Date   

ITS Plans to Place More of Its Collection Online #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

The following information was electronically published in Nu? What's
New? Volume 17, Number 41, October 16, 2016.

In conjunction with a visit >from the German Commissioner of Culture,
the director of the International Tracing Service stated that ITS aims
to make its documents available to even more people around the world
for research and education, as well as personal exploration. "The new
ITS Online Archive is a window into the ITS collection on the web. We
want to open this window even wider, because the value of the archive
grows with the number of people using it," said ITS Director Floriane
Hohenberg, explaining the main goal of the ITS for the coming years.

The International Tracing Service, located in Bad Arolsen, Germany, is
an archive and a center for documenting Nazi persecution and the
liberated survivors. Out of the more than 30 million documents about
an estimated 55 million persons, former victims of Nazism and their
families receive information regarding their incarceration, forced
labor, and postwar allied assistance. The documents in the ITS
archives provide the basis for research and education. In continuing
to fulfill these responsibilities, the ITS is part of an international
cooperation with memorial sites, archives and research institutes.

The ITS is governed by representatives >from 11 member states: Belgium,
France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Luxemburg, Netherlands,
Poland, United Kingdom and U.S. The German Federal Government
Commissioner for Culture and the Media funds ITS. The German Federal
Archives is the institutional partner. The index to their collection
is available at one site within each member state. For Israel, it is
Yad Vashem, and for the United States it is the Holocaust Memorial
Museum. ITS and those sites that have the index accept inquiries from
individuals.

Current collections online include:
- Effects Reserved at the ITS
- Inquiries by Allies on "Death Marches"
- Child Search Branch

The ITS website is at http://its-arolsen.org. The digital archives is
located at http://digitalcollections.its-arolsen.org.

Thank you Gary Mokotoff, Editor, for bringing this to our attention.

Carol Hoffman
LitvakSIG President


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania ITS Plans to Place More of Its Collection Online #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

The following information was electronically published in Nu? What's
New? Volume 17, Number 41, October 16, 2016.

In conjunction with a visit >from the German Commissioner of Culture,
the director of the International Tracing Service stated that ITS aims
to make its documents available to even more people around the world
for research and education, as well as personal exploration. "The new
ITS Online Archive is a window into the ITS collection on the web. We
want to open this window even wider, because the value of the archive
grows with the number of people using it," said ITS Director Floriane
Hohenberg, explaining the main goal of the ITS for the coming years.

The International Tracing Service, located in Bad Arolsen, Germany, is
an archive and a center for documenting Nazi persecution and the
liberated survivors. Out of the more than 30 million documents about
an estimated 55 million persons, former victims of Nazism and their
families receive information regarding their incarceration, forced
labor, and postwar allied assistance. The documents in the ITS
archives provide the basis for research and education. In continuing
to fulfill these responsibilities, the ITS is part of an international
cooperation with memorial sites, archives and research institutes.

The ITS is governed by representatives >from 11 member states: Belgium,
France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Luxemburg, Netherlands,
Poland, United Kingdom and U.S. The German Federal Government
Commissioner for Culture and the Media funds ITS. The German Federal
Archives is the institutional partner. The index to their collection
is available at one site within each member state. For Israel, it is
Yad Vashem, and for the United States it is the Holocaust Memorial
Museum. ITS and those sites that have the index accept inquiries from
individuals.

Current collections online include:
- Effects Reserved at the ITS
- Inquiries by Allies on "Death Marches"
- Child Search Branch

The ITS website is at http://its-arolsen.org. The digital archives is
located at http://digitalcollections.its-arolsen.org.

Thank you Gary Mokotoff, Editor, for bringing this to our attention.

Carol Hoffman
LitvakSIG President


Researching Your Roots Using JewishGen - course begins November 1 #romania

Phyllis Kramer
 

What's special about JewishGen mentored courses?
Answer: you have an instructor who will personally respond to your
questions, make suggestions and assist you in researching the branch
you choose... 24/7.

This 4 week course will help you delve into JewishGen's rich
resources. Your course material includes 7 text based lessons (15-20
pages each), delivered online (which you can download) with hundreds
of links and suggestions.

We'll help you build an effective research plan, manage your data with
our fabulous format, and give you tips and techniques to overcome
research obstacles. To prepare, select one of your family
branches... one set of immigrant ancestors for which you know the town
of origin and we'll expand your knowledge of the world's largest
online Jewish resource for family history.

Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the Internet and
downloading files and have 8-10 hours per week to organize their
papers, read the lessons, search online and interact with the FORUM.
Tuition for this U.S. Genealogy Course is $125 (there is no waiver for
this course). Registration will open October 15; maximum 15 students;
more details and enrollment at www.JewishGen.org/Education
For questions about this course or which course is right for you...
email the instructor at JewishGen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, JewishGen
www.JewishGen.org/Education
phylliskramer1@gmail.com


Romania SIG #Romania Researching Your Roots Using JewishGen - course begins November 1 #romania

Phyllis Kramer
 

What's special about JewishGen mentored courses?
Answer: you have an instructor who will personally respond to your
questions, make suggestions and assist you in researching the branch
you choose... 24/7.

This 4 week course will help you delve into JewishGen's rich
resources. Your course material includes 7 text based lessons (15-20
pages each), delivered online (which you can download) with hundreds
of links and suggestions.

We'll help you build an effective research plan, manage your data with
our fabulous format, and give you tips and techniques to overcome
research obstacles. To prepare, select one of your family
branches... one set of immigrant ancestors for which you know the town
of origin and we'll expand your knowledge of the world's largest
online Jewish resource for family history.

Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the Internet and
downloading files and have 8-10 hours per week to organize their
papers, read the lessons, search online and interact with the FORUM.
Tuition for this U.S. Genealogy Course is $125 (there is no waiver for
this course). Registration will open October 15; maximum 15 students;
more details and enrollment at www.JewishGen.org/Education
For questions about this course or which course is right for you...
email the instructor at JewishGen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, JewishGen
www.JewishGen.org/Education
phylliskramer1@gmail.com


ViewMate translations from German or Yiddish & other cultural/historical interpretations - files # 50530, 50531, 50532, 50533, 50534. #austria-czech

Barrie Karp
 

I've posted 5 vital records (photographs with inscriptions, probably
in German, for which I seek translations; and with photographer's
stamp: Meiselas in Mukacevo, about which I seek knowledge). For all 5
records I seek historical cultural interpretations and observations.
The people in these photographs appear to be parents of my maternal
grandmother, and my grandmother and grandfather told me they came from
Munkacs, which I know was Mukacevo when these photographs were taken.
Can anyone help me find the date of these photographs? Also, I seek
translations. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50530

Photo of my maternal great grandmother: Ester Grunbaum_Mukacevo (BDM
unknown; maiden name: BERKOWITZ), mother of Rose Greenbaum Weiss
1893-1962 (my grandmother, born or last lived before US, in Munkacs,
Bereg, Karpatalja, Hungary; died: Williamsport, PA, 12-6-1962--I have
her US records). Seeking translation of inscription and
cultural/historical interpretations or observations.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50531

Photo of same person as above, Viewmate # 50530. Seeking translation.
I believe it is German. Do you think it was written by the woman in
the photograph or by the photographer or some administrator or other
person?


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50532

Seeking translation of inscription on photo document file # 50532,
from what I believe is German. I'm guessing this is my maternal great
grandfather (husband of Esther Grunbaum in file # 50530 and file #
5051) that the writing is not his. I had been told by my maternal
grandparents (WEISS married BERKOWITZ GRUNBAUM GREENBAUM WEISS), who
each came to US (NYC) early 1900s, that they came >from Munkacs (they
met in NYC, and married in NYC in 1917).

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50533

Seeking translation and cultural historical and photographic
interpretations of file # 50533, knowledge, observations, about the
photographer's stamp on the photos of files # 50531 and # 50532.
Seeking observations >from any history of photography scholars or
ancestry photography researchers or >from anyone who may have known the
photographer or photography studio or company.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50534

Seeking interpretation of photograph in file 50534. Do you know or
recognize this person? Why does this look like a drawing, not a
photograph? Do you know the date of the photo, the era and location
where there were such photographs with the characteristics of this
photograph? Seeking cultural historical interpretations and
observations. Can anyone tell the occupation of this person or
anything else about him?

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application or
directly by email.
Thank you very much.
Barrie Karp PhD, Philosophy
barriekarp@gmail.com

KARP; WIEN; BERKOWITZ; TUCHFELD (Romania (Iasi, Tulcea, etc.),
Ukraine, Galicia, Horodenka, Kolymyya, Lviv, Stryj, Stanislawow,
Austria Hungary, Vienna); WEISS (Kohan?); GRUNBAUM/ GREENBAUM,
BERKOWITZ, FUCHS/Fox,KLEIN, GOTTLIEB [?]; ROSENFELD, ENGEL, LOVENRIN
(Hungary: Munk=C3=A1cs/Muka=C4=8Devo, Kovago-Eors, Kisvarda; Ukraine, Austria,
Germany, Vienna).

NYC all; Wilkes-Barre, PA; Syracuse, NY; Scranton, PA; Cleveland, OH;
Los Angeles, CA; Rochester, NY; Broward, FL; NJ


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech ViewMate translations from German or Yiddish & other cultural/historical interpretations - files # 50530, 50531, 50532, 50533, 50534. #austria-czech

Barrie Karp
 

I've posted 5 vital records (photographs with inscriptions, probably
in German, for which I seek translations; and with photographer's
stamp: Meiselas in Mukacevo, about which I seek knowledge). For all 5
records I seek historical cultural interpretations and observations.
The people in these photographs appear to be parents of my maternal
grandmother, and my grandmother and grandfather told me they came from
Munkacs, which I know was Mukacevo when these photographs were taken.
Can anyone help me find the date of these photographs? Also, I seek
translations. They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50530

Photo of my maternal great grandmother: Ester Grunbaum_Mukacevo (BDM
unknown; maiden name: BERKOWITZ), mother of Rose Greenbaum Weiss
1893-1962 (my grandmother, born or last lived before US, in Munkacs,
Bereg, Karpatalja, Hungary; died: Williamsport, PA, 12-6-1962--I have
her US records). Seeking translation of inscription and
cultural/historical interpretations or observations.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50531

Photo of same person as above, Viewmate # 50530. Seeking translation.
I believe it is German. Do you think it was written by the woman in
the photograph or by the photographer or some administrator or other
person?


http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50532

Seeking translation of inscription on photo document file # 50532,
from what I believe is German. I'm guessing this is my maternal great
grandfather (husband of Esther Grunbaum in file # 50530 and file #
5051) that the writing is not his. I had been told by my maternal
grandparents (WEISS married BERKOWITZ GRUNBAUM GREENBAUM WEISS), who
each came to US (NYC) early 1900s, that they came >from Munkacs (they
met in NYC, and married in NYC in 1917).

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50533

Seeking translation and cultural historical and photographic
interpretations of file # 50533, knowledge, observations, about the
photographer's stamp on the photos of files # 50531 and # 50532.
Seeking observations >from any history of photography scholars or
ancestry photography researchers or >from anyone who may have known the
photographer or photography studio or company.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM50534

Seeking interpretation of photograph in file 50534. Do you know or
recognize this person? Why does this look like a drawing, not a
photograph? Do you know the date of the photo, the era and location
where there were such photographs with the characteristics of this
photograph? Seeking cultural historical interpretations and
observations. Can anyone tell the occupation of this person or
anything else about him?

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application or
directly by email.
Thank you very much.
Barrie Karp PhD, Philosophy
barriekarp@gmail.com

KARP; WIEN; BERKOWITZ; TUCHFELD (Romania (Iasi, Tulcea, etc.),
Ukraine, Galicia, Horodenka, Kolymyya, Lviv, Stryj, Stanislawow,
Austria Hungary, Vienna); WEISS (Kohan?); GRUNBAUM/ GREENBAUM,
BERKOWITZ, FUCHS/Fox,KLEIN, GOTTLIEB [?]; ROSENFELD, ENGEL, LOVENRIN
(Hungary: Munk=C3=A1cs/Muka=C4=8Devo, Kovago-Eors, Kisvarda; Ukraine, Austria,
Germany, Vienna).

NYC all; Wilkes-Barre, PA; Syracuse, NY; Scranton, PA; Cleveland, OH;
Los Angeles, CA; Rochester, NY; Broward, FL; NJ


Researching Your Roots Using JewishGen - course begins November 1 #austria-czech

bounce-3220096-772950@...
 

What's special about JewishGen mentored courses?
Answer: you have an instructor who will personally respond to your
questions, make suggestions and assist you in researching the branch
you choose... 24/7.

This 4 week course will help you delve into JewishGen's rich
resources. Your course material includes 7 text based lessons (15-20
pages each), delivered online (which you can download) with hundreds
of links and suggestions.

We'll help you build an effective research plan, manage your data with
our fabulous format, and give you tips and techniques to overcome
research obstacles. To prepare, select one of your family
branches... one set of immigrant ancestors for which you know the town
of origin and we'll expand your knowledge of the world's largest
online Jewish resource for family history.

Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the Internet and
downloading files and have 8-10 hours per week to organize their
papers, read the lessons, search online and interact with the FORUM.
Tuition for this U.S. Genealogy Course is $125 (there is no waiver for
this course). Registration will open October 15; maximum 15 students;
more details and enrollment at www.JewishGen.org/Education
For questions about this course or which course is right for you...
email the instructor at JewishGen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, JewishGen
www.JewishGen.org/Education
phylliskramer1@gmail.com


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Researching Your Roots Using JewishGen - course begins November 1 #austria-czech

bounce-3220096-772950@...
 

What's special about JewishGen mentored courses?
Answer: you have an instructor who will personally respond to your
questions, make suggestions and assist you in researching the branch
you choose... 24/7.

This 4 week course will help you delve into JewishGen's rich
resources. Your course material includes 7 text based lessons (15-20
pages each), delivered online (which you can download) with hundreds
of links and suggestions.

We'll help you build an effective research plan, manage your data with
our fabulous format, and give you tips and techniques to overcome
research obstacles. To prepare, select one of your family
branches... one set of immigrant ancestors for which you know the town
of origin and we'll expand your knowledge of the world's largest
online Jewish resource for family history.

Requirements: Students must be comfortable browsing the Internet and
downloading files and have 8-10 hours per week to organize their
papers, read the lessons, search online and interact with the FORUM.
Tuition for this U.S. Genealogy Course is $125 (there is no waiver for
this course). Registration will open October 15; maximum 15 students;
more details and enrollment at www.JewishGen.org/Education
For questions about this course or which course is right for you...
email the instructor at JewishGen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, JewishGen
www.JewishGen.org/Education
phylliskramer1@gmail.com


Jewish Herritage - Prague November 2016 #austria-czech

davidlewin@...
 

Did you ever dream of hearing glorious choral and cantorial music resonate
through the beautiful synagogues of Prague, the ones that Hitler thought
he was saving as examples of a dead race?

Well here's your chance! At the time of the European Cantors Convention
in November, Jewish Heritage tours is running a parallel tour to Prague so
you can benefit >from the superb Cantor Naftali Herstik and the choir
of the Tel Aviv Cantors Institute, under the Director of Maestro Raymond
Goldstein as well as dozens of visiting cantors. There will be Shabbat services
in two of the gorgeous synagogues as well as a gala cantorial concert on=
the Saturday night in the Spanish synagogue.

The date is Thursday 17 to Sunday 20 November 2016. The Hotel is in the old
Jewish Quarter, near to the synagogues.

So take your pick, join the European Cantors Convention for masterclasses and
study sessions in the music of Jewish prayer (some scholarships are available)
or come on the Jewish Heritage Tour with guided day tours
of Jewish Prague and a trip to Terezin and join together for a glorious Shabbat.

To book for the Jewish Heritage tour go to http://www.jewishheritagetours.co.uk
To book for the Cantors Convention go to
www.cantors.eu or email convention@cantors.eu


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Jewish Herritage - Prague November 2016 #austria-czech

davidlewin@...
 

Did you ever dream of hearing glorious choral and cantorial music resonate
through the beautiful synagogues of Prague, the ones that Hitler thought
he was saving as examples of a dead race?

Well here's your chance! At the time of the European Cantors Convention
in November, Jewish Heritage tours is running a parallel tour to Prague so
you can benefit >from the superb Cantor Naftali Herstik and the choir
of the Tel Aviv Cantors Institute, under the Director of Maestro Raymond
Goldstein as well as dozens of visiting cantors. There will be Shabbat services
in two of the gorgeous synagogues as well as a gala cantorial concert on=
the Saturday night in the Spanish synagogue.

The date is Thursday 17 to Sunday 20 November 2016. The Hotel is in the old
Jewish Quarter, near to the synagogues.

So take your pick, join the European Cantors Convention for masterclasses and
study sessions in the music of Jewish prayer (some scholarships are available)
or come on the Jewish Heritage Tour with guided day tours
of Jewish Prague and a trip to Terezin and join together for a glorious Shabbat.

To book for the Jewish Heritage tour go to http://www.jewishheritagetours.co.uk
To book for the Cantors Convention go to
www.cantors.eu or email convention@cantors.eu


Re: Attic marriages #austria-czech

Eva Lawrence
 

Craigs question about attic marriage raises an interesting subject. I've
been puzzled by just such an instance, where a couple had a civil
marriage in Bonn, the groom's home town, in 1831, bringing a
one-year-old child >from the mother's Bayern home town with them. The
family certainly colluded in this case, because the older brother lied
about his age to make him seem the younger. This makes me think that
there must have been evasion of some law which restricted permission to
marry even in Western German lands. I've not been able to find out
whether the marriage was >from necessity or was arranged.
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Attic Marriages and Aranged Marriages #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Craig Partridge in "Attic Marriages and Arranged Marriages" (4 Oct 2016)
asks whether parents were subject to possible Familiant Law violation for
actively marrying their ineligible children. To the best of my knowledge,
the Familiant regulations could bring convictions for illegal marriages
against the groom who marries, the rabbi or chazzan who conducted the
ceremony, and the landlord in whose house or manor they lived. To the extent
that a matchmaker was involved - and I am not sure whether there were
official matchmakers in Bohemia - the initiating matchmaker would be
difficult to identify.

However, marriage arrangements, legal or otherwise, were far more varied
given the social, economic and geographical networking that took place. For
example, it would be of great interest to examine the inmates and domestics
in Bohemian families and then attempt a trace of whom they married. But more
importantly, as Mr. Partridge notes, the number of attic marriages which
took place was widespread and may have reached 50 percent of all marriages
before the Familianten Law was abolished. Of greatest significance is the
fact that violations of the Familiant Laws were rarely enforced. Rudolf
Fiser in his book Trebic: Jewish Familiant Stories, cites a case in which a
husband lived 13 years with his wife and raised two children before
prosecution was (apparently reluctantly) undertaken. The "concubine" was
ordered to return to her native town but in a series of comical twists
returned and managed to stay in Trebic with her husband. The final outcome
lacks documentation but Fiser's various stories reveal that there was
intermittent punishment - fines, short periods of incarceration, and
deportation of women to their home domiciles. For the most part, both attic
marriages (performed according to halakha) and concubinage (living together)
endured for years before they were investigated. Fiser's accounts of Trebic
pertain to Moravia; the Bohemian enforcement of Familianten contraventions
was thwarted to an even greater extent.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Attic marriages #austria-czech

Eva Lawrence
 

Craigs question about attic marriage raises an interesting subject. I've
been puzzled by just such an instance, where a couple had a civil
marriage in Bonn, the groom's home town, in 1831, bringing a
one-year-old child >from the mother's Bayern home town with them. The
family certainly colluded in this case, because the older brother lied
about his age to make him seem the younger. This makes me think that
there must have been evasion of some law which restricted permission to
marry even in Western German lands. I've not been able to find out
whether the marriage was >from necessity or was arranged.
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Attic Marriages and Aranged Marriages #austria-czech

Paul King
 

Craig Partridge in "Attic Marriages and Arranged Marriages" (4 Oct 2016)
asks whether parents were subject to possible Familiant Law violation for
actively marrying their ineligible children. To the best of my knowledge,
the Familiant regulations could bring convictions for illegal marriages
against the groom who marries, the rabbi or chazzan who conducted the
ceremony, and the landlord in whose house or manor they lived. To the extent
that a matchmaker was involved - and I am not sure whether there were
official matchmakers in Bohemia - the initiating matchmaker would be
difficult to identify.

However, marriage arrangements, legal or otherwise, were far more varied
given the social, economic and geographical networking that took place. For
example, it would be of great interest to examine the inmates and domestics
in Bohemian families and then attempt a trace of whom they married. But more
importantly, as Mr. Partridge notes, the number of attic marriages which
took place was widespread and may have reached 50 percent of all marriages
before the Familianten Law was abolished. Of greatest significance is the
fact that violations of the Familiant Laws were rarely enforced. Rudolf
Fiser in his book Trebic: Jewish Familiant Stories, cites a case in which a
husband lived 13 years with his wife and raised two children before
prosecution was (apparently reluctantly) undertaken. The "concubine" was
ordered to return to her native town but in a series of comical twists
returned and managed to stay in Trebic with her husband. The final outcome
lacks documentation but Fiser's various stories reveal that there was
intermittent punishment - fines, short periods of incarceration, and
deportation of women to their home domiciles. For the most part, both attic
marriages (performed according to halakha) and concubinage (living together)
endured for years before they were investigated. Fiser's accounts of Trebic
pertain to Moravia; the Bohemian enforcement of Familianten contraventions
was thwarted to an even greater extent.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Jew's House, Newcastle, Monmouthshire, Wales #general

Rose
 

Dear Genners

I'm currently helping a friend who has discovered that her ancestor Samuel BOWEN was living at Jew's House, Newcastle, Monmouthshire, Wales as shown in the UK 1911 census. Would this refer to the fact that Samuel was a Jew or could it have been for a previous owner of the property?

Best wishes

Rose Raymen
Perth, Western Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jew's House, Newcastle, Monmouthshire, Wales #general

Rose
 

Dear Genners

I'm currently helping a friend who has discovered that her ancestor Samuel BOWEN was living at Jew's House, Newcastle, Monmouthshire, Wales as shown in the UK 1911 census. Would this refer to the fact that Samuel was a Jew or could it have been for a previous owner of the property?

Best wishes

Rose Raymen
Perth, Western Australia


Looking for anyone with connections to the name BRIZINOV, BRESENOV, BRESHENEV etc etc #ukraine

Sheila Toffell
 

My maternal grandmother's family name was originally Brizinov. The name
changed to more anglicized versions once they left Russia. The family was
from
Rovnoye /Rivne in the Khirovograd Oblast. Her parents were Yitzhak and
Esther Chrayne. I know of some siblings that left Russia with my grandmother
and her parents and settled in London, but wonder if there were others that
did not go to London. Maybe there is someone out there that might be part of
another branch of the family.

Sheila Toffell,
Glen Rock, NJ

Researching: KORSUNSKY >from Stavische and Tarasche, BRIZINOV >from Rovnye,
FELDMAN and LAZARUS >from the Kiev region - all in the Ukraine.

LAKOMSKI >from Skulsk, RACHWALSKY >from Sclesin, SOMPOLINSKI >from Sompolno
TOFFEL >from Josefow nad Wisla, Krasnik, Opole Lubielskie and Ostrow
Mazoweickie - all in Poland.

HARRIS (>from Eric Street, Burdette Road, Mile End, all in London)

Moderator's Note: If you haven't done so already, check the JewishGen Family
Finder (www.jewishgen.org/jgff) Don't forget to add the names and places you
are searching.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Looking for anyone with connections to the name BRIZINOV, BRESENOV, BRESHENEV etc etc #ukraine

Sheila Toffell
 

My maternal grandmother's family name was originally Brizinov. The name
changed to more anglicized versions once they left Russia. The family was
from
Rovnoye /Rivne in the Khirovograd Oblast. Her parents were Yitzhak and
Esther Chrayne. I know of some siblings that left Russia with my grandmother
and her parents and settled in London, but wonder if there were others that
did not go to London. Maybe there is someone out there that might be part of
another branch of the family.

Sheila Toffell,
Glen Rock, NJ

Researching: KORSUNSKY >from Stavische and Tarasche, BRIZINOV >from Rovnye,
FELDMAN and LAZARUS >from the Kiev region - all in the Ukraine.

LAKOMSKI >from Skulsk, RACHWALSKY >from Sclesin, SOMPOLINSKI >from Sompolno
TOFFEL >from Josefow nad Wisla, Krasnik, Opole Lubielskie and Ostrow
Mazoweickie - all in Poland.

HARRIS (>from Eric Street, Burdette Road, Mile End, all in London)

Moderator's Note: If you haven't done so already, check the JewishGen Family
Finder (www.jewishgen.org/jgff) Don't forget to add the names and places you
are searching.


Looking for connections to the name BRIZINOV, BRESENOV, BRESHENEV #general

Sheila Toffell
 

My maternal grandmother's family name was originally Brizinov. The name changed to
more anglicized versions once they left Russia. The family was >from
Rovnoye /Rivne in the Khirovograd Oblast. Her parents were Yitzhak and Esther
Chrayne. I know of some siblings that left Russia with my grandmother and her
parents and settled in London, but wonder if there were others that did not go to
London. Maybe thereis someone out there that might be part of another branch of the
family.

Sheila Toffell,
Glen Rock, NJ

Researching: KORSUNSKY >from Stavische and Tarasche, BRIZINOV >from Rovnye,
FELDMAN and LAZARUS >from the Kiev region - all in the Ukraine. LAKOMSKI >from
Skulsk, RACHWALSKY >from Sclesin, SOMPOLINSKI >from Sompolno TOFFEL >from Josefow nad
Wisla, Krasnik, Opole Lubielskie and Ostrow Mazoweickie - all in Poland. HARRIS
(>from Eric Street, Burdette Road, Mile End, all in London)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for connections to the name BRIZINOV, BRESENOV, BRESHENEV #general

Sheila Toffell
 

My maternal grandmother's family name was originally Brizinov. The name changed to
more anglicized versions once they left Russia. The family was >from
Rovnoye /Rivne in the Khirovograd Oblast. Her parents were Yitzhak and Esther
Chrayne. I know of some siblings that left Russia with my grandmother and her
parents and settled in London, but wonder if there were others that did not go to
London. Maybe thereis someone out there that might be part of another branch of the
family.

Sheila Toffell,
Glen Rock, NJ

Researching: KORSUNSKY >from Stavische and Tarasche, BRIZINOV >from Rovnye,
FELDMAN and LAZARUS >from the Kiev region - all in the Ukraine. LAKOMSKI >from
Skulsk, RACHWALSKY >from Sclesin, SOMPOLINSKI >from Sompolno TOFFEL >from Josefow nad
Wisla, Krasnik, Opole Lubielskie and Ostrow Mazoweickie - all in Poland. HARRIS
(>from Eric Street, Burdette Road, Mile End, all in London)

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