Date   

Re: List of Jewish refugees, who died in Sweden in 1945-1946 #hungary

Susanna Vendel <susanna.vendel@...>
 

I am sorry but there was a missunderstanding.

The book " 6 thousend of 6 miljons- a Requiem" contains the 6.000 names
which were engraved on the remembrance wall of the Stockholm's Synagogue.
These names belongs to persons who disappeared in the Holocaust and are
remembered by their families and friends.

In the same book there are some other lists of names for people who were
saved >from the concentration camps to Sweden but died on the way to Sweden
or after their arrival to Sweden. These are short lists sorted by
citizenship: Czechoslovakians, Dutchmen, Italians, Poles, Yougoslaves,
Lithuanians, Greeks, Austrians. As H-sig accepts e-mail containing name
lists I copied only the lists for Hungarians and Romanians which can be of
interest for this group.

Regards
Susanna Vendel, Stockholm
susanna.vendel@swipnet.se

----------


Hungary SIG #Hungary SV: List of Jewish refugees, who died in Sweden in 1945-1946 #hungary

Susanna Vendel <susanna.vendel@...>
 

I am sorry but there was a missunderstanding.

The book " 6 thousend of 6 miljons- a Requiem" contains the 6.000 names
which were engraved on the remembrance wall of the Stockholm's Synagogue.
These names belongs to persons who disappeared in the Holocaust and are
remembered by their families and friends.

In the same book there are some other lists of names for people who were
saved >from the concentration camps to Sweden but died on the way to Sweden
or after their arrival to Sweden. These are short lists sorted by
citizenship: Czechoslovakians, Dutchmen, Italians, Poles, Yougoslaves,
Lithuanians, Greeks, Austrians. As H-sig accepts e-mail containing name
lists I copied only the lists for Hungarians and Romanians which can be of
interest for this group.

Regards
Susanna Vendel, Stockholm
susanna.vendel@swipnet.se

----------


Dokszyce Yizkor Book #belarus

Joel Alpert <ALPERT@...>
 

Dokshitz Researchers >from the Belarus Special Interst Group,

I note with joy and satisfaction that you have found the portions of the
Dokshitz Yizkor Book that I have recently placed on the JewishGen Yizkor
Book Project translations and that you have found it useful. I have done
this with the extensive help and efforts of Aviva Neeman (Tel Aviv) who
located the Dokshitz Group in Israel that wrote the book in Hebrew and
Yiddish in the 1970s. We intend to translate the remainer of the book and
place it on the web too. The members of this group in Israel provided the
approval to place the translation on the web and are very interested in
connecting with those of us whose ancestors came >from Dokshitz. I expect
that they knew members of our families who did not survive the Shoah and
would be glad to provide information that they have. One member of this
group (Yechezkeel Levitan) is shortly going to be connected to the net with
email. I would suggest that those of you who are interested in
establishing personal contact send me your email addresses so that I can
compile a list for exchanging Dokshitz information and communication with
the Israeli group of Dokshitzers.

If I can be of further help please contact me at ALPERT@LL.MIT.EDU

Joel Alpert, Woburn (Boston), Massachusetts USA

I suggest you check the section under the Belarus section on JewishGen -
there is a Dokszyce (Dokshitsy) Yizkor Book that was originally compiled in
the 1970s and put on the web site recently. There are lists of families to
go along with the written memories of Holocaust survivors >from the town. I
recognize a couple of the names below >from this site (DUBINSKY and
LEVITAN). For anyone that is searching for family >from this region (as far
as Gleboki), this is a good resource on life in that area during World War
II, even if your family is not mentioned.

:-Daniel Checkman,
New Orleans, LA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Dokszyce Yizkor Book #belarus

Joel Alpert <ALPERT@...>
 

Dokshitz Researchers >from the Belarus Special Interst Group,

I note with joy and satisfaction that you have found the portions of the
Dokshitz Yizkor Book that I have recently placed on the JewishGen Yizkor
Book Project translations and that you have found it useful. I have done
this with the extensive help and efforts of Aviva Neeman (Tel Aviv) who
located the Dokshitz Group in Israel that wrote the book in Hebrew and
Yiddish in the 1970s. We intend to translate the remainer of the book and
place it on the web too. The members of this group in Israel provided the
approval to place the translation on the web and are very interested in
connecting with those of us whose ancestors came >from Dokshitz. I expect
that they knew members of our families who did not survive the Shoah and
would be glad to provide information that they have. One member of this
group (Yechezkeel Levitan) is shortly going to be connected to the net with
email. I would suggest that those of you who are interested in
establishing personal contact send me your email addresses so that I can
compile a list for exchanging Dokshitz information and communication with
the Israeli group of Dokshitzers.

If I can be of further help please contact me at ALPERT@LL.MIT.EDU

Joel Alpert, Woburn (Boston), Massachusetts USA

I suggest you check the section under the Belarus section on JewishGen -
there is a Dokszyce (Dokshitsy) Yizkor Book that was originally compiled in
the 1970s and put on the web site recently. There are lists of families to
go along with the written memories of Holocaust survivors >from the town. I
recognize a couple of the names below >from this site (DUBINSKY and
LEVITAN). For anyone that is searching for family >from this region (as far
as Gleboki), this is a good resource on life in that area during World War
II, even if your family is not mentioned.

:-Daniel Checkman,
New Orleans, LA


Re: IAJGS Cemetery Project #belarus

AGeffner@...
 

Hello,

Since Tammy has had some luck, I thought I would see if you might
have some information on the names I am rearching, >from Belarus. My
grandparents were >from Bykhov, in Mogilev Gobernia.They had some
relatives, >from nearby Gomel, so that is also a spot to look into.The names
are: ZMUDIK, EHUDIN, DRIGANT, ZEROKIN.
Thanks:

Doris Becker Geffner
E-Mail address: ageffner@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: IAJGS Cemetery Project #belarus

AGeffner@...
 

Hello,

Since Tammy has had some luck, I thought I would see if you might
have some information on the names I am rearching, >from Belarus. My
grandparents were >from Bykhov, in Mogilev Gobernia.They had some
relatives, >from nearby Gomel, so that is also a spot to look into.The names
are: ZMUDIK, EHUDIN, DRIGANT, ZEROKIN.
Thanks:

Doris Becker Geffner
E-Mail address: ageffner@aol.com


Yizkor Book Project Monthly Update #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

During the month of October we put a record-breaking 12 new translations on
our web site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>. We now have exactly 50
Yizkor Book items on-line. A heartfelt "thank you" to our translation
donors and our HTML volunteers, and a special appreciation to our tireless
Translations Manager, Joyce Field.

The following nine items are new since our last Update:

* Berezhany, Ukraine - Translation of chapter >from Brzezany, Narajow
ve-ha-seviva; toldot kehilot she-nehrevu (Brzezany Memorial Book),
contributed by Michael Kreindler.

* Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland - Translation of portions of Sefer kehilat
Yehudei Dabrowa Gornicza ve-hurbana (Book of the Jewish community of
Dabrowa Gornicza and its destruction), translated and contributed by Lance
Ackerfeld.

* Grebinki, Ukraine - Translation of Aunt Sophie's Letter, translated and
contributed by Leonard Prager.

* Jedwabne (Yedwabne), Poland - Translation of the Table of Contents and
Necrology >from Sefer Jedwabne; Historiya ve-zikaron (Yedwabne: History and
Memorial Book ), translated and contributed by Morlan Ty Rogers.

* Kozienice, Poland - Lists of martyrs >from The book of Kozienice; The
birth and the destruction of a Jewish community, contributed by Phyllis
Goldberg.

* Piaski [Piesk], Belarus - Translation of Necrology from: Pyesk ve-Most;
sefer yizkor (Piesk (Piaski) and Most, a memorial book), transliterated and
donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Sadgura, Ukraine - Translation of the chapter "Sadgura" >from Volume II of
Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukowina),
translated by Thea Waldman, contributed by Nicholas Martin.

* Suchowola, Poland - Translation of Necrology from: Khurbn Sukhovolye;
lezikorn fun a yidish shtetl tsvishn Bialystok un Grodne (The Holocaust in
Suchowola; in memory of a Jewish shtetl between Bialystok and Grodno),
transliterated and donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Zheludok (Zoludek), Belarus - Translation of Table of Contents and
Necrology from: Sefer Zoludek ve-Orlowa; galed le-zikaron (The book of
Zoludek [Zhelodok] and Orlowa; a living memorial), translated by Michael
Bohnen and Ellen Sadove Renck, donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

We would like to welcome two new volunteer HTML coders, both of whom join
us >from Israel: Jerry Esterson and Moshe Shavit. Jerry has created our web
pages listed under Siemiatycze (announced last month), Grebenki, and
Kozienice. Moshe provided the pages for Dabrowa Gornicza and Jedwabne.
They join our veteran HTML coder Mike Kalt and our translations advisor,
Susannah Juni, who has generously helping to get our web pages up-to-date.

Although the above projects are ready to view, a few still have some
formatting or proofreading work to be done; final versions should be
on-line within a week or so.

With the tremendous activity in our Translations activities, I regret that
I've fallen behind in updating the Database. So if you have sent in
material for the Database within the last several months, please bear with
us. It will be entered into the Database as soon as possible.

Thanks again to everyone who has helped us with the Yizkor Book Project.



Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Yizkor Book Project Monthly Update #yizkorbooks

Martin Kessel <mkessel@...>
 

During the month of October we put a record-breaking 12 new translations on
our web site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>. We now have exactly 50
Yizkor Book items on-line. A heartfelt "thank you" to our translation
donors and our HTML volunteers, and a special appreciation to our tireless
Translations Manager, Joyce Field.

The following nine items are new since our last Update:

* Berezhany, Ukraine - Translation of chapter >from Brzezany, Narajow
ve-ha-seviva; toldot kehilot she-nehrevu (Brzezany Memorial Book),
contributed by Michael Kreindler.

* Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland - Translation of portions of Sefer kehilat
Yehudei Dabrowa Gornicza ve-hurbana (Book of the Jewish community of
Dabrowa Gornicza and its destruction), translated and contributed by Lance
Ackerfeld.

* Grebinki, Ukraine - Translation of Aunt Sophie's Letter, translated and
contributed by Leonard Prager.

* Jedwabne (Yedwabne), Poland - Translation of the Table of Contents and
Necrology >from Sefer Jedwabne; Historiya ve-zikaron (Yedwabne: History and
Memorial Book ), translated and contributed by Morlan Ty Rogers.

* Kozienice, Poland - Lists of martyrs >from The book of Kozienice; The
birth and the destruction of a Jewish community, contributed by Phyllis
Goldberg.

* Piaski [Piesk], Belarus - Translation of Necrology from: Pyesk ve-Most;
sefer yizkor (Piesk (Piaski) and Most, a memorial book), transliterated and
donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Sadgura, Ukraine - Translation of the chapter "Sadgura" >from Volume II of
Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina (History of the Jews in the Bukowina),
translated by Thea Waldman, contributed by Nicholas Martin.

* Suchowola, Poland - Translation of Necrology from: Khurbn Sukhovolye;
lezikorn fun a yidish shtetl tsvishn Bialystok un Grodne (The Holocaust in
Suchowola; in memory of a Jewish shtetl between Bialystok and Grodno),
transliterated and donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

* Zheludok (Zoludek), Belarus - Translation of Table of Contents and
Necrology from: Sefer Zoludek ve-Orlowa; galed le-zikaron (The book of
Zoludek [Zhelodok] and Orlowa; a living memorial), translated by Michael
Bohnen and Ellen Sadove Renck, donated by Ellen Sadove Renck.

We would like to welcome two new volunteer HTML coders, both of whom join
us >from Israel: Jerry Esterson and Moshe Shavit. Jerry has created our web
pages listed under Siemiatycze (announced last month), Grebenki, and
Kozienice. Moshe provided the pages for Dabrowa Gornicza and Jedwabne.
They join our veteran HTML coder Mike Kalt and our translations advisor,
Susannah Juni, who has generously helping to get our web pages up-to-date.

Although the above projects are ready to view, a few still have some
formatting or proofreading work to be done; final versions should be
on-line within a week or so.

With the tremendous activity in our Translations activities, I regret that
I've fallen behind in updating the Database. So if you have sent in
material for the Database within the last several months, please bear with
us. It will be entered into the Database as soon as possible.

Thanks again to everyone who has helped us with the Yizkor Book Project.



Martin Kessel, Project Manager mkessel@jewishgen.org
JewishGen Yizkor Book Project

For information about the Yizkor Book Project,
visit our Web page at: <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/>
or send a blank e-mail message to: <yizkor2@jewishgen.org>


Re: "Migrations from the Russian Empire" #belarus

Myra S. Davis <myrabokpg@...>
 

These volumes are a wonderful source of information if your family came
over starting in 1875. I obtained volume 1, 2, 3, >from my public
library. They had to find them but find them, they did.
My problem is my family didn't start coming over until 1900.
I spoke with the publisher early this year and was told the next couple
of volumes would cover up to 1900 but apparently they do not. They are
supposed to go up to 1910 but each book is so huge and it only covers
about a year.
Each book sells for $50. The publisher is Genealogical Publishing Co.
Inc.
1001 N. Calvert St. Baltimore, MD 21202.
Their phone number is 410-837-8271

I am still trying to find a copy of "They Came In Ships" revised edition
by John Phillip Colletta. Does anyone know about that book?

Myra Davis
myrabokpg@juno.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: "Migrations from the Russian Empire" #belarus

Myra S. Davis <myrabokpg@...>
 

These volumes are a wonderful source of information if your family came
over starting in 1875. I obtained volume 1, 2, 3, >from my public
library. They had to find them but find them, they did.
My problem is my family didn't start coming over until 1900.
I spoke with the publisher early this year and was told the next couple
of volumes would cover up to 1900 but apparently they do not. They are
supposed to go up to 1910 but each book is so huge and it only covers
about a year.
Each book sells for $50. The publisher is Genealogical Publishing Co.
Inc.
1001 N. Calvert St. Baltimore, MD 21202.
Their phone number is 410-837-8271

I am still trying to find a copy of "They Came In Ships" revised edition
by John Phillip Colletta. Does anyone know about that book?

Myra Davis
myrabokpg@juno.com


Research in Tarnow #general

eric adler <ea73@...>
 

I have just returned >from a four-day trip to Tarnow, Poland. Here's a
run-down on the trip. Tarnow is amazing, both for the beauty of its old
town and the richness of its vital records between 1870 and 1940/41
(after the records available on LDS microfilm).

Getting there. Not a problem. No visa required for Americans. Easy
rail connections >from Warsaw or other European cities.

Surviving. I didn't have a guide or anything-just a cheap
Polish-English dictionary and a good bit of improvisation. A guide
would be good for someone interested in visiting shtetls. There are a
number of hotels. I would recommend staying in at least a three star
hotel, maybe the Hotel Tarnovia or the Pod Debem Inn. I chose a
two-star hotel, the Polonia, primarily because of its central location
on Ul. Walowa in the heart of the old town, but the accommodations
weren't great. Most people don't speak English, although some taxi
drivers speak broken English and sometimes broken German. There are a
number of ATM machines, and stores are plentiful. Kiosks are plentiful
and very useful. Things are cheaper here than in Western Europe, and
taxis aren't that expensive. In one instance, I took a taxi >from the
center of town to the shtetl of Plesna, about a fifteen or twenty minute
ride to the south. It cost me about $8. Normal bus rides cost about
thirty cents. I took a $3.50 taxi ride daily >from the center of town to
the branch of the state archives, although a bus is also available.

Archives. There are two main archives in Tarnow. The first is the
branch of the state archives (Archiwum Panstwowe w Krakowie) at Ul.
Chemniczna 16. It is closed on Fridays but otherwise open >from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. It has Jewish vital records for the years 1849-1899. Records
for Tarnow before 1849 are located in the Krakow branch. The Urstad
Stanu Civilnego (U.S.C.) is located on Ul. Gumniska and has Jewish vital
records for the years 1900-1941. There is an index for the years
1900-1929 (1900-1920 for deaths). It is closed on Wednesdays and
usually open >from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
All correspondence, as well as permission to research at the branch
archives in Tarnow, must go through the Polish State Archive in Warsaw
(Ul. Dluga 7, 00-263 Warszawa), where they have people who speak
English. I visited there personally the week before doing research and
had to wait for the director, Mrs. Witkowska, to sign my request. The
first thing the people asked for when I got to Tarnow was a copy of the
permission. The people at the state archives branch (a staff of three)
are very, very helpful (but you'll have to bring your Polish
dictionary). You can look through the actual record books. Things are
very laid back there-they even served me coffee and crackers the first
day. It is open >from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. daily. The records there are
wonderfully complete. The records after 1878 are all in Polish, as
opposed to the usual German. It is a treat alone not to have to
decipher the gothic scribble. The death records are especially good,
listing detailed information down to the time and cause of death.
Marriage records are of course sparse due to the difficulty of Jews
marrying in Galicia. I researched there for three days, but would have
liked thirty. There is supposedly a lot of other historical information
on Tarnow there, too.
I spent the last day researching at U.S.C. The records there are
just as detailed as the ones in the state archives branch. The main
purpose of this place is to register current records (birth, marriage,
death). I took up a position at a corner desk and looked first at
indexes. Here again, I had to rely on my non-existent Polish language
skills. After looking through the indexes, I asked to see the actual
files. The worker there (there are a number of them) told me that I
needed permission, but couldn't tell me exactly how. I got a little
frustrated, and finally asked her to make copies of something like two
hundred listings of things I had found in the indices. She realized
that it was ludicrous, and just decided to bring out all the records.
Again, I wished I had a lot more time there. Especially in these later
records, births were frequently registered under the mother's name. I
would recommend writing them in advance to request permission to view
the files.

The Cemetery. The Jewish cemetery in Tarnow is magnificent. The key to
the cemetery is maintained by Adam Bartosz, the director of museums in
Tarnow. His office is on the main square in Tarnow (Rynek 20/21, 33-100
Tarnow). The cemetery has somewhere between 5000 and 8000 graves. It
was cleaned up four years ago by an independent local organization in
Tarnow that protects Jewish things (e.g., the bimah of an old synagogue
and the mikvah). The stones in the Tarnow cemetery demonstrate
magnificent craftsmanship. The majority are in Hebrew. The most recent
one (the last Jew to die in Tarnow) is, I believe, four years old.
There is a dignified monument to individuals lost in the Holocaust. The
cemetery is absolutely filled with stones. I am not sure of the date of
the earliest burial, but believe it was in the 17th century. Many of
the stones are still toppled and many are not readable, but most of the
stones are in very good condition. The cemetery does show signs of
neglect, though. There is a good deal of plant growth: enough so that
it is difficult to walk in some places. You can also find basketballs
and tennis balls that people have thrown over the wall and not
retrieved. Mr. Bartosz explains that the government does not provide
any money for the upkeep of the cemetery. A professor in Tarnow named
Dr. Leszek Hondo has transcribed approximately 80% of the inscriptions.
He will eventually put these into computer format, but is currently
working on a book about the cemetery in Krakow and that has priority for
him.

Touring Tarnow. Touring the old part of downtown Tarnow is easy and
enjoyable. The centerpiece of the old town is a Renaissance era town
hall in the center of the marketplace. It is now a museum. At the main
museum at Rynek 20/21, you can buy a book and pamphlet about Tarnow
Judaica written by Mr. Bartosz. There is an informative pamphlet called
"In the Footsteps of the Jews of Tarnow" (cost: about 40 cents) which
provides a self-guided tour through the Jewish sections of old Tarnow.
The museum is closed on Mondays. A lot of the old Jewish sections of
Tarnow are destroyed, but there are a number of interesting sights, the
highlight being the bimah of an old synagogue. Mr. Bartosz's book,
Tarnowskie Judaica, costs about $3 and is in Polish, but has a lot of
good historical information and pictures of both Tarnow and the
surrounding shtetls.

Eric Adler
Hanau, Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research in Tarnow #general

eric adler <ea73@...>
 

I have just returned >from a four-day trip to Tarnow, Poland. Here's a
run-down on the trip. Tarnow is amazing, both for the beauty of its old
town and the richness of its vital records between 1870 and 1940/41
(after the records available on LDS microfilm).

Getting there. Not a problem. No visa required for Americans. Easy
rail connections >from Warsaw or other European cities.

Surviving. I didn't have a guide or anything-just a cheap
Polish-English dictionary and a good bit of improvisation. A guide
would be good for someone interested in visiting shtetls. There are a
number of hotels. I would recommend staying in at least a three star
hotel, maybe the Hotel Tarnovia or the Pod Debem Inn. I chose a
two-star hotel, the Polonia, primarily because of its central location
on Ul. Walowa in the heart of the old town, but the accommodations
weren't great. Most people don't speak English, although some taxi
drivers speak broken English and sometimes broken German. There are a
number of ATM machines, and stores are plentiful. Kiosks are plentiful
and very useful. Things are cheaper here than in Western Europe, and
taxis aren't that expensive. In one instance, I took a taxi >from the
center of town to the shtetl of Plesna, about a fifteen or twenty minute
ride to the south. It cost me about $8. Normal bus rides cost about
thirty cents. I took a $3.50 taxi ride daily >from the center of town to
the branch of the state archives, although a bus is also available.

Archives. There are two main archives in Tarnow. The first is the
branch of the state archives (Archiwum Panstwowe w Krakowie) at Ul.
Chemniczna 16. It is closed on Fridays but otherwise open >from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. It has Jewish vital records for the years 1849-1899. Records
for Tarnow before 1849 are located in the Krakow branch. The Urstad
Stanu Civilnego (U.S.C.) is located on Ul. Gumniska and has Jewish vital
records for the years 1900-1941. There is an index for the years
1900-1929 (1900-1920 for deaths). It is closed on Wednesdays and
usually open >from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
All correspondence, as well as permission to research at the branch
archives in Tarnow, must go through the Polish State Archive in Warsaw
(Ul. Dluga 7, 00-263 Warszawa), where they have people who speak
English. I visited there personally the week before doing research and
had to wait for the director, Mrs. Witkowska, to sign my request. The
first thing the people asked for when I got to Tarnow was a copy of the
permission. The people at the state archives branch (a staff of three)
are very, very helpful (but you'll have to bring your Polish
dictionary). You can look through the actual record books. Things are
very laid back there-they even served me coffee and crackers the first
day. It is open >from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. daily. The records there are
wonderfully complete. The records after 1878 are all in Polish, as
opposed to the usual German. It is a treat alone not to have to
decipher the gothic scribble. The death records are especially good,
listing detailed information down to the time and cause of death.
Marriage records are of course sparse due to the difficulty of Jews
marrying in Galicia. I researched there for three days, but would have
liked thirty. There is supposedly a lot of other historical information
on Tarnow there, too.
I spent the last day researching at U.S.C. The records there are
just as detailed as the ones in the state archives branch. The main
purpose of this place is to register current records (birth, marriage,
death). I took up a position at a corner desk and looked first at
indexes. Here again, I had to rely on my non-existent Polish language
skills. After looking through the indexes, I asked to see the actual
files. The worker there (there are a number of them) told me that I
needed permission, but couldn't tell me exactly how. I got a little
frustrated, and finally asked her to make copies of something like two
hundred listings of things I had found in the indices. She realized
that it was ludicrous, and just decided to bring out all the records.
Again, I wished I had a lot more time there. Especially in these later
records, births were frequently registered under the mother's name. I
would recommend writing them in advance to request permission to view
the files.

The Cemetery. The Jewish cemetery in Tarnow is magnificent. The key to
the cemetery is maintained by Adam Bartosz, the director of museums in
Tarnow. His office is on the main square in Tarnow (Rynek 20/21, 33-100
Tarnow). The cemetery has somewhere between 5000 and 8000 graves. It
was cleaned up four years ago by an independent local organization in
Tarnow that protects Jewish things (e.g., the bimah of an old synagogue
and the mikvah). The stones in the Tarnow cemetery demonstrate
magnificent craftsmanship. The majority are in Hebrew. The most recent
one (the last Jew to die in Tarnow) is, I believe, four years old.
There is a dignified monument to individuals lost in the Holocaust. The
cemetery is absolutely filled with stones. I am not sure of the date of
the earliest burial, but believe it was in the 17th century. Many of
the stones are still toppled and many are not readable, but most of the
stones are in very good condition. The cemetery does show signs of
neglect, though. There is a good deal of plant growth: enough so that
it is difficult to walk in some places. You can also find basketballs
and tennis balls that people have thrown over the wall and not
retrieved. Mr. Bartosz explains that the government does not provide
any money for the upkeep of the cemetery. A professor in Tarnow named
Dr. Leszek Hondo has transcribed approximately 80% of the inscriptions.
He will eventually put these into computer format, but is currently
working on a book about the cemetery in Krakow and that has priority for
him.

Touring Tarnow. Touring the old part of downtown Tarnow is easy and
enjoyable. The centerpiece of the old town is a Renaissance era town
hall in the center of the marketplace. It is now a museum. At the main
museum at Rynek 20/21, you can buy a book and pamphlet about Tarnow
Judaica written by Mr. Bartosz. There is an informative pamphlet called
"In the Footsteps of the Jews of Tarnow" (cost: about 40 cents) which
provides a self-guided tour through the Jewish sections of old Tarnow.
The museum is closed on Mondays. A lot of the old Jewish sections of
Tarnow are destroyed, but there are a number of interesting sights, the
highlight being the bimah of an old synagogue. Mr. Bartosz's book,
Tarnowskie Judaica, costs about $3 and is in Polish, but has a lot of
good historical information and pictures of both Tarnow and the
surrounding shtetls.

Eric Adler
Hanau, Germany


Research in Grodno #general

eric adler <ea73@...>
 

I have just returned >from a four-day trip to Belarus focused primarily
on genealogical research in Grodno. It was an absolutely wonderful
trip, and I do recommend travel there. Special thanks to Ellen Sadove
Renck, who helped me greatly. Here's a run-down on the trip.

Getting there. Travel to Belarus, for Americans at least and probably
for a lot of nationalities, requires a visa, which also requires an
"invitation" >from Belarus (e.g., >from a hotel, business, friend, etc.).
I requested mine in Germany, so it may have been easier than in
countries such as the U.S. I also requested an "express" single-entry
visa, which they processed in less than an hour but which cost me DM 200
(about $120). Normal visa processing time takes longer (depending on
type of visa) and costs less.
I took the train to Belarus; flying by plane into Minsk or Warsaw
is another option. There is no direct train >from Minsk to Grodno, so
the best option is taking a train >from Poland. Driving there >from the
West (it is still an appropriate term) often entails waits of over 24
hours at the border of Poland, so I took the train. Many people warned
me of the threat of "Russian bandits" on the train, so I paid an extra
$30 for a sleeping compartment which I locked. I do not believe that it
is possible to rent a car in Belarus.

Surviving. Bottom line: you either need to know Russian or need to
have a guide. A guide is simply the best option. Prices for everything
(except goods >from the West such as razors, toothpaste, fancy beer) are
dirt cheap. The official exchange rate right now is about 70,000 rubles
to the dollar. I could get at least double and as much as 160,000 on
the black market, but risked confiscation of money and fines. The
dollar rules Belarus (and the DM is becoming more important), but is
best to bring small notes ($20 or less). You can also get rubles >from
the bank using credit cards. There are no ATM machines.

Archives. The official-and proper-way to request records >from any
archive in Belarus (or permission to research in them) is through
something called "Belkom Archive" at Kollektornaya Street #10 in Minsk.
The director of one archive also recommended sending a request through
the consulate. Individual archives are not allowed to provide
information on the contents of their holdings, but this archive
supposedly is allowed to provide the information on subordinate
archives. The basic cost for any research request is $50; Belkom
Archive supposedly has a bank account with the Bank of New York.
I did not know about Belkom Archive prior to my trip, so I sent
requests (through a friend) to each of the two regional archives in
Grodno (which also supposedly have information on all towns in the
Grodno Region. The first was the Grodno Regional ZAGS Archives. The
director is Ms. Irina Bolbat. It supposedly has records of births,
deaths, and maybe marriages after about 1900 (she was not allowed to
tell me exactly). Unfortunately, my family had left Grodno in 1891.
She explained that a person at another archive named Kornashova or
something had recently been fired for giving out too much information
(and too freely), possibly to people >from Israel. Because of this, she
was very formal with me.
The other archive in Grodno is the Grodno Regional Historical
Archives. The director is Ms. Karina Botrakova. Based on conversations
at ZAGS two days prior, I understood her constraints. She explained as
soon as I got there that she would have her people do the research I had
requested. She prefers for her workers to do the research because
justifies the existence of her job. Beyond that, however, she seemed
sincerely proud of her research abilities, and even explained that she
felt it was something of a personal failure if she could not find the
information. Anyhow, I'll have to wait on the information and will have
to pay at least $50. With extra time the following day, I had my friend
call her to ask if it was possible for me just to see the revision
lists, but Ms. Botrakova said it was not. I have a feeling that it
could be possible under the right circumstances, but last week was not
the right time due to the person being fired. The best way might be to
write Ms. Botrakova directly and ask for specific permission to do so.

The Cemetery. There were once three Jewish cemeteries in Grodno. The
main cemetery, closest to the city center, was destroyed by the Soviets
in the early 1960s, leveled and dug up and replaced by a sports complex.
A second one was also destroyed by the Soviets. One remains, located
across the Neman River >from Grodno, located in a forest on the opposite
bank below the New Bridge (Nowy Most). I estimate that there are at
least 1500 stones there, the oldest dated 1758 (and still readable) and
the latest >from 1970 (the government has not allowed burials there
since). My friend and I wrote down and/or photographed most of the
readable stones, and will put the information on the digest soon.
The cemetery is in awful condition. The gates are left open, and a
section of wall is missing. It is overgrown with vegetation, many
stones are missing, toppled or broken, and a lot of the old stones are
very worn and partly or mostly submerged. The main exception is the
grave of a famous man named Suesskind, which was restored recently via
money >from donors in Israel. Someone actually lives in the cemetery (in
a house). They have been paid in the past to take care of the cemetery
(of which they do an awful job). Their chickens roam throughout the
cemetery, their two old cars lie abandoned in the cemetery, and their
laundry hangs on tombstones. In the past, they have received about one
million rubles per months (about $7) for the upkeep, but they have not
been paid recently. I gave them a few dollars, which made them happy.
While in the cemetery, we met a few interesting people. One was
Michael Kemerov, whom someone recently mentioned. He is a very nice man
in his early 30s, a Jew who is active in the Jewish community there and
who is writing a book on the history of Jews in Grodno. He asked for
any information or pictures which people might have of Jews in Grodno,
and I have his address if you would like to send him anything. We also
saw a man who was cleaning two gravestones and painting them gold. It
turns out they were the graves of his grandparents. The following day,
we saw him there with his wife and daughter. We also met two Jewish men
in their 70s. They had a long discussion with the couple who lives in
the cemetery. I discussed the possibility of cleaning, restoring, and
indexing the cemetery, possibly this coming summer or the next.
Everyone we talked to supported the idea and agreed that it would be
relatively easy to fund because of the relative strength of the dollar.

The Synagogue. The main synagogue in Grodno is a very important
building, built in the 16th century, I believe. There is also still a
smaller, younger, and less-famous synagogue which is now used as a
commercial type of building. There were once something like 37
synagogues in the city. The main synagogue is apparently the largest in
Belarus. Unfortunately, it is in a disgraceful state of disrepair. It
was handed over to the Jewish community in 1991, and a Jew named Yuri
Chaimovich Boyarsky staked responsibility for the project. He has not,
however, made satisfactory progress on the project. At the very least,
he is a poor manager/fundraiser/restorer. All the people I spoke to in
Grodno, both Jews and non-Jews, called him a liar. The local prosecutor
is investigating him for corruption in the project such as misuse of
donations (there was an investigator there both times I visited). I saw
no work being done. The inside of the synagogue has great potential,
and they have done some work, mainly on the bimah. The outside of the
building remains untouched, in awful condition. The entire building is
generally dirty. Mr. Boyarsky talks frequently about the new roof he
put on the synagogue, but that was five years ago. People say they see
no progress at all, and no work being done. Several people (Jews) told
me that he had rejected offers by a man named Felix Sandmann to restore
the synagogue, and that he will not let anyone else restore the
building. This is an awful pity, because buildings are being restored
throughout the city and the cost of labor and supplies is so low.

The Jewish Community Center. The Hesed Nachum Jewish Welfare/Community
Center is located at Bogdanovich Street #6 in Grodno. I got a great
feeling there. It is clean, friendly, and alive. When we visited,
people were practicing singing songs. There was a full schedule of
events posted. At the cemetery on Friday, Michael Kemerov invited us to
join a youth group there on Friday evening. A very important person in
the community is named Grischa Chosid. He is 74 years old, a retired
physics teacher who escaped through a window in a boxcar headed for
Treblinka and fought as a partisan in World War II. He speaks English.
He is a good man, someone I could trust. He showed us the cemetery near
Nowy Most the first time.

Grodno/Belarus in General. The country itself is flabbergasting, vastly
different >from Western Europe and even countries like Poland and the
Czech Republic. The country is very poor, although people there say
that they are better off than those in other former Soviet republics
like Russia and Uzbekistan. At the market, people sell things like used
light switches and plumbing. The buses (trolley cars) are jam-packed
(!) with people who don't pay the 2000 rubles (1 1/2 cents) or so to
ride, and no-one checks. We often sat in line >from anywhere between ten
and thirty minutes in order to get gas, which is rationed so that people
can get only twenty liters at a time. The cars are not nice-mostly
Ladas and such that are 15-20 years of age on average. Some are new,
but they are few and far between.
The country is very militarized, with mostly unarmed police in gray
camouflage uniforms everywhere. Military vehicles are a frequent sight
throughout the cities. We drove to the capital of Minsk on a Saturday,
hoping not to be stopped at police checkpoints ("milicja") every 50
kilometers or so. I was driving the car to and >from Minsk, and
actually received a speeding ticket on the way back for doing 18 km/h
over the speed limit of 60 km/h. Luckily, it cost only 178,000 (about
$1.20) and didn't affect insurance rates or anything. In Minsk at a
place called Victory Square, four teenagers (both boys and girls) in
Scout-type uniforms stand on low wooden boxes guarding the monument for
several hours a day (taking a break for lunch and such, of course). My
friends said that they were in an organization similar to the Soviet
Komsomol; Hitler Youth came to my mind. I took a picture of the U.S.
Embassy, and two antsy embassy guards and a Belarussian soldier jumped
out of their guard shacks. I showed the guards my U.S. passport, but
they still moronically said that it was not allowed.
Minsk was more well off than Grodno and a different world >from the
farms with horse-drawn plows and wagons that we saw on the way to Minsk
(they reminded me of Little House on the Prairie). In Minsk, there are
even six McDonald's and a decent-but packed-subway. One bar even sold
Guinness beer. Saturday is the day for marriages, and we must have seen
a dozen couples visit the monument to Afghan war heroes in a thirty
minute period. It is tradition for newly-married couples to visit war
monuments.
Grodno also has a lot of beauty in its antiquity. Minsk was
largely built after World War II, whereas much of Grodno survived the
War and is very old. Grodno has two noble castles, one "old" and one
"new." It also has a beautiful theater and an old town. Much of the
Grodno ghetto is either preserved or being renovated, although the gate
to the ghetto has been vandalized and only one candle on the large iron
menorah remains. The Catholic and Orthodox churches in the city are
also pristine. One dominate feature in the city is Lenin Square, a
large open area with a huge statue of Lenin, the base of which is
rumored to be built >from gravestones >from the old main Jewish cemetery
where the stadium now stands.

Eric Adler
Hanau, Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research in Grodno #general

eric adler <ea73@...>
 

I have just returned >from a four-day trip to Belarus focused primarily
on genealogical research in Grodno. It was an absolutely wonderful
trip, and I do recommend travel there. Special thanks to Ellen Sadove
Renck, who helped me greatly. Here's a run-down on the trip.

Getting there. Travel to Belarus, for Americans at least and probably
for a lot of nationalities, requires a visa, which also requires an
"invitation" >from Belarus (e.g., >from a hotel, business, friend, etc.).
I requested mine in Germany, so it may have been easier than in
countries such as the U.S. I also requested an "express" single-entry
visa, which they processed in less than an hour but which cost me DM 200
(about $120). Normal visa processing time takes longer (depending on
type of visa) and costs less.
I took the train to Belarus; flying by plane into Minsk or Warsaw
is another option. There is no direct train >from Minsk to Grodno, so
the best option is taking a train >from Poland. Driving there >from the
West (it is still an appropriate term) often entails waits of over 24
hours at the border of Poland, so I took the train. Many people warned
me of the threat of "Russian bandits" on the train, so I paid an extra
$30 for a sleeping compartment which I locked. I do not believe that it
is possible to rent a car in Belarus.

Surviving. Bottom line: you either need to know Russian or need to
have a guide. A guide is simply the best option. Prices for everything
(except goods >from the West such as razors, toothpaste, fancy beer) are
dirt cheap. The official exchange rate right now is about 70,000 rubles
to the dollar. I could get at least double and as much as 160,000 on
the black market, but risked confiscation of money and fines. The
dollar rules Belarus (and the DM is becoming more important), but is
best to bring small notes ($20 or less). You can also get rubles >from
the bank using credit cards. There are no ATM machines.

Archives. The official-and proper-way to request records >from any
archive in Belarus (or permission to research in them) is through
something called "Belkom Archive" at Kollektornaya Street #10 in Minsk.
The director of one archive also recommended sending a request through
the consulate. Individual archives are not allowed to provide
information on the contents of their holdings, but this archive
supposedly is allowed to provide the information on subordinate
archives. The basic cost for any research request is $50; Belkom
Archive supposedly has a bank account with the Bank of New York.
I did not know about Belkom Archive prior to my trip, so I sent
requests (through a friend) to each of the two regional archives in
Grodno (which also supposedly have information on all towns in the
Grodno Region. The first was the Grodno Regional ZAGS Archives. The
director is Ms. Irina Bolbat. It supposedly has records of births,
deaths, and maybe marriages after about 1900 (she was not allowed to
tell me exactly). Unfortunately, my family had left Grodno in 1891.
She explained that a person at another archive named Kornashova or
something had recently been fired for giving out too much information
(and too freely), possibly to people >from Israel. Because of this, she
was very formal with me.
The other archive in Grodno is the Grodno Regional Historical
Archives. The director is Ms. Karina Botrakova. Based on conversations
at ZAGS two days prior, I understood her constraints. She explained as
soon as I got there that she would have her people do the research I had
requested. She prefers for her workers to do the research because
justifies the existence of her job. Beyond that, however, she seemed
sincerely proud of her research abilities, and even explained that she
felt it was something of a personal failure if she could not find the
information. Anyhow, I'll have to wait on the information and will have
to pay at least $50. With extra time the following day, I had my friend
call her to ask if it was possible for me just to see the revision
lists, but Ms. Botrakova said it was not. I have a feeling that it
could be possible under the right circumstances, but last week was not
the right time due to the person being fired. The best way might be to
write Ms. Botrakova directly and ask for specific permission to do so.

The Cemetery. There were once three Jewish cemeteries in Grodno. The
main cemetery, closest to the city center, was destroyed by the Soviets
in the early 1960s, leveled and dug up and replaced by a sports complex.
A second one was also destroyed by the Soviets. One remains, located
across the Neman River >from Grodno, located in a forest on the opposite
bank below the New Bridge (Nowy Most). I estimate that there are at
least 1500 stones there, the oldest dated 1758 (and still readable) and
the latest >from 1970 (the government has not allowed burials there
since). My friend and I wrote down and/or photographed most of the
readable stones, and will put the information on the digest soon.
The cemetery is in awful condition. The gates are left open, and a
section of wall is missing. It is overgrown with vegetation, many
stones are missing, toppled or broken, and a lot of the old stones are
very worn and partly or mostly submerged. The main exception is the
grave of a famous man named Suesskind, which was restored recently via
money >from donors in Israel. Someone actually lives in the cemetery (in
a house). They have been paid in the past to take care of the cemetery
(of which they do an awful job). Their chickens roam throughout the
cemetery, their two old cars lie abandoned in the cemetery, and their
laundry hangs on tombstones. In the past, they have received about one
million rubles per months (about $7) for the upkeep, but they have not
been paid recently. I gave them a few dollars, which made them happy.
While in the cemetery, we met a few interesting people. One was
Michael Kemerov, whom someone recently mentioned. He is a very nice man
in his early 30s, a Jew who is active in the Jewish community there and
who is writing a book on the history of Jews in Grodno. He asked for
any information or pictures which people might have of Jews in Grodno,
and I have his address if you would like to send him anything. We also
saw a man who was cleaning two gravestones and painting them gold. It
turns out they were the graves of his grandparents. The following day,
we saw him there with his wife and daughter. We also met two Jewish men
in their 70s. They had a long discussion with the couple who lives in
the cemetery. I discussed the possibility of cleaning, restoring, and
indexing the cemetery, possibly this coming summer or the next.
Everyone we talked to supported the idea and agreed that it would be
relatively easy to fund because of the relative strength of the dollar.

The Synagogue. The main synagogue in Grodno is a very important
building, built in the 16th century, I believe. There is also still a
smaller, younger, and less-famous synagogue which is now used as a
commercial type of building. There were once something like 37
synagogues in the city. The main synagogue is apparently the largest in
Belarus. Unfortunately, it is in a disgraceful state of disrepair. It
was handed over to the Jewish community in 1991, and a Jew named Yuri
Chaimovich Boyarsky staked responsibility for the project. He has not,
however, made satisfactory progress on the project. At the very least,
he is a poor manager/fundraiser/restorer. All the people I spoke to in
Grodno, both Jews and non-Jews, called him a liar. The local prosecutor
is investigating him for corruption in the project such as misuse of
donations (there was an investigator there both times I visited). I saw
no work being done. The inside of the synagogue has great potential,
and they have done some work, mainly on the bimah. The outside of the
building remains untouched, in awful condition. The entire building is
generally dirty. Mr. Boyarsky talks frequently about the new roof he
put on the synagogue, but that was five years ago. People say they see
no progress at all, and no work being done. Several people (Jews) told
me that he had rejected offers by a man named Felix Sandmann to restore
the synagogue, and that he will not let anyone else restore the
building. This is an awful pity, because buildings are being restored
throughout the city and the cost of labor and supplies is so low.

The Jewish Community Center. The Hesed Nachum Jewish Welfare/Community
Center is located at Bogdanovich Street #6 in Grodno. I got a great
feeling there. It is clean, friendly, and alive. When we visited,
people were practicing singing songs. There was a full schedule of
events posted. At the cemetery on Friday, Michael Kemerov invited us to
join a youth group there on Friday evening. A very important person in
the community is named Grischa Chosid. He is 74 years old, a retired
physics teacher who escaped through a window in a boxcar headed for
Treblinka and fought as a partisan in World War II. He speaks English.
He is a good man, someone I could trust. He showed us the cemetery near
Nowy Most the first time.

Grodno/Belarus in General. The country itself is flabbergasting, vastly
different >from Western Europe and even countries like Poland and the
Czech Republic. The country is very poor, although people there say
that they are better off than those in other former Soviet republics
like Russia and Uzbekistan. At the market, people sell things like used
light switches and plumbing. The buses (trolley cars) are jam-packed
(!) with people who don't pay the 2000 rubles (1 1/2 cents) or so to
ride, and no-one checks. We often sat in line >from anywhere between ten
and thirty minutes in order to get gas, which is rationed so that people
can get only twenty liters at a time. The cars are not nice-mostly
Ladas and such that are 15-20 years of age on average. Some are new,
but they are few and far between.
The country is very militarized, with mostly unarmed police in gray
camouflage uniforms everywhere. Military vehicles are a frequent sight
throughout the cities. We drove to the capital of Minsk on a Saturday,
hoping not to be stopped at police checkpoints ("milicja") every 50
kilometers or so. I was driving the car to and >from Minsk, and
actually received a speeding ticket on the way back for doing 18 km/h
over the speed limit of 60 km/h. Luckily, it cost only 178,000 (about
$1.20) and didn't affect insurance rates or anything. In Minsk at a
place called Victory Square, four teenagers (both boys and girls) in
Scout-type uniforms stand on low wooden boxes guarding the monument for
several hours a day (taking a break for lunch and such, of course). My
friends said that they were in an organization similar to the Soviet
Komsomol; Hitler Youth came to my mind. I took a picture of the U.S.
Embassy, and two antsy embassy guards and a Belarussian soldier jumped
out of their guard shacks. I showed the guards my U.S. passport, but
they still moronically said that it was not allowed.
Minsk was more well off than Grodno and a different world >from the
farms with horse-drawn plows and wagons that we saw on the way to Minsk
(they reminded me of Little House on the Prairie). In Minsk, there are
even six McDonald's and a decent-but packed-subway. One bar even sold
Guinness beer. Saturday is the day for marriages, and we must have seen
a dozen couples visit the monument to Afghan war heroes in a thirty
minute period. It is tradition for newly-married couples to visit war
monuments.
Grodno also has a lot of beauty in its antiquity. Minsk was
largely built after World War II, whereas much of Grodno survived the
War and is very old. Grodno has two noble castles, one "old" and one
"new." It also has a beautiful theater and an old town. Much of the
Grodno ghetto is either preserved or being renovated, although the gate
to the ghetto has been vandalized and only one candle on the large iron
menorah remains. The Catholic and Orthodox churches in the city are
also pristine. One dominate feature in the city is Lenin Square, a
large open area with a huge statue of Lenin, the base of which is
rumored to be built >from gravestones >from the old main Jewish cemetery
where the stadium now stands.

Eric Adler
Hanau, Germany


Searching: STARKMAN in Philly,PA #general

Bernard Rosinsky <rosinskyb@...>
 

b"H
Does anyone have any info concerning any Starkmans >from Philadelphia who arrived there around the turn of the century either >from Romania or
possibly Galicia? I would appreciate any leads.
Thanks,
Bernard Rosinsky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: STARKMAN in Philly,PA #general

Bernard Rosinsky <rosinskyb@...>
 

b"H
Does anyone have any info concerning any Starkmans >from Philadelphia who arrived there around the turn of the century either >from Romania or
possibly Galicia? I would appreciate any leads.
Thanks,
Bernard Rosinsky


Searching: REISS, KALAFER, WAHL, MARGULIES (Toronto) #general

Bernard Rosinsky <rosinskyb@...>
 

b"H
Does anyone know how I could find out about any Riess, Kalafer, Margulies, Wahl or other surnames >from Pomuran/Pomorzany in Galicia who settled in
Toronto prior to 1910.

Bernard Rosinsky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: REISS, KALAFER, WAHL, MARGULIES (Toronto) #general

Bernard Rosinsky <rosinskyb@...>
 

b"H
Does anyone know how I could find out about any Riess, Kalafer, Margulies, Wahl or other surnames >from Pomuran/Pomorzany in Galicia who settled in
Toronto prior to 1910.

Bernard Rosinsky


Dokszyce #general

Linda Chapman <chapman@...>
 

I read recent question re/location of Dokszyce (also referred to as
Dokshitsy). It was in Belarus, north of Minsk, about halfway between Minsk
and Vilna. Please see Jewishgen Databases for exact location and
information about Yizkor book.
Linda Chapman, Columbia MO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Dokszyce #general

Linda Chapman <chapman@...>
 

I read recent question re/location of Dokszyce (also referred to as
Dokshitsy). It was in Belarus, north of Minsk, about halfway between Minsk
and Vilna. Please see Jewishgen Databases for exact location and
information about Yizkor book.
Linda Chapman, Columbia MO