Date   

What's In A Name #general

GojuMom@...
 

On my father's immigration papers the last name is listed with the suffix
"zky" but on his aunt's papers the same name has the suffix "skaia".
Is this a masculine vs. feminine form?
Thanks,
JoAnne Vanett
Ambler, Pa

Searching: VENETZKY, VENETSKAIA, WINETZKY, ROSENBERG, DOBRISH OR DOBRICH
all >from shtetl Zhivatov, district Tarastcha, Kiev Guberniya


Problem with 1910 Census of Philadelphia, PA #general

Matthew <matthew24@...>
 

I was recently searching for several names in my library's 1910
Census Index of Pennsylvania, but I found none of them, all of whom I am
100% sure lived in Philadelphia at this time. Browsing the index, I
realized that there are no names >from Philadelphia listed. I know that
the 1910 census was only indexed for 21 states (PA inclusive), but were
these states *fully* indexed? Or is the library's microfilm incomplete
(the Carnegie of Pittsburgh)? Has anyone else experienced similar
problems with the 1910 census?

Matthew Meisel
matthew24@geocities.com
http://jewish.genealogy.org

SEARCHING: Abrams-Abramson, Altshool-Altshul-Altschul,
Bleck-Blick-Block, Cohen-Cohn, Drucker, Einwarg, Fox-Fuchs,
Greenfield-Grunfeld, Hossack, Katz, Kleinman, Kesilman-Kesselman,
Mankowitz, Pitlock, Serody-Sirota, Tasman
more info on these surnames at http://www.pitt.edu/~meisel/genealogy/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen What's In A Name #general

GojuMom@...
 

On my father's immigration papers the last name is listed with the suffix
"zky" but on his aunt's papers the same name has the suffix "skaia".
Is this a masculine vs. feminine form?
Thanks,
JoAnne Vanett
Ambler, Pa

Searching: VENETZKY, VENETSKAIA, WINETZKY, ROSENBERG, DOBRISH OR DOBRICH
all >from shtetl Zhivatov, district Tarastcha, Kiev Guberniya


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Problem with 1910 Census of Philadelphia, PA #general

Matthew <matthew24@...>
 

I was recently searching for several names in my library's 1910
Census Index of Pennsylvania, but I found none of them, all of whom I am
100% sure lived in Philadelphia at this time. Browsing the index, I
realized that there are no names >from Philadelphia listed. I know that
the 1910 census was only indexed for 21 states (PA inclusive), but were
these states *fully* indexed? Or is the library's microfilm incomplete
(the Carnegie of Pittsburgh)? Has anyone else experienced similar
problems with the 1910 census?

Matthew Meisel
matthew24@geocities.com
http://jewish.genealogy.org

SEARCHING: Abrams-Abramson, Altshool-Altshul-Altschul,
Bleck-Blick-Block, Cohen-Cohn, Drucker, Einwarg, Fox-Fuchs,
Greenfield-Grunfeld, Hossack, Katz, Kleinman, Kesilman-Kesselman,
Mankowitz, Pitlock, Serody-Sirota, Tasman
more info on these surnames at http://www.pitt.edu/~meisel/genealogy/


Re: Searching: LURIA #general

shimonoz
 

Eric Lewis writes:

<< I am trying to trace the Canadian branch of the family of my late
father, surname LURIA, who visited England during the war whilst in the
Canadian services. >>
Hi!
To whom it may concern!
My late father in law was Alexander lourie' was born in Lockenwald
(Berlin),has passed away in Tel-Aviv
in 1992.I know that the family has a family tree which can't be found.they
are related to the Ari Hakadosh.
His father's name Owsy, he was born in Minsk ? lived in Germany,moved to
France with his wife Rosa
& daughter Marie,is buried in Valencay cemetery his wife made aliya to
Israel.Alex was the General
Executive for Kopel Tours-Europe.

Shimon Ouziel
Tel-Aviv Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching: LURIA #general

shimonoz
 

Eric Lewis writes:

<< I am trying to trace the Canadian branch of the family of my late
father, surname LURIA, who visited England during the war whilst in the
Canadian services. >>
Hi!
To whom it may concern!
My late father in law was Alexander lourie' was born in Lockenwald
(Berlin),has passed away in Tel-Aviv
in 1992.I know that the family has a family tree which can't be found.they
are related to the Ari Hakadosh.
His father's name Owsy, he was born in Minsk ? lived in Germany,moved to
France with his wife Rosa
& daughter Marie,is buried in Valencay cemetery his wife made aliya to
Israel.Alex was the General
Executive for Kopel Tours-Europe.

Shimon Ouziel
Tel-Aviv Israel


Fire in Mezritsh #general

samuel lenger <sdfisr@...>
 

Hi Jgenners
Not a long while ago I remember that I read that in Mezritsh there were two
big fires (one by the end of last century and the other in the beggining of
this). I can't remember were I read this (I checked the Jewish Enciclopedia
and it was not there). May someone help?

TIA
Sam Lenger <sdfisr@shani.net>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fire in Mezritsh #general

samuel lenger <sdfisr@...>
 

Hi Jgenners
Not a long while ago I remember that I read that in Mezritsh there were two
big fires (one by the end of last century and the other in the beggining of
this). I can't remember were I read this (I checked the Jewish Enciclopedia
and it was not there). May someone help?

TIA
Sam Lenger <sdfisr@shani.net>


OBA Cemetery in Minneapolis #general

Paul Fisher <fisherpaul@...>
 

OBA is Order of Bnai Abraham. It is one of a four part cemetery in
Richfield, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. Its current name is
Minneaplis Jewish Cemetery.

They are located at 70-1/2 Street and Penn Avenue South.

The others are United Hebrew Brotherhood, Gemulus Chesed and Bnai Jacob
or Sons of Jacob, I can't remember I haven't been to that side of the
cemetery. (My father is buried in United Hebrew Brotherhood plus my
mother's parents.)

I want to thank everyone who replied ,for the information. I am
grateful.

Paul Fisher
Atlanta, Georgia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen OBA Cemetery in Minneapolis #general

Paul Fisher <fisherpaul@...>
 

OBA is Order of Bnai Abraham. It is one of a four part cemetery in
Richfield, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. Its current name is
Minneaplis Jewish Cemetery.

They are located at 70-1/2 Street and Penn Avenue South.

The others are United Hebrew Brotherhood, Gemulus Chesed and Bnai Jacob
or Sons of Jacob, I can't remember I haven't been to that side of the
cemetery. (My father is buried in United Hebrew Brotherhood plus my
mother's parents.)

I want to thank everyone who replied ,for the information. I am
grateful.

Paul Fisher
Atlanta, Georgia


Organizations NYC circa 1930 #general

AnieDoodle
 

The will of my great-grandmother, Sarah GROZCKY, lists the following
associations/organizations as legatees.

Uptown Talmud Torah Association
Hebrew Free Loan Association
Chebrah Peol Zedek Anschei Illia

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who might be able to tell me more
about these groups.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Anne M. Dean
Covington, VA

AnieDoodle@aol.com

Searching: ALLEN, COPELAND, FRIEDLANDER, GILLMAN, GRODZKI, GROCZKY,
GROSBY, KAPLAN, LEWIN, LEWINTHAL, SZEYNMAN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Organizations NYC circa 1930 #general

AnieDoodle
 

The will of my great-grandmother, Sarah GROZCKY, lists the following
associations/organizations as legatees.

Uptown Talmud Torah Association
Hebrew Free Loan Association
Chebrah Peol Zedek Anschei Illia

I would appreciate hearing >from anyone who might be able to tell me more
about these groups.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Anne M. Dean
Covington, VA

AnieDoodle@aol.com

Searching: ALLEN, COPELAND, FRIEDLANDER, GILLMAN, GRODZKI, GROCZKY,
GROSBY, KAPLAN, LEWIN, LEWINTHAL, SZEYNMAN


Funeral Directors: A Valuable Resource #general

ddworski@...
 

Contacting the funeral director listed on a relative's death certificate
can be a short-cut to learning valuable genealogical information. I
stumbled across this research strategy in a desperate attempt to learn
something--anything about my ggf's death. I had my ggm's death
certificate which listed the funeral director. I called, presuming that
my great grandparents were buried near each other, and hoping that the
funeral home might have some record of my ggf. Indeed, the same funeral
director had handled my ggf's burial. Here is some of the terrific
information I learned >from that one, 15-minute phone call:

1) date and place of death (now I can obtain the death certificate)

2) data provided by the informant--which is then used to prepare the
death certificate
(includes date and country of birth, parents' names, last residence, name
and address of informant)

3) name and location of cemetery and exact location of gravestone
(including section, row, and plot #)

4) inscription on tombstone

5) copy of death notice appearing in local newspaper
(provides date of funeral and the all-important names of
previously-unknown relatives!)

6) multiply by six all of the above data--I learned that the same funeral
home had arranged the burials of all of my relatives residing in that
city!

The above is a wonderful example of "one-stop" shopping for genealogical
information. This one resource eliminated several phone calls and lots
of footwork. I did not have to call the cemetery for specific burial
location. I did not even have to visit the cemetery since the funeral
director provided the tombstone inscription. Also, I did not have to
scan through old newspapers in search of a death notice or obituary.
And, I saved all of these steps for six different relatives!

Cooperation of funeral home staff and thoroughness of funeral homes'
records will vary, but it is worth a phone call.

Deborah Dworski
Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Funeral Directors: A Valuable Resource #general

ddworski@...
 

Contacting the funeral director listed on a relative's death certificate
can be a short-cut to learning valuable genealogical information. I
stumbled across this research strategy in a desperate attempt to learn
something--anything about my ggf's death. I had my ggm's death
certificate which listed the funeral director. I called, presuming that
my great grandparents were buried near each other, and hoping that the
funeral home might have some record of my ggf. Indeed, the same funeral
director had handled my ggf's burial. Here is some of the terrific
information I learned >from that one, 15-minute phone call:

1) date and place of death (now I can obtain the death certificate)

2) data provided by the informant--which is then used to prepare the
death certificate
(includes date and country of birth, parents' names, last residence, name
and address of informant)

3) name and location of cemetery and exact location of gravestone
(including section, row, and plot #)

4) inscription on tombstone

5) copy of death notice appearing in local newspaper
(provides date of funeral and the all-important names of
previously-unknown relatives!)

6) multiply by six all of the above data--I learned that the same funeral
home had arranged the burials of all of my relatives residing in that
city!

The above is a wonderful example of "one-stop" shopping for genealogical
information. This one resource eliminated several phone calls and lots
of footwork. I did not have to call the cemetery for specific burial
location. I did not even have to visit the cemetery since the funeral
director provided the tombstone inscription. Also, I did not have to
scan through old newspapers in search of a death notice or obituary.
And, I saved all of these steps for six different relatives!

Cooperation of funeral home staff and thoroughness of funeral homes'
records will vary, but it is worth a phone call.

Deborah Dworski
Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.


First names Hertze Soje #general

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

My gf had a brother who in our family was known as Herman Katzeff. I had
understood that Herman was a western name, but have never seen his
hebrew-yiddish name until recently. In a Swedish "census" >from 1906 I found
him under the name Hertze Soje Katzeff. I now wonder what kind of first
names they are. I presume that Hertze is a yiddish name meaning heart or
likely. Maybe it's a kinnui with a biblical connection to his hebrew name.
Soje sounds for me like a yiddish short form/nickname for a hebrew name.

Thankful for any help in this subject!

Adam Katzeff
Malmoe, Sweden

Searching:
GOLDBERG: Tapelau, Lithuania; Parnu, Estonia; Stockholm, Sweden
KATZEFF: Tapelau, Lithuania; Parnu, Estonia; Stockholm and Gothenburg,
Sweden; Copenhagen, Denmark; Glasgow, Scotland
NEMZOFF: Gub. Vitebsk; Stockholm and Gothenburg, Sweden; Copenhagen,
Denmark


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen First names Hertze Soje #general

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

My gf had a brother who in our family was known as Herman Katzeff. I had
understood that Herman was a western name, but have never seen his
hebrew-yiddish name until recently. In a Swedish "census" >from 1906 I found
him under the name Hertze Soje Katzeff. I now wonder what kind of first
names they are. I presume that Hertze is a yiddish name meaning heart or
likely. Maybe it's a kinnui with a biblical connection to his hebrew name.
Soje sounds for me like a yiddish short form/nickname for a hebrew name.

Thankful for any help in this subject!

Adam Katzeff
Malmoe, Sweden

Searching:
GOLDBERG: Tapelau, Lithuania; Parnu, Estonia; Stockholm, Sweden
KATZEFF: Tapelau, Lithuania; Parnu, Estonia; Stockholm and Gothenburg,
Sweden; Copenhagen, Denmark; Glasgow, Scotland
NEMZOFF: Gub. Vitebsk; Stockholm and Gothenburg, Sweden; Copenhagen,
Denmark


Basche; Basya #general

Compaq <silk@...>
 

Just one correction to an otherwise very informative answer by Ms. Romney
Wegner. There are actually two names: Bisya/Bithia (Bitya in Modern
Hebrew) and Basya (Batya in Modern Hebrew). True, the daughter of Pharoah
is not mentioned in Exodus. However, she is indeed mentioned in Chronicles
in the enumeration of the sons and daughters of Pharoah. The spelling of
her name uses a chirik, which would indicate that the name should be
pronounced as Bisya, or in Modern Hebrew, Bitya. The confusion stems from
two interrelated points. First, the name is spelled with a chirik chasir
(that is, an "ee" sound vowel that is not followed by a yud). Therefore,
as a second point, in Modern Hebrew, which is spelled without vowels, one
cannot distinguish the names Bitya and Basya based on the spelling alone
without the vowels. This explains why women named Bitya have modified the
spelling of the name in modern times to add a yud.

The Zohar actually explains that notwithstanding the differences in
spelling, the names may actually be viewed as the same. However, this is
based on kabbalistic, and not linguistic or other grounds. The reason
cited by the Zohar is that Bitya daughter of Pharoah was actually the
daughter of G-d because, through various transmigrations of the soul, she
had the neshama (soul) of Chava (Eve), who was truly the first daughter of
G-d.

Mitch Silk
Hong Kong

MODERATOR NOTE: We have included this post in a spirit of generosity and
fairness, since we also approved a second post by Dr Wegner on the same
topic. Nevertheless, this discussion is straying too far >from genealogy
into the field of Biblical scholarship. While many of us (including this
moderator) find such discussions of interest, they really belong in a
different forum. We are therefore closing this thread with this post.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Basche; Basya #general

Compaq <silk@...>
 

Just one correction to an otherwise very informative answer by Ms. Romney
Wegner. There are actually two names: Bisya/Bithia (Bitya in Modern
Hebrew) and Basya (Batya in Modern Hebrew). True, the daughter of Pharoah
is not mentioned in Exodus. However, she is indeed mentioned in Chronicles
in the enumeration of the sons and daughters of Pharoah. The spelling of
her name uses a chirik, which would indicate that the name should be
pronounced as Bisya, or in Modern Hebrew, Bitya. The confusion stems from
two interrelated points. First, the name is spelled with a chirik chasir
(that is, an "ee" sound vowel that is not followed by a yud). Therefore,
as a second point, in Modern Hebrew, which is spelled without vowels, one
cannot distinguish the names Bitya and Basya based on the spelling alone
without the vowels. This explains why women named Bitya have modified the
spelling of the name in modern times to add a yud.

The Zohar actually explains that notwithstanding the differences in
spelling, the names may actually be viewed as the same. However, this is
based on kabbalistic, and not linguistic or other grounds. The reason
cited by the Zohar is that Bitya daughter of Pharoah was actually the
daughter of G-d because, through various transmigrations of the soul, she
had the neshama (soul) of Chava (Eve), who was truly the first daughter of
G-d.

Mitch Silk
Hong Kong

MODERATOR NOTE: We have included this post in a spirit of generosity and
fairness, since we also approved a second post by Dr Wegner on the same
topic. Nevertheless, this discussion is straying too far >from genealogy
into the field of Biblical scholarship. While many of us (including this
moderator) find such discussions of interest, they really belong in a
different forum. We are therefore closing this thread with this post.


Could "Sayfet" be "Seifert." #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Concerning Linda Saegert's question about the origins of a name that was
phonetically pronounced "Sayfet"

I am familiar with the surname "Seifert" (a marriage connection in my
father's family). They pronounced it "See-fert", and some of them had
anglicised it to "Seaford." I also twosisters called Zeffert 50 years
ago when I was a student at Cambridge. They lived on the Isle of Man (in
England, near Liverpool).

So, you might want to try searching names like Seifert, Zeifert, Zeffert, etc.

Judith

MODERATOR NOTE: Be aware that British and American pronunciations, even of
common words, can be radically different and may not be reliable guides.
For instance, the common chemical prefix "methyl-" is pronounced "meth-ull"
in the US and "mee-thile" in Britain by at least some knowledgeable
speakers.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Could "Sayfet" be "Seifert." #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Concerning Linda Saegert's question about the origins of a name that was
phonetically pronounced "Sayfet"

I am familiar with the surname "Seifert" (a marriage connection in my
father's family). They pronounced it "See-fert", and some of them had
anglicised it to "Seaford." I also twosisters called Zeffert 50 years
ago when I was a student at Cambridge. They lived on the Isle of Man (in
England, near Liverpool).

So, you might want to try searching names like Seifert, Zeifert, Zeffert, etc.

Judith

MODERATOR NOTE: Be aware that British and American pronunciations, even of
common words, can be radically different and may not be reliable guides.
For instance, the common chemical prefix "methyl-" is pronounced "meth-ull"
in the US and "mee-thile" in Britain by at least some knowledgeable
speakers.