Date   

Limanowa, Galicia #general

James Wray <wraybj@...>
 

<< maybe someone can help me with locating
Limanowa where my gf was born.
Rachel Ben-Eliezer >>

If you look up the site: http:www.feefhs.org
Then look under Map Room, highlight it and ask for Galicia or Poland.

I know it it is in Galicia map room, it can be found southeast of Cracow,
just a little north of Neu Sandec or your spelling Nowe Sancz. At least I
think this is what you are searching.

Regards, Betty Wray


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Limanowa, Galicia #general

James Wray <wraybj@...>
 

<< maybe someone can help me with locating
Limanowa where my gf was born.
Rachel Ben-Eliezer >>

If you look up the site: http:www.feefhs.org
Then look under Map Room, highlight it and ask for Galicia or Poland.

I know it it is in Galicia map room, it can be found southeast of Cracow,
just a little north of Neu Sandec or your spelling Nowe Sancz. At least I
think this is what you are searching.

Regards, Betty Wray


*Re: Faulty URLs - help needed #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Martin, Stephen and all,

Confuncius says: don't give a starving man a fish, teach him to fish. In
this spirit, allow me to give you the background of the URL system of site
naming. Once it is understood, it is MUCH easier to find a missing page.

Let me use the example Martin gave:

www.awf.wroc.pll/~romek/hobby/cmen.htm

First note: if you mention an URL in an email message write it in its
*complete* format, namely including the prefix which establishes the
communication protocol. For the Web, this prefix is http://, for FTP sites
ftp://, for an email address mailto:

Thus, the complete URL of the address above would be:

http://www.awf.wroc.pll/~romek/hobby/cmen.htm

This has a side benefit for most users: one can click (or double-click) on
this string and the browser will automatically open and take us to the
desired site.

Lets analyze what this shorthand means:

www.awf.wroc.pll is the *mnemonic name* of the web server. Most of the time
it is composed of 3 words only, separated by dots, such as in www.att.com
(AT&T's site). This is very common in America. 'www' simply means its a
website, 'com' means its a commercial site and 'att' is the shorthand for
the site owner's company name.

If so, why is the address inquired by Martin different? Because it's an URL
*outside* the USA. In these cases it's quite customary to add to the main
server's address a shorting code of the country of origin (in this case
Poland). These are always 2 characters, and this code is internationally
standardized.

Some common codes which you may encounter:
Israel: il
Canada: ca
Germany: de
France: fr
Hungary: hu
Slovakia: sk
Czech Rep.: cz
Poland: pl
Russia: ru

'pll' is therefor a mistake, the correct country code for Poland is 'pl'.

Important Note: ANY MISTAKE one makes in entering an URL address will
result in an error (in the jargon called 404 error - file missing). In this
case the error would result >from the double 'l' in 'pll', however it could
have many other sources, specially letter case!!! Pay attention to this -
most web servers are driven by Unix, which is a *case sensitive* operating
system.

Sorry I am getting out of the subject, so let's get back to Martin's example:
'awf.wroc' is in this case the name of some institution or an Internet
service provider.

How do we know this? because of what follows after the server's name
(~romek) This kind of shorting is very typical of institutions or used by
service providers to indicate the directory of their
clients/students/faculty members, etc. The tilde mark before the name is
what reveals us this little secret. Thus, in this case there must be a
user called 'romek' who has a space for his pages at server www.awf.wroc.pl

'hobby' is a subdirectory Mr. Romek created at his site. Very self evident,
so we might conclude that genealogy is Mr. Romek's hobby. And finally, Mr.
Romek gave us the web page called 'cmen.htm' which may contain the
information Martin was looking for.

Note that 'htm' is a typical shorthand for HTML web pages (the programming
code in which pages are written) created on PC/Windows systems, whereas
'html' stands for the complete shorthand used on Macintoshes and Unix boxes
(Windows 95 or NT also).

The recommendation made by Stephen becomes now a bit clearer. One works
from backwards of an URL address up to its server's name because this is
the logical method of eliminating stages of error in the directory
structure - first one eliminates the page name (cmen.htm in this case),
checking if the rest of the directory structure exists.

If one receives a page saying "Directory of /~romek/hobby/" we will know
for sure that the server's address is correct, that the directory is also
correct but the page doesn't exist anymore. This may not happen always,
even if the directory /~romek/hobby/ exists. Instead we might get a normal
web page containing links, text, images, etc. Even so, in both cases we
would confirm that what lacks is page 'cmen.htm' but the directory
structure is correct.

On the other hand, if a 404 error message appears, we know that there is
something wrong with the structure. We have to cut one level up, thus to
/~romek/, and check if Mr. Romek's web space still exists. Etc., etc. until
we have reached the uppermost directory level.

We don't have to check for the server's existence because the browser will
determine that kind of error. If the server *doesn't exists* in the first
place, the browser will give us some error message saying that it didn't
find the indicated DNS. No need to check further!

BTW, DNS is the fancy jargon for the server's unique registered address, a
4 parts number which identifies it unequivocally (e.g. 206.123.45.117)

Voila' elementary my dear Watson ;)

Take care and have a great New Year
Tom Venetianer

martin b mannlein wrote in message ...
I recently tried to access several web sites that fellow Jewish Genners
cited.
In the first case, www.awf.wroc.pll/~romek/hobby/cmen.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen *Re: Faulty URLs - help needed #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Martin, Stephen and all,

Confuncius says: don't give a starving man a fish, teach him to fish. In
this spirit, allow me to give you the background of the URL system of site
naming. Once it is understood, it is MUCH easier to find a missing page.

Let me use the example Martin gave:

www.awf.wroc.pll/~romek/hobby/cmen.htm

First note: if you mention an URL in an email message write it in its
*complete* format, namely including the prefix which establishes the
communication protocol. For the Web, this prefix is http://, for FTP sites
ftp://, for an email address mailto:

Thus, the complete URL of the address above would be:

http://www.awf.wroc.pll/~romek/hobby/cmen.htm

This has a side benefit for most users: one can click (or double-click) on
this string and the browser will automatically open and take us to the
desired site.

Lets analyze what this shorthand means:

www.awf.wroc.pll is the *mnemonic name* of the web server. Most of the time
it is composed of 3 words only, separated by dots, such as in www.att.com
(AT&T's site). This is very common in America. 'www' simply means its a
website, 'com' means its a commercial site and 'att' is the shorthand for
the site owner's company name.

If so, why is the address inquired by Martin different? Because it's an URL
*outside* the USA. In these cases it's quite customary to add to the main
server's address a shorting code of the country of origin (in this case
Poland). These are always 2 characters, and this code is internationally
standardized.

Some common codes which you may encounter:
Israel: il
Canada: ca
Germany: de
France: fr
Hungary: hu
Slovakia: sk
Czech Rep.: cz
Poland: pl
Russia: ru

'pll' is therefor a mistake, the correct country code for Poland is 'pl'.

Important Note: ANY MISTAKE one makes in entering an URL address will
result in an error (in the jargon called 404 error - file missing). In this
case the error would result >from the double 'l' in 'pll', however it could
have many other sources, specially letter case!!! Pay attention to this -
most web servers are driven by Unix, which is a *case sensitive* operating
system.

Sorry I am getting out of the subject, so let's get back to Martin's example:
'awf.wroc' is in this case the name of some institution or an Internet
service provider.

How do we know this? because of what follows after the server's name
(~romek) This kind of shorting is very typical of institutions or used by
service providers to indicate the directory of their
clients/students/faculty members, etc. The tilde mark before the name is
what reveals us this little secret. Thus, in this case there must be a
user called 'romek' who has a space for his pages at server www.awf.wroc.pl

'hobby' is a subdirectory Mr. Romek created at his site. Very self evident,
so we might conclude that genealogy is Mr. Romek's hobby. And finally, Mr.
Romek gave us the web page called 'cmen.htm' which may contain the
information Martin was looking for.

Note that 'htm' is a typical shorthand for HTML web pages (the programming
code in which pages are written) created on PC/Windows systems, whereas
'html' stands for the complete shorthand used on Macintoshes and Unix boxes
(Windows 95 or NT also).

The recommendation made by Stephen becomes now a bit clearer. One works
from backwards of an URL address up to its server's name because this is
the logical method of eliminating stages of error in the directory
structure - first one eliminates the page name (cmen.htm in this case),
checking if the rest of the directory structure exists.

If one receives a page saying "Directory of /~romek/hobby/" we will know
for sure that the server's address is correct, that the directory is also
correct but the page doesn't exist anymore. This may not happen always,
even if the directory /~romek/hobby/ exists. Instead we might get a normal
web page containing links, text, images, etc. Even so, in both cases we
would confirm that what lacks is page 'cmen.htm' but the directory
structure is correct.

On the other hand, if a 404 error message appears, we know that there is
something wrong with the structure. We have to cut one level up, thus to
/~romek/, and check if Mr. Romek's web space still exists. Etc., etc. until
we have reached the uppermost directory level.

We don't have to check for the server's existence because the browser will
determine that kind of error. If the server *doesn't exists* in the first
place, the browser will give us some error message saying that it didn't
find the indicated DNS. No need to check further!

BTW, DNS is the fancy jargon for the server's unique registered address, a
4 parts number which identifies it unequivocally (e.g. 206.123.45.117)

Voila' elementary my dear Watson ;)

Take care and have a great New Year
Tom Venetianer

martin b mannlein wrote in message ...
I recently tried to access several web sites that fellow Jewish Genners
cited.
In the first case, www.awf.wroc.pll/~romek/hobby/cmen.htm


*Re: JONAP = YOMTOV in Hungarian? #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Michael and all,

The words are JO' NAPOT == (have) a good day == boker tov.

Etymology is:
'jo' == good
'nap' == day
'ot' a common Hungarian suffix meaning "a" or "one"

JO' NAP means 'good day', and *is not* a greeting.

Therefore, there is no basis for what your acquaintance told you. Actually,
the Hungarian Ashkenazim call Yom Tov "jontev" (sounds like jontaph) a
corrupted form of the Hebrew words. This has nothing to do with 'jo napot'.

Regards to all
Tom Venetianer

One of the variants of the YomTov names in my family is Jontaph. A
Jewishgenner says that the JONAP in her family is a Hungarian translation of
YomTov.
Michael Bernet


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen *Re: JONAP = YOMTOV in Hungarian? #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Michael and all,

The words are JO' NAPOT == (have) a good day == boker tov.

Etymology is:
'jo' == good
'nap' == day
'ot' a common Hungarian suffix meaning "a" or "one"

JO' NAP means 'good day', and *is not* a greeting.

Therefore, there is no basis for what your acquaintance told you. Actually,
the Hungarian Ashkenazim call Yom Tov "jontev" (sounds like jontaph) a
corrupted form of the Hebrew words. This has nothing to do with 'jo napot'.

Regards to all
Tom Venetianer

One of the variants of the YomTov names in my family is Jontaph. A
Jewishgenner says that the JONAP in her family is a Hungarian translation of
YomTov.
Michael Bernet


Change-of-life babies?? #general

Marion Werle <werle@...>
 

I just received some information >from the Latvian State Historical Archives
from the All Russian Census of 1897, that shows my ggf's sister, age 23 and
unmarried, living with my gggf and gggm, aged 72 and 75, respectively.
Also living in the household were my ggf's widowed sister, age 35, and her
son. My eyebrows raised at the prospect of a 52 year-old mother, and
Family Tree Maker also flagged the fact that the mother was over 50 at the
time of her birth.

Today it is relatively common for women in their 40's to give birth,
although 50 is still on the outer edges of probability. Are any
Jewishgenners familiar with the normal fertility range in the 19th century?
I am not overlooking the strong possibility that the information in the
census could be wrong, either deliberately or by accident, but I am
curious, nonetheless as to whether it would be biologically possible for a
woman of that age to have a child in those days.

Shana tova to all!

Marion Werle
North Hills, CA

Searching: MOLCHADSKY (Kossovo, Bereza and Pruzhany, Belarus); RATNER
(Kossovo, Belarus); SKUTELSKI, GETZ (Riebene, Latvia); MINSK (Daugavpils,
Latvia); SKUDER/SCUDER, COHEN (Skuodas, Lith.); KRAWITZ (Mosedis, Lith.)
See the Latvia SIG web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/latvia
AND the LitvakSIG web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Change-of-life babies?? #general

Marion Werle <werle@...>
 

I just received some information >from the Latvian State Historical Archives
from the All Russian Census of 1897, that shows my ggf's sister, age 23 and
unmarried, living with my gggf and gggm, aged 72 and 75, respectively.
Also living in the household were my ggf's widowed sister, age 35, and her
son. My eyebrows raised at the prospect of a 52 year-old mother, and
Family Tree Maker also flagged the fact that the mother was over 50 at the
time of her birth.

Today it is relatively common for women in their 40's to give birth,
although 50 is still on the outer edges of probability. Are any
Jewishgenners familiar with the normal fertility range in the 19th century?
I am not overlooking the strong possibility that the information in the
census could be wrong, either deliberately or by accident, but I am
curious, nonetheless as to whether it would be biologically possible for a
woman of that age to have a child in those days.

Shana tova to all!

Marion Werle
North Hills, CA

Searching: MOLCHADSKY (Kossovo, Bereza and Pruzhany, Belarus); RATNER
(Kossovo, Belarus); SKUTELSKI, GETZ (Riebene, Latvia); MINSK (Daugavpils,
Latvia); SKUDER/SCUDER, COHEN (Skuodas, Lith.); KRAWITZ (Mosedis, Lith.)
See the Latvia SIG web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/latvia
AND the LitvakSIG web site: http://www.jewishgen.org/litvak


Searching: LOWENSTEIN/Lowenberg/Lowen-something (Philadelphia area, 50's-60's) #general

JoanSGross@...
 

I am looking for information about a Dr. Lowenstein (maybe Lowenberg or
Lowenthal) who lived in Cheltenham Township which is a suburb of Philadelphia
in the 1950's and 1960's. I believe his family is related to my
Silverman/Goldfarb/Goldsmith/Seidenberg families.

Or, I'd like any information on Lowenstein families in the Philadelphia area
before 1960.

Contact me by e-mail: joansgross@.... Thanks for your help.

Joan S. Gross
Jenkintown, PA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: LOWENSTEIN/Lowenberg/Lowen-something (Philadelphia area, 50's-60's) #general

JoanSGross@...
 

I am looking for information about a Dr. Lowenstein (maybe Lowenberg or
Lowenthal) who lived in Cheltenham Township which is a suburb of Philadelphia
in the 1950's and 1960's. I believe his family is related to my
Silverman/Goldfarb/Goldsmith/Seidenberg families.

Or, I'd like any information on Lowenstein families in the Philadelphia area
before 1960.

Contact me by e-mail: joansgross@.... Thanks for your help.

Joan S. Gross
Jenkintown, PA


Re: Locating Ships Passenger Lists #general

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Phil, Try this. First, consult the Morton Allan Directory of European
Passenger Ships Arrivals to confirm that the Kroonland did indeed arrive on
Oct. 10. If correct, look up the the two microfilms (Oct. 7 and Oct. 13)
that respectively precedes and follows the microfilm of Oct 10, 1905. For
example, the Oct. 10 microfilm contains volumes 1352 and 1353. You may
discover that Vol. 1352 actually begins at the end of the Oct. 7 film or
that Vol. 1353 actually ends at the beginning of the Oct. 13 film. This is
what I found while I was searching for the ship that brought my mother to
the U.S. in 1923.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC

My grandfather emigrated to the US by ship via Antwerp Belgium to New
York in 1905 in the month of October. ... However, the microfilm that
should have had the ship, Kroonland, arriving in New York on October 10,
1905, in fact did not have that ship listed.
Phil Silverman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Locating Ships Passenger Lists #general

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Phil, Try this. First, consult the Morton Allan Directory of European
Passenger Ships Arrivals to confirm that the Kroonland did indeed arrive on
Oct. 10. If correct, look up the the two microfilms (Oct. 7 and Oct. 13)
that respectively precedes and follows the microfilm of Oct 10, 1905. For
example, the Oct. 10 microfilm contains volumes 1352 and 1353. You may
discover that Vol. 1352 actually begins at the end of the Oct. 7 film or
that Vol. 1353 actually ends at the beginning of the Oct. 13 film. This is
what I found while I was searching for the ship that brought my mother to
the U.S. in 1923.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC

My grandfather emigrated to the US by ship via Antwerp Belgium to New
York in 1905 in the month of October. ... However, the microfilm that
should have had the ship, Kroonland, arriving in New York on October 10,
1905, in fact did not have that ship listed.
Phil Silverman


visit in hungary - 4 #hungary

l`d wx`eq <kraus@...>
 

Shalom and shana tova to all.
In this visit we saw 3 archive- lists:
1. The list in the jewish community in budapest (in Sip utca) of those>who
are buried, in Kozma utca emetery, is computerized. the details include:
family name, first name, for marries woman her husband's name and maiden
name, and date of death. I could not understand if "death certificate" can
be received with all these details.

2. In the jewish cemetery in Obuda the lists are written in books. It
seems that in the years 1942 - 1949 during the war and later) the book was
not updated on the burial time but much later (at 1949) , the details
include only family name, first name, month of death - burial, and the
location of the grave. We took a picture (with a camera) of the page in
which my uncle is listed to remembrance. I don't know why but here also we
did not ask about death/burial certificate.

3. Lists of birth in Edeleny - a town 24 km. north to Mishkoltz with
11,500 citizens. The lists are in heavy "big books" in the town council, in
an excellent condition. Can be found there the family name, first name, boy
or girl, father name, mother name + her maiden name. There is referring to
death books and the year it happened. I got birth certificates for my
father's 6 brothers and sisters who were born in Edeleny, 2 of them passed
away being 1 and 2 yeas old (and we never heard about them). I found there,
that when the first baby was sick his father (my grandfather) changed his
name to the jewish name (>from Isidor to Mor Israel) and >from that time on
he used only this name. In that office the secretary told me that they can
find more details on marriage and death. Because of the late hour I did not
want to be a "nudnik" and not to hold them up. hope to be there again to
get other certificates. It seems that in Hungary we can find in most
countries registrations, at
least for 100 years back and earlier. just have to try it via post also.
when trying, must know that they do not know english, some know germany.
Shana Tova, happiness, health and 'hazlacha'. 'ktiva ve'hatima tova'
Leah Kraus
Haifa , Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary visit in hungary - 4 #hungary

l`d wx`eq <kraus@...>
 

Shalom and shana tova to all.
In this visit we saw 3 archive- lists:
1. The list in the jewish community in budapest (in Sip utca) of those>who
are buried, in Kozma utca emetery, is computerized. the details include:
family name, first name, for marries woman her husband's name and maiden
name, and date of death. I could not understand if "death certificate" can
be received with all these details.

2. In the jewish cemetery in Obuda the lists are written in books. It
seems that in the years 1942 - 1949 during the war and later) the book was
not updated on the burial time but much later (at 1949) , the details
include only family name, first name, month of death - burial, and the
location of the grave. We took a picture (with a camera) of the page in
which my uncle is listed to remembrance. I don't know why but here also we
did not ask about death/burial certificate.

3. Lists of birth in Edeleny - a town 24 km. north to Mishkoltz with
11,500 citizens. The lists are in heavy "big books" in the town council, in
an excellent condition. Can be found there the family name, first name, boy
or girl, father name, mother name + her maiden name. There is referring to
death books and the year it happened. I got birth certificates for my
father's 6 brothers and sisters who were born in Edeleny, 2 of them passed
away being 1 and 2 yeas old (and we never heard about them). I found there,
that when the first baby was sick his father (my grandfather) changed his
name to the jewish name (>from Isidor to Mor Israel) and >from that time on
he used only this name. In that office the secretary told me that they can
find more details on marriage and death. Because of the late hour I did not
want to be a "nudnik" and not to hold them up. hope to be there again to
get other certificates. It seems that in Hungary we can find in most
countries registrations, at
least for 100 years back and earlier. just have to try it via post also.
when trying, must know that they do not know english, some know germany.
Shana Tova, happiness, health and 'hazlacha'. 'ktiva ve'hatima tova'
Leah Kraus
Haifa , Israel


Re: Reading the 1848 Census of Hung. Jews #hungary

Melodykatz@...
 

I believe there is an article I wrote that is on the H-SIG homepage under
articles concerning deciphering old European handwriting. If you can find
nothing more explicit, try deciphering the handwriting by first picking out
the familiar names and places and making a chart of the letters that look
different >from our American letters. It takes a little while to learn, but
pretty soon you will be able to read most of the census (if the census taker
had a half-way decent handwriting!!). Good luck!
Melody (Southern California)

In a message dated 9/18/98 2:49:50 PM, ezwiebac@... writes:

<<In trying to get the best info out of the 1848 Census, I would like

reference to a handwriting guide for that period in time. The handwriting of

the census entries can be hard to decipher for those of us in the U.S. who

don't read Hungarian.


Re: Help with a name, Don't think it's the original #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

The Russo-Japanese war happened in 1905 and a lot of Russians Jews got
out rather than get drafted. Polish Jews who were in Congress Poland
(the part partitioned to Russia) may have been subject to the draft.

If any of the Scotts came to the US directly >from Poland, get the
naturalization papers and find the ship. Then borrow the roll of film
with the manifest >from Salt Lake and go through the entire ship
manifest until you find someone that seems to fit.

In my family, the original Polish name was unknown, but in the US it
was Jacobson. I went through this process and, >from other information
on the manifest, including first name, occupation, destination, I found
my grandfather, Itzrok Dzikowski.

Good luck and happy new year.

Debbi


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Reading the 1848 Census of Hung. Jews #hungary

Melodykatz@...
 

I believe there is an article I wrote that is on the H-SIG homepage under
articles concerning deciphering old European handwriting. If you can find
nothing more explicit, try deciphering the handwriting by first picking out
the familiar names and places and making a chart of the letters that look
different >from our American letters. It takes a little while to learn, but
pretty soon you will be able to read most of the census (if the census taker
had a half-way decent handwriting!!). Good luck!
Melody (Southern California)

In a message dated 9/18/98 2:49:50 PM, ezwiebac@... writes:

<<In trying to get the best info out of the 1848 Census, I would like

reference to a handwriting guide for that period in time. The handwriting of

the census entries can be hard to decipher for those of us in the U.S. who

don't read Hungarian.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Help with a name, Don't think it's the original #hungary

Lawrence Korman <korman3@...>
 

The Russo-Japanese war happened in 1905 and a lot of Russians Jews got
out rather than get drafted. Polish Jews who were in Congress Poland
(the part partitioned to Russia) may have been subject to the draft.

If any of the Scotts came to the US directly >from Poland, get the
naturalization papers and find the ship. Then borrow the roll of film
with the manifest >from Salt Lake and go through the entire ship
manifest until you find someone that seems to fit.

In my family, the original Polish name was unknown, but in the US it
was Jacobson. I went through this process and, >from other information
on the manifest, including first name, occupation, destination, I found
my grandfather, Itzrok Dzikowski.

Good luck and happy new year.

Debbi


Senno, Belarus - Trip Report #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

The following article was received >from Elliot Lepler about a month =
ago. The plan was to include it in our first issue of the Belarus =
SIG on-line Newsletter. Since no one has stepped forward to take the =
job of newsletter editor, I wanted to share Elliot's trip report =
rather than hold it any longer.

David Fox
Belarus SIG Coordinator

*********************************************************************
Reacquaintance

by Elliot Lepler

This spring the Leplers in America rediscovered family in Eastern =
Europe who had been lost to us for the past 60 years. For 10 days in =
May, Marcia and I journeyed with our new-found cousins back to =
Belarus and Saint Petersburg, Russia, a trip which became one of the =
most emotional experiences of my life.

My Grandfather left Senno in Belarus in 1912 to avoid serving in the =
Tsar=EDs armed forces. He kissed his family goodbye and traveled =
eventually to America, never to see his parents again. He =
corresponded with his family in the =ECold country=EE until Stalin =
made it unhealthy to receive mail >from America. In the World War II =
the Nazis overran all of Belarus.

As a young person I asked about life in Europe and about my family =
there. Like many other immigrants my grandparents did not like to =
talk much about the difficult lives they had escaped from. I was told =
that all of my relatives had been wiped out in the Holocaust. Off and =
on over the years I wondered if there were any of my kin still alive, =
and even thought of trying to find them, but my interest was not as =
strong as one of my cousins.

She listed our name on a Jewish genealogy web site, =
<http://www.jewishgen.org>. This spring we were very surprised when =
she received an email >from a Vladimir Lepler. He and a number of his =
family emigrated >from St. Petersburg to Denver in 1996. They seemed =
to be related as they knew much that corroborated what we knew about =
the Lepler ancestors. Then they sent us a scanned photo of my =
great-grandfather. The photo was an exact duplicate of the picture =
that has hung on my wall for the past 30 years! Vladimir is a =
grandson of my grandfather=EDs brother, a second cousin.

We heard that Vladimir=EDs wife and son, Svetlana and Alex, were =
going to be in St. Petersburg in May so we decided to go visit them. =
They were most anxious to get to know us and offered for us to stay =
with them in their apartment. We accepted, but we also wanted to =
visit Belarus to see Senno and Lepel, the city for which we are =
named. In the course of conversation with Svetlana we learned that we =
also have a cousin in Minsk who was also interested in meeting us.

So we began our trip flying into Minsk where our cousins met us at =
the airport. First introductions were a bit formal but the =
relationships warmed quickly. We were given a tour of Minsk for a few =
days and then set out on pilgrimage through the Belarussian =
countryside. We went to Lepel first and found the old Jewish quarter. =
Nobody there knew of the Leplers. Our Russian cousins had told us =
that all the Jewish Leplers in the former Soviet Union are descended =
from an Abram Lepler who was born there about 1800. There were only a =
few Jews left in Lepel and we did not spend much time there.

We drove then an hour or so to Senno, a town of about 11,000 current =
population. We knew some Leplers died there at the hands of the =
Nazis, but there seemed to be no record of them at City Hall. But one =
of the officials suggested we speak with a 90 year-old man, who was =
referred to as a =ECwalking encyclopedia.=EE Within 10 minutes his =
son arrived to take us to his house.

My heart leapt as the old man answered in Russian =ECAbsolutno!=EE to =
the question whether he remembered Leplers. He then mentioned an =
uncle and several cousins by name. He did not remember my =
grandfather, since he was 4 years old when he had left. His son then =
proceeded to lead us to the street the Leplers lived on. He did not =
know which house on this dirt path was theirs, but it did not matter =
since the Nazis had burned the village to the ground.

The son then took us to the site of the Senno ghetto and >from there a =
short walk to a memorial at the burial place of the 800 who were =
exterminated on New Years Eve, 1941. Although the names were not =
engraved on the monument, I felt touched by the Holocaust at that =
moment to a depth I had never felt.

Not far >from the mass grave was the old Jewish cemetery. It was not =
cared for and bushes and trees grew among the decaying stones. But =
Hebrew markings remained clear on some. My great-grandfather was =
lying there and I felt a deep sense of order coming back >from America =
to retouch the past.

We then left Senno and traveled to Vitebsk and on to St. Petersburg =
by overnight train for a week=EDs stay. During that time we talked =
late into the night about life on both sides of the Iron Curtain. =
Leplers did well on both continents. Three Leplers went to jail in =
Europe, for political crimes. But they prospered in jail! The stories =
entertained me and filled in a void that I did not realize until then =
was so important to me.

Our relatives in Russia had never set foot in a synagogue. They have =
little understanding of Jewish culture. They are very careful to keep =
their Jewish identity quiet. We hope to share with them Jewish life =
in America. Maybe next year some will partake in our Seder. I feel as =
though a new avenue in my life has been opened.

I write this for you in hopes that some of you can have a similar =
wondrous experience. The former Soviet Union is much more open now. =
The Internet is a new tool you can use in place of tedious searches =
through old records. I know a number of Kol Emeth members have found =
relatives through the Internet and I would encourage all of you to do =
so. If you would like to hear more of our experiences, please feel =
free to call me.

Elliot Lepler
ECL1@...


Belarus SIG #Belarus Senno, Belarus - Trip Report #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

The following article was received >from Elliot Lepler about a month =
ago. The plan was to include it in our first issue of the Belarus =
SIG on-line Newsletter. Since no one has stepped forward to take the =
job of newsletter editor, I wanted to share Elliot's trip report =
rather than hold it any longer.

David Fox
Belarus SIG Coordinator

*********************************************************************
Reacquaintance

by Elliot Lepler

This spring the Leplers in America rediscovered family in Eastern =
Europe who had been lost to us for the past 60 years. For 10 days in =
May, Marcia and I journeyed with our new-found cousins back to =
Belarus and Saint Petersburg, Russia, a trip which became one of the =
most emotional experiences of my life.

My Grandfather left Senno in Belarus in 1912 to avoid serving in the =
Tsar=EDs armed forces. He kissed his family goodbye and traveled =
eventually to America, never to see his parents again. He =
corresponded with his family in the =ECold country=EE until Stalin =
made it unhealthy to receive mail >from America. In the World War II =
the Nazis overran all of Belarus.

As a young person I asked about life in Europe and about my family =
there. Like many other immigrants my grandparents did not like to =
talk much about the difficult lives they had escaped from. I was told =
that all of my relatives had been wiped out in the Holocaust. Off and =
on over the years I wondered if there were any of my kin still alive, =
and even thought of trying to find them, but my interest was not as =
strong as one of my cousins.

She listed our name on a Jewish genealogy web site, =
<http://www.jewishgen.org>. This spring we were very surprised when =
she received an email >from a Vladimir Lepler. He and a number of his =
family emigrated >from St. Petersburg to Denver in 1996. They seemed =
to be related as they knew much that corroborated what we knew about =
the Lepler ancestors. Then they sent us a scanned photo of my =
great-grandfather. The photo was an exact duplicate of the picture =
that has hung on my wall for the past 30 years! Vladimir is a =
grandson of my grandfather=EDs brother, a second cousin.

We heard that Vladimir=EDs wife and son, Svetlana and Alex, were =
going to be in St. Petersburg in May so we decided to go visit them. =
They were most anxious to get to know us and offered for us to stay =
with them in their apartment. We accepted, but we also wanted to =
visit Belarus to see Senno and Lepel, the city for which we are =
named. In the course of conversation with Svetlana we learned that we =
also have a cousin in Minsk who was also interested in meeting us.

So we began our trip flying into Minsk where our cousins met us at =
the airport. First introductions were a bit formal but the =
relationships warmed quickly. We were given a tour of Minsk for a few =
days and then set out on pilgrimage through the Belarussian =
countryside. We went to Lepel first and found the old Jewish quarter. =
Nobody there knew of the Leplers. Our Russian cousins had told us =
that all the Jewish Leplers in the former Soviet Union are descended =
from an Abram Lepler who was born there about 1800. There were only a =
few Jews left in Lepel and we did not spend much time there.

We drove then an hour or so to Senno, a town of about 11,000 current =
population. We knew some Leplers died there at the hands of the =
Nazis, but there seemed to be no record of them at City Hall. But one =
of the officials suggested we speak with a 90 year-old man, who was =
referred to as a =ECwalking encyclopedia.=EE Within 10 minutes his =
son arrived to take us to his house.

My heart leapt as the old man answered in Russian =ECAbsolutno!=EE to =
the question whether he remembered Leplers. He then mentioned an =
uncle and several cousins by name. He did not remember my =
grandfather, since he was 4 years old when he had left. His son then =
proceeded to lead us to the street the Leplers lived on. He did not =
know which house on this dirt path was theirs, but it did not matter =
since the Nazis had burned the village to the ground.

The son then took us to the site of the Senno ghetto and >from there a =
short walk to a memorial at the burial place of the 800 who were =
exterminated on New Years Eve, 1941. Although the names were not =
engraved on the monument, I felt touched by the Holocaust at that =
moment to a depth I had never felt.

Not far >from the mass grave was the old Jewish cemetery. It was not =
cared for and bushes and trees grew among the decaying stones. But =
Hebrew markings remained clear on some. My great-grandfather was =
lying there and I felt a deep sense of order coming back >from America =
to retouch the past.

We then left Senno and traveled to Vitebsk and on to St. Petersburg =
by overnight train for a week=EDs stay. During that time we talked =
late into the night about life on both sides of the Iron Curtain. =
Leplers did well on both continents. Three Leplers went to jail in =
Europe, for political crimes. But they prospered in jail! The stories =
entertained me and filled in a void that I did not realize until then =
was so important to me.

Our relatives in Russia had never set foot in a synagogue. They have =
little understanding of Jewish culture. They are very careful to keep =
their Jewish identity quiet. We hope to share with them Jewish life =
in America. Maybe next year some will partake in our Seder. I feel as =
though a new avenue in my life has been opened.

I write this for you in hopes that some of you can have a similar =
wondrous experience. The former Soviet Union is much more open now. =
The Internet is a new tool you can use in place of tedious searches =
through old records. I know a number of Kol Emeth members have found =
relatives through the Internet and I would encourage all of you to do =
so. If you would like to hear more of our experiences, please feel =
free to call me.

Elliot Lepler
ECL1@...