Date   

Book- My mother Chaya Sara #lithuania

Molly Karp <MALKAHKARP@...>
 

Subject: Book - My mother Chaya Sara
From: edinbal@netvision.net.il
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 98 18:28:06 PDT

I am trying to get the book written
by Don Gussow in the 1970's called
"My mother Chaya Sara".

Dear Beryl, and other members of the list,

If you go to the website of the Advanced Book Exchange
(www.abebooks.com),
you will see that they search out-of-print, second-hand, rare and
antiquarian books. Maybe they can find what you're looking for. I have
used this website extensively and have found it to be an excellent
resource. I have no financial interest in the company of any kind.

Molly Karp
New York


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Book- My mother Chaya Sara #lithuania

Molly Karp <MALKAHKARP@...>
 

Subject: Book - My mother Chaya Sara
From: edinbal@netvision.net.il
Date: Wed, 14 Oct 98 18:28:06 PDT

I am trying to get the book written
by Don Gussow in the 1970's called
"My mother Chaya Sara".

Dear Beryl, and other members of the list,

If you go to the website of the Advanced Book Exchange
(www.abebooks.com),
you will see that they search out-of-print, second-hand, rare and
antiquarian books. Maybe they can find what you're looking for. I have
used this website extensively and have found it to be an excellent
resource. I have no financial interest in the company of any kind.

Molly Karp
New York


Auschwitz Archives #hungary

cyberpass <cyberpass@...>
 

A very dear friend of ours who lives near Krakow called the director of
the archives at Auschwitz yesterday to inquire about the best method for
placing inquiries with the archive. Maria was told that inquiries sent
in Polish will be answered within 2 to 3 weeks (although she was assured
they do read and respond in English if necesssary). There was no mention
of the need for any numbers >from the Auschwitz death books--but you must
include as much detail as possible. The address she was told to write
to is:

ARCHIWUM PANSTWOWEGO MUZEUM W OSWIECIMIU
UL.WIEZNIOW OSWIECIMIA 20
33-603 OSWIECIM

It appears to be pretty close to the one I've seen posted, but this seems
to have a street address--maybe it speeds things up a little?

Good luck,
Sheryl Kastriner ( PS Sorry if some perceive that this did not pertain
directly to Hungary...my thought was that if you are inquiring about you
r Hungarian family as I am, and you know someone who can read and write
Polish, that you would be much better off inquiring in Polish)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Auschwitz Archives #hungary

cyberpass <cyberpass@...>
 

A very dear friend of ours who lives near Krakow called the director of
the archives at Auschwitz yesterday to inquire about the best method for
placing inquiries with the archive. Maria was told that inquiries sent
in Polish will be answered within 2 to 3 weeks (although she was assured
they do read and respond in English if necesssary). There was no mention
of the need for any numbers >from the Auschwitz death books--but you must
include as much detail as possible. The address she was told to write
to is:

ARCHIWUM PANSTWOWEGO MUZEUM W OSWIECIMIU
UL.WIEZNIOW OSWIECIMIA 20
33-603 OSWIECIM

It appears to be pretty close to the one I've seen posted, but this seems
to have a street address--maybe it speeds things up a little?

Good luck,
Sheryl Kastriner ( PS Sorry if some perceive that this did not pertain
directly to Hungary...my thought was that if you are inquiring about you
r Hungarian family as I am, and you know someone who can read and write
Polish, that you would be much better off inquiring in Polish)


Subject: Information about Slovakian & Hungarian Gazetteers #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Subject: Information about Slovakian & Hungarian Gazetteers
From: Marian Brown <mbrown@fuse.net>
To those researching Slovakian towns:
In talking to Melody Gross yesterday, I realized that many may not know
of two outstanding resources available >from the LDS library for
Slovakian research....

Info follows:

1) 1972 Slovakian Gazetteer (LDS film #1181569 Item 1). Includes place
names of Slovakia in the last 200 years, including Hungarian and German
names.

Author: Majtan, Milan
Title: Nazvy obci na Slovensku za ostatnych dvesto rokov
Publication information: Bratislave: Slovenska Akademie Vied. 1972
Copyright Date: 1972
Format: 673 str. (pages)

The 1972 edition is very helpful as a source for connecting former town
names with current names, but be aware that Milan Majtan has published a
revised edition for this year:

Author: Maijtan, Milan
Title: Nazvy obci Slovenskej Republiky (Vyvin v rokoch 1773-1997).
Published by Slovenskej akademie vied, Bratislava, 1998.
600 pages
ISBN: 80-224-0530-2

The main difference between the two editions is that the 1998 edition
follows the 1996 official realignment of districts (okres) and regions
(kraj) of the Slovak Republic. Each town is listed in its current district
and region along with any mergers or separations that occurred over the
past 200 years.

I was fortunate to find this book and purchased it during a recent visit to
Bratislava. The book has a soft cover and cost me 477 Slovak crowns (about
$14). Perhaps, one can purchase this edition via one of the Internet book
services.

Another reference book is:

Magyar Neve - Hatarokon tuli magyar helysegnevszotar
Arany Lapok, 1990
ISBN: 9630284553

This book contains town names, current and past, of the former
Austro-Hungarian Empire that included parts (or all) of Germany,
Yugoslavia, Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. Place names for
these countries are alphabetized as well as their Hungarian equivalent. I
obtained the book through Blue Danube Gifts in New York, see
http://www.blue-danube.com/.

You might also want to look at the complete and official list of current
Slovak towns, districts and regions. http://www.fns.uniba.sk/pravo/258_96.txt

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC


Hungary SIG #Hungary Subject: Information about Slovakian & Hungarian Gazetteers #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Subject: Information about Slovakian & Hungarian Gazetteers
From: Marian Brown <mbrown@fuse.net>
To those researching Slovakian towns:
In talking to Melody Gross yesterday, I realized that many may not know
of two outstanding resources available >from the LDS library for
Slovakian research....

Info follows:

1) 1972 Slovakian Gazetteer (LDS film #1181569 Item 1). Includes place
names of Slovakia in the last 200 years, including Hungarian and German
names.

Author: Majtan, Milan
Title: Nazvy obci na Slovensku za ostatnych dvesto rokov
Publication information: Bratislave: Slovenska Akademie Vied. 1972
Copyright Date: 1972
Format: 673 str. (pages)

The 1972 edition is very helpful as a source for connecting former town
names with current names, but be aware that Milan Majtan has published a
revised edition for this year:

Author: Maijtan, Milan
Title: Nazvy obci Slovenskej Republiky (Vyvin v rokoch 1773-1997).
Published by Slovenskej akademie vied, Bratislava, 1998.
600 pages
ISBN: 80-224-0530-2

The main difference between the two editions is that the 1998 edition
follows the 1996 official realignment of districts (okres) and regions
(kraj) of the Slovak Republic. Each town is listed in its current district
and region along with any mergers or separations that occurred over the
past 200 years.

I was fortunate to find this book and purchased it during a recent visit to
Bratislava. The book has a soft cover and cost me 477 Slovak crowns (about
$14). Perhaps, one can purchase this edition via one of the Internet book
services.

Another reference book is:

Magyar Neve - Hatarokon tuli magyar helysegnevszotar
Arany Lapok, 1990
ISBN: 9630284553

This book contains town names, current and past, of the former
Austro-Hungarian Empire that included parts (or all) of Germany,
Yugoslavia, Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. Place names for
these countries are alphabetized as well as their Hungarian equivalent. I
obtained the book through Blue Danube Gifts in New York, see
http://www.blue-danube.com/.

You might also want to look at the complete and official list of current
Slovak towns, districts and regions. http://www.fns.uniba.sk/pravo/258_96.txt

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC


Holds, vineyards, labor, fruit #hungary

MTB <71431.1612@...>
 

On the Censuses of Jewish Taxpayers in Hungary for 1735, 1753, 1770, 1774
and 1828 (all on LDS microfilm), I have seen that a fair number of Jews in
the east/northeastern counties of Hungary owned some land. These censuses
break down the number of holds that were meadow, grazing, crops, and
vineyards, and also the number of each type of animal owned, for each
householder. As I remember, these families owned few animals, and most of
their land was used as vineyards.


(I could add here that the Austrian historian Michael Mitterauer has found
that large Austrian Christian families were sufficient labor to handle
their vineyard, which does not require constant, intensive labor. These
families only hired labor until their children were past toddlerhood and
could help out. Compared with the Burgenland families of 2-4 children
listed in the censuses, these E/NE families listed 4-9 children routinely 2E)

In contrast, almost none of the middle Burgenland Jews owned land, although
until the last third of the 19th century, many of them were involved in the
making/selling of spirits. This region was (and is) a great grape-growing
district, but before 1848, most serfs raised grain, while the minor
nobility raised grapes (at least for Deutschkreutz serfs as compared with
next-door Girm's minor nobility). So perhaps these Jews bought their
grapes >from these nobility or >from their Esterhazy landlords. Or perhaps
they bought other fruit to make different brandies.

Therefore, these censuses should make it more clear exactly what type of
spirits the families were involved in. Although surnames appear only in
the 1828 census, it would be useful to look at the earlier censuses, to get
a sense of what types of animals and lands most householders owned. Then
you could generalize for your own family.

Maureen Tighe-Brown
University of Pittsburgh


Hungary SIG #Hungary Holds, vineyards, labor, fruit #hungary

MTB <71431.1612@...>
 

On the Censuses of Jewish Taxpayers in Hungary for 1735, 1753, 1770, 1774
and 1828 (all on LDS microfilm), I have seen that a fair number of Jews in
the east/northeastern counties of Hungary owned some land. These censuses
break down the number of holds that were meadow, grazing, crops, and
vineyards, and also the number of each type of animal owned, for each
householder. As I remember, these families owned few animals, and most of
their land was used as vineyards.


(I could add here that the Austrian historian Michael Mitterauer has found
that large Austrian Christian families were sufficient labor to handle
their vineyard, which does not require constant, intensive labor. These
families only hired labor until their children were past toddlerhood and
could help out. Compared with the Burgenland families of 2-4 children
listed in the censuses, these E/NE families listed 4-9 children routinely 2E)

In contrast, almost none of the middle Burgenland Jews owned land, although
until the last third of the 19th century, many of them were involved in the
making/selling of spirits. This region was (and is) a great grape-growing
district, but before 1848, most serfs raised grain, while the minor
nobility raised grapes (at least for Deutschkreutz serfs as compared with
next-door Girm's minor nobility). So perhaps these Jews bought their
grapes >from these nobility or >from their Esterhazy landlords. Or perhaps
they bought other fruit to make different brandies.

Therefore, these censuses should make it more clear exactly what type of
spirits the families were involved in. Although surnames appear only in
the 1828 census, it would be useful to look at the earlier censuses, to get
a sense of what types of animals and lands most householders owned. Then
you could generalize for your own family.

Maureen Tighe-Brown
University of Pittsburgh


The book "Paper Gauze Ballerina" #general

Susanna Vendel <susanna.vendel@...>
 

Do anybody know where I could find, buy or loan the book "Paper
Gauze Ballerina" written by Sophie Miklos Weiss and edited by the
temple in Hilton Head, South Carolina ?

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm
susanna.vendel@swipnet.se

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The book "Paper Gauze Ballerina" #general

Susanna Vendel <susanna.vendel@...>
 

Do anybody know where I could find, buy or loan the book "Paper
Gauze Ballerina" written by Sophie Miklos Weiss and edited by the
temple in Hilton Head, South Carolina ?

Susanna Vendel, Stockholm
susanna.vendel@swipnet.se

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Re: butcher/midwife #general

Shalom Mandelbaum <shalom_m@...>
 

Butcher = Katzev

Shalom Mandelbaum

Jane M. Dotson wrote:

What is the Jewish terminology for butcher and midewife?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: butcher/midwife #general

Shalom Mandelbaum <shalom_m@...>
 

Butcher = Katzev

Shalom Mandelbaum

Jane M. Dotson wrote:

What is the Jewish terminology for butcher and midewife?


Re: Workman's Circle #belarus

Danita Simon <dhsimon@...>
 

Many thanks to all of you that responded to my query about Workman's
Circle. There are too many of you to thank individually.

For all those who asked that I pass along any information I find I
visited the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies in Philadelphia. Here in
a nut shell is what I learned.

The Workman's Circle also known as Arbeiter Ring was founded in New York
City in 1892 and federated as a national organization in 1900. It's
founding members were yiddish-speaking working class people >from Russia
who has a strong socialist, trade unionist, and secular Jewish
identity. It was organized into chapters that followed landsmanshaftn
or workplace groups.

Workman's Circle fought the rise of anti-Semitism and fascism in the
1930's. Though it had its roots in Socialism, Workman's Circle moved
away >from that position to support Roosevelt's New Deal policies as well
as supporting the United States' entrance into World War II.

Since the 1940's the organization has been known for its humanitarian
interests, and its commitment to the preservation of Yiddish culture.

If you are interested in learning more, I found these two books useful.

1) The Workman's Circle by Maximilian Hurwitz
2) The Friendly Society by Judah Shapiro

Danita Simon
Warren Blatt wrote:


Danita Simon <dhsimon@home.com> wrote:

Does anyone have information and/or can you direct me to information
about the Workman's Circle. I have reason to believe that my
grandfather was involved in the very beginning of this organization.
See the Workmen's Circle's web page at: <http://www.circle.org>.

The archives of the Workmen's Circle can be found at YIVO,
in Record Group 575, 258 linear feet of records, covering
1893-1972.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Workman's Circle #general

Danita Simon <dhsimon@...>
 

Many thanks to all of you that responded to my query about Workman's
Circle. There are too many of you to thank individually.

For all those who asked that I pass along any information I find I
visited the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies in Philadelphia. Here in
a nut shell is what I learned.

The Workman's Circle also known as Arbeiter Ring was founded in New York
City in 1892 and federated as a national organization in 1900. It's
founding members were yiddish-speaking working class people >from Russia
who has a strong socialist, trade unionist, and secular Jewish
identity. It was organized into chapters that followed landsmanshaftn
or workplace groups.

Workman's Circle fought the rise of anti-Semitism and fascism in the
1930's. Though it had its roots in Socialism, Workman's Circle moved
away >from that position to support Roosevelt's New Deal policies as well
as supporting the United States' entrance into World War II.

Since the 1940's the organization has been known for its humanitarian
interests, and its commitment to the preservation of Yiddish culture.

If you are interested in learning more, I found these two books useful.

1) The Workman's Circle by Maximilian Hurwitz
2) The Friendly Society by Judah Shapiro

Danita Simon
Warren Blatt wrote:


Danita Simon <dhsimon@home.com> wrote:

Does anyone have information and/or can you direct me to information
about the Workman's Circle. I have reason to believe that my
grandfather was involved in the very beginning of this organization.
See the Workmen's Circle's web page at: <http://www.circle.org>.

The archives of the Workmen's Circle can be found at YIVO,
in Record Group 575, 258 linear feet of records, covering
1893-1972.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


several road blocks -- need advice, please #general

Corin Goodwin <corin@...>
 

Hi,

I have several branches where I can trace the family lines to their
arrival in NYC, but can't quite place where they came from. I also have
a couple of random questions. I wonder if anyone can offer
advice/suggestions for the following:

* Max BARZILY -- I have his naturalization papers (a big
disappointment), including the date he ostensibly first arrived in NY
(May 29, 1891). I believe he was in NY in 1893, and he and his wife, Ida
(nee BASOK), were in NY after they were married in 1895, then went back
to Russia, then to Glasgow (where they had the children), and then came
to NY for good in 1900 or 1901.

I will write for his passenger arrival records again, but otherwise have
no idea where in "Russia" he was from. Where do I go >from here? I know
he was married to Ida in Orsha, then-Russian Poland (now Belarus), on
July 24, 1894, but haven't been able to obtain any records >from there at
all (for his family or hers). I have BCs and one DC for his three
children, but those are all >from Glasgow, Scotland, before they came to
NY. Fwiw, he has consistently stated his profession as "segars", ie
tobacco.

* Philip RIVKIN -- I wrote to the NY Dept of Health in early August,
requesting my gf's BC. I included his BC number; a copy of his DC; and a
letter >from my aunt, the executor of his estate, stating that she needed
his BC to settle his estate. I have had no response. Now what should I
do? It seems like a long time to wait...

* Morris RIVKIN -- I have his parents' names, and I am told by one of
his (still living) sons that he and his wife, Pauline (nee KANEFSKY),
came
over seperately >from Elizabetgrod, Ukraine before they were married (he
brought her over a little later, with her younger siblings and possibly
her mother), but I have been unable to get passenger records for them,
and I don't believe they were naturalized. I think they came to NY
around 1910, but I'm not entirely sure. Where can I go >from here? Is
there somewhere in Elizabetgrod I can write, on the chance they have
vital records in that city?

* Abraham DU BOFF -- He came to NY >from somewhere in Russia in 1890 with
his wife, Ella (nee MEISTROFF) and several children, but I have been
unable to find passenger records or naturalization papers for any of
them (I have the children's dates of birth, as well). I am told he was a
member of the Tsar's Royal Guard, &/or a Cossack (not exactly sure of
the difference). In any case, I was surprised by that as he was Jewish
(I believe). I know that when they came to NY he had to 'start over' in
the factories.

* Isaac "Jacques" VAN SANTEN -- I have his Dutch BC, but his SS
application shows he claimed to be born in York, PA. Why would he say
this? I have been unable to obtain naturalization records for him, so I
don't know when he came to NY. Also, the 1920 census lists him as
manager of a Turkish Bath. Does that translate to managing a whorehouse,
or am I off the mark entirely? My gm is very touchy about him, and one
story is that he had something to do with Tammany Hall. Is there some
way to check this out (I have had no luck so far), or to check for
criminal records associated with white collar crime? I know he ended up
in sales for different companies, including Electrolux at one point;
might they have records I could access? I'm really curious about this
guy!

Thanks in advance,
//Corin Barsily Goodwin
Cupertino, CA USA

Searching:

BARSILA/BARZILY/BARZILOV -- Russia; Scotland; NYC
BASOK/BARSACH -- Orsha, Belarus; Scotland; NYC; Providence, RI
BRAUN -- Hungary; NYC ...DU BOFF/MEISTROFF -- Russia; NYC & Long Island
KANEFSKY/KANEVSKY and RIVKIN -- Elizabetgrod (Kirovgrod), Ukraine; NYC
SIGAAR -- Holland ...VAN SANTEN -- Amsterdam; NYC
WEISS -- Hungary; NYC; Middlesex, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen several road blocks -- need advice, please #general

Corin Goodwin <corin@...>
 

Hi,

I have several branches where I can trace the family lines to their
arrival in NYC, but can't quite place where they came from. I also have
a couple of random questions. I wonder if anyone can offer
advice/suggestions for the following:

* Max BARZILY -- I have his naturalization papers (a big
disappointment), including the date he ostensibly first arrived in NY
(May 29, 1891). I believe he was in NY in 1893, and he and his wife, Ida
(nee BASOK), were in NY after they were married in 1895, then went back
to Russia, then to Glasgow (where they had the children), and then came
to NY for good in 1900 or 1901.

I will write for his passenger arrival records again, but otherwise have
no idea where in "Russia" he was from. Where do I go >from here? I know
he was married to Ida in Orsha, then-Russian Poland (now Belarus), on
July 24, 1894, but haven't been able to obtain any records >from there at
all (for his family or hers). I have BCs and one DC for his three
children, but those are all >from Glasgow, Scotland, before they came to
NY. Fwiw, he has consistently stated his profession as "segars", ie
tobacco.

* Philip RIVKIN -- I wrote to the NY Dept of Health in early August,
requesting my gf's BC. I included his BC number; a copy of his DC; and a
letter >from my aunt, the executor of his estate, stating that she needed
his BC to settle his estate. I have had no response. Now what should I
do? It seems like a long time to wait...

* Morris RIVKIN -- I have his parents' names, and I am told by one of
his (still living) sons that he and his wife, Pauline (nee KANEFSKY),
came
over seperately >from Elizabetgrod, Ukraine before they were married (he
brought her over a little later, with her younger siblings and possibly
her mother), but I have been unable to get passenger records for them,
and I don't believe they were naturalized. I think they came to NY
around 1910, but I'm not entirely sure. Where can I go >from here? Is
there somewhere in Elizabetgrod I can write, on the chance they have
vital records in that city?

* Abraham DU BOFF -- He came to NY >from somewhere in Russia in 1890 with
his wife, Ella (nee MEISTROFF) and several children, but I have been
unable to find passenger records or naturalization papers for any of
them (I have the children's dates of birth, as well). I am told he was a
member of the Tsar's Royal Guard, &/or a Cossack (not exactly sure of
the difference). In any case, I was surprised by that as he was Jewish
(I believe). I know that when they came to NY he had to 'start over' in
the factories.

* Isaac "Jacques" VAN SANTEN -- I have his Dutch BC, but his SS
application shows he claimed to be born in York, PA. Why would he say
this? I have been unable to obtain naturalization records for him, so I
don't know when he came to NY. Also, the 1920 census lists him as
manager of a Turkish Bath. Does that translate to managing a whorehouse,
or am I off the mark entirely? My gm is very touchy about him, and one
story is that he had something to do with Tammany Hall. Is there some
way to check this out (I have had no luck so far), or to check for
criminal records associated with white collar crime? I know he ended up
in sales for different companies, including Electrolux at one point;
might they have records I could access? I'm really curious about this
guy!

Thanks in advance,
//Corin Barsily Goodwin
Cupertino, CA USA

Searching:

BARSILA/BARZILY/BARZILOV -- Russia; Scotland; NYC
BASOK/BARSACH -- Orsha, Belarus; Scotland; NYC; Providence, RI
BRAUN -- Hungary; NYC ...DU BOFF/MEISTROFF -- Russia; NYC & Long Island
KANEFSKY/KANEVSKY and RIVKIN -- Elizabetgrod (Kirovgrod), Ukraine; NYC
SIGAAR -- Holland ...VAN SANTEN -- Amsterdam; NYC
WEISS -- Hungary; NYC; Middlesex, NJ


ESTELLE BERGER - Bronx, NY #general

Sheldon Clare <clare+@...>
 

Are there any descendents out there of ESTELLE BERGER? She attended
Hermann Ridder JHS and James Monroe HS during the mid 1940's.


Sheldon I. Clare
clare+@pitt.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ESTELLE BERGER - Bronx, NY #general

Sheldon Clare <clare+@...>
 

Are there any descendents out there of ESTELLE BERGER? She attended
Hermann Ridder JHS and James Monroe HS during the mid 1940's.


Sheldon I. Clare
clare+@pitt.edu


Need Polish translator #general

Joan Krotenberg
 

I need someone who is able to translate 19th century Polish court documents as
well as a contemporary letter in Polish for their usual translation fee.
Please e-mail me at JoanK16157@aol.com
Thank you.
Joan Krotenberg
Woodstock, New York
Searching KROTENBERG, KAFKA >from Warsaw. HAGLER, FEIN, FELLER >from Lutowiska,
Poland. STREICHLER, BRODBAR, HIRSCHENFANG >from Rohatyn and Knyazhnychi,
Ukraine. MERER, CHESAK >from Slonim and David Gorodok, Belarus.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need Polish translator #general

Joan Krotenberg
 

I need someone who is able to translate 19th century Polish court documents as
well as a contemporary letter in Polish for their usual translation fee.
Please e-mail me at JoanK16157@aol.com
Thank you.
Joan Krotenberg
Woodstock, New York
Searching KROTENBERG, KAFKA >from Warsaw. HAGLER, FEIN, FELLER >from Lutowiska,
Poland. STREICHLER, BRODBAR, HIRSCHENFANG >from Rohatyn and Knyazhnychi,
Ukraine. MERER, CHESAK >from Slonim and David Gorodok, Belarus.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately