimes*
locate the whereabouts of the ancestry of a person by the way he prays.
*sometimes* - This is probably much more common with the older generations,
because often, nowadays, a person is taught differently to his paternal
tradition.
For example: My grandfather's ashkenazi pronunciation nuances might possibly
be matched to others >from the Bialystok region, as he could have been taught
directly by his father. This would be untrue of my father and myself,
who were taught by others in our pre-bar-mitzva days.

David Ziants <davidz@netmedia.net.il>
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel

ZIANTS was originally ZENETSKI >from Narewka, and also searching ISHMA
(became DAVIDSON) >from this town.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Pronouncing the A'yin #general

David Ziants <davidz@...>
 

The moderator wrote concerning the relevance of Hebrew (or Yiddish)
pronunciation to genealogy:
MODERATOR NOTE: The original question was allowed because it was
deemed of genealogical value. The pronunciation of a word, when
transliterated into English or another language might change it
enough to make it difficult for a researcher to link it to a known
family name. ... Snipped...
Apart >from the aspect of difficulty in matching names because of different
pronunciations, there is another relevance to genealogy which hopefully
has been exemplified in this thread. This is the ability to *sometimes*
locate the whereabouts of the ancestry of a person by the way he prays.
*sometimes* - This is probably much more common with the older generations,
because often, nowadays, a person is taught differently to his paternal
tradition.
For example: My grandfather's ashkenazi pronunciation nuances might possibly
be matched to others >from the Bialystok region, as he could have been taught
directly by his father. This would be untrue of my father and myself,
who were taught by others in our pre-bar-mitzva days.

David Ziants <davidz@netmedia.net.il>
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel

ZIANTS was originally ZENETSKI >from Narewka, and also searching ISHMA
(became DAVIDSON) >from this town.


Q about Shtetl Seeker #general

IsraelP <p2o5rock@...>
 

I understand that Shtetl Seeker (which I've used very
infrequently) can list a town under several spellings -
some more official than others.

It explains that those labelled "N" and "C" are official
(one local and one what we consider normative), while
"V" means "former names, minority language names or
variations..."

So one would think that every town listed would have at
least one "C" or "N." So howcum Rozdol (now Ukraine) has
only listings that are considered variant. Don't the
governments call it something??

Israel Pickholtz
(Rozdol is probably ground zero for every Pi(c)khol(t)z/c
who ever lived. We are chasing all of them.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Q about Shtetl Seeker #general

IsraelP <p2o5rock@...>
 

I understand that Shtetl Seeker (which I've used very
infrequently) can list a town under several spellings -
some more official than others.

It explains that those labelled "N" and "C" are official
(one local and one what we consider normative), while
"V" means "former names, minority language names or
variations..."

So one would think that every town listed would have at
least one "C" or "N." So howcum Rozdol (now Ukraine) has
only listings that are considered variant. Don't the
governments call it something??

Israel Pickholtz
(Rozdol is probably ground zero for every Pi(c)khol(t)z/c
who ever lived. We are chasing all of them.)


Austrian War Archive in Vienna #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

A letter to one of our members >from Dr. Rainer Egger, Director
of the War Archive in Vienna, contains information relevant
to some past discussions on this list.

1) If I have translated the German correctly, Herr Egger states
that individual service records of military personnel >from outside
the borders of modern-day Austria are not in the Archive.
Per the St. Germain Peace Treaty of 1919, these records--including
those for Polish and Ukrainian Galicia--remained in the custody
of the countries in which they were located after the fall of the
Habsburg monarchy, and were by and large destroyed.

2) _The Handbook of the Austro-Hungarian Army in War, June 1918_,
published by the British War Office, was reprinted in 1994
by Battery Press, and is currently available. Herr Egger quoted
from the book to explain our member's ancestor's status of "ersatz
reservist."

Renee Steinig
JGS of Long Island
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Austrian War Archive in Vienna #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

A letter to one of our members >from Dr. Rainer Egger, Director
of the War Archive in Vienna, contains information relevant
to some past discussions on this list.

1) If I have translated the German correctly, Herr Egger states
that individual service records of military personnel >from outside
the borders of modern-day Austria are not in the Archive.
Per the St. Germain Peace Treaty of 1919, these records--including
those for Polish and Ukrainian Galicia--remained in the custody
of the countries in which they were located after the fall of the
Habsburg monarchy, and were by and large destroyed.

2) _The Handbook of the Austro-Hungarian Army in War, June 1918_,
published by the British War Office, was reprinted in 1994
by Battery Press, and is currently available. Herr Egger quoted
from the book to explain our member's ancestor's status of "ersatz
reservist."

Renee Steinig
JGS of Long Island
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us


The first name "THUN" from Yad Vashem #general

JLowenkron@...
 

Dear Genners,

I just received a sobering and sad reply to my letter to Yad Vashem
enquiring about my relatives >from the Lemberg area, most of whom perished during WWII. The response was more than I'd anticipated and beyond words.

One person whose records they found was named Thun Leopold Loewenkron...I
dont know what to make of the name Thun...at first I thought it might be a
title or description, as it doesnt seem like a name, but then I thought it
might be a misspelling....any suggestions? Jane Lowenkron Foss, NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The first name "THUN" from Yad Vashem #general

JLowenkron@...
 

Dear Genners,

I just received a sobering and sad reply to my letter to Yad Vashem
enquiring about my relatives >from the Lemberg area, most of whom perished during WWII. The response was more than I'd anticipated and beyond words.

One person whose records they found was named Thun Leopold Loewenkron...I
dont know what to make of the name Thun...at first I thought it might be a
title or description, as it doesnt seem like a name, but then I thought it
might be a misspelling....any suggestions? Jane Lowenkron Foss, NYC


Spisske Podhradie #general

BABSK@...
 

Would those of you researching Spisske Podhradie (Szepesvaralja) please
contact me privately about the renovation of the cemetery and synagogue
there.

Barbara Kaufman
Mt. Vernon, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Spisske Podhradie #general

BABSK@...
 

Would those of you researching Spisske Podhradie (Szepesvaralja) please
contact me privately about the renovation of the cemetery and synagogue
there.

Barbara Kaufman
Mt. Vernon, NY