Date   

Searching: BARMATZ/BARMAC from Brest-Litovsk #belarus

Solly&Estelle <sollyestelle@...>
 

Dear Sir/Madam,
I am searching for information re the BARMATZ family (also spelt BARMAC) who
lived in Brest Litovsk, Poland (now Belarus) >from the years 1780 until 1941
- any information regarding the family will be greatly appreciated.

Thanking you,

Estelle Sher (Israel)

My email address is sollyestelle@nirel.org.il
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching: BARMATZ/BARMAC from Brest-Litovsk #belarus

Solly&Estelle <sollyestelle@...>
 

Dear Sir/Madam,
I am searching for information re the BARMATZ family (also spelt BARMAC) who
lived in Brest Litovsk, Poland (now Belarus) >from the years 1780 until 1941
- any information regarding the family will be greatly appreciated.

Thanking you,

Estelle Sher (Israel)

My email address is sollyestelle@nirel.org.il
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...>
 

As people who have gathered on JewishGen as part of their search for our
ancestors, we all have the yearning to make discoveries that will bring them
alive for us, and we all regret the missed opportunities of not asking more
questions of the generation that came before us.That's why this excerpt from
the Yizkor book of Devenishki, Lithuania caught my eye: "I got to see a
picture of the people I love." In it, Nili Itskovish gets a wish fulfilled.
Her story originally appeared in "Davar LeYeladim," a popular weekly
published by the Histradutfor children, published between the years
1936-1985. Devenishki (or Dieveniks in Lithuanian) is on the border of
Belarus, about 35 miles southeast of Vilnius. In 1900, when it was part of
the Russian Empire, it had a Jewish population of 1,225. There is also a
Kehilalinks site for the town (http://bit.ly/2eJqiVP)

URL:https://business.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/photos/a.603500999672059.1073741827.196931900328973/1230783393610480/?type=3&theater
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2fqzo8q

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD
Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow (http://bit.ly/2eAUPDL), Kovel (http://bit.ly/2dG6bY4)
Kovel Yizkor book (1957 edition): http://bit.ly/cA6w1d=20


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <bruce.drake@...>
 

As people who have gathered on JewishGen as part of their search for our
ancestors, we all have the yearning to make discoveries that will bring them
alive for us, and we all regret the missed opportunities of not asking more
questions of the generation that came before us.That's why this excerpt from
the Yizkor book of Devenishki, Lithuania caught my eye: "I got to see a
picture of the people I love." In it, Nili Itskovish gets a wish fulfilled.
Her story originally appeared in "Davar LeYeladim," a popular weekly
published by the Histradutfor children, published between the years
1936-1985. Devenishki (or Dieveniks in Lithuanian) is on the border of
Belarus, about 35 miles southeast of Vilnius. In 1900, when it was part of
the Russian Empire, it had a Jewish population of 1,225. There is also a
Kehilalinks site for the town (http://bit.ly/2eJqiVP)

URL:https://business.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/photos/a.603500999672059.1073741827.196931900328973/1230783393610480/?type=3&theater
Short URL: http://bit.ly/2fqzo8q

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD
Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow (http://bit.ly/2eAUPDL), Kovel (http://bit.ly/2dG6bY4)
Kovel Yizkor book (1957 edition): http://bit.ly/cA6w1d=20


(UK) Ancestry UK Offering Free Access to UK Military Records Through 13 November #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry.co.uk is offering free access to their UK military records in
commemoration of ancestors who fought for their country. The record
collection includes service, pension and medal collections. The records in
the featured collections will be free through 13 November, 2016 23:59 GMT.
To check what time it is in your local area see:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html.

To view the records you will need to access you will need to register with
your name and email address. It is free, and does not require any credit
card information. They will then send you a username and password. If you
try to access records not in the featured collection you will be directed to
subscribe., If you try to access the featured collection after the free
period expires you will be directed to subscribe.

To access the site go to: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/cs/remembrance and click
on the "search free" green button.

To see the full list of the records in the featured collections, go to:
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_military_collections?

Thank you to Peter Calver and LostCousins newsletter for informing us of
this opportunity.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) Ancestry UK Offering Free Access to UK Military Records Through 13 November #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry.co.uk is offering free access to their UK military records in
commemoration of ancestors who fought for their country. The record
collection includes service, pension and medal collections. The records in
the featured collections will be free through 13 November, 2016 23:59 GMT.
To check what time it is in your local area see:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html.

To view the records you will need to access you will need to register with
your name and email address. It is free, and does not require any credit
card information. They will then send you a username and password. If you
try to access records not in the featured collection you will be directed to
subscribe., If you try to access the featured collection after the free
period expires you will be directed to subscribe.

To access the site go to: http://www.ancestry.co.uk/cs/remembrance and click
on the "search free" green button.

To see the full list of the records in the featured collections, go to:
http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/group/uk_military_collections?

Thank you to Peter Calver and LostCousins newsletter for informing us of
this opportunity.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Jewish Rural Life in Hesse #general

Carola Murray-Seegert
 

I was interested to read Stephen Denker's post of November 8th, reminding
readers that these days mark the anniversary of Kristallnacht and describing
his new book about the events in the countryside of Hesse. I am an American,
married to a German, and I live in a village near Frankfurt in the state of
Hesse, about 20 minutes drive >from the Hessenpark, the open-air museum that
houses the synagogue Stephen describes.

JewishGen members might be interested to know that the Hessenpark opened a new
exhibit in May 2016 called "Sie Waren Hier : Juedisches Landleben in Suedhessen"
(They Were Here : Jewish Rural Life in Southern Hesse). The new exhibit,
created in cooperation with the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt, is housed in the
former synagogue >from Gross-Umstadt - the second of two synagogues
reconstructed in the park.

The state of Hesse is unusual for Germany in that an exceptionally large percentage
of Jews lived outside the large cities. The new exhibit is extensive, containing
detailed biographies of Jewish families >from Oberursel, Gross-Umstadt, Michelstadt
and Fraenkisch-Crumbach, as well as many original documents addressing broader
themes, such as professional life, social integration and the need for
highly-mobile matchmakers (given that the pool of potential spouses was so widely
dispersed). Unfortunately, the exhibit is very text-dense and - surprisingly
(considering the fact that the Hessenpark often publishes materials in English) -
everything is in German. Still, for anyone connected to a Jewish family that lived
in rural Hessen, it would be worth a visit.

Here is a link to the museum's information about the new exhibit (in German)
with photos of the Gross-Umstadt synagogue
http://tinyurl.com/o5bsvj5

Here are photos and information >from the museum about the Nentershausen synagogue
http://tinyurl.com/pvcvp9m

And here is a newspaper article, announcing the renovation of the Gross-Umstadt
synagogue (which the Hessenpark had been using as a storehouse for the past 20
years or so!!!!) and the creation of the new exhibit.
http://tinyurl.com/pmx93ma

Oberursel Germany
Coordinator, Igumen District Research Group
Manager, Byerazino Pahost KehilaLink
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Byerazino/
Manager, Moskva KehilaLink
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Moskva/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Rural Life in Hesse #general

Carola Murray-Seegert
 

I was interested to read Stephen Denker's post of November 8th, reminding
readers that these days mark the anniversary of Kristallnacht and describing
his new book about the events in the countryside of Hesse. I am an American,
married to a German, and I live in a village near Frankfurt in the state of
Hesse, about 20 minutes drive >from the Hessenpark, the open-air museum that
houses the synagogue Stephen describes.

JewishGen members might be interested to know that the Hessenpark opened a new
exhibit in May 2016 called "Sie Waren Hier : Juedisches Landleben in Suedhessen"
(They Were Here : Jewish Rural Life in Southern Hesse). The new exhibit,
created in cooperation with the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt, is housed in the
former synagogue >from Gross-Umstadt - the second of two synagogues
reconstructed in the park.

The state of Hesse is unusual for Germany in that an exceptionally large percentage
of Jews lived outside the large cities. The new exhibit is extensive, containing
detailed biographies of Jewish families >from Oberursel, Gross-Umstadt, Michelstadt
and Fraenkisch-Crumbach, as well as many original documents addressing broader
themes, such as professional life, social integration and the need for
highly-mobile matchmakers (given that the pool of potential spouses was so widely
dispersed). Unfortunately, the exhibit is very text-dense and - surprisingly
(considering the fact that the Hessenpark often publishes materials in English) -
everything is in German. Still, for anyone connected to a Jewish family that lived
in rural Hessen, it would be worth a visit.

Here is a link to the museum's information about the new exhibit (in German)
with photos of the Gross-Umstadt synagogue
http://tinyurl.com/o5bsvj5

Here are photos and information >from the museum about the Nentershausen synagogue
http://tinyurl.com/pvcvp9m

And here is a newspaper article, announcing the renovation of the Gross-Umstadt
synagogue (which the Hessenpark had been using as a storehouse for the past 20
years or so!!!!) and the creation of the new exhibit.
http://tinyurl.com/pmx93ma

Oberursel Germany
Coordinator, Igumen District Research Group
Manager, Byerazino Pahost KehilaLink
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Byerazino/
Manager, Moskva KehilaLink
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Moskva/


Re: The List of Registered Voters for New York City for 1924 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Ira Martin Leviton wrote:
I have only one small comment to add to Allan Jordan's excellent summary about
why these voter records are potentially so useful. The E.D.s in the voter lists
are "election districts," and have nothing to do with the E.D.s in the census,
which are "enumeration districts." Don't use the E.D. >from a census to look up
an E.D. in a voter list.


Thanks for the compliment, but sorry your message is not correct. The districts in
the 1925 NY State Census are Assembly District and Election District not
Enumeration District.

Someone just asked me to help them find an address in Manhattan. They had the
person's address and listing >from the 1925 Census.

What I did for them (so everyone can see how this works) is first I checked the
address and AD/ED on the census and then I went to the link that shows all the
voters files for Manhattan. I had to use my cursor to point at each file and wait
for the title to appear to see the AD numbers. The file images are not in numeric
order.

The one I wanted was AD 7 and when I found it I clicked on the file and then on the
magnifying glass which permits you to search inside the file (don't use the search
you see above that is searching the site not the image file).

I skipped the ED number and went straight for the street which was West 93rd. As I
explained in the first post sometimes or maybe always it appears the search needs
to be 93D in this example. That is how they abbreviated streets that we would
write as "rd". That worked but the highlighting is fairly faint on my screen.
Then I looked for the house number and found it at the bottom right column. I
started down and did not see the name but since it went to the end of the page I
advanced to the next page and low and behold one of the people was there.

I double checked the ED was an exact match with the Census but with the AD >from
the Census I got close enough to use the search feature, but the AD and ED matched
the 1925 Census.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The List of Registered Voters for New York City for 1924 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Ira Martin Leviton wrote:
I have only one small comment to add to Allan Jordan's excellent summary about
why these voter records are potentially so useful. The E.D.s in the voter lists
are "election districts," and have nothing to do with the E.D.s in the census,
which are "enumeration districts." Don't use the E.D. >from a census to look up
an E.D. in a voter list.


Thanks for the compliment, but sorry your message is not correct. The districts in
the 1925 NY State Census are Assembly District and Election District not
Enumeration District.

Someone just asked me to help them find an address in Manhattan. They had the
person's address and listing >from the 1925 Census.

What I did for them (so everyone can see how this works) is first I checked the
address and AD/ED on the census and then I went to the link that shows all the
voters files for Manhattan. I had to use my cursor to point at each file and wait
for the title to appear to see the AD numbers. The file images are not in numeric
order.

The one I wanted was AD 7 and when I found it I clicked on the file and then on the
magnifying glass which permits you to search inside the file (don't use the search
you see above that is searching the site not the image file).

I skipped the ED number and went straight for the street which was West 93rd. As I
explained in the first post sometimes or maybe always it appears the search needs
to be 93D in this example. That is how they abbreviated streets that we would
write as "rd". That worked but the highlighting is fairly faint on my screen.
Then I looked for the house number and found it at the bottom right column. I
started down and did not see the name but since it went to the end of the page I
advanced to the next page and low and behold one of the people was there.

I double checked the ED was an exact match with the Census but with the AD >from
the Census I got close enough to use the search feature, but the AD and ED matched
the 1925 Census.

Allan Jordan


(US-NY) The First Jewish Americans: Freedom and Culture in the New World #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The New York Historical Society has a new exhibit: The First Jewish
Americans-Freedom and Culture in the New World October 28, 2016-February 26,
2017. Jews have been part of the American story since before the American
Revolution. It addresses how Jewish settlers came to inhabit the New World,
Jews in Colonial America and their contributions to the flowering of
American culture. The exhibit follows the immigration >from Europe, South
America and the Caribbean to arriving in Nieuw Amsterdam in 1654.

More about the exhibit may be read at:
http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/first-jewish-americans-freedom-and-cult
ure-new-world

The Forward has an article with 11 images >from the exhibit. They may be
viewed at:
http://tinyurl.com/jd4a8y4
Original url:
http://forward.com/news/353045/look-11-astounding-images-of-jewish-settlers-
in-colonial-america/

If you are visiting New York City during the time of the exhibit, and want
to see the exhibit it is located at:
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY 10024

Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Early American SIG #USA (US-NY) The First Jewish Americans: Freedom and Culture in the New World #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The New York Historical Society has a new exhibit: The First Jewish
Americans-Freedom and Culture in the New World October 28, 2016-February 26,
2017. Jews have been part of the American story since before the American
Revolution. It addresses how Jewish settlers came to inhabit the New World,
Jews in Colonial America and their contributions to the flowering of
American culture. The exhibit follows the immigration >from Europe, South
America and the Caribbean to arriving in Nieuw Amsterdam in 1654.

More about the exhibit may be read at:
http://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/first-jewish-americans-freedom-and-cult
ure-new-world

The Forward has an article with 11 images >from the exhibit. They may be
viewed at:
http://tinyurl.com/jd4a8y4
Original url:
http://forward.com/news/353045/look-11-astounding-images-of-jewish-settlers-
in-colonial-america/

If you are visiting New York City during the time of the exhibit, and want
to see the exhibit it is located at:
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY 10024

Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: SITE CITE - Civil birth records Breslau on line - how to translate #germany

Deborah Blinder
 

Tobias Kemper recommended the following site:

http://wiki-de.genealogy.net/Breslau/Standesamtsregister

[In German - No obvious toggle to other languages.]
The moderator asked if there is a way to view the site in English.

For anyone using the Google Chrome browser, this can be done easily for
any site in a foreign language: At the right end of the address bar,
just to the left of the star icon, you'll see another icon that looks
like two overlapping pages with a G on the top one. Click that icon
and Google will offer to translate the page for you. The translations
using this tool are sometimes a bit rough, but it's usually sufficient
to navigate a site and understand most of the data presented.

Deborah Blankenberg (JewishGen ID #613395) Lodi, California

Researching BLOCH/BLOCK (Germany to New York and Missouri),
BLINDER (Russia to New York via France), KUSHER/KUSZER (Poland
to New York via France), GOLDSCHMIDT (Germany)


German SIG #Germany Re: SITE CITE - Civil birth records Breslau on line - how to translate #germany

Deborah Blinder
 

Tobias Kemper recommended the following site:

http://wiki-de.genealogy.net/Breslau/Standesamtsregister

[In German - No obvious toggle to other languages.]
The moderator asked if there is a way to view the site in English.

For anyone using the Google Chrome browser, this can be done easily for
any site in a foreign language: At the right end of the address bar,
just to the left of the star icon, you'll see another icon that looks
like two overlapping pages with a G on the top one. Click that icon
and Google will offer to translate the page for you. The translations
using this tool are sometimes a bit rough, but it's usually sufficient
to navigate a site and understand most of the data presented.

Deborah Blankenberg (JewishGen ID #613395) Lodi, California

Researching BLOCH/BLOCK (Germany to New York and Missouri),
BLINDER (Russia to New York via France), KUSHER/KUSZER (Poland
to New York via France), GOLDSCHMIDT (Germany)


correction to Jewish Community of Lithuania newsletter link #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

Several people >from the US have written to me that the link does not
work to read the newsletter/magazine. Therefore I have posted in on
the LitvakSIG online journal for download, see
https://www.litvaksig.org/information-and-tools/online-journal/jewish-community-of-lithuania-newsletter.

Carol Hoffman
LitvaSIG President


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania correction to Jewish Community of Lithuania newsletter link #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

Several people >from the US have written to me that the link does not
work to read the newsletter/magazine. Therefore I have posted in on
the LitvakSIG online journal for download, see
https://www.litvaksig.org/information-and-tools/online-journal/jewish-community-of-lithuania-newsletter.

Carol Hoffman
LitvaSIG President


Yaffa Eliach a"h #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

When we are fortunate enough for our own family history to grow
into the history of the community in which our family lived,
we are truly blessed when a person >from that community
makes it her or his life's work to document everything >from
that community.

Those of us whose roots are >from Eishishok, (now Eisiskes in
Lithuania), were indeed blessed to know Prof. Yaffa Eliach,
who collected photographs, oral histories and artifacts >from the town.
Her book, "There Once Was a Town" was read not only by those of us
with connections >from Eishishok and other nearby Lida District
towns, but by thousands of people who learned about shtetl life
from its pages.
Yaffa passed away Tuesday after a long illness. An obituary
for her by Joseph Berger in the New York Times is a fitting
tribute. It may be found at

http://nyti.ms/2eE4wiX

May her memory be for a blessing.

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Yaffa Eliach a"h #lithuania

Jrbaston
 

When we are fortunate enough for our own family history to grow
into the history of the community in which our family lived,
we are truly blessed when a person >from that community
makes it her or his life's work to document everything >from
that community.

Those of us whose roots are >from Eishishok, (now Eisiskes in
Lithuania), were indeed blessed to know Prof. Yaffa Eliach,
who collected photographs, oral histories and artifacts >from the town.
Her book, "There Once Was a Town" was read not only by those of us
with connections >from Eishishok and other nearby Lida District
towns, but by thousands of people who learned about shtetl life
from its pages.
Yaffa passed away Tuesday after a long illness. An obituary
for her by Joseph Berger in the New York Times is a fitting
tribute. It may be found at

http://nyti.ms/2eE4wiX

May her memory be for a blessing.

Judy Baston, Coordinator,
LitvakSIG Lida District Research Group


Jewish Community of Lithuania BAGEL SHOP newsletter #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

Learn about our Litvak traditions and current projects in the Jewish
Community of Lithuania. See

https://docs.google.com/viewerng/viewer?url=http://
www.lzb.lt/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/BK_4_ENG_A4_screen.pdf&hl=en

Carol Hoffman
LitvakSIG President


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jewish Community of Lithuania BAGEL SHOP newsletter #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

Learn about our Litvak traditions and current projects in the Jewish
Community of Lithuania. See

https://docs.google.com/viewerng/viewer?url=http://
www.lzb.lt/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/BK_4_ENG_A4_screen.pdf&hl=en

Carol Hoffman
LitvakSIG President

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