Date   

NY Public Library #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Is there a kind JewishGennner who is going to NYPL library soon? I need information on the book in Polish" Republic Tarnobrzeg" or Republika Tarnobrzeska 1918-1945, author Joseph Rawski published in 1993. There is no other copy available thru inter-library loan.
Please contact me privately.

Gayle Schlissel Riley


BOEKBINDER - Amsterdam / London #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aubrey@...>
 

I have collected data on the family BOEKBINDER - London after 1860 and
Amsterdam / Amersfoort before that.
If anyone interested.

Aubrey Jacobus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NY Public Library #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Is there a kind JewishGennner who is going to NYPL library soon? I need information on the book in Polish" Republic Tarnobrzeg" or Republika Tarnobrzeska 1918-1945, author Joseph Rawski published in 1993. There is no other copy available thru inter-library loan.
Please contact me privately.

Gayle Schlissel Riley


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BOEKBINDER - Amsterdam / London #general

Aubrey Jacobus <aubrey@...>
 

I have collected data on the family BOEKBINDER - London after 1860 and
Amsterdam / Amersfoort before that.
If anyone interested.

Aubrey Jacobus


Edelstein/Fried/Kalvaria #lithuania

MJRISKIND@...
 

Dear LitvakSIG members:

I am a new member of the LitvakSIG and am just learning how to use the
computer. I am beginning research on my family and one branch, the Edelsteins
and Frieds, who came >from Kalvaria, Lithuania.

Any information, tips, suggestions, or any other ideas would be greatly
appreciated. You can write me at:

MJRiskind@...

Family: Edelstein and Fried
City: Kalvaria, Lithuania

Thank you all for the opportunity to participate and contribute. A Happy,
Healthy and Safe New Year to you all.

Sincerely,
Miriam Riskind
Houston, Texas USA


Moderator's note: Welcome, Miriam. A good place to start is the Litvaksig FAQ at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Edelstein/Fried/Kalvaria #lithuania

MJRISKIND@...
 

Dear LitvakSIG members:

I am a new member of the LitvakSIG and am just learning how to use the
computer. I am beginning research on my family and one branch, the Edelsteins
and Frieds, who came >from Kalvaria, Lithuania.

Any information, tips, suggestions, or any other ideas would be greatly
appreciated. You can write me at:

MJRiskind@...

Family: Edelstein and Fried
City: Kalvaria, Lithuania

Thank you all for the opportunity to participate and contribute. A Happy,
Healthy and Safe New Year to you all.

Sincerely,
Miriam Riskind
Houston, Texas USA


Moderator's note: Welcome, Miriam. A good place to start is the Litvaksig FAQ at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/


Lucky Strike 2 #general

Saul Klarer <klar-pax@...>
 

I went through the international telephone directories. I tried every
country. I went looking to see if I could locate family elsewhere.
I inserted the family name KLERER in each and every place that would
have white pages, and where I could use the English Alphabet. I came up
with nothing everywhere until I hit Belgium. I did not expect the KLERER
family >from Poland to migrate there. I was doubly fortunate, because my
relative was a woman who had her m.n. as well as her husband's surname on
the listing. I sent a letter to them and received a call a few days
later. Her husband spoke in a heavy french accent, but I got most of
what he said.
It turns out that they were also trying to construct a family tree.
Within a few days after I got a disc and printout >from them. Then I sent
a pile of information to them. We are still working on it. Meanwhile I have received more family to add to my tree.
So try it, it cost nothing but time.

Saul KLARER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lucky Strike 2 #general

Saul Klarer <klar-pax@...>
 

I went through the international telephone directories. I tried every
country. I went looking to see if I could locate family elsewhere.
I inserted the family name KLERER in each and every place that would
have white pages, and where I could use the English Alphabet. I came up
with nothing everywhere until I hit Belgium. I did not expect the KLERER
family >from Poland to migrate there. I was doubly fortunate, because my
relative was a woman who had her m.n. as well as her husband's surname on
the listing. I sent a letter to them and received a call a few days
later. Her husband spoke in a heavy french accent, but I got most of
what he said.
It turns out that they were also trying to construct a family tree.
Within a few days after I got a disc and printout >from them. Then I sent
a pile of information to them. We are still working on it. Meanwhile I have received more family to add to my tree.
So try it, it cost nothing but time.

Saul KLARER


Polish Documents #general

Saul Klarer <klar-pax@...>
 

I have seven Polish documents. They appear to be pre surname 1810-11.
They are short handwritten photocopies taken >from FHC.I do not know now
if they are my family or not.
Is there someone who would like to try and translate all or some of
them.
If they are not my family I will publish what it is on this usenet and
maybe it may be
a find for someone else

Saul KLARER <klar-pax@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish Documents #general

Saul Klarer <klar-pax@...>
 

I have seven Polish documents. They appear to be pre surname 1810-11.
They are short handwritten photocopies taken >from FHC.I do not know now
if they are my family or not.
Is there someone who would like to try and translate all or some of
them.
If they are not my family I will publish what it is on this usenet and
maybe it may be
a find for someone else

Saul KLARER <klar-pax@...>


Electoral Registers: a source for British genealogy #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

In the UK all those eligible are registered as of right as voters in local,
national and European elections. In the autumn of each year the local
authority sends out a form for each household to complete for each member
of the household who is eligible to be listed. The consolidated Register
for the district is then published and is a public document, available for
inspection.

The fullest ones are those >from after the extension of the franchise in
1918 and 1928 but earlier ones >from several decades before then, when fewer
people had the right to vote, have survived. They are usually found in
local libraries or local record offices. They are a kind of partial annual
census - they obviously do not include children nor certain other
categories of people, and the information is limited to name and address.
Rather like the decennial Population Censuses of England & Wales, Scotland,
and Northern Ireland, the information is arranged in streets and by houses.
But the Registers can be useful if one has a name and an address >from some
source for then one can pursue the person in the Registers. Or, with some
searching through many streets, one might find the person being sought.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Electoral Registers: a source for British genealogy #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

In the UK all those eligible are registered as of right as voters in local,
national and European elections. In the autumn of each year the local
authority sends out a form for each household to complete for each member
of the household who is eligible to be listed. The consolidated Register
for the district is then published and is a public document, available for
inspection.

The fullest ones are those >from after the extension of the franchise in
1918 and 1928 but earlier ones >from several decades before then, when fewer
people had the right to vote, have survived. They are usually found in
local libraries or local record offices. They are a kind of partial annual
census - they obviously do not include children nor certain other
categories of people, and the information is limited to name and address.
Rather like the decennial Population Censuses of England & Wales, Scotland,
and Northern Ireland, the information is arranged in streets and by houses.
But the Registers can be useful if one has a name and an address >from some
source for then one can pursue the person in the Registers. Or, with some
searching through many streets, one might find the person being sought.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England


Searching: Szymon and Cecelia OGUS, Johannesburg (1934) #general

Roy Ogus <ogus@...>
 

I am trying to make contact with any of the descendants of Szymon and
Cecelia OGUS, who I believe last lived in Johannesburg, South Africa.
I believed that this family may be related to mine.

I believe that both these people are now deceased.

This is what I know about this family:

Szymon and Cecelia OGUS arrived in Cape Town in June 1934 aboard the
Gloucester Castle. Their last residence before emigrating to South
Africa was Berlin, Germany. I do not know >from which port the
Gloucester originated.

Both Szymon and Cecelia held German passports, and had lived in Germany
for at least 5 years prior to arriving in South Africa.

Szymon, however, was born in Vilna, Lithuania, in 1899. He was an
electrical engineer by profession. Cecelia was born in 1908 in
Germany.

I do not know where they lived in South Africa after their arrival
(possibly Cape Town), but in the 1949, 1953, and 1955 Johannesburg City
phone books, there is a listing for:

OGUS, S. 77 Dunbar Street, Bellevue, Johannesburg

I believe that this may be a listing for Szymon and Cecelia's residence
in Johannesburg. The listing is not present in the 1960 and 1962 city
directories.

I have no record of Szymon's death, but I know that Cecelia OGUS died
on 20 July 1994, and is buried in the Westpark Cemetery in
Johannesburg.

Her gravestone bears the following inscription:

"CAECILIE OGUS, passed away 20th July 1994, lovingly remembered by her
family, Essie, Bertha, Stephanie, Clive, Leanne, Hailey, Pesach, and
Naftali"

I have no information on the names of their children, or even if they
even had any. It's not obvious >from the above gravestone inscription
which names were their children's, and which of these names were for
other family members.

If anyone has any information about the above family, or knows how I
may contact any descendants of Szymon and Cecelia, I'd appreciate
hearing >from you.

Hopefully someone may recognize the collection of names on the
inscription.

Thanks,
Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Szymon and Cecelia OGUS, Johannesburg (1934) #general

Roy Ogus <ogus@...>
 

I am trying to make contact with any of the descendants of Szymon and
Cecelia OGUS, who I believe last lived in Johannesburg, South Africa.
I believed that this family may be related to mine.

I believe that both these people are now deceased.

This is what I know about this family:

Szymon and Cecelia OGUS arrived in Cape Town in June 1934 aboard the
Gloucester Castle. Their last residence before emigrating to South
Africa was Berlin, Germany. I do not know >from which port the
Gloucester originated.

Both Szymon and Cecelia held German passports, and had lived in Germany
for at least 5 years prior to arriving in South Africa.

Szymon, however, was born in Vilna, Lithuania, in 1899. He was an
electrical engineer by profession. Cecelia was born in 1908 in
Germany.

I do not know where they lived in South Africa after their arrival
(possibly Cape Town), but in the 1949, 1953, and 1955 Johannesburg City
phone books, there is a listing for:

OGUS, S. 77 Dunbar Street, Bellevue, Johannesburg

I believe that this may be a listing for Szymon and Cecelia's residence
in Johannesburg. The listing is not present in the 1960 and 1962 city
directories.

I have no record of Szymon's death, but I know that Cecelia OGUS died
on 20 July 1994, and is buried in the Westpark Cemetery in
Johannesburg.

Her gravestone bears the following inscription:

"CAECILIE OGUS, passed away 20th July 1994, lovingly remembered by her
family, Essie, Bertha, Stephanie, Clive, Leanne, Hailey, Pesach, and
Naftali"

I have no information on the names of their children, or even if they
even had any. It's not obvious >from the above gravestone inscription
which names were their children's, and which of these names were for
other family members.

If anyone has any information about the above family, or knows how I
may contact any descendants of Szymon and Cecelia, I'd appreciate
hearing >from you.

Hopefully someone may recognize the collection of names on the
inscription.

Thanks,
Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA


Burial in Jewish cemeteries #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

I asked a question about a Canadian cemetery and got helpful responses for
which I'm grateful.

I now have a more general question which arises >from research I am doing on
Jewish soldiers in the First World War. In the Registers of the
Commonwealth War Graves Commission one can see that as well as the special,
and usually large, military cemeteries, many soldiers were buried in small,
existing civilian cemeteries and even occasionally singly in churchyards.
In the last case, if in Britain, this was often because it was their own
church. But I have come across Jewish soldiers - listed in Jewish sources -
buried in churchyards. Such isolated burials undoubtedly occurred because
men were sometimes buried near to where they died and not transported to
large cemeteries.

One explanation is that some Jews attested as Christians or did not state a
religion and that might have led to their interment in a Christian site.
But that does not account for all of them.

If a Jew can be buried (in wartime) in a non-Jewish cemetery does it follow
that a non-Jew might be buried in a Jewish cemetery? I have a number of
names of men buried in Jewish cemeteries but who are not listed in other
Jewish sources. I have assumed so far that their burial there is proof that
they had attested as Jews when they joined the armed forces.

Harold Pollins


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Burial in Jewish cemeteries #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

I asked a question about a Canadian cemetery and got helpful responses for
which I'm grateful.

I now have a more general question which arises >from research I am doing on
Jewish soldiers in the First World War. In the Registers of the
Commonwealth War Graves Commission one can see that as well as the special,
and usually large, military cemeteries, many soldiers were buried in small,
existing civilian cemeteries and even occasionally singly in churchyards.
In the last case, if in Britain, this was often because it was their own
church. But I have come across Jewish soldiers - listed in Jewish sources -
buried in churchyards. Such isolated burials undoubtedly occurred because
men were sometimes buried near to where they died and not transported to
large cemeteries.

One explanation is that some Jews attested as Christians or did not state a
religion and that might have led to their interment in a Christian site.
But that does not account for all of them.

If a Jew can be buried (in wartime) in a non-Jewish cemetery does it follow
that a non-Jew might be buried in a Jewish cemetery? I have a number of
names of men buried in Jewish cemeteries but who are not listed in other
Jewish sources. I have assumed so far that their burial there is proof that
they had attested as Jews when they joined the armed forces.

Harold Pollins


JONAP = YOMTOV in Hungarian? #general

MBernet@...
 

One of the variants of the YomTov names in my family is Jontaph. A
Jewishgenner says that the JONAP in her family is a Hungarian translation of
YomTov.

Can anyone with knowledge of Hungarian confirm this? It sounds to me to be
too close to the Hebrew original.

Michael Bernet


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JONAP = YOMTOV in Hungarian? #general

MBernet@...
 

One of the variants of the YomTov names in my family is Jontaph. A
Jewishgenner says that the JONAP in her family is a Hungarian translation of
YomTov.

Can anyone with knowledge of Hungarian confirm this? It sounds to me to be
too close to the Hebrew original.

Michael Bernet


Help with gravestone inscription #general

Roy Ogus <ogus@...>
 

A portion of a gravestone inscription for a relative has a word or an
acronym that I'm not familiar with. Does anyone know what it means?

The inscription is as follows:

Tsiporah bat Dov bet-ayin-resh Halevi

What does the bet-ayin-resh mean? Is it just the word "Ber"
(a name) or is it an acronym?

Also, would the name "Halevi" be likely to be a surname, or an
indication that the person was a Levi?

Any inputs would be appreciated.
Thanks.

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please consult the Discussion Group Archives
on our web site for answers to your questions.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with gravestone inscription #general

Roy Ogus <ogus@...>
 

A portion of a gravestone inscription for a relative has a word or an
acronym that I'm not familiar with. Does anyone know what it means?

The inscription is as follows:

Tsiporah bat Dov bet-ayin-resh Halevi

What does the bet-ayin-resh mean? Is it just the word "Ber"
(a name) or is it an acronym?

Also, would the name "Halevi" be likely to be a surname, or an
indication that the person was a Levi?

Any inputs would be appreciated.
Thanks.

Roy Ogus
Palo Alto, California, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please consult the Discussion Group Archives
on our web site for answers to your questions.