Date   

Re: yizkor digest: November 19, 1998 #yizkorbooks

Barbara L. Kornblau
 

Yaffa Eliach will be appearing at the Miami (Florida) bookfare, Sunday
11/22/98 at 10:00 a.m speaking about her book on Eishyshok.

Barbara L. Kornblau (a decendent of Eishyshok)


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Re: yizkor digest: November 19, 1998 #yizkorbooks

Barbara L. Kornblau
 

Yaffa Eliach will be appearing at the Miami (Florida) bookfare, Sunday
11/22/98 at 10:00 a.m speaking about her book on Eishyshok.

Barbara L. Kornblau (a decendent of Eishyshok)


Buckstein #general

Finey@...
 

I would like to hear >from anyone that may have knowledge of Max
Buckstein (Bockstein?) , who cam to New York in 1990. TIA. Bob Fineberg
Dr Robert P Fineberg, Colorado Springs, CO. FINEY@KKTV.COM-See our
family site at Http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Wood/9167/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Buckstein #general

Finey@...
 

I would like to hear >from anyone that may have knowledge of Max
Buckstein (Bockstein?) , who cam to New York in 1990. TIA. Bob Fineberg
Dr Robert P Fineberg, Colorado Springs, CO. FINEY@KKTV.COM-See our
family site at Http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Wood/9167/


KAUFMAN Family #general

AZISRAEL <azisrael@...>
 

I am researching a Moses KAUFMAN, >from Germany, who settled in Indiana. I
believe he also had a brother Moritz. Moses was married to Sophia
MIDDLEBERGER. The lived in Indianapolis and Lyons, IN, in the late 1800's.
Moses and Sophia had several children, descendents are KAUFMAN, STEIN, FISHER.

Thanks for you help
Barbara (Fisher) Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KAUFMAN Family #general

AZISRAEL <azisrael@...>
 

I am researching a Moses KAUFMAN, >from Germany, who settled in Indiana. I
believe he also had a brother Moritz. Moses was married to Sophia
MIDDLEBERGER. The lived in Indianapolis and Lyons, IN, in the late 1800's.
Moses and Sophia had several children, descendents are KAUFMAN, STEIN, FISHER.

Thanks for you help
Barbara (Fisher) Israel


ORLOFF family #general

AZISRAEL <azisrael@...>
 

I am looking for information on my gg grandparents and their family. My gg
grandparents were Solomon and Sarah (Cohen) ORLOFF. They came to the US about
1905 and I know that they lived in Manhatten in 1910 on Orchard street. They
moved to Chicago sometime before 1920. They had several children, Esther,
Mollie, David, Agusta, Dorothy, Albert. I believe Sarah had a sister , Mollie
COHEN and brothers who were furriers in NY. If any one has information
regarding this family I am anxious to hear. Oh yes they were from
Russia/Poland.

Barbara Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ORLOFF family #general

AZISRAEL <azisrael@...>
 

I am looking for information on my gg grandparents and their family. My gg
grandparents were Solomon and Sarah (Cohen) ORLOFF. They came to the US about
1905 and I know that they lived in Manhatten in 1910 on Orchard street. They
moved to Chicago sometime before 1920. They had several children, Esther,
Mollie, David, Agusta, Dorothy, Albert. I believe Sarah had a sister , Mollie
COHEN and brothers who were furriers in NY. If any one has information
regarding this family I am anxious to hear. Oh yes they were from
Russia/Poland.

Barbara Israel


Re: Stonegrave...words #general

Stephen Rabinowitz <srabinow@...>
 

ada01@netvision.net.il wrote in message ...
In response to Mr. Ouziel question,

Can any one explain the meaning of three words I saw
on my Gfather grave.(Hebrew letters).
beth-shin-teth...mem-he-ayin...caph-he-lamed.
here are my suggestions:
<snip>
"mem-he-ayin"
Michtav Ha'iti - >from the inscription of time
another possibility - - - min ha'olam - - - >from the world
<snip
There are still two abbreviations I ask the wise council of JewishGen
to advise what they stand for:

*Bet Ayin He Mem Khet
possibly - - - baal ha-mechaber - - - the author of a book

*Samech Gimel Lamed
this is sgan levayah a Levite, the basis of the family name Siegel

Steve Rabinowitz
Great Neck, NY
srabinow "at" ix.netcom.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Stonegrave...words #general

Stephen Rabinowitz <srabinow@...>
 

ada01@netvision.net.il wrote in message ...
In response to Mr. Ouziel question,

Can any one explain the meaning of three words I saw
on my Gfather grave.(Hebrew letters).
beth-shin-teth...mem-he-ayin...caph-he-lamed.
here are my suggestions:
<snip>
"mem-he-ayin"
Michtav Ha'iti - >from the inscription of time
another possibility - - - min ha'olam - - - >from the world
<snip
There are still two abbreviations I ask the wise council of JewishGen
to advise what they stand for:

*Bet Ayin He Mem Khet
possibly - - - baal ha-mechaber - - - the author of a book

*Samech Gimel Lamed
this is sgan levayah a Levite, the basis of the family name Siegel

Steve Rabinowitz
Great Neck, NY
srabinow "at" ix.netcom.com


Re: Seeking Family of Zyndel Berger, Lublin, Poland #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

David Carver wrote:

I am seeking any knowledge of the family of my uncle Zyndel Berger or
Bergier of prewar Lublin. He had 3 children, one named Leibish. The
names of the others or of his wife are not known. Would appreciate any
help at all.
David Carver

David,

May I suggest to start search >from this website in Lublin, entitled
"Jews of Lublin". Webmaster, Pawel Skonecki is one of the few remaining
in Lublin and Poland Yiddishe boys. Other people on his team are great
people, Gentile Poles, Lublin's University researchers. Beside the fact
that website is in Polish, they can commonicate in English. One day,
they might translate all the website information into English.

They are looking for the connections with people >from pre-war Lublin.
Perphaps you can help each other.Of course other sources, like Yzkor
books, should not be neglected.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Family of Zyndel Berger, Lublin, Poland #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

David Carver wrote:

I am seeking any knowledge of the family of my uncle Zyndel Berger or
Bergier of prewar Lublin. He had 3 children, one named Leibish. The
names of the others or of his wife are not known. Would appreciate any
help at all.
David Carver

David,

May I suggest to start search >from this website in Lublin, entitled
"Jews of Lublin". Webmaster, Pawel Skonecki is one of the few remaining
in Lublin and Poland Yiddishe boys. Other people on his team are great
people, Gentile Poles, Lublin's University researchers. Beside the fact
that website is in Polish, they can commonicate in English. One day,
they might translate all the website information into English.

They are looking for the connections with people >from pre-war Lublin.
Perphaps you can help each other.Of course other sources, like Yzkor
books, should not be neglected.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


Searching: SIMON #general

AZISRAEL <azisrael@...>
 

I am researching SIMON as well. All I know of the family is that they settled
in Wabash, IN after leaving Germany. My ggg grand parents were Herman and Eva
(Bockman) Simon. My gg grand mother was Amelia, there were many other children
besides her. Herman was a merchant in Wabash, this was in the mid to late
1800's. Does any of this fit into your information?
Barbara Israel AZISRAEL@aol.com


Re: Zavad in Poland #general

BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

Simcha Glaser is searching for the Polish town of ZAVAD. Perhaps it is
ZAWADOW also known as Zavidov, located close to and north of Lviv.

Hope this helps.

Betty Provizer Starkman, Michigan
BetteJoy@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: SIMON #general

AZISRAEL <azisrael@...>
 

I am researching SIMON as well. All I know of the family is that they settled
in Wabash, IN after leaving Germany. My ggg grand parents were Herman and Eva
(Bockman) Simon. My gg grand mother was Amelia, there were many other children
besides her. Herman was a merchant in Wabash, this was in the mid to late
1800's. Does any of this fit into your information?
Barbara Israel AZISRAEL@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Zavad in Poland #general

BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

Simcha Glaser is searching for the Polish town of ZAVAD. Perhaps it is
ZAWADOW also known as Zavidov, located close to and north of Lviv.

Hope this helps.

Betty Provizer Starkman, Michigan
BetteJoy@aol.com


Brothers with same middle "patronymic" name #general

Bill Gladstone <bstone@...>
 

H. Marshall Schaffner asked:
-> Recently took pictures of family tombstones while visiting in Chicago.
-> Thought that I had identified the graves of two cousins until I took
-> a closer look at their fathers' Hebrew names. One's father was named
-> Schlame Itzhak and the other's father was named Mordechai Itzhak.
-> Presumably these fathers were brothers, however it now seems unlikely
-> as they both have the same second Hebrew name of "Itzhak".
-> My Question, is it possible that brothers would be given the same
-> Hebrew name if it is a second name?
My comments:
I've found that it's entirely possible that two brothers may share the
sa me "middle" name, such as Shlomo Yitzhak and Mordekhai Yitzhak, and
that the middle name may have been their father's name. This is in keeping
with a peculiar Jewish naming custom that existed in areas of Prussia from
the early 1800s. Perhaps it was in effect in other areas as well.

I've discovered several instances of this curious naming pattern in my
family tree. It involves the combination of a traditional Hebrew patronymic
name with the modern secular surname required by law. Evidently the Hebrew
tradition of patronymics (e.g., Jakob ben Rafal) gave rise in the early
1800s to the apparently infrequent practice whereby a son took the first
name of his father as a middle, identifying name=97for example, Jakob Rafal
Zygiel. Some families may have adopted a patronymic as an identifying badge
and passed it on intact to the next generation, along with their officially
adopted surname.

Other examples: Itzik Mordecai Siegel, son of Mortke (i.e., Mordecai), and
Abram Benjamin Karp, son of Benjamin Karp.

Alex Beider, author of the dictionaries of Jewish surnames >from the Russian
Empire and the Kingdom of Poland, confirms the phenomenon of patronymic
second names and states that their use was restricted to Prussian Poland
and other areas of Prussia.

He writes: "The use of the father's given name as the second name was the
rule in all German provinces before the mass adoption of surnames. Thus,
during the Prussian occupation of Konin (1793=961807), Jews could use that
pattern in official documents and, therefore, at that time Layb Ber meant
'Layb, son of Ber.' Was this pattern still used under the Russians, i.e.,
after 1815? I do not know. In any case, in Kalisz guberniya, many Jews had
surnames coinciding with given names, possibly as a consequence of the
Prussian period." (Personal correspondence.)

I have found evidence that this naming custom persisted sporadically until
nearly the mid-point of the 19th century. In some families, it may have
carried on into the 20th century. For further reference, see Beider's book
on the Kingdom of Poland or my article in Avotaynu, "Nineteenth-Century
Congress Documents
And the Jews of Congress Poland: Enigmas and Idiosyncracies" (Fall 1995).

BILL GLADSTONE,
Toronto Canada
bstone@pathcom.com

Searching: GLICENSTEIN (various spellings) in KONIN, TUREK, DOBRA Poland
or anywhere; KAMOROW (anywhere in Pale) HAHN (Konin & vicinity);
SCHWAITZER, RAGOFSKY, ALEXANDER (London UK), NAFTOLIN, RUBINOFF (Zhlobin
& Strashin, Belarus; Toronto).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Brothers with same middle "patronymic" name #general

Bill Gladstone <bstone@...>
 

H. Marshall Schaffner asked:
-> Recently took pictures of family tombstones while visiting in Chicago.
-> Thought that I had identified the graves of two cousins until I took
-> a closer look at their fathers' Hebrew names. One's father was named
-> Schlame Itzhak and the other's father was named Mordechai Itzhak.
-> Presumably these fathers were brothers, however it now seems unlikely
-> as they both have the same second Hebrew name of "Itzhak".
-> My Question, is it possible that brothers would be given the same
-> Hebrew name if it is a second name?
My comments:
I've found that it's entirely possible that two brothers may share the
sa me "middle" name, such as Shlomo Yitzhak and Mordekhai Yitzhak, and
that the middle name may have been their father's name. This is in keeping
with a peculiar Jewish naming custom that existed in areas of Prussia from
the early 1800s. Perhaps it was in effect in other areas as well.

I've discovered several instances of this curious naming pattern in my
family tree. It involves the combination of a traditional Hebrew patronymic
name with the modern secular surname required by law. Evidently the Hebrew
tradition of patronymics (e.g., Jakob ben Rafal) gave rise in the early
1800s to the apparently infrequent practice whereby a son took the first
name of his father as a middle, identifying name=97for example, Jakob Rafal
Zygiel. Some families may have adopted a patronymic as an identifying badge
and passed it on intact to the next generation, along with their officially
adopted surname.

Other examples: Itzik Mordecai Siegel, son of Mortke (i.e., Mordecai), and
Abram Benjamin Karp, son of Benjamin Karp.

Alex Beider, author of the dictionaries of Jewish surnames >from the Russian
Empire and the Kingdom of Poland, confirms the phenomenon of patronymic
second names and states that their use was restricted to Prussian Poland
and other areas of Prussia.

He writes: "The use of the father's given name as the second name was the
rule in all German provinces before the mass adoption of surnames. Thus,
during the Prussian occupation of Konin (1793=961807), Jews could use that
pattern in official documents and, therefore, at that time Layb Ber meant
'Layb, son of Ber.' Was this pattern still used under the Russians, i.e.,
after 1815? I do not know. In any case, in Kalisz guberniya, many Jews had
surnames coinciding with given names, possibly as a consequence of the
Prussian period." (Personal correspondence.)

I have found evidence that this naming custom persisted sporadically until
nearly the mid-point of the 19th century. In some families, it may have
carried on into the 20th century. For further reference, see Beider's book
on the Kingdom of Poland or my article in Avotaynu, "Nineteenth-Century
Congress Documents
And the Jews of Congress Poland: Enigmas and Idiosyncracies" (Fall 1995).

BILL GLADSTONE,
Toronto Canada
bstone@pathcom.com

Searching: GLICENSTEIN (various spellings) in KONIN, TUREK, DOBRA Poland
or anywhere; KAMOROW (anywhere in Pale) HAHN (Konin & vicinity);
SCHWAITZER, RAGOFSKY, ALEXANDER (London UK), NAFTOLIN, RUBINOFF (Zhlobin
& Strashin, Belarus; Toronto).


Re: Non-Combat Duty in Russian Military #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

ddworski@erols.com wrote:

An elderly relative has informed me that her father "served two terms in
the Russian military as a tailor." I could not find any mention
of non-combat duty in the JewishGen Infofiles. I would appreciate any
feedback about the plausibility of her statement. If the Russian
military did include tailors, would there be records of the individuals
who served in such a capacity? Would such records be similar to those
maintained for Russian soldiers?
Deborah Dworski > Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.
Deborah,

I assume that you are referring to the events of W.W.II, not W.W.I. If
this is correct, I would like to confirm statement of your relative.

This non combat organizations was known as "TRUDARMIA", an abbreviation
of "Trudowaya Armia" which translates into english as "Working Army".
Many Jewish tradesmen >from shtetls of the Poland's territories of
Ukraine (Galicia), White Russia and Vilna region, following Soviet
invasion in 1939, were initially enslaved in Soviet camps and later (in
1940 during Soviet- Finnish war and 1941- war with Germany) enlisted
into Trudarmia brigades. Same scenario was repeated again, when Soviets
invaded in 1940 Baltic States (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) and
Romania's Bessarabia.

Since many of the Jewish shtetls tradesman were tailors and shoemakers,
they became a backbone of this Army, by manufacturing uniforms and
footwear for the Soviet Army. Besides tradesman >from the occupied by
Russia western territories ("the westerners"), many Jewish tradesman
from Soviet Territory proper, who were not qualified for the combat
duties, were also incorporated into this paramilitary workforce. Some
metalworking tradesmen (eg.blacksmith) were employed in Soviet
military/industrial complexes in Ural and Siberia producing ammunition
and war hardware

I am not aware about "serving two terms". Persons, who entered the
Trudarmia, were released (demobilized) when W.W.II has ended.

I couldn't find any meaningful information about Trudarmia on the Web, I
don't recall seeing any books or publication either in Russian or
English, which doesn't mean that they are not exist. Since all archives
of the Soviet Army are located in the Central Archives of the Soviet
Army in town Podol'sk, near Moscow, queries should be directed to them.

The following web site dedicated Soviet Army history is written by Mr.
Nikiforov >from Russia. he should be capable to assist you with your
query about Trudarmia, and establish the proper address for Army
archives in Podol'sk. His web site is in English, and I presume that you
can write your email in English.

http://www.dol.ru/users/hotdog/home.htm.

Hope this information helps.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Non-Combat Duty in Russian Military #general

A.Sharon <a.sharon@...>
 

ddworski@erols.com wrote:

An elderly relative has informed me that her father "served two terms in
the Russian military as a tailor." I could not find any mention
of non-combat duty in the JewishGen Infofiles. I would appreciate any
feedback about the plausibility of her statement. If the Russian
military did include tailors, would there be records of the individuals
who served in such a capacity? Would such records be similar to those
maintained for Russian soldiers?
Deborah Dworski > Arlington, Virginia U.S.A.
Deborah,

I assume that you are referring to the events of W.W.II, not W.W.I. If
this is correct, I would like to confirm statement of your relative.

This non combat organizations was known as "TRUDARMIA", an abbreviation
of "Trudowaya Armia" which translates into english as "Working Army".
Many Jewish tradesmen >from shtetls of the Poland's territories of
Ukraine (Galicia), White Russia and Vilna region, following Soviet
invasion in 1939, were initially enslaved in Soviet camps and later (in
1940 during Soviet- Finnish war and 1941- war with Germany) enlisted
into Trudarmia brigades. Same scenario was repeated again, when Soviets
invaded in 1940 Baltic States (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) and
Romania's Bessarabia.

Since many of the Jewish shtetls tradesman were tailors and shoemakers,
they became a backbone of this Army, by manufacturing uniforms and
footwear for the Soviet Army. Besides tradesman >from the occupied by
Russia western territories ("the westerners"), many Jewish tradesman
from Soviet Territory proper, who were not qualified for the combat
duties, were also incorporated into this paramilitary workforce. Some
metalworking tradesmen (eg.blacksmith) were employed in Soviet
military/industrial complexes in Ural and Siberia producing ammunition
and war hardware

I am not aware about "serving two terms". Persons, who entered the
Trudarmia, were released (demobilized) when W.W.II has ended.

I couldn't find any meaningful information about Trudarmia on the Web, I
don't recall seeing any books or publication either in Russian or
English, which doesn't mean that they are not exist. Since all archives
of the Soviet Army are located in the Central Archives of the Soviet
Army in town Podol'sk, near Moscow, queries should be directed to them.

The following web site dedicated Soviet Army history is written by Mr.
Nikiforov >from Russia. he should be capable to assist you with your
query about Trudarmia, and establish the proper address for Army
archives in Podol'sk. His web site is in English, and I presume that you
can write your email in English.

http://www.dol.ru/users/hotdog/home.htm.

Hope this information helps.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada