Date   

Stepney Orthodox Synagogue continued #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

A few further bits on this synagogue.
According to V.D. Lipman, A History of the Jews in Britain since 1858,
1990, p.53, the synagogue was built by traditionally minded immigrants
who did not like the latitudinarian tendencies of Rev J.F. Stern who
was the minister of the East London Synagogue, built in 1877. Stern's
congregation tended to be composed of the more anglicised and
established Jews of the area. He was popularly known as the Bishop;
his son was killed in action in 1915.
Clearly the Stepney Orthodox Synagogue was built after 1877. I have
not got the exact date.
There may be more information in Geoffrey Alderman's history of the
Federation of Synagogues and Sharman Kadish has written on the history
of synagogues in Britain. I do not have these books in front of me to check.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England

pollins@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Stepney Orthodox Synagogue continued #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

A few further bits on this synagogue.
According to V.D. Lipman, A History of the Jews in Britain since 1858,
1990, p.53, the synagogue was built by traditionally minded immigrants
who did not like the latitudinarian tendencies of Rev J.F. Stern who
was the minister of the East London Synagogue, built in 1877. Stern's
congregation tended to be composed of the more anglicised and
established Jews of the area. He was popularly known as the Bishop;
his son was killed in action in 1915.
Clearly the Stepney Orthodox Synagogue was built after 1877. I have
not got the exact date.
There may be more information in Geoffrey Alderman's history of the
Federation of Synagogues and Sharman Kadish has written on the history
of synagogues in Britain. I do not have these books in front of me to check.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England

pollins@...


re Living Descendants!! #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Ricki Randall Zunk is so correct but I didn't realise there was
anyone else out there with the same passion as I. That is in
connecting with present-day descendants of our predecessors as
well as researching those that have gone before us.

We have just had a visitor for two days here in Manchester,
England >from Philadelphia. Her gggrandfather was the brother of
my husbands ggrandmother. That makes her about a 7th cousin to my
husband and there are some people that might think we are completely
mad but as Ricki Randall Zunk said, they are descended >from the same
root stock. It was such an enlightening visit. We had been on
email for the last two years but after meeting her personally we
felt very comfortable with her as though we had known her forever.
She knew less than I had discovered about this part of the family
genealogy, before we "found" her.

I would very much like to promote family genealogy in Jewish
schools in England so that our youth will not forget where they
came >from and who they are as Jews and perhaps, what there
predecessors sacrificed in order to live.

Rica B Goldberg (Mrs)
Manchester, England.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re Living Descendants!! #general

Rica Goldberg
 

Ricki Randall Zunk is so correct but I didn't realise there was
anyone else out there with the same passion as I. That is in
connecting with present-day descendants of our predecessors as
well as researching those that have gone before us.

We have just had a visitor for two days here in Manchester,
England >from Philadelphia. Her gggrandfather was the brother of
my husbands ggrandmother. That makes her about a 7th cousin to my
husband and there are some people that might think we are completely
mad but as Ricki Randall Zunk said, they are descended >from the same
root stock. It was such an enlightening visit. We had been on
email for the last two years but after meeting her personally we
felt very comfortable with her as though we had known her forever.
She knew less than I had discovered about this part of the family
genealogy, before we "found" her.

I would very much like to promote family genealogy in Jewish
schools in England so that our youth will not forget where they
came >from and who they are as Jews and perhaps, what there
predecessors sacrificed in order to live.

Rica B Goldberg (Mrs)
Manchester, England.


Gravestone in Rotterdam #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Dear J.G

In my letter >from today I do a mistake. The date must be:

19 Nisan or 12 Nisan (Yud Tet or Yud Bet) Taf Kuf Lamed Zein = Taklaz =
537. = 1777

Ury link
Amsterdam
Holland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gravestone in Rotterdam #general

Ury Link <uryl@...>
 

Dear J.G

In my letter >from today I do a mistake. The date must be:

19 Nisan or 12 Nisan (Yud Tet or Yud Bet) Taf Kuf Lamed Zein = Taklaz =
537. = 1777

Ury link
Amsterdam
Holland


Re: Tracing a Kohen #general

A.I. & S.W. Lebowitz <aileb@...>
 

On 2 Sep 98, at 12:18, MBernet@... wrote:

Cohanim are a subset of the tribe of Levi. Commonly, the gravestone of a
Cohen is marked with two hands, thumbs touching, spread two finger, space,
two fingers, space, thumbs . . . to mark the Cohen's only surviving
religious function, raising his hands to bless ("dukhaning"). If these
symbols appear on your ancestor's tombstones, the word Cohen might have
been considered superfluous. It is also superfluous if the name Katz
appears, or they are designated with the letters Kaf-Tzade.
The fact that a person bears the name Katz does not necessarily indicate
that they are a cohen. My son-in-law's family name is Katz and he is not
a cohen. His family acquired the name, apparently for one of the reasons
for name change common in Eastern Europe during the last century.

A Cohen who is physically deformed in certain ways, by birth disease or
accident, or one who marries a divorced woman or a proselyte, may no
longer assume his functions. I am not sure to what extent that would
exclude also his descendants.
The descendants of a cohen who marries a divorcee or proselyte are
not cohanim, those of a physically impaired cohen are.
Abe
Abraham & Shulamith Lebowitz (Har Nof-Jerusalem) aileb@...

MODERATOR NOTE: While of genealogical interest, we are now getting
into differences of opinion more heavily weighted in religious
interpretation. This forum is not appropriate for such discussion.
Please continue privately as this thread is ended.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tracing a Kohen #general

A.I. & S.W. Lebowitz <aileb@...>
 

On 2 Sep 98, at 12:18, MBernet@... wrote:

Cohanim are a subset of the tribe of Levi. Commonly, the gravestone of a
Cohen is marked with two hands, thumbs touching, spread two finger, space,
two fingers, space, thumbs . . . to mark the Cohen's only surviving
religious function, raising his hands to bless ("dukhaning"). If these
symbols appear on your ancestor's tombstones, the word Cohen might have
been considered superfluous. It is also superfluous if the name Katz
appears, or they are designated with the letters Kaf-Tzade.
The fact that a person bears the name Katz does not necessarily indicate
that they are a cohen. My son-in-law's family name is Katz and he is not
a cohen. His family acquired the name, apparently for one of the reasons
for name change common in Eastern Europe during the last century.

A Cohen who is physically deformed in certain ways, by birth disease or
accident, or one who marries a divorced woman or a proselyte, may no
longer assume his functions. I am not sure to what extent that would
exclude also his descendants.
The descendants of a cohen who marries a divorcee or proselyte are
not cohanim, those of a physically impaired cohen are.
Abe
Abraham & Shulamith Lebowitz (Har Nof-Jerusalem) aileb@...

MODERATOR NOTE: While of genealogical interest, we are now getting
into differences of opinion more heavily weighted in religious
interpretation. This forum is not appropriate for such discussion.
Please continue privately as this thread is ended.


109 Norfolk St., NYC #general

David W. Harris <dharris1@...>
 

I have the 1910 census page for #109 Norfolk St. in New York City. If
interested in data regarding the following parties please email to my
direct address. Sorry for any misspellings - I tried my best.

109 Norfolk Street

LIEBMAN, Rosie, Les
BLUM, Sam
DRECHSLER, Irv
HARRIS, Solomon, Beckie, Harry, Eva, Rubie
BERNSTEIN, Yetta, Dora
CASLE, Avigdor, Mazie, Ozzie, Moses, Nathan, Joe, Bessie
MORT, Baruch, Gussie
HURWITZ, Joseph
ROSENBERG, Louis, Clara, William, Joe, Bessie
MOONSHINE, Abe
FUCHS, Mandel, Mayer
WINKLER, Lewis, Sarah, Rose, Markus, David
DARSHEFSKY, Jack, Yetta
SCHWARTZ, Hyman, Celia, Esther, David, Simon, Issie
SHAPULEIN, Benny
LEVINE, Aaron
MANDEL, Israel
FEIGENBAUM, Harry
BIRNBAUM, Harry, Bessie, Jakie, Bertha

Good luck.
---------------
David W. Harris
<dharris1@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 109 Norfolk St., NYC #general

David W. Harris <dharris1@...>
 

I have the 1910 census page for #109 Norfolk St. in New York City. If
interested in data regarding the following parties please email to my
direct address. Sorry for any misspellings - I tried my best.

109 Norfolk Street

LIEBMAN, Rosie, Les
BLUM, Sam
DRECHSLER, Irv
HARRIS, Solomon, Beckie, Harry, Eva, Rubie
BERNSTEIN, Yetta, Dora
CASLE, Avigdor, Mazie, Ozzie, Moses, Nathan, Joe, Bessie
MORT, Baruch, Gussie
HURWITZ, Joseph
ROSENBERG, Louis, Clara, William, Joe, Bessie
MOONSHINE, Abe
FUCHS, Mandel, Mayer
WINKLER, Lewis, Sarah, Rose, Markus, David
DARSHEFSKY, Jack, Yetta
SCHWARTZ, Hyman, Celia, Esther, David, Simon, Issie
SHAPULEIN, Benny
LEVINE, Aaron
MANDEL, Israel
FEIGENBAUM, Harry
BIRNBAUM, Harry, Bessie, Jakie, Bertha

Good luck.
---------------
David W. Harris
<dharris1@...>


Re: Sjouwermen and other trades? #general

Rob van Geuns <rvgeuns@...>
 

Diamantslijper = Diamond cutter
Sjouwerman = Porter, dock-hand
but in the 1800's not necessarily in the harbor
Cap maker: this is not Dutch, the Dutch translation would be
Hoedjesmaker, somebody who makes hats (typically for women)

These are typical Amsterdam (City) professions; Jews in the
country were usually merchants (hawkers) or butchers.

Rob van Geuns
Best, the Netherlands
---------------------------
Alan Perry wrote:

Does anybody out there know what a "diamond slijper"; a "sjouwerman";
and a "cap maker" do? These are all professions or trades of Dutch Jews
in the 1800s.
EXCESSIVE QUOTES DELETED>>>>>>>>>>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sjouwermen and other trades? #general

Rob van Geuns <rvgeuns@...>
 

Diamantslijper = Diamond cutter
Sjouwerman = Porter, dock-hand
but in the 1800's not necessarily in the harbor
Cap maker: this is not Dutch, the Dutch translation would be
Hoedjesmaker, somebody who makes hats (typically for women)

These are typical Amsterdam (City) professions; Jews in the
country were usually merchants (hawkers) or butchers.

Rob van Geuns
Best, the Netherlands
---------------------------
Alan Perry wrote:

Does anybody out there know what a "diamond slijper"; a "sjouwerman";
and a "cap maker" do? These are all professions or trades of Dutch Jews
in the 1800s.
EXCESSIVE QUOTES DELETED>>>>>>>>>>>


Re: Stepney Orthodox Synagogue, London #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

The synagogue was destroyed by enemy bombing during the war. It
belonged to the Federation of Synagogues whose address is 65
Watford Way, London, NW4 3AQ, UK. Telephone 0181 202 2263.
FAX 0181 203 0610.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Stepney Orthodox Synagogue, London #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

The synagogue was destroyed by enemy bombing during the war. It
belonged to the Federation of Synagogues whose address is 65
Watford Way, London, NW4 3AQ, UK. Telephone 0181 202 2263.
FAX 0181 203 0610.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England


Re: Tombstone inscription #general

Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Sun, 6 Sep 1998 20:34:54, levinson@... (Jon and
Peggy Levinson) 'llowed:

Could anyone tell me the significance of the following two words on a
tombstone:
In order (R to L): hay-alepf-shin-hay, then hay-chet-shin-vov-bet-hay
The Esteemed Wife (Woman)
-------------
Stan Goodman
Qiryat Tiv'on
Israel

(Remove "takeout" >from domain; change "sheol" to "stan". Sorry)

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ISMACH, ROKITA: Lomza Gubernia,
Poland
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Romania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tombstone inscription #general

Stan Goodman <sheol@...>
 

On Sun, 6 Sep 1998 20:34:54, levinson@... (Jon and
Peggy Levinson) 'llowed:

Could anyone tell me the significance of the following two words on a
tombstone:
In order (R to L): hay-alepf-shin-hay, then hay-chet-shin-vov-bet-hay
The Esteemed Wife (Woman)
-------------
Stan Goodman
Qiryat Tiv'on
Israel

(Remove "takeout" >from domain; change "sheol" to "stan". Sorry)

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ISMACH, ROKITA: Lomza Gubernia,
Poland
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Romania


Genealogy Software #general

Philip Levinson <telecom@...>
 

I presently use Quinsept's MSDOS based 'Family Roots', and would like to
update to a WIN95/98 software. The application should import Family
Roots data files, and not GEDCOM. Which software packages seem to be the
most popular and the phone number for the manufacturer.

Thanks

MODERATOR NOTE: Respond privately please


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy Software #general

Philip Levinson <telecom@...>
 

I presently use Quinsept's MSDOS based 'Family Roots', and would like to
update to a WIN95/98 software. The application should import Family
Roots data files, and not GEDCOM. Which software packages seem to be the
most popular and the phone number for the manufacturer.

Thanks

MODERATOR NOTE: Respond privately please


Hebrew names and nonsense #general

DAVID SNYDER <ds66@...>
 

At the risk of sounding inflamatory and after many, many, many postings
on this subject I would like to add a few comments to the discussion
about Hebrew names, naming patterns and issues of translation,
transliteration and usage. It seems to me that the vast majority of
people seeking Hebrew "equivalents" for Anglicised names are simply
searching for the actual names given to their ancestors - and are not
necessarily interested in either the etymological or philological
development of a sepcific name. When discussing European Jewry, if not
the overwhelming majority of world Jewry, in the broader non-Jewish
cultural context, we should keep in mind that our common cultural
history includes at least one major source - the Hebrew Bible. Moishe
from Dribkelevke, Russia may have been known as "Moishele" to his
mother, recorded as "Moisey" in official Russian documents, entered on a
passenger list as "Movshe" in the port of Libau en route to America, and
naturalized in the District court on Main Street America as "Maurice".
When someone asks in this forum for the Hebrew equivalent of
"Maurice" (the question may be phrased as looking for the translation,
transliteration, equivalent or whatever), it seems to me that this
person is primarily interested in getting to the name "Moshe" and not
interested in the etymological megillah tracing the evolution of the
Hebrew original name to the name adopted in America. Although such
information is indeed interesting (to me, at least), the sometimes
lengthy responses in this forum to such questions seem to demonstrate
more about the respondent's erudition tthan about the original question
posed by a fellow JewishGenner.
I think it important to note that someone with a question concerning
Hebrew names (or any other subject for that matter), should check the
Discussion Group Archives (as routine) to read what has already been
written on the subject. Secondly, it seems to me that one should always
bear in mind the cultural context that influenced the choice of a
particular name - as indeed some English names, albeit with Biblical
(hence Hebrew) origins are considered by a certain group as sounding too
"non-Jewish". Thirdly, I believe one should begin with the premise that
all Anglicized names are arbitrary in relation to the Hebrew name given
to the individual at birth, even names that appear to be direct
equivalents for a Hebrew name. At one time, in Poland, Russia and
Romania there were many "Moisheles" running around, and today there are
many "Moshes" in Israel (where Hebrew is the language of usage) and
"Moisheles" in places like Borough Park and Bnai Brak (where Yiddish
still prevails) - but in suburban America you will probably find more
Jewish males named "Michael", "Max" and "Mark" who were given the Hebrew
name "Moshe" after some ancestor bearing that name, even though
"Michael" and "Mark" are Anglicized equivalents of Hebrew names.
To unwravel the mystery of a relative's Hebrew name, first check all
available sources which might have their Hebrew name recorded (such as
circumcission and marriage records or tombstone epitaphs), ask relatives
if anyone >from an earlier generation ever addressed that person by their
"Jewish" name, look for re-occurring Hebrew names in the family lines,
consult the many books written about Hebrew names and naming patterns
(which will give you information and clues to help track down an elusive
name) and THEN, when all else fails, post your problem on this public
forum. The reasons why my Uncle Samuel (a perfectly acceptible Hebrew
name) was called "Samuel" in America and named "Yedidiya" in Bialystok
will more than likely have no bearing whatsoever on your Uncle Sam's
Hebrew name - but someone out there in JewishGen land may be able to add
some insightful information. Even names which appear to be obvious
equivalents of Hebrew names may simply be an arbitrary name chosen by
your ancestor and the mere existence of exact equivalents does not in
any way confirm the relationship between the Hebrew and secular names
used by an individual.


David Snyder,
Tel Aviv


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hebrew names and nonsense #general

DAVID SNYDER <ds66@...>
 

At the risk of sounding inflamatory and after many, many, many postings
on this subject I would like to add a few comments to the discussion
about Hebrew names, naming patterns and issues of translation,
transliteration and usage. It seems to me that the vast majority of
people seeking Hebrew "equivalents" for Anglicised names are simply
searching for the actual names given to their ancestors - and are not
necessarily interested in either the etymological or philological
development of a sepcific name. When discussing European Jewry, if not
the overwhelming majority of world Jewry, in the broader non-Jewish
cultural context, we should keep in mind that our common cultural
history includes at least one major source - the Hebrew Bible. Moishe
from Dribkelevke, Russia may have been known as "Moishele" to his
mother, recorded as "Moisey" in official Russian documents, entered on a
passenger list as "Movshe" in the port of Libau en route to America, and
naturalized in the District court on Main Street America as "Maurice".
When someone asks in this forum for the Hebrew equivalent of
"Maurice" (the question may be phrased as looking for the translation,
transliteration, equivalent or whatever), it seems to me that this
person is primarily interested in getting to the name "Moshe" and not
interested in the etymological megillah tracing the evolution of the
Hebrew original name to the name adopted in America. Although such
information is indeed interesting (to me, at least), the sometimes
lengthy responses in this forum to such questions seem to demonstrate
more about the respondent's erudition tthan about the original question
posed by a fellow JewishGenner.
I think it important to note that someone with a question concerning
Hebrew names (or any other subject for that matter), should check the
Discussion Group Archives (as routine) to read what has already been
written on the subject. Secondly, it seems to me that one should always
bear in mind the cultural context that influenced the choice of a
particular name - as indeed some English names, albeit with Biblical
(hence Hebrew) origins are considered by a certain group as sounding too
"non-Jewish". Thirdly, I believe one should begin with the premise that
all Anglicized names are arbitrary in relation to the Hebrew name given
to the individual at birth, even names that appear to be direct
equivalents for a Hebrew name. At one time, in Poland, Russia and
Romania there were many "Moisheles" running around, and today there are
many "Moshes" in Israel (where Hebrew is the language of usage) and
"Moisheles" in places like Borough Park and Bnai Brak (where Yiddish
still prevails) - but in suburban America you will probably find more
Jewish males named "Michael", "Max" and "Mark" who were given the Hebrew
name "Moshe" after some ancestor bearing that name, even though
"Michael" and "Mark" are Anglicized equivalents of Hebrew names.
To unwravel the mystery of a relative's Hebrew name, first check all
available sources which might have their Hebrew name recorded (such as
circumcission and marriage records or tombstone epitaphs), ask relatives
if anyone >from an earlier generation ever addressed that person by their
"Jewish" name, look for re-occurring Hebrew names in the family lines,
consult the many books written about Hebrew names and naming patterns
(which will give you information and clues to help track down an elusive
name) and THEN, when all else fails, post your problem on this public
forum. The reasons why my Uncle Samuel (a perfectly acceptible Hebrew
name) was called "Samuel" in America and named "Yedidiya" in Bialystok
will more than likely have no bearing whatsoever on your Uncle Sam's
Hebrew name - but someone out there in JewishGen land may be able to add
some insightful information. Even names which appear to be obvious
equivalents of Hebrew names may simply be an arbitrary name chosen by
your ancestor and the mere existence of exact equivalents does not in
any way confirm the relationship between the Hebrew and secular names
used by an individual.


David Snyder,
Tel Aviv