Date   

Re: Help Needed on Yiskor Book #general

Werner S. Hirsch <whirsch@...>
 

On Wed, 09 Sep 1998, Carole Feinberg <feincgs@...> said:

I, too, am translating part of a yiskor book and need help with a few
Yiddish words, abbreviations, titles.
1. alef, yud, nun, zayin, shin
Could possibly be the English word "inch."

2. pey, alef, resh, yud, zayin

Looks like "Paris."

3. dalet, gimel, nun, yud

This would be the Hebrew word for "my grain," but I don't think that that's
what is meant here.

4. Is pey/fey, resh, vav, yud the abbreviation for Professor?

I would expect the abbreviation for professor to be: pey, resh, alef, fey.
This seems to be the word "froi," i.e. woman.

Because Yiddish usage varies, often depending on where the speaker or writer
came from, or where they live now, it helps greatly to see the words in
context. Especially with a word like No. 1, above, which looks a lot like
it might have a Slavic root. Also, when translating written material, there
is always a possibility of typographical errors or misspellings.

Sincerely,

Werner

Werner Hirsch
Curator, JHS of Gr. New Haven (CT)
JHS Homepage: http://pages.cthome.net/hirsch/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help Needed on Yiskor Book #general

Werner S. Hirsch <whirsch@...>
 

On Wed, 09 Sep 1998, Carole Feinberg <feincgs@...> said:

I, too, am translating part of a yiskor book and need help with a few
Yiddish words, abbreviations, titles.
1. alef, yud, nun, zayin, shin
Could possibly be the English word "inch."

2. pey, alef, resh, yud, zayin

Looks like "Paris."

3. dalet, gimel, nun, yud

This would be the Hebrew word for "my grain," but I don't think that that's
what is meant here.

4. Is pey/fey, resh, vav, yud the abbreviation for Professor?

I would expect the abbreviation for professor to be: pey, resh, alef, fey.
This seems to be the word "froi," i.e. woman.

Because Yiddish usage varies, often depending on where the speaker or writer
came from, or where they live now, it helps greatly to see the words in
context. Especially with a word like No. 1, above, which looks a lot like
it might have a Slavic root. Also, when translating written material, there
is always a possibility of typographical errors or misspellings.

Sincerely,

Werner

Werner Hirsch
Curator, JHS of Gr. New Haven (CT)
JHS Homepage: http://pages.cthome.net/hirsch/


Not all names are nonsense #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-09-09 22:27:53 EDT, yairharu@... (Haim
Harutz) writes:

<< Mr David Snyder, I thank you very much for your posting on Jewish names and
their "origins". I can only hope that this has some beneficial effect on
people who post queries (sometimes previously frequently answered) on the
"meanings" of names in other languages.>>

==I agree, but not quite 100%
==Questions such as "What is this English name in Hebrew?" and "What is this
Hebrew name in English?" cannot be answered when we refer to first name. But
even there it is useful when it can give us the possible alternate names that
a person has been referred to. As an example, somone may have been givent the
Hrebrew name Yehuda, registered with the authorities as Leonid, gone by the
kinnuy Leib, and anglicised the name later to Leo. All are variations on
Yehuda and its kinnuy. Now we can understand that we're dealing with one
person, not one ancestor and three hitherto unknown brothers.

==It is very useful, too, to explore family names. Often it will be a clue in
which past of Europe to seek for the earliest ancestors (but they probably
won't have that name in the town of origin--a Jew has no reason to be called
Konigshofer when he lives in Konigshof or Konigshofen--but when he moves to
another town, that's when that surname sticks to him). Some surnames take us
back to early kinnuyim, perhaps even many generations. Occasionally they are
clues to profession (Schatz, Schaub) or descent (Kagan, Segal, Lewitsky).

==Please, no more "what is the Jewish name for my ancestor Richard?" (or
Timothy or Marmaduke)--but it's OK to ask "How likely is it that Yehuda Leib
Cohen and Leo Cohen are the same person?"

Just so long as you don't expect perfect answers.

Michael Bernet

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg, (Bavaria)
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth (S. Germany)
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF, Sali & Rachel, Rotterdam, murdered by Dr. Petiot, Paris ca 1942
WEIL[L], Albert, Fr. hon. consul in Nurnberg; returned to France 1936/7.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Not all names are nonsense #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-09-09 22:27:53 EDT, yairharu@... (Haim
Harutz) writes:

<< Mr David Snyder, I thank you very much for your posting on Jewish names and
their "origins". I can only hope that this has some beneficial effect on
people who post queries (sometimes previously frequently answered) on the
"meanings" of names in other languages.>>

==I agree, but not quite 100%
==Questions such as "What is this English name in Hebrew?" and "What is this
Hebrew name in English?" cannot be answered when we refer to first name. But
even there it is useful when it can give us the possible alternate names that
a person has been referred to. As an example, somone may have been givent the
Hrebrew name Yehuda, registered with the authorities as Leonid, gone by the
kinnuy Leib, and anglicised the name later to Leo. All are variations on
Yehuda and its kinnuy. Now we can understand that we're dealing with one
person, not one ancestor and three hitherto unknown brothers.

==It is very useful, too, to explore family names. Often it will be a clue in
which past of Europe to seek for the earliest ancestors (but they probably
won't have that name in the town of origin--a Jew has no reason to be called
Konigshofer when he lives in Konigshof or Konigshofen--but when he moves to
another town, that's when that surname sticks to him). Some surnames take us
back to early kinnuyim, perhaps even many generations. Occasionally they are
clues to profession (Schatz, Schaub) or descent (Kagan, Segal, Lewitsky).

==Please, no more "what is the Jewish name for my ancestor Richard?" (or
Timothy or Marmaduke)--but it's OK to ask "How likely is it that Yehuda Leib
Cohen and Leo Cohen are the same person?"

Just so long as you don't expect perfect answers.

Michael Bernet

seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg, (Bavaria)
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth (S. Germany)
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF, Sali & Rachel, Rotterdam, murdered by Dr. Petiot, Paris ca 1942
WEIL[L], Albert, Fr. hon. consul in Nurnberg; returned to France 1936/7.


GenAmi issue number 5 #general

micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

For all the Jewishgenners who have not received or who have not seen
GenAmi number 5 (summer 1998) at Los angeles Seminar, you may consult
the Website .
Some extracts, questions, list of publications, may be seen if you look
at: http://www.sgip.fr/rdegroot/genami

The list of our library may be downloaded.

Micheline GUTMANN
MichelineGUTMANN@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GenAmi issue number 5 #general

micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

For all the Jewishgenners who have not received or who have not seen
GenAmi number 5 (summer 1998) at Los angeles Seminar, you may consult
the Website .
Some extracts, questions, list of publications, may be seen if you look
at: http://www.sgip.fr/rdegroot/genami

The list of our library may be downloaded.

Micheline GUTMANN
MichelineGUTMANN@...


The Index of names from Brussels #general

micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

INDEX OF JEWISH FAMILY NAMES AND FAMILY SEARCH INDICATORS TO PROVIDE
QUICKER AND EASIER SEARCHES IN BRUSSELS' ARCHIVES
(compiled by Claude C. Geudevert)

This index is a genealogical tool which provides useful information for
those interested in finding their Jewish roots and their possible
connections with Belgium. It is based on available archival sources in
Brussels.
An alphabetical list of family names is provided, along with the first
location where an individual or family is known or proved to have lived
prior to coming to Brussels. Though not all of Belgium's Jews passed
through Brussels, an important number of Jewish families lived, at least
for some period of time, in the present European capital. Brussels served
as one of the central locations for the great internal Jewish migrations in
Belgium.

Using this index as a guide, and sources identified within this index, we
see that a great many Jews of Eastern European decent, heading for America
between the two World Wars, ended up staying in Brussels and maintaining
their bases in Europe. The index clearly shows that the major Sephardic
group in Brussels didn't make it there until the immigration waves of the
1920's!


This index is one of a series of helpful publications available >from GenAmi
/Micheline Gutmann at a nominal charge. Additional information on specific
families or family names, as well as the actual historic locations and the
modern names of numerous villages and cities of Brussels' Jewish immigrants
and emigrants, are accessible at GenAmi and can be obtained by membership
in GenAmi and/or through numerous publications of the society.


R.S. CCOURTNEY and Claude GEUDEVERT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Index of names from Brussels #general

micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

INDEX OF JEWISH FAMILY NAMES AND FAMILY SEARCH INDICATORS TO PROVIDE
QUICKER AND EASIER SEARCHES IN BRUSSELS' ARCHIVES
(compiled by Claude C. Geudevert)

This index is a genealogical tool which provides useful information for
those interested in finding their Jewish roots and their possible
connections with Belgium. It is based on available archival sources in
Brussels.
An alphabetical list of family names is provided, along with the first
location where an individual or family is known or proved to have lived
prior to coming to Brussels. Though not all of Belgium's Jews passed
through Brussels, an important number of Jewish families lived, at least
for some period of time, in the present European capital. Brussels served
as one of the central locations for the great internal Jewish migrations in
Belgium.

Using this index as a guide, and sources identified within this index, we
see that a great many Jews of Eastern European decent, heading for America
between the two World Wars, ended up staying in Brussels and maintaining
their bases in Europe. The index clearly shows that the major Sephardic
group in Brussels didn't make it there until the immigration waves of the
1920's!


This index is one of a series of helpful publications available >from GenAmi
/Micheline Gutmann at a nominal charge. Additional information on specific
families or family names, as well as the actual historic locations and the
modern names of numerous villages and cities of Brussels' Jewish immigrants
and emigrants, are accessible at GenAmi and can be obtained by membership
in GenAmi and/or through numerous publications of the society.


R.S. CCOURTNEY and Claude GEUDEVERT


** A New Important Source For Jewish Genealogy ** #general

micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

A very important source for Jewish genealogy comes >from Claude
GEUDEVERT who had worked during 10 years compiling a lot of
information coming >from different archives of Brussels completed
by his correspondants eveywhere in France, Netherlands, Germany, ....

Claude GEUDEVERTT has written the Dictionnary of genealogy and
biography which contains about 100000 individuals >from 18th
century until WW2.

The names concerns people >from everywhere in Western or Eastern
Europe,North Africa, Greece, Turkey, even America and Oceania !
Everybody can be concerned.

The different chapters are arriving at GenAmi .

For these names, and for each letter , an index has been composed
The indexes for names beginning with A, B, C, D, E, F, I, N, O, Q,
T, U,XYZ, are already available and can be downloaded >from GenAmi
website : http://www.sgip.fr/rdegroot/genami

If you are concerned, it will often be the case, ask information to

Micheline GUTMANN
MichelineGUTMANN@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ** A New Important Source For Jewish Genealogy ** #general

micheline Gutmann <MichelineGUTMANN@...>
 

A very important source for Jewish genealogy comes >from Claude
GEUDEVERT who had worked during 10 years compiling a lot of
information coming >from different archives of Brussels completed
by his correspondants eveywhere in France, Netherlands, Germany, ....

Claude GEUDEVERTT has written the Dictionnary of genealogy and
biography which contains about 100000 individuals >from 18th
century until WW2.

The names concerns people >from everywhere in Western or Eastern
Europe,North Africa, Greece, Turkey, even America and Oceania !
Everybody can be concerned.

The different chapters are arriving at GenAmi .

For these names, and for each letter , an index has been composed
The indexes for names beginning with A, B, C, D, E, F, I, N, O, Q,
T, U,XYZ, are already available and can be downloaded >from GenAmi
website : http://www.sgip.fr/rdegroot/genami

If you are concerned, it will often be the case, ask information to

Micheline GUTMANN
MichelineGUTMANN@...


JewishGen College Re-opens!! #latvia

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Latvia Sig readers...

We are very pleased to announce the reactivation of the
JewishGen College beginning the week of Oct.5th with "Creating
a Webpage"

Our instructor Mark Heckman is a lecturer and
researcher in the computer science department
at the University of California, Davis, where he has
taught classes in web page design for computer
novices. Mark is the webmaster for several
JewishGen-hosted webpages (Sacramento JGS;
Gesher Galicia and ROM-SIG; Volhynia, Gorodenka,
and Kovel ShtetLinks pages),

Because the envisioned outcome is a coterie of trained folks who
will volunteer to create both Yizkor Book as
well as ShtetLinks pages for JewishGen, this course has certain
prerequisites:

1.) Participants must have a working familiarity with Windows or
MacIntosh, knowing how to open and close windows, how to use a
mouse, and other basic computer skills.

2.) They must also be familiar with using a word processing
program, such as Microsoft Word or WordPerfect, and be
comfortable with cutting and pasting text, with using multiple
fonts in a document, and with other word processing features.

3.) The class will use a free program, called "Netscape
Composer," to create and edit web pages. Netscape Composer is
part of the Netscape Communicator
package. You can obtain Netscape Communicator
from the following page:
< http://www.netscape.com/download/selectplatform
_1_1.html>

Be aware that Netscape Communicator is quite large
and will take a while to download.

Click on your operating system and follow the links to download
and install Communicator on your system.
The latest version is 4.06. If you already have Netscape
Communicator version 4.0 or later you do not need to download it
again.

Netscape Communicator is also widely available >from different
internet service providers, and on CD-ROM.

Netscape Composer is a type of program called an
"HTML editor." We will use Netscape Composer for
three reasons:

a.) Netscape runs on a wide variety of computers and operating
systems so probably no student will be
unable to use it;
b.) Netscape is widely used and therefore many of you
may already have it installed on your systems; and
c.) it's free.

There are many other HTML editors available, and most have very
similar user interfaces. If you have another HTML editor, you
can use that in the class but the commands will be different
from those in Composer
and you might get confused. We expect many students
in this class, so there probably won't be time to answer
questions about HTML editors other than Netscape Composer.

4.) The final prerequisite is the reason we're offering this
course. JewishGen is desperately in need of volunteers
who know how to create webpages for the Yizkor
Book and the ShtetLinks Projects. We have more
material waiting to be put online than our current
volunteers and managers can handle. Since both these projects
are extremely important to researchers, we can only turn to you,
the users of JewishGen to help us out here. We're offering this
course to provide you with
a skill that you in turn will use to help us all. With that
said, the final prerequisite is your promise that once trained,
you will volunteer to help JewishGen get more
and more material online.

So, if you feel you meet all the prerequisites for this
course, here's how to enroll:

Send an email to listserve@...
and say

subscribe webpage <firstname> <lastname>

enrollment will close on Sunday October 4th
and class will start on Monday Oct. 5th

The "lectures" will come to you just the way
messages do >from any of our mailing lists.

We expect a hefty crowd of enrollees and some
very well trained volunteers to help JewishGen
bring more and more information to us all!

Carol Skydell
JewishGen Operations


Latvia SIG #Latvia JewishGen College Re-opens!! #latvia

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Latvia Sig readers...

We are very pleased to announce the reactivation of the
JewishGen College beginning the week of Oct.5th with "Creating
a Webpage"

Our instructor Mark Heckman is a lecturer and
researcher in the computer science department
at the University of California, Davis, where he has
taught classes in web page design for computer
novices. Mark is the webmaster for several
JewishGen-hosted webpages (Sacramento JGS;
Gesher Galicia and ROM-SIG; Volhynia, Gorodenka,
and Kovel ShtetLinks pages),

Because the envisioned outcome is a coterie of trained folks who
will volunteer to create both Yizkor Book as
well as ShtetLinks pages for JewishGen, this course has certain
prerequisites:

1.) Participants must have a working familiarity with Windows or
MacIntosh, knowing how to open and close windows, how to use a
mouse, and other basic computer skills.

2.) They must also be familiar with using a word processing
program, such as Microsoft Word or WordPerfect, and be
comfortable with cutting and pasting text, with using multiple
fonts in a document, and with other word processing features.

3.) The class will use a free program, called "Netscape
Composer," to create and edit web pages. Netscape Composer is
part of the Netscape Communicator
package. You can obtain Netscape Communicator
from the following page:
< http://www.netscape.com/download/selectplatform
_1_1.html>

Be aware that Netscape Communicator is quite large
and will take a while to download.

Click on your operating system and follow the links to download
and install Communicator on your system.
The latest version is 4.06. If you already have Netscape
Communicator version 4.0 or later you do not need to download it
again.

Netscape Communicator is also widely available >from different
internet service providers, and on CD-ROM.

Netscape Composer is a type of program called an
"HTML editor." We will use Netscape Composer for
three reasons:

a.) Netscape runs on a wide variety of computers and operating
systems so probably no student will be
unable to use it;
b.) Netscape is widely used and therefore many of you
may already have it installed on your systems; and
c.) it's free.

There are many other HTML editors available, and most have very
similar user interfaces. If you have another HTML editor, you
can use that in the class but the commands will be different
from those in Composer
and you might get confused. We expect many students
in this class, so there probably won't be time to answer
questions about HTML editors other than Netscape Composer.

4.) The final prerequisite is the reason we're offering this
course. JewishGen is desperately in need of volunteers
who know how to create webpages for the Yizkor
Book and the ShtetLinks Projects. We have more
material waiting to be put online than our current
volunteers and managers can handle. Since both these projects
are extremely important to researchers, we can only turn to you,
the users of JewishGen to help us out here. We're offering this
course to provide you with
a skill that you in turn will use to help us all. With that
said, the final prerequisite is your promise that once trained,
you will volunteer to help JewishGen get more
and more material online.

So, if you feel you meet all the prerequisites for this
course, here's how to enroll:

Send an email to listserve@...
and say

subscribe webpage <firstname> <lastname>

enrollment will close on Sunday October 4th
and class will start on Monday Oct. 5th

The "lectures" will come to you just the way
messages do >from any of our mailing lists.

We expect a hefty crowd of enrollees and some
very well trained volunteers to help JewishGen
bring more and more information to us all!

Carol Skydell
JewishGen Operations


Re: How to Contact Milton Berle? #general

Jeff Bloom <jeffbloom@...>
 

On 5 Sep 1998 21:15:55 -0700, dygordon@... (Deena Yoffa Gordon)
wrote:

Dear JewishGen friends,

I have been told that Milton Berle, the comedian, performed with a 2nd
cousin, once removed of mine. I would like to contact him and ask if he
remembers her, and possibly if he knows her married name.
I have had good success with SAG, the Screen Actors Guild, and with
ASCAP. Also, with the Screenwriters group as well. You can find
these on the net by searching (web pages and phone directories), and
then give them a call.

What with all the weirdos in the world and a "stars" need for both
publicity and privacy, you cannot get direct contact information.
However, they are all absolutely delighted to provide you the name and
contact information for the agent or agency that handles your subject.
What you do then is call or write and ask if they would forward your
enclosed letter to the subject. Leave it open and suggest that they
can read it themselves to verify that it is harmless.

I have actually had three successes this way with no failures. Even
got a surprise phone call >from Betsy Palmer. (Yes, I know that dates
me, and you kids will not even have heard of her :) I received a
nice long response letter >from Alan Arkin too. For you youngsters,
that's Adam's father.

Hope this helps.

Jeff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to Contact Milton Berle? #general

Jeff Bloom <jeffbloom@...>
 

On 5 Sep 1998 21:15:55 -0700, dygordon@... (Deena Yoffa Gordon)
wrote:

Dear JewishGen friends,

I have been told that Milton Berle, the comedian, performed with a 2nd
cousin, once removed of mine. I would like to contact him and ask if he
remembers her, and possibly if he knows her married name.
I have had good success with SAG, the Screen Actors Guild, and with
ASCAP. Also, with the Screenwriters group as well. You can find
these on the net by searching (web pages and phone directories), and
then give them a call.

What with all the weirdos in the world and a "stars" need for both
publicity and privacy, you cannot get direct contact information.
However, they are all absolutely delighted to provide you the name and
contact information for the agent or agency that handles your subject.
What you do then is call or write and ask if they would forward your
enclosed letter to the subject. Leave it open and suggest that they
can read it themselves to verify that it is harmless.

I have actually had three successes this way with no failures. Even
got a surprise phone call >from Betsy Palmer. (Yes, I know that dates
me, and you kids will not even have heard of her :) I received a
nice long response letter >from Alan Arkin too. For you youngsters,
that's Adam's father.

Hope this helps.

Jeff


Re: Cause of death - old style #general

Adelle Gloger
 

On Sept. 9th Alan Perry posted the following:

I remember once seeing a website that "translated" the name of an
illness or cause of death as used today to what it was called in the
earlier part of the century. Does anybody know the address of this web
site?
GenRecords at http://www.genrecords.com

Has a list of Old Time Illnesses. It is a PDF file and you must have Adobe
Reader which can be downloaded >from the web site. There are also other things
of interest than can be downloaded.
Adelle Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio
agloger@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cause of death - old style #general

Adelle Gloger
 

On Sept. 9th Alan Perry posted the following:

I remember once seeing a website that "translated" the name of an
illness or cause of death as used today to what it was called in the
earlier part of the century. Does anybody know the address of this web
site?
GenRecords at http://www.genrecords.com

Has a list of Old Time Illnesses. It is a PDF file and you must have Adobe
Reader which can be downloaded >from the web site. There are also other things
of interest than can be downloaded.
Adelle Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio
agloger@...


Re: 1848 Tax Census from Munkacs #hungary

Dennis Baer <dbaer@...>
 

Hi Debbi

I know someone who's looking at it now.

Dennis Baer

At 10:12 AM 9/10/98 -0500, you wrote:
So, who is going to look at this film no 1529782 and see what it really
is? Perhaps a Munkacs researcher will volunteer and report??


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: 1848 Tax Census from Munkacs #hungary

Dennis Baer <dbaer@...>
 

Hi Debbi

I know someone who's looking at it now.

Dennis Baer

At 10:12 AM 9/10/98 -0500, you wrote:
So, who is going to look at this film no 1529782 and see what it really
is? Perhaps a Munkacs researcher will volunteer and report??


Question re Soundex Card Numbers #general

Lewis F. Ciener <lciener@...>
 

Hello,

Has anyone found the answer to the question posed below by Mr. Stone in
1995? I have tried to email Mr. Stone, but apparently his email address
has changed.

If you can be of help, please send your reply to lciener@....

Thank you,

Lew Ciener

Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 14:03:48 -0800
Reply-To: Jewish Genealogy Discussion Group <JEWGEN@...>
Sender: Jewish Genealogy Discussion Group <JEWGEN@...>
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
sgjewish-owner@...
From: Ray Stone <rstone@...>
Subject: Soundex Index for Passenger Lists

The Soundex index cards for passenger arrivals at New York are
printed in a number of formats. One format is especially obscure.
Here is an example:

Last Name, First Name 42m 18 39 7466

That's all the information on the card. I understand the names, and I
assume the 42 is the age, and the "m" is for male (only m and f appear
in this field). But what the heck are those other numbers?

Unfortunately, over 60 percent of the cards I encountered on the index
I was looking at were of this format.

Thanks for your help.

Ray Stone

MODERATOR NOTE: For the answer, see the JewishGen InfoFile
"How to Interpret New York Passenger Arrival Index Cards"
at http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/passndx.txt


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Question re Soundex Card Numbers #general

Lewis F. Ciener <lciener@...>
 

Hello,

Has anyone found the answer to the question posed below by Mr. Stone in
1995? I have tried to email Mr. Stone, but apparently his email address
has changed.

If you can be of help, please send your reply to lciener@....

Thank you,

Lew Ciener

Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 14:03:48 -0800
Reply-To: Jewish Genealogy Discussion Group <JEWGEN@...>
Sender: Jewish Genealogy Discussion Group <JEWGEN@...>
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
sgjewish-owner@...
From: Ray Stone <rstone@...>
Subject: Soundex Index for Passenger Lists

The Soundex index cards for passenger arrivals at New York are
printed in a number of formats. One format is especially obscure.
Here is an example:

Last Name, First Name 42m 18 39 7466

That's all the information on the card. I understand the names, and I
assume the 42 is the age, and the "m" is for male (only m and f appear
in this field). But what the heck are those other numbers?

Unfortunately, over 60 percent of the cards I encountered on the index
I was looking at were of this format.

Thanks for your help.

Ray Stone

MODERATOR NOTE: For the answer, see the JewishGen InfoFile
"How to Interpret New York Passenger Arrival Index Cards"
at http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/passndx.txt