Date   

Re: Yizkor Book Project Translation Fund #poland

ZABLUDOVER@...
 

Thanks for sending me the information on the funding of Yizkor book
translations. I am actually interested in two shtetlach: Marijampole, as you
lnow; and Zablu-dow which is near Bialystok in Poland.

I have the Marijampole Book, and, with financial assistnce, could proceed with
a translation. And judging >from the large number of people listed as being
interested in Marijampole -- over 100 -- it might be do-able. Zabludow is a
different story. The book, I believe, was published in Argentina and, I
think, in Yiddish. YIVO has a copy. There is also a Hebrew book, published
in Israel; whether it is simply a Hebrew translation of the Yiddish or an
entirely different book, I have no idea. In either case, there don't seem to
be too many people interested in Zabludow at the moment.

As I said, I could take on the responsibility for the Marijampole translation;
and inasmuch as Orly Biggie is an Israeli and not a native speaker of English,
I could work with her on turning out a good English version.

Sincerely,

Jim Friedlander


MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply to this message privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Yizkor Book Project Translation Fund #lithuania

ZABLUDOVER@...
 

Thanks for sending me the information on the funding of Yizkor book
translations. I am actually interested in two shtetlach: Marijampole, as you
lnow; and Zablu-dow which is near Bialystok in Poland.

I have the Marijampole Book, and, with financial assistnce, could proceed with
a translation. And judging >from the large number of people listed as being
interested in Marijampole -- over 100 -- it might be do-able. Zabludow is a
different story. The book, I believe, was published in Argentina and, I
think, in Yiddish. YIVO has a copy. There is also a Hebrew book, published
in Israel; whether it is simply a Hebrew translation of the Yiddish or an
entirely different book, I have no idea. In either case, there don't seem to
be too many people interested in Zabludow at the moment.

As I said, I could take on the responsibility for the Marijampole translation;
and inasmuch as Orly Biggie is an Israeli and not a native speaker of English,
I could work with her on turning out a good English version.

Sincerely,

Jim Friedlander


MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply to this message privately.


Re: Lithuanian museum/The Book of Sorrow #lithuania

Momteller@...
 

In a message dated 12/22/98 9:49:53 PM Central Standard Time,
szome@hotmail.com writes:

<< Just arrived back >from a visit to the Lithuanian museum here in Chicago.
What can I say? It is not a comfortable place to do Jewish research
with all those knights on the wall staring at me. >>

Dear STeven,
I live in Evanston and just recently found out that my grandmother came from
Lithuania (we thought she did--or maybe Poland--but a social security
application turned up the name of her town in the Lida Uzed). Is it worth it
to go to this museum? I understand that it must be strange going there.
Please let me know.

Susan Stone


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Lithuanian museum/The Book of Sorrow #lithuania

Momteller@...
 

In a message dated 12/22/98 9:49:53 PM Central Standard Time,
szome@hotmail.com writes:

<< Just arrived back >from a visit to the Lithuanian museum here in Chicago.
What can I say? It is not a comfortable place to do Jewish research
with all those knights on the wall staring at me. >>

Dear STeven,
I live in Evanston and just recently found out that my grandmother came from
Lithuania (we thought she did--or maybe Poland--but a social security
application turned up the name of her town in the Lida Uzed). Is it worth it
to go to this museum? I understand that it must be strange going there.
Please let me know.

Susan Stone


Re: Seeking Information On Vilna #lithuania

ADAM1GS@...
 

While doing research into my Yezerski Family I had the opportunity to speak to a former resident of Vilna, who lived there before the war, who mentioned to me about different stops along a bus route into Vilna, called Vilna Skaplerna (sp?)and Vilna Kemenetz(sp?). In the past I had heard members of my family speak about these locations and I thought they might be like suburbs of Vilna.

I have not been able to find any listing under the ShtetlSeeker or on any maps that I have. I was just wondering if any other Litvak researcher had any information or knowledge of these locations.


MODERATOR'S NOTE: All messages to the Litvak SIG Discussion Group should be signed with the full name of the sender.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Seeking Information On Vilna #lithuania

ADAM1GS@...
 

While doing research into my Yezerski Family I had the opportunity to speak to a former resident of Vilna, who lived there before the war, who mentioned to me about different stops along a bus route into Vilna, called Vilna Skaplerna (sp?)and Vilna Kemenetz(sp?). In the past I had heard members of my family speak about these locations and I thought they might be like suburbs of Vilna.

I have not been able to find any listing under the ShtetlSeeker or on any maps that I have. I was just wondering if any other Litvak researcher had any information or knowledge of these locations.


MODERATOR'S NOTE: All messages to the Litvak SIG Discussion Group should be signed with the full name of the sender.


FW: Yizkor Book Translation Fund #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Joyce Field [mailto:jfield@nlci.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 1998 5:15 AM
To: lmagyar@en.com
Subject: Yizkor Book Translation Fund


Dear Hungarian SIG:

If you have been wondering how to contribute money to fund a translation
of a yizkor book for your mother or father's or grandparent's shtetl, and
didn't know how to do it, we have come up with a new, easy-to-use
procedure.

JewishGen announces the creation of a Yizkor Book Translation Fund,
which will be used to translate yizkor books for presentation on the Yizkor
Book Project web site. JewishGen has created an online donation form -- a
secure web site where you can make your contribution with a credit card. You may also mail your contribution to JewishGen, paying by credit card or
check. As JewishGen is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, contributions to JewishGen are charitable donations. Thus, by making a contribution to the Yizkor Book Translation Fund, you will not only be helping to make more translations available to the public, but you also will help yourself by receiving a tax deduction for your gift.

Two types of donations can be made: donations earmarked for the
translation of a specific book and donations to a general fund, which will be allocated to specific translation projects determined by Yizkor Book Project volunteers. In its first year, the Project put 50 translations online, and the backlog keeps increasing. It is clear that the interest in yizkor books is growing and that more can be done and more rapidly if funds become available to fund translations. Our goal is to have 100 translations online by Rosh HaShanah 1999. You can make this happen by making a monetary gift to the Yizkor Book Project.

Each translation project will have a volunteer coordinator who will get
interested parties to contribute toward a specific translation, keep in
contact with everyone interested in a particular book, set priorities
for which chapters to translate first, secure permission >from the book's
copyright holder, and hire and work with a translator. The resulting
translation will then be published on the JewishGen's web site. The
Internet's World Wide Web is an ideal medium for publishing these works,
since it is not necessary to raise money to translate an entire book
before a translation project can begin. Chapters can be placed on the Web as soon as they are completed, and this, it is hoped, will stimulate more
donations.
---------------------
Mod.- FYI as of December 1, 1998 per my conversation (LS) with the Yad Vashem librarian there are 1,132 Yizkor books in their collection. My research shows about 110 of these books or a little less than 10% are written about towns and regions in pre-Trianon Hungary.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Anyone wishing to donate to the Translation Fund can do on a secure
web-based form, available at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizkortrans.html>. The list of approved
projects appears on this form. Contributions for a specific project
should NOT be made until the project is approved by the Yizkor Book Project and listed on this form.

Current projects are:
1. Dokshitsy, Belarus: Sefer yizkor Dokszyce-Parafianow.
Contact person: Joel Alpert <ALPERT@LL.MIT.EDU>
2. Gargzdai, Lithuania: Sefer Gorzd (Lita).
Contact person: Kevin Ossey <kossey@mailhost.nr.infi.net>

Coordinators of existing translation projects who are interested in
participating in the Translation Fund should contact Joyce Field at
<jfield@jewishgen.org>. Persons interested in starting a new translation
project can find complete information and the necessary forms at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation.html>.

All of the Yizkor Book Project's resources can be found on the JewishGen
web site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>.

Martin Kessel, Project Manager <mkessel@jewishgen.org>
Joyce Field, Translations Manager <jfield@jewishgen.org>
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project


Hungary SIG #Hungary FW: Yizkor Book Translation Fund #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Joyce Field [mailto:jfield@nlci.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 1998 5:15 AM
To: lmagyar@en.com
Subject: Yizkor Book Translation Fund


Dear Hungarian SIG:

If you have been wondering how to contribute money to fund a translation
of a yizkor book for your mother or father's or grandparent's shtetl, and
didn't know how to do it, we have come up with a new, easy-to-use
procedure.

JewishGen announces the creation of a Yizkor Book Translation Fund,
which will be used to translate yizkor books for presentation on the Yizkor
Book Project web site. JewishGen has created an online donation form -- a
secure web site where you can make your contribution with a credit card. You may also mail your contribution to JewishGen, paying by credit card or
check. As JewishGen is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organization, contributions to JewishGen are charitable donations. Thus, by making a contribution to the Yizkor Book Translation Fund, you will not only be helping to make more translations available to the public, but you also will help yourself by receiving a tax deduction for your gift.

Two types of donations can be made: donations earmarked for the
translation of a specific book and donations to a general fund, which will be allocated to specific translation projects determined by Yizkor Book Project volunteers. In its first year, the Project put 50 translations online, and the backlog keeps increasing. It is clear that the interest in yizkor books is growing and that more can be done and more rapidly if funds become available to fund translations. Our goal is to have 100 translations online by Rosh HaShanah 1999. You can make this happen by making a monetary gift to the Yizkor Book Project.

Each translation project will have a volunteer coordinator who will get
interested parties to contribute toward a specific translation, keep in
contact with everyone interested in a particular book, set priorities
for which chapters to translate first, secure permission >from the book's
copyright holder, and hire and work with a translator. The resulting
translation will then be published on the JewishGen's web site. The
Internet's World Wide Web is an ideal medium for publishing these works,
since it is not necessary to raise money to translate an entire book
before a translation project can begin. Chapters can be placed on the Web as soon as they are completed, and this, it is hoped, will stimulate more
donations.
---------------------
Mod.- FYI as of December 1, 1998 per my conversation (LS) with the Yad Vashem librarian there are 1,132 Yizkor books in their collection. My research shows about 110 of these books or a little less than 10% are written about towns and regions in pre-Trianon Hungary.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Anyone wishing to donate to the Translation Fund can do on a secure
web-based form, available at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizkortrans.html>. The list of approved
projects appears on this form. Contributions for a specific project
should NOT be made until the project is approved by the Yizkor Book Project and listed on this form.

Current projects are:
1. Dokshitsy, Belarus: Sefer yizkor Dokszyce-Parafianow.
Contact person: Joel Alpert <ALPERT@LL.MIT.EDU>
2. Gargzdai, Lithuania: Sefer Gorzd (Lita).
Contact person: Kevin Ossey <kossey@mailhost.nr.infi.net>

Coordinators of existing translation projects who are interested in
participating in the Translation Fund should contact Joyce Field at
<jfield@jewishgen.org>. Persons interested in starting a new translation
project can find complete information and the necessary forms at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/donation.html>.

All of the Yizkor Book Project's resources can be found on the JewishGen
web site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>.

Martin Kessel, Project Manager <mkessel@jewishgen.org>
Joyce Field, Translations Manager <jfield@jewishgen.org>
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project


Wives' names #general

Paul Silverstone <paulh@...>
 

Am I alone in wanting to list women under both their maiden and
married names? My program (Family Tree Maker) doesn't seem to
want to let me list the married names in any index. Since I
know most by their married names, I will have to think what was
the maiden name before I look for them.
Do others have this problem?
--
Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wives' names #general

Paul Silverstone <paulh@...>
 

Am I alone in wanting to list women under both their maiden and
married names? My program (Family Tree Maker) doesn't seem to
want to let me list the married names in any index. Since I
know most by their married names, I will have to think what was
the maiden name before I look for them.
Do others have this problem?
--
Paul Silverstone
New York

reply to: paulh@aya.yale.edu


Hungarian synagogue on Lower East side of NYC #hungary

Counsel17@...
 

Does anyone know if this synagogue still exists? My FISCHERs are buried in
Riverside in NJ in its section:

First Hungarian, Cong. Ohab Zedek

John Anderson,
Danbury, CT


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian synagogue on Lower East side of NYC #hungary

Counsel17@...
 

Does anyone know if this synagogue still exists? My FISCHERs are buried in
Riverside in NJ in its section:

First Hungarian, Cong. Ohab Zedek

John Anderson,
Danbury, CT


Wilfred RESCHKE #general

Goldschmidt
 

Hallo Friends,
I am searching a schoolfriend (1937) >from Berlin, Wilfred RESCHKE,
whose father Max RESCHKE was the schoolmaster of the Jewish school
in Kaiserstrasse, Berlin. Wilfred came to Palestine in 1947, lived
in a kibutz near Nahariah until 1953 when he left Israel. In Israel
he changed his name to Daniel.
Any information would be appreciated.
Thanks and Shalom >from Israel
Joseph Goldschmidt

Researching: GUMPEL, MERENLENDER, HOHENSTEIN, NEUGASS, ISSERLIN,
GOLDSCHMIDT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wilfred RESCHKE #general

Goldschmidt
 

Hallo Friends,
I am searching a schoolfriend (1937) >from Berlin, Wilfred RESCHKE,
whose father Max RESCHKE was the schoolmaster of the Jewish school
in Kaiserstrasse, Berlin. Wilfred came to Palestine in 1947, lived
in a kibutz near Nahariah until 1953 when he left Israel. In Israel
he changed his name to Daniel.
Any information would be appreciated.
Thanks and Shalom >from Israel
Joseph Goldschmidt

Researching: GUMPEL, MERENLENDER, HOHENSTEIN, NEUGASS, ISSERLIN,
GOLDSCHMIDT


Gonyenz #general

AnieDoodle
 

A newly found relative has given me a lead, indicating the that KILLASINSKY
(sp.?) family may have originated >from a Polish town called Gonyenz. The
patriarch of the family may have managed a Polish estate there. I have run
a search on the shtetl seeker, and did not come up with an exact match, but
an overwhelming (to me anyway) number of soundex suggestions.


I would appreciate hearing >from anyone about the possible location and
correct name of this Polish town.

TIA for your help!

Anne Dean
Covington, VA

Searching:
ALLEN, COPELAND (Minsk/Grodno?), FRIEDLANDER, GILLMAN, GREENBERG
(Grodno), GRODZKI (Suwalki), GROZCKY, GROSBY, GROSSKY, KAPLAN, KILLASHINSKY,
KILLASINSKY, KRAZINSKY (Dubrova), LEWIN, LEWINTHAL, SZEYNMAN (Suwalki)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gonyenz #general

AnieDoodle
 

A newly found relative has given me a lead, indicating the that KILLASINSKY
(sp.?) family may have originated >from a Polish town called Gonyenz. The
patriarch of the family may have managed a Polish estate there. I have run
a search on the shtetl seeker, and did not come up with an exact match, but
an overwhelming (to me anyway) number of soundex suggestions.


I would appreciate hearing >from anyone about the possible location and
correct name of this Polish town.

TIA for your help!

Anne Dean
Covington, VA

Searching:
ALLEN, COPELAND (Minsk/Grodno?), FRIEDLANDER, GILLMAN, GREENBERG
(Grodno), GRODZKI (Suwalki), GROZCKY, GROSBY, GROSSKY, KAPLAN, KILLASHINSKY,
KILLASINSKY, KRAZINSKY (Dubrova), LEWIN, LEWINTHAL, SZEYNMAN (Suwalki)


Philadelphia #general

Carl Alpert <alpert@...>
 

Researchers into Philadelphia will find a wealth of information in the
576-page book "The Jews of Philadelphia, by Henry Samuel Morais, published
in 1894.

It is rich in family biographies and full details on congregations.
Obviously there is little on Russian Jews, but it does detail the various
congregations with lists of the names of officers. The book is
thoroughkly indexed.

Carl Alpert


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Philadelphia #general

Carl Alpert <alpert@...>
 

Researchers into Philadelphia will find a wealth of information in the
576-page book "The Jews of Philadelphia, by Henry Samuel Morais, published
in 1894.

It is rich in family biographies and full details on congregations.
Obviously there is little on Russian Jews, but it does detail the various
congregations with lists of the names of officers. The book is
thoroughkly indexed.

Carl Alpert


Re: Wive's names #general

Steven Chall <steven.chall@...>
 

Paul Silverstone asked:

Am I alone in wanting to list women under both their maiden and
married names? My program (Family Tree Maker) doesn't seem to
want to let me list the married names in any index. Since I
know most by their married names, I will have to think what was
the maiden name before I look for them.
Do others have this problem?
When choosing genealogy software, everyone must determine what
information will be important to them, what form will be most
convenient, and how critical is it to verify any findings - among
many other parameters. Some software allows one name per person
while others allow as many vaiations as you need. Among the latter
are The Master Genealogist (TMG) and Ultimate Family Tree (UFT).
These allow you to see every name variation in your index so you
can decide if you prefer the main entry by birth name, married name,
a legally changed name, hebrew name, nickname, whatever. They also
encourage you to document where you obtained the information and how
reliable you believe each piece of data to be.

While discussion of the pros and cons of individual software does not
belong on the public part of this forum, I would be interested in
tabulating how many people are using which program so we can assist
each other privately. Most of the software forums deal with problems
other than those which are unique to the Jewish community.

Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN =[;-)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wive's names #general

Steven Chall <steven.chall@...>
 

Paul Silverstone asked:

Am I alone in wanting to list women under both their maiden and
married names? My program (Family Tree Maker) doesn't seem to
want to let me list the married names in any index. Since I
know most by their married names, I will have to think what was
the maiden name before I look for them.
Do others have this problem?
When choosing genealogy software, everyone must determine what
information will be important to them, what form will be most
convenient, and how critical is it to verify any findings - among
many other parameters. Some software allows one name per person
while others allow as many vaiations as you need. Among the latter
are The Master Genealogist (TMG) and Ultimate Family Tree (UFT).
These allow you to see every name variation in your index so you
can decide if you prefer the main entry by birth name, married name,
a legally changed name, hebrew name, nickname, whatever. They also
encourage you to document where you obtained the information and how
reliable you believe each piece of data to be.

While discussion of the pros and cons of individual software does not
belong on the public part of this forum, I would be interested in
tabulating how many people are using which program so we can assist
each other privately. Most of the software forums deal with problems
other than those which are unique to the Jewish community.

Steven Chall in Minneapolis, MN =[;-)