Date   

Thank you #general

Linda Saegert <lsaegert@...>
 

Thanks to all who wrote to help me with the name SAYFET. I will try
every suggestion
Thank you,
Linda
Linda Saegert New York lsaegert@erols.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thank you #general

Linda Saegert <lsaegert@...>
 

Thanks to all who wrote to help me with the name SAYFET. I will try
every suggestion
Thank you,
Linda
Linda Saegert New York lsaegert@erols.com


Name that sounds like SAYFET #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-12-14 07:17:28 EST, pzavon@worldnet.att.net writes
(in suggesting alternative names:

<< SHEJFET and variants (Beider uses a "J" where American forms would use
an "I" in many cases, so think of this as SHEIFOT) It is derived from
"shoyhet", the Hebrew word for a ritual slaughterer, according to Beider.>>

==I don't know about Beider. The only way shoyhet can be called shejfet is
if it's written in Spanish (j = ch). Was Beider Spanish? I suggest a much
simpler derivation: "shoyfet" in Yiddish (sheyfet in Livak pronounciation)
derives >from the Hebrew Shofet wich means judge--but, I admit, I've never
come across Shofet or its variants among Jewish surnames.

As for the use of using ShtettelSeeker, I want to defend its use in
searching for names. Sure, it can in no way be relied on for any
indication of a family's name or origin, but it can often lead in the right
direction. Mintz brings up Mainz, Halpern brings up Heilbronn--which are
both the correct origins of these two family names. True, Drefyus brings up
Drebs but not the correct Treves--understandably, because the town is now
called Trier. And Shapiro did not bring up the correct location source, Speyer

This is the way I use it: I enter the family name in ShtettelSeeker
(lopping off the -er suffix where appropriate. I then look at the town
name and its location to see if it's plausible. Then I check through the
most likely locations, seeking towns within 30 miles distance. Sometimes i
say Ah! because I recognize a town or village >from family history, or I
come across a family name that married into my family name: do I have any
ancestors >from that town? Could the i-married person's family have come
from that town . . .
It's a great way of opening up to possibilities and speculations . . . but
that's all. It does still require you to check out all details, to use
references etc . . . . but it often gets you into the ballpark.

As example, Sayfet in ShtettelSeeker brings up towns like Zavet in
Bulgaria, Scheft in Czech Rep., Zavod in Hungary, Shepit and Zavadi in
Ukraine . . . If any of these names stirrs a faint memory of place or name,
or reminds you that one of your ancestors comes >from that country . . . .
you have a possible starting point. You might even remmber suddenly that
you have a third cousin named Zaved, or a Schefter . . . it might give you
a clue as to how your ancestral name was written.

No guarantees . . . but a useful hint that may open wider horizons. In my
own family, I've found places like Konigshof, Kaltenbach, Nusshof,
Heidelberg by taking names in the family and follwong up this method. It
doesn't tell me where this particular ancestor came from, but it suggests
where that family may have lived at one time and suggests geographic
resouces I could search further.

Never ignore any clues . . . and never rely on anything implicitly, not
even written records!

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Name that sounds like SAYFET #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-12-14 07:17:28 EST, pzavon@worldnet.att.net writes
(in suggesting alternative names:

<< SHEJFET and variants (Beider uses a "J" where American forms would use
an "I" in many cases, so think of this as SHEIFOT) It is derived from
"shoyhet", the Hebrew word for a ritual slaughterer, according to Beider.>>

==I don't know about Beider. The only way shoyhet can be called shejfet is
if it's written in Spanish (j = ch). Was Beider Spanish? I suggest a much
simpler derivation: "shoyfet" in Yiddish (sheyfet in Livak pronounciation)
derives >from the Hebrew Shofet wich means judge--but, I admit, I've never
come across Shofet or its variants among Jewish surnames.

As for the use of using ShtettelSeeker, I want to defend its use in
searching for names. Sure, it can in no way be relied on for any
indication of a family's name or origin, but it can often lead in the right
direction. Mintz brings up Mainz, Halpern brings up Heilbronn--which are
both the correct origins of these two family names. True, Drefyus brings up
Drebs but not the correct Treves--understandably, because the town is now
called Trier. And Shapiro did not bring up the correct location source, Speyer

This is the way I use it: I enter the family name in ShtettelSeeker
(lopping off the -er suffix where appropriate. I then look at the town
name and its location to see if it's plausible. Then I check through the
most likely locations, seeking towns within 30 miles distance. Sometimes i
say Ah! because I recognize a town or village >from family history, or I
come across a family name that married into my family name: do I have any
ancestors >from that town? Could the i-married person's family have come
from that town . . .
It's a great way of opening up to possibilities and speculations . . . but
that's all. It does still require you to check out all details, to use
references etc . . . . but it often gets you into the ballpark.

As example, Sayfet in ShtettelSeeker brings up towns like Zavet in
Bulgaria, Scheft in Czech Rep., Zavod in Hungary, Shepit and Zavadi in
Ukraine . . . If any of these names stirrs a faint memory of place or name,
or reminds you that one of your ancestors comes >from that country . . . .
you have a possible starting point. You might even remmber suddenly that
you have a third cousin named Zaved, or a Schefter . . . it might give you
a clue as to how your ancestral name was written.

No guarantees . . . but a useful hint that may open wider horizons. In my
own family, I've found places like Konigshof, Kaltenbach, Nusshof,
Heidelberg by taking names in the family and follwong up this method. It
doesn't tell me where this particular ancestor came from, but it suggests
where that family may have lived at one time and suggests geographic
resouces I could search further.

Never ignore any clues . . . and never rely on anything implicitly, not
even written records!

Michael Bernet, New York


more on Hamburg Passenger Lists #general

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

A newly discovered URL (at least for me <grin>) provides additional sources
of information over and above the well known Direct and Indirect Lists
which can be a horror to slog through.

http://www.genealogy.net/gene/www/emig/ham_pass.html

Among some of the new material listed:

"Modern.
1) A 15-year index, covering the Direct Lists for 1856-1871, was
compiled on typed cards by LDS volunteers in 1969. It is easy to use, but
incomplete.

2) The late Hamburg genealogist Karl Werner Klueber compiled a card
index to the Direct Lists for 1850-1870, and to the Indirect Lists for
1850-1867. The Family History Library does not have a microfilm
copy of this index, which is deposited in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg,
ABC-Strasse 19, D-20354 Hamburg, which will search this index for a fee.

Additional records in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg, but not available on
microfilm through the Family History Library, include 3 volumes listing the
ships that sailed >from Hamburg carrying emigrants, 1850-1914; 2 volumes
listing people going overseas on merchant (as distinct >from emigration)
vessels, 1871-1887; lists of returning Jewish emigrants, 1905-1907; and
lists of prospective emigrants denied emigration due to disease or other
causes. "

The site also has a section listing the FHL film numbers on which you will
find the actual passenger manifests.

Carol Skydell
Laguna Hills, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen more on Hamburg Passenger Lists #general

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

A newly discovered URL (at least for me <grin>) provides additional sources
of information over and above the well known Direct and Indirect Lists
which can be a horror to slog through.

http://www.genealogy.net/gene/www/emig/ham_pass.html

Among some of the new material listed:

"Modern.
1) A 15-year index, covering the Direct Lists for 1856-1871, was
compiled on typed cards by LDS volunteers in 1969. It is easy to use, but
incomplete.

2) The late Hamburg genealogist Karl Werner Klueber compiled a card
index to the Direct Lists for 1850-1870, and to the Indirect Lists for
1850-1867. The Family History Library does not have a microfilm
copy of this index, which is deposited in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg,
ABC-Strasse 19, D-20354 Hamburg, which will search this index for a fee.

Additional records in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg, but not available on
microfilm through the Family History Library, include 3 volumes listing the
ships that sailed >from Hamburg carrying emigrants, 1850-1914; 2 volumes
listing people going overseas on merchant (as distinct >from emigration)
vessels, 1871-1887; lists of returning Jewish emigrants, 1905-1907; and
lists of prospective emigrants denied emigration due to disease or other
causes. "

The site also has a section listing the FHL film numbers on which you will
find the actual passenger manifests.

Carol Skydell
Laguna Hills, CA


Genealogy and Genograms #general

David Ziants <davidz@...>
 

Barbara Krasner-Khait <bkhait@aol.com> >from Somerset, NJ wrote:
If anyone has had any experience with using genograms, please
e-mail me privately.
Assuming that a *genogram* is a genealogy related term, please could you
tell me briefly what this means, as I have something to learn here.

No doubt, there are others who also don't know the word.

Wishing everyone a happy Chanuka.
--
David Ziants <davidz@netmedia.net.il>
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy and Genograms #general

David Ziants <davidz@...>
 

Barbara Krasner-Khait <bkhait@aol.com> >from Somerset, NJ wrote:
If anyone has had any experience with using genograms, please
e-mail me privately.
Assuming that a *genogram* is a genealogy related term, please could you
tell me briefly what this means, as I have something to learn here.

No doubt, there are others who also don't know the word.

Wishing everyone a happy Chanuka.
--
David Ziants <davidz@netmedia.net.il>
Ma'aleh Adumim, Israel


Updating your JGFF entry #general

james gross <larklane@...>
 

Hello,
With all the recent surname posts, I want to remind
everyone that the JGFF area is where researchers are
supposed to, or at least encouraged, to place the
surnames they are working on. I personally know of a
few people that aren't using this feature of Jewishgen.
Based on my personal experience, I have found this
feature of Jewishgen to be very useful. Listing your
surnames in the JGFF allows others to find you.
Whether it is laziness or bashfulness, not listing your
names prevents people >from finding you. So, add your
names today.

James H. Gross
Cherry Hill, N.J.
e-mail: larklane@juno.com
Gross-Steinberg Family Tree
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/6721/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Updating your JGFF entry #general

james gross <larklane@...>
 

Hello,
With all the recent surname posts, I want to remind
everyone that the JGFF area is where researchers are
supposed to, or at least encouraged, to place the
surnames they are working on. I personally know of a
few people that aren't using this feature of Jewishgen.
Based on my personal experience, I have found this
feature of Jewishgen to be very useful. Listing your
surnames in the JGFF allows others to find you.
Whether it is laziness or bashfulness, not listing your
names prevents people >from finding you. So, add your
names today.

James H. Gross
Cherry Hill, N.J.
e-mail: larklane@juno.com
Gross-Steinberg Family Tree
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/6721/


Origin of Yiddish Nickname "Nuchem" or "Nachim" #general

Michael Rothenberg <mikeroth@...>
 

Hi,

I'd like to learn the name (or names?) that the Yiddish nicknames "Nuchem"
or "Nachim" derive from. I've been told that one name is Nathan. Is this
correct? Could Menachem also be the origin of one of those nicknames?
What about Nechemiah? Or?

If you know, could you also note which nickname corresponds to which
Hebrew name? This is regard to ancestors in my STOCKHAMER family, which
came >from what was Rawa Ruska, Galicia (Austro-Hangarian Empire), then
Poland, and now called Rava Russkaya, Ukraine. It is about 20 miles west
of Lvov.

Thanks,

Mike Rothenberg

MODERATOR NOTE: As has been stated many times in this Discussion Group,
there is no firm correspondence between secular and ritual names, even when
the ritual name has a common translation into the vernacular. See the
JewishGen InfoFiles "Jewish Given Names" and "Names of the Jews", which can
be found on the InfoFiles index page at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/#Names>,
for more information. Those with specific information for Mike Rothenberg
please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Origin of Yiddish Nickname "Nuchem" or "Nachim" #general

Michael Rothenberg <mikeroth@...>
 

Hi,

I'd like to learn the name (or names?) that the Yiddish nicknames "Nuchem"
or "Nachim" derive from. I've been told that one name is Nathan. Is this
correct? Could Menachem also be the origin of one of those nicknames?
What about Nechemiah? Or?

If you know, could you also note which nickname corresponds to which
Hebrew name? This is regard to ancestors in my STOCKHAMER family, which
came >from what was Rawa Ruska, Galicia (Austro-Hangarian Empire), then
Poland, and now called Rava Russkaya, Ukraine. It is about 20 miles west
of Lvov.

Thanks,

Mike Rothenberg

MODERATOR NOTE: As has been stated many times in this Discussion Group,
there is no firm correspondence between secular and ritual names, even when
the ritual name has a common translation into the vernacular. See the
JewishGen InfoFiles "Jewish Given Names" and "Names of the Jews", which can
be found on the InfoFiles index page at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/#Names>,
for more information. Those with specific information for Mike Rothenberg
please reply privately.


Re: Shkelki #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear subscribers to the JRI-Poland list...

Please do not post private messages to the JRI-Poland list.
That happens when you hit the "reply" button instead of cutting and
pasting the sender's address the "to" box.

Stanley Diamond
Coordinator, Jewish Records indexing - Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Fwd: Re: Shkelki #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear subscribers to the JRI-Poland list...

Please do not post private messages to the JRI-Poland list.
That happens when you hit the "reply" button instead of cutting and
pasting the sender's address the "to" box.

Stanley Diamond
Coordinator, Jewish Records indexing - Poland


Re: [LDS microfilm #poland

ileana payne <ileanap@...>
 

Hi all,

I was wondering if anyone who has used the records filmed by LDS could give me a few pointers on how to figure out exactly what I am looking at to help me find the record I need. Since I do not speak Polish I am having great difficulty deciphering the microfilm! I am looking at the records for Suwalki, Poland, 1878 - birth, marriage, & death. The particular record I am looking for is the marriage of my great grandparents, Chaim GREMZFIANSKI and Michla Michalina WILEMBERG. If anyone could give me a few hints as to words or phrases in polish I could look for to narrow down which is the record of their marriage. I guess I just did not expect the microfilm to be in paragraph form. If anyone knows what those surnames would look like in Polish, that would be a great help as well.
thanks in advance!

Ileana Payne =


JRI Poland #Poland Re: [LDS microfilm #poland

ileana payne <ileanap@...>
 

Hi all,

I was wondering if anyone who has used the records filmed by LDS could give me a few pointers on how to figure out exactly what I am looking at to help me find the record I need. Since I do not speak Polish I am having great difficulty deciphering the microfilm! I am looking at the records for Suwalki, Poland, 1878 - birth, marriage, & death. The particular record I am looking for is the marriage of my great grandparents, Chaim GREMZFIANSKI and Michla Michalina WILEMBERG. If anyone could give me a few hints as to words or phrases in polish I could look for to narrow down which is the record of their marriage. I guess I just did not expect the microfilm to be in paragraph form. If anyone knows what those surnames would look like in Polish, that would be a great help as well.
thanks in advance!

Ileana Payne =


HNOH Welcome/Jewish Orphanages Update #general

MSpearssol@...
 

Over 35 new URL links have been added to the Jewish Genealogy Page and
Other Resources Page for your "Researching Pleasure". Now totaling over
500 links to thousands of sites on the Internet, they may all be found on
my website HNOH Welcome/Jewish Orphanages in the US at

http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh

Also new information has been added and updated on the following Pages:
Census Information, JCCA and Jewish Orphanages in the US.

Marge Spears-Soloff
Orlando, FL
MSpearssol@aol.com

For website mail:
HNOHalumni@aol.com
http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HNOH Welcome/Jewish Orphanages Update #general

MSpearssol@...
 

Over 35 new URL links have been added to the Jewish Genealogy Page and
Other Resources Page for your "Researching Pleasure". Now totaling over
500 links to thousands of sites on the Internet, they may all be found on
my website HNOH Welcome/Jewish Orphanages in the US at

http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh

Also new information has been added and updated on the following Pages:
Census Information, JCCA and Jewish Orphanages in the US.

Marge Spears-Soloff
Orlando, FL
MSpearssol@aol.com

For website mail:
HNOHalumni@aol.com
http://www.scruz.net/~elias/hnoh


1999 Conference on Jewish Genealogy - Request for Program Proposals #general

JCYMBLER@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of New York invites interested genealogists
to submit proposals for lectures at the 19th Annual Conference on Jewish
Genealogy to be held >from August 8 - 13, 1999 at the Marriot Marquis Hotel
in New York City. While we are contacting potential speakers and have
received confirmations for more than two thirds of the program, we would
welcome additional program offerings >from the rest of the genealogical
community. Many of you have experience and knowledge that would be of great
interest to others and make for an interesting lecture presentation. If
you are interested in presenting a lecture at the conference, please submit
the following information.

-- A brief description of the proposed program, not to exceed one page in
length.

-- A biographical description, including your professional work and
genealogical experience.

-- A list of any genealogical lectures that you have given, specifying the
society.

A tentative list of some of the lectures that we have already planned may
be found at our website: <http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf>.

We will accept program proposals until December 31, 1998. Program
proposals will be evaluated by the conference programming committee, and
acceptances will be based upon the relevance of the topic, whether the
topic is already covered by confirmed speakers and the proposed speaker's
experience.

We look forward to reading your program proposals and hope to see all of
you at the next summer conference.

Please send your proposals to:

Jeffrey Cymbler at <jcymbler@aol.com>

or by snail mail to:

Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc.
600 West End Ave., Suite 10F
New York, NY 10024


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1999 Conference on Jewish Genealogy - Request for Program Proposals #general

JCYMBLER@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of New York invites interested genealogists
to submit proposals for lectures at the 19th Annual Conference on Jewish
Genealogy to be held >from August 8 - 13, 1999 at the Marriot Marquis Hotel
in New York City. While we are contacting potential speakers and have
received confirmations for more than two thirds of the program, we would
welcome additional program offerings >from the rest of the genealogical
community. Many of you have experience and knowledge that would be of great
interest to others and make for an interesting lecture presentation. If
you are interested in presenting a lecture at the conference, please submit
the following information.

-- A brief description of the proposed program, not to exceed one page in
length.

-- A biographical description, including your professional work and
genealogical experience.

-- A list of any genealogical lectures that you have given, specifying the
society.

A tentative list of some of the lectures that we have already planned may
be found at our website: <http://members.aol.com/nyc99conf>.

We will accept program proposals until December 31, 1998. Program
proposals will be evaluated by the conference programming committee, and
acceptances will be based upon the relevance of the topic, whether the
topic is already covered by confirmed speakers and the proposed speaker's
experience.

We look forward to reading your program proposals and hope to see all of
you at the next summer conference.

Please send your proposals to:

Jeffrey Cymbler at <jcymbler@aol.com>

or by snail mail to:

Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc.
600 West End Ave., Suite 10F
New York, NY 10024