Date   

fyi: Ten Commandments for Genealogists #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

Ten Commandments for Genealogists
by Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern (1916-1994)
Dean of American-Jewish Genealogy

I. I am a genealogist dedicated to true knowledge about the
families I am researching.

II. Thou shalt use family traditions with caution and only as clues.

III. Thou shalt not accept as gospel every written record or printed
record.

IV. Thou shalt not hang nobility or royalty on your family tree
without verifying with experts.

V. Thou shalt clearly label the questionable and the fairy tale.

VI. Thou shalt handle all records in such a way that the next users
will find them in the same condition you did.

VII. Thou shalt credit those who help you and ask permission of those
whose work you use.

VIII. Thou shalt not query any source of information without supplying
postage.

IX. Thou shalt respect the sensitivities of the living in whatever
you record but tell the truth about the dead.

X. Thou shalt not become a genealogical teacher or authority
without appropriate training and certification.


--
Bernard I. Kouchel
<mailto:bkouchel@jewishgen.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen fyi: Ten Commandments for Genealogists #general

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

Ten Commandments for Genealogists
by Rabbi Malcolm H. Stern (1916-1994)
Dean of American-Jewish Genealogy

I. I am a genealogist dedicated to true knowledge about the
families I am researching.

II. Thou shalt use family traditions with caution and only as clues.

III. Thou shalt not accept as gospel every written record or printed
record.

IV. Thou shalt not hang nobility or royalty on your family tree
without verifying with experts.

V. Thou shalt clearly label the questionable and the fairy tale.

VI. Thou shalt handle all records in such a way that the next users
will find them in the same condition you did.

VII. Thou shalt credit those who help you and ask permission of those
whose work you use.

VIII. Thou shalt not query any source of information without supplying
postage.

IX. Thou shalt respect the sensitivities of the living in whatever
you record but tell the truth about the dead.

X. Thou shalt not become a genealogical teacher or authority
without appropriate training and certification.


--
Bernard I. Kouchel
<mailto:bkouchel@jewishgen.org


Suwalki visit described in NY Times article #general

MMBegun@...
 

In today's (Sunday, November 8, 1998) New York Times, there is a travel
supplement called "The Sophisticated Traveler." (Not the regular travel
section.) It features a very moving account of a visit made by the author,
Joseph Skibell (nee Skibelsky), and his brother to their ancestral town,
Suwalki, Poland. The article is titled "In Poland, Invisible Others."

He also describes a visit to surrounding towns, such as Tykocin.

If you're not a subscriber to the NY Times and you have an interest in that
part of Poland, you might try your local library or the Nexus service,
which is available through many libraries.

Mila Begun in NYC (MMBegun@aol.com)

Researching:
BEFELER, GRACHNIAK: Cziemierniki, Radzyn, Deblin & Miedzyrzec, Poland
GOLDBERG: Lukow, Parczew, Miedzyrzec Podl., Poland
BRODSKY, ELLIS, YELLISHAVETSKY, ORLIK and TALANSKY: Talnoye, Ukr.
BEGUN, ROSENBAUM, MELTZER: Pinsk, Belarus
PILATSKY: anywhere in Poland

MODERATOR NOTE: Most articles >from The New York Times are available online
at the Times's website, <http://www.nytimes.com> on the day of publication.
Selected articles remain available for longer periods. Check the website
for details.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Suwalki visit described in NY Times article #general

MMBegun@...
 

In today's (Sunday, November 8, 1998) New York Times, there is a travel
supplement called "The Sophisticated Traveler." (Not the regular travel
section.) It features a very moving account of a visit made by the author,
Joseph Skibell (nee Skibelsky), and his brother to their ancestral town,
Suwalki, Poland. The article is titled "In Poland, Invisible Others."

He also describes a visit to surrounding towns, such as Tykocin.

If you're not a subscriber to the NY Times and you have an interest in that
part of Poland, you might try your local library or the Nexus service,
which is available through many libraries.

Mila Begun in NYC (MMBegun@aol.com)

Researching:
BEFELER, GRACHNIAK: Cziemierniki, Radzyn, Deblin & Miedzyrzec, Poland
GOLDBERG: Lukow, Parczew, Miedzyrzec Podl., Poland
BRODSKY, ELLIS, YELLISHAVETSKY, ORLIK and TALANSKY: Talnoye, Ukr.
BEGUN, ROSENBAUM, MELTZER: Pinsk, Belarus
PILATSKY: anywhere in Poland

MODERATOR NOTE: Most articles >from The New York Times are available online
at the Times's website, <http://www.nytimes.com> on the day of publication.
Selected articles remain available for longer periods. Check the website
for details.


cancelled lecture in CT #general

Joyce Peck <Joycekp@...>
 

The Jewish genealogy talk by Rabbi Edward Cohen, planned for Nov. 22 at
Beth El Synagogue in Torrington, has been cancelled. Rabbi Cohen will be
rescheduled for the spring.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen cancelled lecture in CT #general

Joyce Peck <Joycekp@...>
 

The Jewish genealogy talk by Rabbi Edward Cohen, planned for Nov. 22 at
Beth El Synagogue in Torrington, has been cancelled. Rabbi Cohen will be
rescheduled for the spring.


Nov 12 & 19, 1998, 7pm-9pm, NYC - Researching Your Family History #general

Jgsny@...
 

LAST CALL!

A joint JGS (NY)/ 92nd St YM-YWHA program, Researching Your Family History,
will be held on the next two Thursdays, November 12th & 19th, 7:00-9:00pm,
at the 92nd St Y, 1395 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY. Participants will
receive a 100+ page syllabus. Discover the wide range of library and
archival resources available locally and elsewhere. Topics include naming
traditions, vital records, cemeteries, computer technology, census and
naturalization records, passenger lists, yizkor books, Holocaust research,
finding survivors, and researching in Eastern Europe. Two sessions, $40.
Pre-registration required. Register through the Y, either in person, by
mail or telephone. Call 212-996-1100.

Estelle Guzik
Pres. JGS (NY)

Check our web site periodically for information on the 1999 Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in NYC August 8-13, 1999.
http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nov 12 & 19, 1998, 7pm-9pm, NYC - Researching Your Family History #general

Jgsny@...
 

LAST CALL!

A joint JGS (NY)/ 92nd St YM-YWHA program, Researching Your Family History,
will be held on the next two Thursdays, November 12th & 19th, 7:00-9:00pm,
at the 92nd St Y, 1395 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY. Participants will
receive a 100+ page syllabus. Discover the wide range of library and
archival resources available locally and elsewhere. Topics include naming
traditions, vital records, cemeteries, computer technology, census and
naturalization records, passenger lists, yizkor books, Holocaust research,
finding survivors, and researching in Eastern Europe. Two sessions, $40.
Pre-registration required. Register through the Y, either in person, by
mail or telephone. Call 212-996-1100.

Estelle Guzik
Pres. JGS (NY)

Check our web site periodically for information on the 1999 Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in NYC August 8-13, 1999.
http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf


Minsk District (Uzed) History Project #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

The following message was received today >from Oleg Perzashkevich. I had
previously asked him which towns and villages would be included in the
Minsk District (Uzed) study.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD

*****************************

Subject: Re: Minsk
Sent: 11/8/98 5:45 PM
Received: 11/8/98 1:04 PM
From: Oleg Perzashkevich, minskhist@yahoo.com
To: David M. Fox, fox@erols.com

Dear David,

here is the list of settlements, you asked about:

Annopol, Koydanov, Obchak, Samokhvalovichi,
Beloruchye, Krasnoye, Syelo, Ostroshitsky Gorodok, Semkov Gorodok,
Grichin, Metlichino, Pershay, Slobodka,
Ivenets, Mikhanovichi, Pyatevshchina, Staroye, Syelo,
Kamen, Minsk, Rakov, Stolbtsy,
Karpilovka, Nedvezhino, Ratomka, Sverzhen,
Khmelevka, Negoreloye, Rubezhevichi, Zaslavl,
Kolodishchi, Nikolaevshchina, Rusinovichi.

Hope to get ready with Minsk District soon.
Sincerely,

Oleg Perzashkevich


Belarus SIG #Belarus Minsk District (Uzed) History Project #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

The following message was received today >from Oleg Perzashkevich. I had
previously asked him which towns and villages would be included in the
Minsk District (Uzed) study.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD

*****************************

Subject: Re: Minsk
Sent: 11/8/98 5:45 PM
Received: 11/8/98 1:04 PM
From: Oleg Perzashkevich, minskhist@yahoo.com
To: David M. Fox, fox@erols.com

Dear David,

here is the list of settlements, you asked about:

Annopol, Koydanov, Obchak, Samokhvalovichi,
Beloruchye, Krasnoye, Syelo, Ostroshitsky Gorodok, Semkov Gorodok,
Grichin, Metlichino, Pershay, Slobodka,
Ivenets, Mikhanovichi, Pyatevshchina, Staroye, Syelo,
Kamen, Minsk, Rakov, Stolbtsy,
Karpilovka, Nedvezhino, Ratomka, Sverzhen,
Khmelevka, Negoreloye, Rubezhevichi, Zaslavl,
Kolodishchi, Nikolaevshchina, Rusinovichi.

Hope to get ready with Minsk District soon.
Sincerely,

Oleg Perzashkevich


Re: Belarus Travel #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

This message was posted on the JewishGen Discussion Group in response to
the message >from Eric Adler about his trip to Grodno.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator

**************************
Subject: Re: trip to Grodno
From: YuriShch1@aol.com
Date: Sat, 7 Nov 1998 01:29:56 EST
X-Message-Number: 25

Hi everybody!

My name is Yuri Shcherbina, I'm a Jew who was living in Grodno
for 25 years, and having left there only two years ago. BTW, my
parents still live there.

It was very exciting to hear about the Eric's trip to Grodno,
and it brought back so many memories. I'm very grateful to Eric
for this message.

There are just a few things that I would like to express my
opinion about, which I think were incorrect and which I can explain.

Here are some notes re this exiting letter:

I also requested an "express" single-entry visa, which they
processed in less than an hour but which cost me DM 200
(about $120). Normal visa processing time takes longer
(depending on type of visa) and costs less.
I'm not sure it really costs less. The American Embassies in
Moscow, Minsk and Vilnius charge $150 for a single-entry visa
issuing to Belorussian citizens. When somebody is brave enough
to ask them why it is so expensive, they usually say that the
price is absolutely equal to the price that Belorussian Embassy
charges for American citizens applying for the same type of the
visa.

There is no direct train >from Minsk to Grodno, so
the best option is taking a train >from Poland.
This is incorrect, as there are at least four direct trains
from Minsk to Grodno. There is also a direct bus route connecting
these towns. It takes about five hours to get in Grodno by a bus.
The train >from Poland is more expensive and takes longer.

rent a car in Belarus.
This is correct. It is impossible.

It supposedly has records of births, deaths, and maybe
marriages after about 1900.
They usually keep documents that have been issued during
the last 80 years. But, of course, with some exceptions.

(she was not allowed to tell me exactly).
She was allowed to tell you. She just did not know.

She explained that a person at another archive named Kornashova
or something had recently been fired for giving out too much
information (and too freely), possibly to people >from Israel.
Because of this, she was very formal with me.
Not because of this: 100 bucks cash would probably have made
her very friendly. That is exactly what people there call
"Russian business."

The Synagogue. The main synagogue in Grodno is a very important
building, built in the 16th century, I believe.
At the end of the 15 century.

There were once something like 37 synagogues in the city.
Forty-five synagogues, based on the Grodno Directory published
before W.W.I.

a Jew named Yuri Chaimovich Boyarsky staked responsibility
for the project. He has not, however, made satisfactory progress
on the project. At the very least, he is a poor manager /
fundraiser / restorer. All the people I spoke to in Grodno,
both Jews and non-Jews, called him a liar...
This is a very sad story. I knew him as a very nice, friendly
and honest person. I don't believe he really was involved in this
"shakher--makher". I remember him working hard on the restoration
of the Synagogue and Jewish Community in Grodno. He is a very old
man, he does not have children, what could be his reason for
corruption? At his age people usually think about their coming
visit to G-d, not about money...

A very important person in the community is named Grischa Chosid
The more appropriate spelling would be Grisha (Grigoriy) Hasid.
He is son of Nisel.

doing 18 km/h over the speed limit of 60 km/h
The speed limit in out-city-zone is 90 km/h, sometimes 100.
No idea why Eric got the ticket if it happened out of city.

Minsk was largely built after World War II,
Both, Minsk and Grodno are very old towns: Grodno is about
900 years old, Minsk is about 700. But unlike Grodno, Minsk
was completely ruined during the W.W.II, that's why it looks
like a modern city.

Much of the Grodno ghetto is either preserved or being renovated
Thanks to Yuri Boyarsky, who people seemed to be speaking badly about.

One dominate feature in the city is Lenin Square, a large open
area with a huge statue of Lenin, the base of which is rumored
to be built >from gravestones >from the old main Jewish cemetery
where the stadium now stands.
The mentioned statue is pretty new, built about 10 years ago.
But the old one really was standing on the pedestal made of the
old Jewish gravestones.


Very sincerely,
Yuri Shcherbina,
LA, CA
YuriShch1@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: Belarus Travel #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

This message was posted on the JewishGen Discussion Group in response to
the message >from Eric Adler about his trip to Grodno.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Belarus SIG Coordinator

**************************
Subject: Re: trip to Grodno
From: YuriShch1@aol.com
Date: Sat, 7 Nov 1998 01:29:56 EST
X-Message-Number: 25

Hi everybody!

My name is Yuri Shcherbina, I'm a Jew who was living in Grodno
for 25 years, and having left there only two years ago. BTW, my
parents still live there.

It was very exciting to hear about the Eric's trip to Grodno,
and it brought back so many memories. I'm very grateful to Eric
for this message.

There are just a few things that I would like to express my
opinion about, which I think were incorrect and which I can explain.

Here are some notes re this exiting letter:

I also requested an "express" single-entry visa, which they
processed in less than an hour but which cost me DM 200
(about $120). Normal visa processing time takes longer
(depending on type of visa) and costs less.
I'm not sure it really costs less. The American Embassies in
Moscow, Minsk and Vilnius charge $150 for a single-entry visa
issuing to Belorussian citizens. When somebody is brave enough
to ask them why it is so expensive, they usually say that the
price is absolutely equal to the price that Belorussian Embassy
charges for American citizens applying for the same type of the
visa.

There is no direct train >from Minsk to Grodno, so
the best option is taking a train >from Poland.
This is incorrect, as there are at least four direct trains
from Minsk to Grodno. There is also a direct bus route connecting
these towns. It takes about five hours to get in Grodno by a bus.
The train >from Poland is more expensive and takes longer.

rent a car in Belarus.
This is correct. It is impossible.

It supposedly has records of births, deaths, and maybe
marriages after about 1900.
They usually keep documents that have been issued during
the last 80 years. But, of course, with some exceptions.

(she was not allowed to tell me exactly).
She was allowed to tell you. She just did not know.

She explained that a person at another archive named Kornashova
or something had recently been fired for giving out too much
information (and too freely), possibly to people >from Israel.
Because of this, she was very formal with me.
Not because of this: 100 bucks cash would probably have made
her very friendly. That is exactly what people there call
"Russian business."

The Synagogue. The main synagogue in Grodno is a very important
building, built in the 16th century, I believe.
At the end of the 15 century.

There were once something like 37 synagogues in the city.
Forty-five synagogues, based on the Grodno Directory published
before W.W.I.

a Jew named Yuri Chaimovich Boyarsky staked responsibility
for the project. He has not, however, made satisfactory progress
on the project. At the very least, he is a poor manager /
fundraiser / restorer. All the people I spoke to in Grodno,
both Jews and non-Jews, called him a liar...
This is a very sad story. I knew him as a very nice, friendly
and honest person. I don't believe he really was involved in this
"shakher--makher". I remember him working hard on the restoration
of the Synagogue and Jewish Community in Grodno. He is a very old
man, he does not have children, what could be his reason for
corruption? At his age people usually think about their coming
visit to G-d, not about money...

A very important person in the community is named Grischa Chosid
The more appropriate spelling would be Grisha (Grigoriy) Hasid.
He is son of Nisel.

doing 18 km/h over the speed limit of 60 km/h
The speed limit in out-city-zone is 90 km/h, sometimes 100.
No idea why Eric got the ticket if it happened out of city.

Minsk was largely built after World War II,
Both, Minsk and Grodno are very old towns: Grodno is about
900 years old, Minsk is about 700. But unlike Grodno, Minsk
was completely ruined during the W.W.II, that's why it looks
like a modern city.

Much of the Grodno ghetto is either preserved or being renovated
Thanks to Yuri Boyarsky, who people seemed to be speaking badly about.

One dominate feature in the city is Lenin Square, a large open
area with a huge statue of Lenin, the base of which is rumored
to be built >from gravestones >from the old main Jewish cemetery
where the stadium now stands.
The mentioned statue is pretty new, built about 10 years ago.
But the old one really was standing on the pedestal made of the
old Jewish gravestones.


Very sincerely,
Yuri Shcherbina,
LA, CA
YuriShch1@aol.com


Re: Minsk in Poland? #belarus

Larry Gaum <lgaum@...>
 

Barbara Khait wrote:
My grandfather, born in Minsk Gubernia ca. 1869, referred
to his prior citizenship on his naturalization papers as "Polish."
If your grandfather was born in 1869, Minsk Guberniya was
under Russian Tzarist control. He was Russian, despite the
information he gave for his naturalization papers.The final
partition of Poland took place in 1795, and up until 1921,
Poland ceased to exist.

Larry Gaum


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Minsk in Poland? #belarus

Larry Gaum <lgaum@...>
 

Barbara Khait wrote:
My grandfather, born in Minsk Gubernia ca. 1869, referred
to his prior citizenship on his naturalization papers as "Polish."
If your grandfather was born in 1869, Minsk Guberniya was
under Russian Tzarist control. He was Russian, despite the
information he gave for his naturalization papers.The final
partition of Poland took place in 1795, and up until 1921,
Poland ceased to exist.

Larry Gaum


All SIG mailing lists now archived #lithuania

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Hello Litvak SIG

All messages posted to this list since July 1998 are now being
archived and are searchable online. >from JewishGen's homepage
http://www.jewishgen.org, click on Databases and then select
The JewishGen SIG Lists message Archive - 1998

Carol Skydell
JewishGen Operations


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania All SIG mailing lists now archived #lithuania

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Hello Litvak SIG

All messages posted to this list since July 1998 are now being
archived and are searchable online. >from JewishGen's homepage
http://www.jewishgen.org, click on Databases and then select
The JewishGen SIG Lists message Archive - 1998

Carol Skydell
JewishGen Operations


Re: Bat and Ben Discussion #lithuania

Anita Berk <anitab@...>
 

I would live to add several more comments before this discussion closes:

1. My mother and father were born "Litvaks" in 1909 and 1906,
respectively. They came to America in 1939 and 1937. There were both
from religious families. My mother did NOT have a Hebrew name. Women
were not called to the Torah, and thus did not have Hebrew names.

2. These Ben/Bat names you wish to use were not used by the original
list makers.

3. My grandfather was known as Boruch Labe, yet his Hebrew name was
Boruch Yehudah. No matter what people say, people will misinterpret your
intentions.

4. People listed in the household my be step-children and/or
nieces/nephews or their neighbor's kids. They may not be children of the
head-of household.

You would be truly doing a disservice by creating a field, and listing
someone as Bar or Bat when theses fields were not used in the original
record. You do not even know if the children in the household are the
children of the adults in the household. You only know they are reported
together.

I have American census records where Isaac was listed as head of
household, with wife Leah, and a number of children. The wife was the
2nd wife, and some children were hers, some were his, and some were both
of theirs. With your method, these children would be listed as children
of his, even though they were children of another father.

The right thing to do is list the data as it exists WITHOUT any
interpretation.

Anita Berk

Anita Berk
anitab@starmail.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Bat and Ben Discussion #lithuania

Anita Berk <anitab@...>
 

I would live to add several more comments before this discussion closes:

1. My mother and father were born "Litvaks" in 1909 and 1906,
respectively. They came to America in 1939 and 1937. There were both
from religious families. My mother did NOT have a Hebrew name. Women
were not called to the Torah, and thus did not have Hebrew names.

2. These Ben/Bat names you wish to use were not used by the original
list makers.

3. My grandfather was known as Boruch Labe, yet his Hebrew name was
Boruch Yehudah. No matter what people say, people will misinterpret your
intentions.

4. People listed in the household my be step-children and/or
nieces/nephews or their neighbor's kids. They may not be children of the
head-of household.

You would be truly doing a disservice by creating a field, and listing
someone as Bar or Bat when theses fields were not used in the original
record. You do not even know if the children in the household are the
children of the adults in the household. You only know they are reported
together.

I have American census records where Isaac was listed as head of
household, with wife Leah, and a number of children. The wife was the
2nd wife, and some children were hers, some were his, and some were both
of theirs. With your method, these children would be listed as children
of his, even though they were children of another father.

The right thing to do is list the data as it exists WITHOUT any
interpretation.

Anita Berk

Anita Berk
anitab@starmail.com


Re: Ben and Bat Discussion #lithuania

Deena Yoffa Gordon <dygordon@...>
 

To provide my 2 cents on several points of the discussion:

I appreciate that the people working with the data are so concerned with
setting up the database and the rules for inputting the data.

I agree with those who have suggested using "daughter of" and "son of"
rather than Hebrew. Some members of this list seem to feel that mixing
languages (we are using English for the most part) would be confusing
and I feel this is a valid point. All the data has been either
translated or transliterated. To answer the argument that daughter has
too many letters, dau. is a comm abbreviation.

I like the idea of an added field with this additional data, which I
understand is the conclusion of either the person translating the lists
or the person doing the input. You have already said that this would be
made clear in the introduction to the database. Those who do not read
instructions will not pay attention anyway.

I would like to suggest that any of us who have expressed an opinion
also back it up with some volunteer hours for input. I expect to be
available in about a month and have been told to request specific
information when I AM READY TO WORK!

A trial run on the Beta version of the database has shown me that it is
quite powerful. As usual in our research, records are not complete, but
if the one you are looking for is there it is really wonderful to be
able to find it!

Deena Yoffa Gordon
Researching YOFFA/JAFFE etc, >from Ponevezh region, MANCOVITZ, a Litvak,
COPPLEMAN/KOPELMAN, also a Litvak.


Lithuanian Database -- Headers #lithuania

Sgirson@...
 

I believe we have a no win situation on the use/non-use of "bas - bat" or
whatever. It is now time for someone to MAKE A DECISION and go with it!

Sam Girson (Silver Spring, MD)