Date   

Re: What does a name mean #general

Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Fri, 25 Dec 1998 08:16:27, sprottm@rocknet.net.au (Mrs M Sprott)
'llowed:

->Can anyone tell me what the name Hadassah Shulamith means in English? I
->believe the name is Russian or Polish. My friend's grandmother was
->called this and she does not have access to the internet, so I am asking
-> for her.


In fact, the names are neither Russian nor Polish, but straight Hebrew.

"Hadassah" is a feminine form of the noun "Hadas", which means 'myrtle'
(the plant).

"Shulamit" is >from the same root as "Shalom", and quite a number of other
words, the basic semantic meaning of which is 'completion'. For
translation, it is probably best to start with "Shalom"; in Spanish, for
example, there exists a feminine name "Paz", meaning 'peace'.

Stan Goodman
Qiryat Tiv'on
Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ISMACH, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia,
Poland
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive tree (requires Java 1.1 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
[You can download Java 1.1.6 >from my site, if you don't have it]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What does a name mean #general

Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Fri, 25 Dec 1998 08:16:27, sprottm@rocknet.net.au (Mrs M Sprott)
'llowed:

->Can anyone tell me what the name Hadassah Shulamith means in English? I
->believe the name is Russian or Polish. My friend's grandmother was
->called this and she does not have access to the internet, so I am asking
-> for her.


In fact, the names are neither Russian nor Polish, but straight Hebrew.

"Hadassah" is a feminine form of the noun "Hadas", which means 'myrtle'
(the plant).

"Shulamit" is >from the same root as "Shalom", and quite a number of other
words, the basic semantic meaning of which is 'completion'. For
translation, it is probably best to start with "Shalom"; in Spanish, for
example, there exists a feminine name "Paz", meaning 'peace'.

Stan Goodman
Qiryat Tiv'on
Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ISMACH, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia,
Poland
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive tree (requires Java 1.1 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
[You can download Java 1.1.6 >from my site, if you don't have it]


Drohobycz #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aubrey@...>
 

I am unable to locte Drohobycz in Shtetl finder - Any ideas
gratefully received


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Drohobycz #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aubrey@...>
 

I am unable to locte Drohobycz in Shtetl finder - Any ideas
gratefully received


19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy (August 8-13) -Bulletin #4 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Genealogists >from Europe, Israel, South America, Australia, South Africa
as well as the USA will find local phone numbers for the Mariott Marquis
Hotel, the NYC headquarters fof the 19th Annual Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, August 8-13, 1999, on the Conference web site:

http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf

Check the site for the list of programs as it develops... You can copy
the application for the conference directly >from this site. We look
forward to seeing you all in NYC next summer!

Happy New Year to all!
Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 19th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy (August 8-13) -Bulletin #4 #general

Jgsny@...
 

Genealogists >from Europe, Israel, South America, Australia, South Africa
as well as the USA will find local phone numbers for the Mariott Marquis
Hotel, the NYC headquarters fof the 19th Annual Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, August 8-13, 1999, on the Conference web site:

http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf

Check the site for the list of programs as it develops... You can copy
the application for the conference directly >from this site. We look
forward to seeing you all in NYC next summer!

Happy New Year to all!
Estelle Guzik, Pres.
JGS (NY)


Inquiry about NJ agric. community #general

joan breslow <webjoan@...>
 

Per Margot Tutum's question about her relative's placement in NJ, and
the response in today's digest by Paul Brenner:
Ellen Eisenberg's book has some very good historical points, even though
she seems drawn to the Alliance/Vineland area where apparently is where
her family has roots..
Gertrude Dubrovsky's book relates almost totally to her family, and the
folks in Farmingdale, NJ and the early 1920's.

As a result of my postings re: Woodbine, NJ, I am compiling a reference
list for NJ agric. settlements and am willing to share it. Info. is from
the great family of Jewishgenners.

Send private response: webjoan@earthlink.net
Joan Breslow


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Inquiry about NJ agric. community #general

joan breslow <webjoan@...>
 

Per Margot Tutum's question about her relative's placement in NJ, and
the response in today's digest by Paul Brenner:
Ellen Eisenberg's book has some very good historical points, even though
she seems drawn to the Alliance/Vineland area where apparently is where
her family has roots..
Gertrude Dubrovsky's book relates almost totally to her family, and the
folks in Farmingdale, NJ and the early 1920's.

As a result of my postings re: Woodbine, NJ, I am compiling a reference
list for NJ agric. settlements and am willing to share it. Info. is from
the great family of Jewishgenners.

Send private response: webjoan@earthlink.net
Joan Breslow


Re: Military Records #hungary

spvolk@...
 

According to my National Archives pamphlet, where you write for info
depends on when the person served. NARA is the official depository
for the records, but in three locations:
National Archives Building
Volunteers thru 1902
Regular Army, enlisted personnel thru 10/31/1912, officers thru
6/30/1917
Navy, enlisted personnel thru 12/31/1885, officers thru 12/31/1902
Marines, enlisted personnel thru 1904, and some officers thru
12/31/1895
Coast Guard, thru 1919
National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis MO
Army, officers after 6/30/1917, enlisted personnel after 10/31/1912
Air Force, after 9/1947 (when Air Force established)
Navy and Marines, naval officers after 1902, enlisted after 1885,
marine officers after 1895 and marine officers after 1904
Coast Guard officers after 1928, enlisted after 1914
Washington National Records Center
Coast Guard 1890 - 1929

All of the above is >from "National Archives and Records administration
General Information Leaflet Number 7, Revised 1985"

Regards,
Shelley Volk
Chicago, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Military Records #general

spvolk@...
 

According to my National Archives pamphlet, where you write for info
depends on when the person served. NARA is the official depository
for the records, but in three locations:
National Archives Building
Volunteers thru 1902
Regular Army, enlisted personnel thru 10/31/1912, officers thru
6/30/1917
Navy, enlisted personnel thru 12/31/1885, officers thru 12/31/1902
Marines, enlisted personnel thru 1904, and some officers thru
12/31/1895
Coast Guard, thru 1919
National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis MO
Army, officers after 6/30/1917, enlisted personnel after 10/31/1912
Air Force, after 9/1947 (when Air Force established)
Navy and Marines, naval officers after 1902, enlisted after 1885,
marine officers after 1895 and marine officers after 1904
Coast Guard officers after 1928, enlisted after 1914
Washington National Records Center
Coast Guard 1890 - 1929

All of the above is >from "National Archives and Records administration
General Information Leaflet Number 7, Revised 1985"

Regards,
Shelley Volk
Chicago, IL


Re: Yiddish name at birth #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

To try to prevent confusion for this discussion the term "Torah" name
(what many Sephardim call their religious names) rather than the term
"Hebrew" name, which Americans usually use, because the "Hebrew" name in
this case is actually Yiddish.

Giving a child a "Torah" name to be used in Jewish contexts (depending on
the family background such name would be in Hebrew, Yiddish,
Ladino/Judezmo, or possibly one of the other handfuls of similar
languages) is far >from an "unusual practice". In fact, this would be
done a matter of course by any family for every child who takes Judaism
as a religious system seriously. Names are serious business. (Remember
Jews are Semites >from Shem, talk about HaShem, PRoverbs "A good name is
rather to be chosen than great riches" etc. etc.)

Patricia's question about how the name gets recorded is a more
complicated one. For families who go to schul or otherwise participate
in rituals the "Torah" name would be in use on a regular basis so people
would know. For a family that gave such a name but did not go on to use
it regularly there are different places to look.

For a boy it is easier. (And by the way in observant families no one
would be told the actual name until it is announced at the circumcision.
Some observant families now take this approach for girls as well.) Most
mohelim/mohelot (ritual circumcisers) give the family certificates and
also keep registers of all circumcisions done.

For a girl the record may not have been kept. Some families wrote names
in endpapers of family Bibles so check older family books. If the girl
was named in schul, a handful of schuls keep track (although those
records may be hard to find). An older relative might remember after
whom someone was named. There might have been an immediately preceding
death of a significant relative (Patricia said Yiddish name, so safe to
assume some variant of Ashkenazi naming traditions); however if the name
was not used enough or referred to enough within a family so that you
know what it was, the odds that the older and more traditional custom of
giving the exact name (either in the same language or translating it when
possible, only changing gender of the name if needed) was not followed.
Any religious education? Even for a year or so? The name would
probably have been used in the religious school and might survive on
papers or school records if the school kept records.
Look around papers >from the time of your birth. Any older relatives make
donations to JNF or other Jewish organization in your honor? Is it on
any version of your birth announcement?
Older relatives call you by any nicknames when you were little? MIght
have been variants or related to your Torah name. These are the paths
you will have to pursue.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish name at birth #general

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

To try to prevent confusion for this discussion the term "Torah" name
(what many Sephardim call their religious names) rather than the term
"Hebrew" name, which Americans usually use, because the "Hebrew" name in
this case is actually Yiddish.

Giving a child a "Torah" name to be used in Jewish contexts (depending on
the family background such name would be in Hebrew, Yiddish,
Ladino/Judezmo, or possibly one of the other handfuls of similar
languages) is far >from an "unusual practice". In fact, this would be
done a matter of course by any family for every child who takes Judaism
as a religious system seriously. Names are serious business. (Remember
Jews are Semites >from Shem, talk about HaShem, PRoverbs "A good name is
rather to be chosen than great riches" etc. etc.)

Patricia's question about how the name gets recorded is a more
complicated one. For families who go to schul or otherwise participate
in rituals the "Torah" name would be in use on a regular basis so people
would know. For a family that gave such a name but did not go on to use
it regularly there are different places to look.

For a boy it is easier. (And by the way in observant families no one
would be told the actual name until it is announced at the circumcision.
Some observant families now take this approach for girls as well.) Most
mohelim/mohelot (ritual circumcisers) give the family certificates and
also keep registers of all circumcisions done.

For a girl the record may not have been kept. Some families wrote names
in endpapers of family Bibles so check older family books. If the girl
was named in schul, a handful of schuls keep track (although those
records may be hard to find). An older relative might remember after
whom someone was named. There might have been an immediately preceding
death of a significant relative (Patricia said Yiddish name, so safe to
assume some variant of Ashkenazi naming traditions); however if the name
was not used enough or referred to enough within a family so that you
know what it was, the odds that the older and more traditional custom of
giving the exact name (either in the same language or translating it when
possible, only changing gender of the name if needed) was not followed.
Any religious education? Even for a year or so? The name would
probably have been used in the religious school and might survive on
papers or school records if the school kept records.
Look around papers >from the time of your birth. Any older relatives make
donations to JNF or other Jewish organization in your honor? Is it on
any version of your birth announcement?
Older relatives call you by any nicknames when you were little? MIght
have been variants or related to your Torah name. These are the paths
you will have to pursue.


Name De PAZ #general

Micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

The name DE PAZ France became also PAEZ and PAZ and DEPAS.
Found in 1808 in the list of fixation of names of Bordeaux.
They are mentionned in "Les Juifs de Bordeaux" published by GenAmi.

Micheline GUTMANN, GenAmi, Paris, France
http://www.chez.com/genami


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name De PAZ #general

Micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

The name DE PAZ France became also PAEZ and PAZ and DEPAS.
Found in 1808 in the list of fixation of names of Bordeaux.
They are mentionned in "Les Juifs de Bordeaux" published by GenAmi.

Micheline GUTMANN, GenAmi, Paris, France
http://www.chez.com/genami


Today I thank G-d once qagain. Birth certificate of a daughter- of Munkacs, 1891. #hungary

Dennis Baer <dbaer@...>
 

Hello

To those reading this list and to those who have ancestors who lived in
Munkacs, Hungary >from Birth I say to each of you and G-d that a birth record
of a daughter of our Jewish ancestors >from Munkacs, Hungary has gotten found
and validated and proved to the best of our ability in terms of retrieveing
the birth certificate transcript of Esther Schantz born in 1891 in Munkacs,
Hungary.

I received the birth certificate today by registered mail >from the Ukrainian
Embassy in New York City. Thanks go to Bohdan Yaremenko at the Ukrainian
Embassy in New York City.

Thanks go to Louis Schonfeld, Betty Rosen, Rabbi Marmorstein,
Linda Cohen, Rhoda Miller, Jordan Auslander George Eotvos and the Munkacs
research group for encouragement and advice.

I have made several copies of the certificate, written in Ukrainian. I will
send a copy to get translated into English and then both the Ukrainian and
English texts will get scanned as jpg files and I will soon mention and ask
anyone who wants a copy to send me email and I will email a copy of such
English and Ukrainian Texts of the birth certificate of Esther Schantz.


Dennis Baer


Hungary SIG #Hungary Today I thank G-d once qagain. Birth certificate of a daughter- of Munkacs, 1891. #hungary

Dennis Baer <dbaer@...>
 

Hello

To those reading this list and to those who have ancestors who lived in
Munkacs, Hungary >from Birth I say to each of you and G-d that a birth record
of a daughter of our Jewish ancestors >from Munkacs, Hungary has gotten found
and validated and proved to the best of our ability in terms of retrieveing
the birth certificate transcript of Esther Schantz born in 1891 in Munkacs,
Hungary.

I received the birth certificate today by registered mail >from the Ukrainian
Embassy in New York City. Thanks go to Bohdan Yaremenko at the Ukrainian
Embassy in New York City.

Thanks go to Louis Schonfeld, Betty Rosen, Rabbi Marmorstein,
Linda Cohen, Rhoda Miller, Jordan Auslander George Eotvos and the Munkacs
research group for encouragement and advice.

I have made several copies of the certificate, written in Ukrainian. I will
send a copy to get translated into English and then both the Ukrainian and
English texts will get scanned as jpg files and I will soon mention and ask
anyone who wants a copy to send me email and I will email a copy of such
English and Ukrainian Texts of the birth certificate of Esther Schantz.


Dennis Baer


Rechitsa- a book about #belarus

Yackov & Lena Berkun <berkun@...>
 

A list of names >from "HaHeder  haMetukan be Rechitsa" by M.Ts.Frank
( >from "HeAvar"), which I found in National library, Hebrew University,
Jerusalem

Teachers in the "heder" : ROBINSON, LEPITSKY Mendel, SOSNOVSKY Baruch,
SKLYAR,  VILENSKY, LEIBOVITCH.
Students and other mentioned : FUKOVSKY son of butcher, HOROVITS
Peisach-Leib, KUM Bentsion b. Avraham the carpenter, KUM Yackov and
Yehuda, POROTSKY Yosef b. Baruch, RAICHENSHTEIN Moshe,
RAICHENSHTEIN Tsfaniya. RAPPOPORT Zyama, ZAYLITCHONOK Riva
SHNEYERSON Pinhas b. Moshe b.Shalom-Ber (rabbi),

Berkun Yackov,
Jerusalem

researching: KATSENELSON >from Rechitsa,
             SHEICHET and GETS >from Mozyr


Belarus SIG #Belarus Rechitsa- a book about #belarus

Yackov & Lena Berkun <berkun@...>
 

A list of names >from "HaHeder  haMetukan be Rechitsa" by M.Ts.Frank
( >from "HeAvar"), which I found in National library, Hebrew University,
Jerusalem

Teachers in the "heder" : ROBINSON, LEPITSKY Mendel, SOSNOVSKY Baruch,
SKLYAR,  VILENSKY, LEIBOVITCH.
Students and other mentioned : FUKOVSKY son of butcher, HOROVITS
Peisach-Leib, KUM Bentsion b. Avraham the carpenter, KUM Yackov and
Yehuda, POROTSKY Yosef b. Baruch, RAICHENSHTEIN Moshe,
RAICHENSHTEIN Tsfaniya. RAPPOPORT Zyama, ZAYLITCHONOK Riva
SHNEYERSON Pinhas b. Moshe b.Shalom-Ber (rabbi),

Berkun Yackov,
Jerusalem

researching: KATSENELSON >from Rechitsa,
             SHEICHET and GETS >from Mozyr


Re: Yiddish Name #general

Judith27
 

Patricia Adama < pla@sover.net> asked:
When I was born I was given an American name (that on my birth
certificate)and a Yiddish name, after a dead relative, as was my sister
and other members of my family. I do not think this was an unusual
practice, but my question is would this Yiddish name ever have been
written on a document, and if so where would such a document be recorded,
if it was?
The only places that readily spring to my mind where a Hebrew or iddish
name might have been "officially" recorded at the time of birth in America
would be in a family Bible or in a naming certificate a rabbi might have
given the family. Possibly, for a boy, the mohel who did the circumcision
might have kept a record book of his own, with the full Hebrew names given.
I remember that when I was a little girl my father used to have pre-
printed naming certificates ~pink for girls and blue for boys ~ that he would
fill out and give to the parents so they would have a record of the Hebrew
name they had chosen for their new baby.
Other than these, a baby's Hebrew or Yiddish name would probably not
routinely be recorded or written down. I think the knowledge of one's
Hebrew/Yiddish religious name given shortly after one's birth would usually be
more a matter of oral family transmission and usage.
I do have, though, one personal genealogical story or discovery that
touches on this area of the recording of a new baby's Hebrew/Yiddish names....
Amongst my father's voluminous files, I found my mother's mother's
Ketubah. It was printed on an old brown type paper, and looked like it was
folded in half. I went to unfold the back part, thinking I could cut the
excess off, and get the Ketubah ready for framing. Well!! To my surprise
and delight, on the back of the "extra" half of what was his daughter's
Ketubah, my great-grandfather had apparently recorded in Hebrew the names
given to his first two grandsons, along with the date and place of birth,
plus the parsha for that
So, now I have both sides ~ the Ketubah side recording the marriage of
Yakov Shalom ben Moshe Mordechai to Bryna bas Yosef HaLevi as well as the
side recording in the handwriting of my gg Joseph A. Balinky the birth of
his first two Surnamer grandsons ~ framed and hanging in a place of honor.

Shalom,
Judith Shulamith Langer-Surnamer Caplan <Judith27@aol.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Yiddish Name #general

Judith27
 

Patricia Adama < pla@sover.net> asked:
When I was born I was given an American name (that on my birth
certificate)and a Yiddish name, after a dead relative, as was my sister
and other members of my family. I do not think this was an unusual
practice, but my question is would this Yiddish name ever have been
written on a document, and if so where would such a document be recorded,
if it was?
The only places that readily spring to my mind where a Hebrew or iddish
name might have been "officially" recorded at the time of birth in America
would be in a family Bible or in a naming certificate a rabbi might have
given the family. Possibly, for a boy, the mohel who did the circumcision
might have kept a record book of his own, with the full Hebrew names given.
I remember that when I was a little girl my father used to have pre-
printed naming certificates ~pink for girls and blue for boys ~ that he would
fill out and give to the parents so they would have a record of the Hebrew
name they had chosen for their new baby.
Other than these, a baby's Hebrew or Yiddish name would probably not
routinely be recorded or written down. I think the knowledge of one's
Hebrew/Yiddish religious name given shortly after one's birth would usually be
more a matter of oral family transmission and usage.
I do have, though, one personal genealogical story or discovery that
touches on this area of the recording of a new baby's Hebrew/Yiddish names....
Amongst my father's voluminous files, I found my mother's mother's
Ketubah. It was printed on an old brown type paper, and looked like it was
folded in half. I went to unfold the back part, thinking I could cut the
excess off, and get the Ketubah ready for framing. Well!! To my surprise
and delight, on the back of the "extra" half of what was his daughter's
Ketubah, my great-grandfather had apparently recorded in Hebrew the names
given to his first two grandsons, along with the date and place of birth,
plus the parsha for that
So, now I have both sides ~ the Ketubah side recording the marriage of
Yakov Shalom ben Moshe Mordechai to Bryna bas Yosef HaLevi as well as the
side recording in the handwriting of my gg Joseph A. Balinky the birth of
his first two Surnamer grandsons ~ framed and hanging in a place of honor.

Shalom,
Judith Shulamith Langer-Surnamer Caplan <Judith27@aol.com>